Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Freshmen: Shakespeare Excerpts


Refer to your notes and select the most meaningful passage from the play thus far. Quote the passage with proper formatting and respond to the following questions in a complete paragraph.


Click here for a full manuscript of the play.


How might you paraphrase the excerpt? What plot implications does the excerpt suggest? How does the excerpt characterize the speaker(s)? How does the excerpt serve as an example of Shakespeare's craft as a writer?

Due Friday.

36 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think the most important part of the play was when Romeo meets Juliet for the first time at her party. The reason I believe this is because this seems to be his first TRUE love and he kisses her for the first time there, that's when they realise they're meant to be together. Another reason this is very important is becuase Juliet finds out that Romeo is a Montague, and is a Capulet so she wishes that he was not a Montague so they could be together and there parents would not care.

-Tyler Freeman

Anonymous said...

FRIAR LAURENCE
I will be brief, for my short date of breath
Is not so long as is a tedious tale.
Romeo, there dead, was husband to that Juliet;
And she, there dead, that Romeo's faithful wife:
I married them; and their stol'n marriage-day
Was Tybalt's dooms-day, whose untimely death
Banish'd the new-made bridegroom from the city,
For whom, and not for Tybalt, Juliet pined.
You, to remove that siege of grief from her,
Betroth'd and would have married her perforce
To County Paris: then comes she to me,
And, with wild looks, bid me devise some mean
To rid her from this second marriage,
Or in my cell there would she kill herself.
Then gave I her, so tutor'd by my art,
A sleeping potion; which so took effect
As I intended, for it wrought on her
The form of death: meantime I writ to Romeo,
That he should hither come as this dire night,
To help to take her from her borrow'd grave,
Being the time the potion's force should cease.
But he which bore my letter, Friar John,
Was stay'd by accident, and yesternight
Return'd my letter back. Then all alone
At the prefixed hour of her waking,
Came I to take her from her kindred's vault;
Meaning to keep her closely at my cell,
Till I conveniently could send to Romeo:
But when I came, some minute ere the time
Of her awaking, here untimely lay
The noble Paris and true Romeo dead.
She wakes; and I entreated her come forth,
And bear this work of heaven with patience:
But then a noise did scare me from the tomb;
And she, too desperate, would not go with me,
But, as it seems, did violence on herself.
All this I know; and to the marriage
Her nurse is privy: and, if aught in this
Miscarried by my fault, let my old life
Be sacrificed, some hour before his time,
Unto the rigour of severest law.


The excerpt should say I have just found out the news that young Romeo and Juliet have died after I (Friar Laurence) have married them and Tybalt has now poisioned me as well from wedding the two of them. As I lay here dying I offer you my last breath, to tell you why I married them.And also to tell you who has attempted to kill me as well.

The excerpt characterizes the speakers as angry people arguing over something that the two children's parents have started with the town before they have died. The excerpt serves as an example of Shakespeare's craft as a writer because he tends to express his feelings through poems of what people of my generation called "Old English". And most of this poems/plays is about anger and his love relationships.The plot implications of the excerpt suggest that the only way to get things done is to disobey the law by poisioning/stabbing people in their way.

-Lauren Wefers
class unknown

Anonymous said...

Nurse
A man, young lady! lady, such a man
As all the world--why, he's a man of wax.


In scene III of act 1 of Romeo and Juliet, Juliet, her Nurse, and Lady Capulet are discussing the possibilities of Juliet marrying Paris. This quote tells how the nurse believes that Paris is so attractive, that he should be the mold from which all men are created. This quote, in my eyes, is supposed to have a type of backwards humor. The quote gives the idea that the nurse and Lady Capulet are pushing for Juliet to marry Paris, who is in good favor with the Capulet family. But, Juliet ends up marrying a Montague, Romeo, the one family at feud with the Capulet's. It shows that the rebellion of Juliet, so to speak, is even more so. She refuses to marry a man who is not only in good favor with her family, but is a favorite of Lady Capulet and Juliet's Nurse. This quote shows how Shakespeare empowers the readers, giving them more information than the characters in his plays, the fact that the nurse and Lady Capulet are hoping for Juliet to marry Paris, but she ends up not only falling for, but marrying Romeo is an example of this.
Roland R.

Anonymous said...

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?/Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,/And I'll no longer be a Capulet.
In this excerpt, Juliet is telling Romeo what her feelings are for him. After Juliet confesses to Romeo, throughout the play we know that they both care for each other, and don’t have to hide their feelings anymore. This really characterizes Juliet now, because before she wouldn’t tell Romeo how she felt, or tell anyone how she felt for him, because he was a Montague. The excerpt serves as an example of Shakespeare’s craft as a writer because he let both Romeo and Juliet, realize that they both like each other and don’t care what family they are apart of.

C. Twitchell

Anonymous said...

"ROMEO
[To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

JULIET
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.

ROMEO
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

JULIET
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

ROMEO
O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do;
They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.

JULIET
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake.

ROMEO
Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take.
Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged.

JULIET
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.

ROMEO
Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged!
Give me my sin again.

JULIET
You kiss by the book."

This is the Scene I was refering to in my last comment.

-Tyler Freeman

Anonymous said...

- Mitchell Robey, English I- E

The passage that I think is most meaningful in Romeo & Juliet is
“O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.”

In this scene Romeo is at the Capulet’s Garden, and Romeo hears Juliet expressing her feelings for him. The quote above affects the plot because we learn that the relationship changes between Romeo and Juliet when the Balcony scene took place. In this scene, Juliet is characterized by falling in love at first sight, Romeo also fell in love with first sight. In some ways Romeo and Juliet are a lot alike. This excerpt serves as an example of Shakespeare’s craft as a writer because in the quote above it uses alliteration when Juliet says “O Romeo, Romeo!” because his name is repeated twice, by Juliet to get his attention. Another example is of an allusion, “…be but sworn my love” because Juliet expresses her love for him. Conflict is also another example because the conflict is that Romeo and Juliet’s parents will not let them be together, but Romeo and Juliet want to be together.

Anonymous said...

-Mitchell Robey Egnlish 1- E

The passage that I think is most meaningful in Romeo & Juliet is
“O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.”

In this scene Romeo is at the Capulet’s Garden, and Romeo hears Juliet expressing her feelings for him. The quote above affects the plot because we learn that the relationship changes between Romeo and Juliet when the Balcony scene took place. In this scene, Juliet is characterized by falling in love at first sight, Romeo also fell in love with first sight. In some ways Romeo and Juliet are a lot alike. This excerpt serves as an example of Shakespeare’s craft as a writer because in the quote above it uses alliteration when Juliet says “O Romeo, Romeo!” because his name is repeated twice, by Juliet to get his attention. Another example is of an allusion, “…be but sworn my love” because Juliet expresses her love for him. Conflict is also another example because the conflict is that Romeo and Juliet’s parents will not let them be together, but Romeo and Juliet want to be together.

Mitchell said...

Mitchell Robey English E

The passage that I think is most meaningful in Romeo & Juliet is
“O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.”

In this scene Romeo is at the Capulet’s Garden, and Romeo hears Juliet expressing her feelings for him. The quote above affects the plot because we learn that the relationship changes between Romeo and Juliet when the Balcony scene took place. In this scene, Juliet is characterized by falling in love at first sight, Romeo also fell in love with first sight. In some ways Romeo and Juliet are a lot alike. This excerpt serves as an example of Shakespeare’s craft as a writer because in the quote above it uses alliteration when Juliet says “O Romeo, Romeo!” because his name is repeated twice, by Juliet to get his attention. Another example is of an allusion, “…be but sworn my love” because Juliet expresses her love for him. Conflict is also another example because the conflict is that Romeo and Juliet’s parents will not let them be together, but Romeo and Juliet want to be together.

Anonymous said...

Hannah Labonte

Quote:
Juliet- “Deny your father and refun thy name”

In modern day terms, I would say that the quote “Deny your father and refun thy name” means that Juliet is trying to say that Romeo should deny his fathers name as a Montague because their families are enemies.
This excerpt's plot implications suggest that Juliet is also interested in Romeo. Romeo is spying on Juliet when she says this. This implies that Romeo hears that Juliet is also in-love with him and that he no longer needs to hide and spy on her and he can reveal that he is hiding in the bushes.
This excerpt characterizes the speakers by saying that Juliet is trying to look past the fact that Romeo is a Montague.
This excerpt serves an example of Shakespeare's craft as a writer because he makes it sound like Juliet cares that he is a Montague, but she really believes that names are just a label.

Anonymous said...

The quote that I have chosen is o Romeo, Romeo wherefore art thou Romeo. This quote paraphrased by me is pretty much Romeo, Romeo where are you Romeo. That’s what this quote says to me in my mind. This quote of mine affects the story in a way where now Romeo understands that Juliet is truly in love with him and now he has nothing to hide from her. This quote characterizes Juliet because it puts her name in the book and gives her a reason to be a part of this book because now Romeo found someone that not only does he love but she loves him also. This excerpt serves itself as an example of Shakespeare’s craft as a writer because he puts everything together like a puzzle piece one at a time and everything just flows through the book smoothly.

T. Dalrymple

Anonymous said...

“O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet”

The first line she is wondering where he is. The second line she is saying she will not listen to her father. The third line she is saying that she is willing to marry him. And the fourth she is saying she will give up her name as a Capulet. In saying this she is giving away that she can love him even though he is supposed to be an “enemy” of her family. With Shakespeare saying this he is show that he is an articulate writer and that he knows how to use his words. This is also is suggesting and showing that their families don’t want them to be together.
This quote is said by Juliet thinking about Romeo. I think is the most important quote because this is where she basically tells him she will marry him. She is thinking and wondering where her Romeo is. She is also saying that she will deny her father, in saying not to see Romeo. She says that she would like to be a Montague by marrying him and swearing in her love. She is telling him that she loves him and is willing to marry him even though her father thinks she shouldn’t. That is what this quote suggests.
~Rachel Smith
G block

Julie Towne Block G said...

JULIET
O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

I think this section in the play is the most important, because its when Romeo and Juliet both discover that they love each other on her balcony. Juliet basically tells Romeo to deny his last name (Montague). She says that so they could be together, and she says she will deny being a Capulet. The choice of words in this saying shows that Shakespeare is good with words.

Anonymous said...

Katie Sullivan Period: G
I think that the most important part in the play was when Juliet was on her balcony and Romeo was underneath her waiting for her to come out, so he could see her. This is what she said,
“O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.”
I think this is the most important part of the play because the whole play is about Romeo and Juliet falling in love. Right before this happened is when they first met. The play makes it very obvious that Romeo has fallen in love with Juliet right away. It is still a little bit of a mystery though to Romeo if Juliet loves him as well. When Romeo goes to see her and she comes out saying this it makes him happy to know that not only is he thinking of her, she is thinking of him too. She also says that even though she is a Capulet and he is a Montague that doesn’t matter to her. Then she says if that matters to Romeo then she will no longer be a Capulet. I like this quote because it shows that she loves Romeo as much as he loves her. Also I like this because it says that no matter what their names are she doesn’t care. I think that they shouldn’t have to fight just because of their names, because they didn’t even know each other until the party. That is why I think Juliet saying this letting the readers of the play know how she really feels about Romeo is the most important part in the play.

Anonymous said...

Matthew Butler
Class: G
Blog essay #2




“O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny my father and refuse thy name; or if tho wilt not, be but sworn my love, and I’ll not longer be a Capulet.” This is a very important excerpt because Juliet is expressing her love for Romeo on the balcony, little does she know Romeo is listening. If Romeo hadn’t have been there to hear her say this then they probably won’t have gotten married under Fair Laurence. “Sworn my love, and I’ll no longer be a Capulet.” Juliet is saying that she wants Romeo to refuse his name( Montague) so they can be together, and if he doesn’t she will deny hers. You can tell that this is Shakespeare’s writhing because its so fluent and romantic.

Anonymous said...

TYBALT
This, by his voice, should be a Montague.
Fetch me my rapier, boy. What dares the slave
Come hither, cover'd with an antic face,
To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,
To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.
The excerpt I would like to talk about is when Tybalt talks to the capulet about suspecting Romeo is at attendance at the party. What Tybalt is basically telling the capulet about is that, since he recognizes that there is a montague in prescence, he would have no problem killing him by his rapier. He also says to the capulet that he doesn't think it's a sin to kill a montague.The plot implications from the excerpt suggest that tybalt carries a hatred against the montagues. He extends his hatred towards this attendee of the ball who he suspects is a montague, and possibly Romeo. The excerpt leads the reader to believe that Tybalt will soon do something bad to Romeo and Juliets' relationship later in the story. The excerpt characterizes the speakers by telling the readers what that characters personality is. The excerpt serves as an example of Shakespeare’s craft as a writer by telling the readers what Shakespeare’s imagination was like. It also tells the readers what his language was.

-Kevin Belt

Anonymous said...

The most meaningful passage to me in the play “Romeo and Juliet” is when Romeo tells Benvolio he is not over Rosaline. When the serving man comes in and asks Romeo to read the list of people invited to the party, the serving man also invites Romeo and Benvolio. When Romeo was saying he is not over Rosaline and Benvolio says, “At this same ancient feast of Capulet's Sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so lovest, With all the admired beauties of Verona: Go thither; and, with unattainted eye, Compare her face with some that I shall show, And I will make thee think thy swan a crow.” This means that Benvolio will show Romeo other women to help Romeo get over her. At the party Romeo see’s Juliet and makes Romeo get over Rosaline. Now after he was in love with Rosaline from the beginning of the play, which is about one day, he see’s Juliet and falls in love with him proving that Benvolio helped Romeo get over Juliet. Before the party Romeo had said, “Bid a sick man in sadness makes his will: Ah, word ill urged to one that is so ill! In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.” This was about Rosaline but after the party he said, “But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun…” By the point we had stopped reading he was already over Rosaline and in love with Juliet. This part is the most meaningful to me because it shows how strong his love is from Juliet. Also how Juliet sits on her balcony and talks about Romeo and how he is a Montague and her family hates each other so there move cannot be. I find it interesting how this happens so suddenly.

By, Chelsea Crogan.

Anonymous said...

What Romeo is trying to say is that he is lost without her. He basically is trying to say that he really loves Rosalina, and cant stand to be without her. The excerpt characterizes the speaker as lonely, and depressed because he is just so lost without Rosalina. This shows that Shakespeare knew how to write something with meaning behind it. He knew how to make you feel like you were the actual person saying this.

Brittany Gillon
Class: G

Tyler said...

Tyler R
English D
10/9/09


The quote I chose was from the prince in scene 1 act 1 line 60 – 80 somewhere around there (full quote is below on last page). What led up to this quote was a fight in the street’s of Verona Italy between the Capulet’s and Montague’s. The prince of Verona comes with a sword to break it up, and basically say’s if I ever see this kind of behavior in my streets again I will kill you all. Now this is hard for these to families not fight after all the hate each other. This is a major plot change cause now all this fighting that they do throughout the book can no longer occur in the streets, but in other places like schools, homes etc. What we have here is a change of scenery were now most of the action can longer take place on the streets (at least fighting any way) without a major event in the story happening, meaning death, murder stuff like that. What Shakespeare does here is set himself up for a tragedy to occur. You see by doing this it not only sets up a potential for shadowing of what will happen later in the play, but also gets the audience wondering how they’re going to die. Are they going to die by the prince’s blade or will it be something else, and this is what will keep the audience interested in what is going on ,and potentially what will happen next. This is what really amazes me about Shakespeare cause even though he tells you what is going to happen someway he still keeps you guessing, and asking questions, and generally keeps your attention throughout the play. This quote defines the prince as a very controlling figure in society somebody who likes order, and organization. He is the type were if he tells you to do something you do it no questions asked. This I believe is a perfect quote for this type of person in society because it shows the characters leadership, and authority. This is perfect for a prince who is the ruler of a city.








PRINCE
Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,--
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,
And made Verona's ancient citizens
Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,
To wield old partisans, in hands as old,
Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:
If ever you disturb our streets again,
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
For this time, all the rest depart away:
You Capulet; shall go along with me:
And, Montague, come you this afternoon,
To know our further pleasure in this case,
To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.
Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.

22569 said...

PRINCE:

Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace, Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,--
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts, That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins, On pain of torture, from those bloody hands Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground, And hear the sentence of your moved prince.

Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,And made Verona's ancient citizens Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,To wield old partisans, in hands as old,Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:If ever you disturb our streets again,Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.

For this time, all the rest depart away: You Capulet; shall go along with me: And, Montague, come you this afternoon, To know our further pleasure in this case, To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.

Basically what the "Prince" is saying "Capulet and Montague, you have caused an uproar in this town thrice or three times, that has now turned into a weaponary battle involving the town to riot or cheer on your side". And then the Prince decides to say "If you continue to fight then you will loose all of the peace that is left in this town".

Apparently physical violence is the solution to every problem being faced.

Anonymous said...

In the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, there are many meaningful quotes that describe so much about the plot. The quote that I chose from the play was from Act II, Scene II: Capulet’s orchard. This was a quote from Juliet.

“'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.What's Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot, Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What's in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet; So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd,
Retain that dear perfection which he owesWithout that title. Romeo, doff thy name,And for that name which is no part of thee Take all myself.”

This excerpt addresses one of the biggest issues that there is with Romeo and Juliet getting married. Juliet says that the name is her enemy, not a part of his body, his last name. The name Montague is a big issue because Juliet is a Capulet and they are sworn enemies. She wants him to have a different last name so that they can be in love and live happily together. She also says to forget about the name because his name is no part of him. This has a lot to do with the plot because this one of the biggest conflicts that they are facing and if Romeo had a different last name then they would probably be able love each other without a problem with the families.

This excerpt shows a lot about Juliet. This shows that she is a good person and she is not a follower, just because her family hates the Montague’s doesn’t mean she has to. This also shows that she is more open-minded than the rest of her family because she has never seen anything happen between her family and the Montague’s, it is just an old family feud. She is willing to give them a chance because they may not be the same as they used to be, the Capulet’s wouldn’t hate them if they had a different last name.

William Shakespeare is a very crafty writer and this excerpt shows it very well. The part where he compares the name to a limb of a man’s body is very clever because it shows how harmless the name is by comparing it to a hand or a foot. There are many examples of Shakespeare’s craft in this excerpt.

-C. Douglas

Baa12366 said...

Brittany Alioto
10/8/09
G

In the story Romeo and Juliet, there are many beautiful and important excepts spoken by the different characters. One of the best lines in the play is said by Juliet, “ My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth love it is to me, that I must love my loathed enemy.” To paraphrase this, the only guy I like is the only one I am supposed to hate! I saw him before I knew he was a Montague and found out after I fell for him! This is too much, that I love my enemy.
This scene is important because it foreshadows on how difficult it is going to be for Romeo and Juliet to be together. Also, even though we all know Romeo likes Juliet, this is pretty much the first time we realize Juliet likes Romeo as well. This excerpt is an example of Shakespeare’s wit because it shows one of the many examples of how Shakespeare likes to foreshadow his plays. In the play Romeo and Juliet, this except is important.

Anonymous said...

SAMPSON
I strike quickly, being moved.






This quote from romeo and juliet means that he is attacking. He is saying that he attacks quickly and makes

damage on his enemy. He says it in that way because that’s how they talk in little riddles like that. He says

that when he attacks he attacks quickly and being moved means to hurt them.

By: Luke Cosgrove

Anonymous said...

TYBALT
“Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe,
A villain that is hither come in spite,
To scorn at our solemnity this night.”



This quote pretty much says that the Capulet family really doesn’t like the Montague family. Romeo is there enemy and he is at the Capulet party. The plot implications to the quote is that the Capulet’s have a reason to kill Romeo because he showed up to their party when he Montague. This excerpt characterizes the speaker as a bad man or someone who really doesn’t like the Montague family. In the writing it shows so much detail for the hatred of one person’s family or enemy.

Josh Jenkins
E

Anonymous said...

Juliana Ahern 10/7/09 English Prompt

“O, she doth teaches the torches to burn bright……For I ne’ev saw true beauty till this night”
-Romeo

In this quote, Romeo is saying Juliet stand out compared to everyone else in the room. He also says she is like fine jewelry against dark colored skin. He says she looks like a dove hanging around crows.Romeo says her hand is so “blessed” that if she touched his “rude” hands, his hands will be blessed too.
Despite Rosaline, the girl he “loved” hours before, he swears he has never seen true beauty before looking at Juliet. This quote affects the plot because it states that Romeo has fallen in love with Juliet Capulet, the daughter in a rival family. This quote says that Romeo is very dramatic when it comes to love. In this quote, Shakespeare rhymes all the sentences and still makes the statement make sense. He also uses clever similes and metaphors to describe Juliet that makes the readers picture her flawlessness in their head.

sarahb81500 said...

The most meaningful passage from the play is at the Capulet’s ball, where Romeo and Juliet first meet. Romeo is broken hearted over Rosaline. Benvolio takes Romeo to the Capulet's feast because he knows that there will be plenty of women there to get his mind off Juliet. Romeo agreed to going because he knew Rosaline would be there. Romeo arrives at the Capulet's feast looking for Rosaline. As Romeo arrives at the ball, he spots Juliet right away, it was love at first sight on Romeo's part. Romeo compares Juliet to a beautiful diamond in an Ethiope's ear, "Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear..."
Romeo immediately asks people about her, so eager to learn who this beautiful girl is. Romeo thinks she is so beautiful, he decides to go talk to her. Romeo and Juliet begin to talk, and Romeo tells Juliet how he wishes he could kiss her. At first Juliet thinks that Romeo is moving very fast. After a while, Juliet begins to fall for Romeo, and this is where the play really takes off leading to a chain of more events. This is probably the most important passage in the entire play.

Sarah Buchan
October 8, 2009
G Block

Rashid said...

the part i enjoy was when tybalt got killed. Seeing that he would have killed Romeo anyway, him dieing fixed the hatred party against Romeo. But i dont it should of been Romeo who killed him, it should have been Mercuitio who ende up on the fatak side of the battle.


Another reason i think i Romeo shouldn't have been the one to kill Tybalt is the relation to Juliet and her The Cpaulets. Being that they are cousins and Romeo is from the rival family and he's marrying Juliet may complicate the two lovers. But because of Mercuitio's death it might equal out Tybalt's death.


But what still stands is the parents' issues against each other from the begining of the play. Seing that they won't find a solution to finding peace with each other. I think the nurse will inform the Capulets about the secret marriage between the two meant-to-be lovers. And the result will not be a good one.

Rashid Williams

Anonymous said...

"Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night"
– Romeo

This excerpt means that Romeo just realizes that his love for Rosaline was nothing compared to his love for Juliet. The plot implications of the excerpt suggest that Romeo sees that he was never really in love with Rosaline because he feels a deeper love for Juliet. If he never noticed this and was still in love with Rosaline, Romeo and Juliet would have never even met at that time. This characterizes Romeo to be easily won over because he was in love with Rosaline and quickly switched to Juliet. The excerpt serves as an example of Shakespeare’s craft as a writer by using personification when he says “Forswear it, sight!” because he’s showing Romeo’s sight that Juliet is far more beautiful than Rosaline. It’s also a great passage because it’s memorable and well known.
-Danielle Puopolo

Anonymous said...

Shakespeare prompt~
JULIET:
O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

In this excerpt, Juliet tells the reader for the first time, that she has feelings for Romeo. She acts as if she is as shocked as the reader for she has fallen in love with her family’s enemy. When Juliet says these words what she is really saying is-how can I have fallen in love with Romeo. Juliet also is wondering if Romeo has the same feelings for her as she has for him. Romeo is hiding in the bushes when Juliet is saying out loud what is on her mind so Romeo is able to hear and find out how Juliet is feeling and these feelings are the exact feelings Romeo is feeling for Juliet.

This quote is an example of Shakespeare’s craft of writing because the reader did not expect for the enemies to fall in love. This changes the whole outlook or plot of the play.
~S. McManus

Anonymous said...

Miranda Donato
G Block 10/8/09
Prince:
“Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,--
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,
And made Verona's ancient citizens
Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,
To wield old partisans, in hands as old,
Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:
If ever you disturb our streets again,
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
For this time, all the rest depart away:
You Capulet; shall go along with me:
And, Montague, come you this afternoon,
To know our further pleasure in this case,
To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.
Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.”
I think that this quote by the prince is one of the most important quotes of the book. He is basically telling the Montagues and Capulets that they have to stop fighting, and find some sort of peace between them. He says that the next person who fights with the other is going to be killed. He says that they need to put their differences aside and try to get along. This quote really affects the story later on though. When Tybalt bursts in on Romeo, Benvolio, and Mercutio in the woods, the quote comes right back to them. Tybalt came to fight Romeo, but Romeo refuses because he just married Juliet and they are basically family now. Of course Romeo can’t tell Tybalt this, but as he is trying to make peace, Tybalt stabs Mercutio, and he dies. Romeo will not let Tybalt get away with killing his best friend, so he fights Tybalt, and kills him. Romeo flees the scene, as Benvolio tries to retell the story in accurate detail. The Capulets believe that he is just covering for his friends, and the Prince decides to exile Romeo from Verona. This is a huge problem, because he was supposed to meet Juliet later, but now he won’t be able to. This Quote also compliments Shakespeare’s writing ability. It shows us some of a character’s traits just by one quote of the book. It tells us that the prince is a man of authority, and a well respected man at that. He lays down the laws, and is a rather serious character. That is why I think that this is one of the most important quotes in the book.

Anonymous said...

Rachel Burgess Class: E

Abraham: "Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?"
Sampson: "I do bite my thumb, sir."
Abraham: "Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?"
Sampson: "Is the law of our side, If i say ay?"
Gregory: "No."
Sampson: "No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but i bite my thumb, sir.


In this excerpt it is showing that The Capulet family and The Montague family dislike each other. Sampson, who bit his thumb, is a servant to The Capulet's, along with Gregory. And Abraham is a servant to The Montague family. The Montague family and The Capulet family dislike each other and obviously got their servants involved. The reason you can tell they dislike each other in this excerpt is because Sampson bit his thumb at Abraham. In Midevil times it was a rude gesture to bite your thumb at someone. Sampson told Abraham he did not bite his thumb at him because he did not want to get in trouble. Although it was really directed to him. He told Abraham he bit his thumb, but he did not say who he did it at. This is what the excerpt is saying.

Anonymous said...

JULIET
O Romeo, Romeo! Where art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse thy name; Or if thou wilt not, be sworn my love, And I'll no longer be a Capulet.
In this except, Juliet is saying, "Romeo, Romeo, i wish you were here. If you are to forget your father and family, then so will I." This excerpt plot implications suggest that Juliet is showing her feelings to Romeo, by talking to him. Before this, Romeo mentioned the feelings he had to her, and Juliet didn't. Although, throughtout the play, she started to also have feelings for him, but didn't say anything because she is a Capulet and he is a Montague, in which both their families hated one another. An example of this excerpt of Shakespeare's craft as a writer is that he had let Juliet and Romeo realize their feelings towards another, and that they didn't want each of their familes to get in the way of it.


Nicole Anderson

Anonymous said...

I think the most important quote in the play is when Juliet had said
“My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.”
I think this is the most important quote because it is when Juliet realizes that she is falling in love with Romeo. They had seen each other one night and just instantly fallen in love. Juliet is basically saying in the quote above that she loves Romeo, yet she is supposed to hate him. Juliet does not know why she had fallen so hard for the boy she is supposed to hate just as the rest of her family does. She says “my only love sprung by my only hate... that I must love a loathed enemy” stating that her love had been towards the one she is supposed to hate, but she still loves him anyways. When she says “too early seen unknown, and known to late to!” she is saying that she loved him too late but it’s too early to know.

Jess Dowdy

Anonymous said...

The most important quote that I think has been said in Romeo and Juliet is when Romeo first sees Juliet and says "O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!/ It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night/ Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear; / Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!". This is a major effect of the story because it is when Romeo first sees Juliet and it is love at first sight for Romeo. This allows him to forget about Rosaline and try to woo Juliet and eventually fall in love. This is one of the most major parts of the book because most of the book is about Romeoo and Juliet falling in love and this is the quote that started it. In my eyes this is the most important quote in Romeo and Juliet.

n petersen

22569 said...

BENVOLIO
Madam, an hour before the worshipp'd sun peer'd forth the golden window of the east,a troubled mind drave me to walk abroad; where,underneath the grove of sycamore that westward rooteth from the city's side,so early walking did I see your son:towards him I made, but he was ware of me and stole into the covert of the wood:I, measuring his affections by my own,that most are busied when they're most alone,pursued my humour not pursuing his,and gladly shunn'd who gladly fled from me.

MONTAGUE
Many a morning hath he there been seen, with tears augmenting the fresh morning dew.Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs;
But all so soon as the all-cheering sun should in the furthest east begin to draw the shady curtains from Aurora's bed,away from the light steals home my heavy son,and private in his chamber pens himself,
shuts up his windows, locks far daylight out.And makes himself an artificial night:black and portentous must this humour prove,unless good counsel may the cause remove.

BENVOLIO
My noble uncle, do you know the cause?

MONTAGUE
I neither know it nor can learn of him.

BENVOLIO
Have you importuned him by any means?

MONTAGUE
Both by myself and many other friends: but he, his own affections' counsellor,
is to himself--I will not say how true-- but to himself so secret and so close,so far from sounding and discovery,as is the bud bit with an envious worm,ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air,
or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow.We would as willingly give cure as know.

In other words,(Benvolio says)
Lady Capulet, I was terribly woken up this morning an hour before the sun rose by you're son Romeo. But it wasn't until I randomly started walking down the street following that dreadful crying.I attempted to approach him but he hid in the woods and continued until he reached his room.He's practically crying himself to sleep, cries far away from us so we won't know then as the sun begins to rise, he crawls into bed and forces himself to sleep.

(Montague says), I agree I have seen him do it as well but he will continue to act this way unless he has good counseling by someone he trusts. And both myself and some of his own friends have tried to help him but he conseals his sadness and refuses to talk to anyone about it.

Plot implications of this excerpt suggest that not talking about how you feel is worse than talking about how you feel and nobody listens or doesn't understand and tries really hard too but you can't explain yourself.

class: British Literature at SERSD

Anonymous said...

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?/Deny thy father and refuse thy name; Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,/And I'll no longer be a Capulet.


In the excerpt, Juliet is talking to herself not realizing that Romeo is hiding beneath her deck and she says how she feels about Romeo. Romeo hears this and soon talks to her and they can no longer hide their feelings for each other. This characterized Juliet as a person who would do anything for love, even if it meant if they were the only person she was not suppose to fall in love with. This shows Shakespeare’s craft as a writer as he pretends to give to audience more knowledge then the actors/actresses in the plays.

-Dave Couming
G period

CoreyMarsden said...

Corey Marsden
English G






JULIET
O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.


In this excerpt Juliet is basically saying “Romeo, I would not listen to my father and deny my last name and I will no longer be who I am now.” The excerpt suggests that Juliet is very in love with Romeo and will do anything to be with him. This excerpt characterizes Juliet as a passionate, dramatic, and loving character. Shakespeare makes Juliet seem very sad and in love in this excerpt and keeping the audience on their toes.