Sunday, September 28, 2014

Beowulf & The Canterbury Tales


You will utilize this post to complete an online unit regarding Beowulf and Chaucer. As you complete your work, be sure to save it as a Word or Google Document. This unit will take some time, so be sure to work incrementally and manage your time well. Some students find it helpful to copy and paste this post onto their document for convenience. You will submit your completed unit (as a comment to this post) no later than midnight on Monday, 10-13. Please be sure to identify which "part" is which. You will be graded holistically on the + to - scale as 2 quiz grades (AP) or 1 test grade (Level 1 College).
For Beowulf

 
Click here to link to a full-text online translation of Beowulf. I do not expect you to read the entire work, but you must "sample" enough of it to get a feel for Old English and respond to the following:
B1. What is a caesura? Find an example of a caesura from the text and defend your selection (paragraph).
B2. What is kenning? Find 3 examples of kenning and defend your selections (paragraph).
B3. Beowulf is indicative of Old English and is infused with a curious blend of the traditions and values of Anglo-Saxon culture and the rise of Christianity. Quote and discuss passages from the text that represent this unique dynamic. 


For The Canterbury Tales:

C1: Click here to access the text.  Read The Prologue and the Introduction in their entirety. Chaucer will introduce you to each of his pilgrims; choose 3 of them (one must be The Pardoner). Then, use this link to read the descriptions of characters. Discuss how Chaucer characterizes them: their class, appearance, character, etc. (3 paragraphs).
C2: Click here to check out a dope rap version of The Prologue. Describe the attire of the MC's to verify your visit.
C3: Click here to hear an audio recording of The Prologue in Middle English. Describe the narrator's voice and your impressions regarding how pronunciation, accent and emphasis help you decode the passage. 
C4: Click here to access the Pardoner's Tale. Read his tale (lines 375-682).Compose a response to the following prompt: How is the Pardoner's Tale, in relation to the Pardoner's persona and role, painfully ironic? How does this irony conflict or complement the irony within the Tale itself? How might you characterize Chaucer's tone as echoed through his juxtaposition of the Pardoner's story and personality? What might we conclude about Chaucer's attitude toward religion and morality?
C5: Click here to access a link to Hieronymous Bosch's painting "The Garden of Earthly Delights". Synthesis prompt: Bosch is a Dutch painter who lived and worked shortly after the publication of the Tales. You will be able to zoom in a bit. Examine the triptych and respond to the following questions in paragraph form. 1. What scenes are being depicted in each panel? 2. Create a conversation (RAFT style) between Chaucer and the Pardoner as they discuss the image (particularly the right panel). 

 


111 comments:

Anonymous said...

Mickayla Shepard
Beowulf
B1. Caesura in a Greek or Latin verse means a break between words within a metrical foot, any interruption or break. Example: “No hero ‘neath heaven, -- who harbored that freight!”. This example can be considered a caesura because it breaks up the sentence which leads to a longer pause in the metrical foot.
B2. Kenning is a compound expression in old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. Example: “On the breast of the boat, the breaker-of-rings, by the mast the mighty one.” The breaker-of-rings is a king. It is considered a kenning because it’s an old expression that has a metaphorical meaning which in this case means a king. Battle-sweat means blood. Raven-harvest means a corpse.
B3. One example of how Beowulf displays traditions of the Anglo-Saxons “Many a treasure fetched far from far was freighted with him. No ship have I known so nobly dight with weapons of war and weeds of battle.” This describes the Anglo-Saxon tradition because they were violent, and this quote displays how in Beowulf they portray acts of violence. An example of the rise of Christianity is Grendel “Grendel this monster grim was called, march-riever mighty, in moorland living, in fen and fastness: fief of the giants the hapless wight a while has kept since the creator his exile doomed.” Grendel is a disturber of the border, who roams over the country nearby with biblical credentials as a fiend or devil. Hoping that all Englishmen might read about him.

alexyis dyckman said...

B1. A ceasure is a dramatic stop in the middle of a line, an example is:
"Loud moan in the moon. The mighty Chief,"
B2. A kenning is a compound expression in Old English, using a metaphorical meaning. An example is “sea-huge”
B3. “Forth he fared at the fated moment,
sturdy Scyld to the shelter of God.”
There are many references to God throughout the text to show the rise of Christianity values.
“'Tis plain that for prowess, not plunged into exile,
for high-hearted valor, Hrothgar ye seek!”
This shows the Angelo-Saxon pagan values because of the reference of exiles

Anonymous said...

Jordan D.
B1: Caesura is a pause near the middle of a line or an interruption. For example in Beowulf “of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped”. It shows the poetic side of old English and how it has evolved in to the poetry we read today.
B2: Kenning is a compound expression in Old English with metaphorical meaning. First example in Beowulf is they replace heaven or the afterlife to the “shelter of God”. Second example they switch the words “ocean's billow” for waves. Third example of kenning would be “breastplate” what they mean by that is armor.
B3: In Beowulf they show the first Christianity values for example “To him an heir was afterward born, a son in his halls, whom heaven sent to favor the folk, feeling their woe that erst they had lacked an earl for leader so long a while; the Lord endowed him”. It is saying how grateful they are that the “lord” blessed them with their child showing their faith or religious beliefs.

Anonymous said...

Jordan D.
B1: Caesura is a pause near the middle of a line or an interruption. For example in Beowulf “of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped”. It shows the poetic side of old English and how it has evolved in to the poetry we read today.
B2: Kenning is a compound expression in Old English with metaphorical meaning. First example in Beowulf is they replace heaven or the afterlife to the “shelter of God”. Second example they switch the words “ocean's billow” for waves. Third example of kenning would be “breastplate” what they mean by that is armor.
B3: In Beowulf they show the first Christianity values for example “To him an heir was afterward born, a son in his halls, whom heaven sent to favor the folk, feeling their woe that erst they had lacked an earl for leader so long a while; the Lord endowed him”. It is saying how grateful they are that the “lord” blessed them with their child showing their faith or religious beliefs.

Anonymous said...

Jordan D.
B1: Caesura is a pause near the middle of a line or an interruption. For example in Beowulf “of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped”. It shows the poetic side of old English and how it has evolved in to the poetry we read today.
B2: Kenning is a compound expression in Old English with metaphorical meaning. First example in Beowulf is they replace heaven or the afterlife to the “shelter of God”. Second example they switch the words “ocean's billow” for waves. Third example of kenning would be “breastplate” what they mean by that is armor.
B3: In Beowulf they show the first Christianity values for example “To him an heir was afterward born, a son in his halls, whom heaven sent to favor the folk, feeling their woe that erst they had lacked an earl for leader so long a while; the Lord endowed him”. It is saying how grateful they are that the “lord” blessed them with their child showing their faith or religious beliefs.

Elliott Johnson said...

Beowulf
By Elliott HC Johnson


B1 Cae-su-ra; is a break between words within a metrical foot.
Example: “Hidden evil before hid den evil.” “Burns like a torch, no one knows its bottom.”
Caesura are words that divide metrical footing that gives you a taste of Old English and how they worded things differently, it makes a break between words within a metrical foot.
B2 Kenning; a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning.
Example: “In between the words like battle-sweat (sweat from battles)”
Example2: “Fighting-gear; armor. Light-of-battle (sword)”
Example3 “Hell-serf = slave of the underworld... a demon... evil spirit”
These are examples of kennings; compound expressions that have metaphorical meaning, “Hell-serf” means slave of the underworld and Fighting-gear means armor. Old English and Old Norse poetry used words that create a sort of flow to the rhythm.
B3 Beowulf is full of interesting and fascinating tales and traditions that go back to the Anglo Saxons, Anglo Saxons did not believe in one God but multiple God’s. “So the Spear Danes in days gone by and the kings who ruled them had courage.” But there was another group that supported Christianity “Afterword’s a by-child was sent to sheer a cub in the yard, a comfort sent by God to that nation.’’ The Characterization of Anglo-Saxon England was a process spanning the 7th century, due to the result of Gregorian Mission.

Elliott Johnson said...

Canterbury Tales
By Elliott HC Johnson
3 pilgrims
After reading the Monk in the Canterbury Tales, I have learned the Monk is a very wise man and an outrider; “hunting was his sport. A manly man to be an abbot able, very many excellent horses had he in stable.”
Then we have the Summoner, a very nasty drunk who was so ugly he scares little children just by looking at them. “He who had a fiery-red, cherubic face, All pimpled it was; his eyes were narrow as hot he was, and lecherous, as a sparrow; with black and scabby brows and scanty beard.”
Last but not least The Pardoner a man that wasn’t at most fair, but ten dollars for a confession for a clean conscious is what he did. A scam for people who believed, but not one care was given. Long yellow wax hair he had not a manly man but maybe a mare.
C2 The rap was funny but hard to understand, based on three men, with weird hats and one guy with sunglasses. Couldn’t take these men seriously.
C3 The man talking was not speaking English or I have to get my ears checked! His accent was pretty cool though, would I want it? Nah haha
C4 The Pardoners Tale was very interesting and fun to read, but the moral of the story is greed doesn’t get you anywhere in life. All three of these men planed on getting the money in their own way. The young man was going to poison the older males until they killed the younger male and what do you know… All of them end up dying from drinking the unknown poison. Don’t be greedy!

C5
These images depicts Heaven, Earth, and Hell in that order. In heaven you have God’s blessings, and on Earth we have your typical greed and nastiness and then you get to the worst place of all Hell, a place The Pardoner doesn’t think he is going because he is a “holy man.” But little does he know he’s probably on first class straight down.
Conversation time
Hey Choucer, when you die where do you think you’re going with all your sins?! Well Pardoner were going to the same place so what now ??

alexyis dyckman said...

Beowulf
B1. A ceasure is a dramatic stop in the middle of a line, an example is:
"Loud moan in the moon. The mighty Chief,"
B2. A kenning is a compound expression in Old English, using a metaphorical meaning. An example is “sea-huge”
B3. “Forth he fared at the fated moment,
sturdy Scyld to the shelter of God.”
There are many references to God throughout the text to show the rise of Christianity values.
“'Tis plain that for prowess, not plunged into exile,
for high-hearted valor, Hrothgar ye seek!”
This shows the Angelo-Saxon pagan values because of the reference of exiles.

Anonymous said...

Mickayla Shepard
Beowulf
B1. Caesura in a Greek or Latin verse means a break between words within a metrical foot, any interruption or break. Example: “No hero ‘neath heaven, -- who harbored that freight!”. This example can be considered a caesura because it breaks up the sentence which leads to a longer pause in the metrical foot.
B2. Kenning is a compound expression in old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. Example: “On the breast of the boat, the breaker-of-rings, by the mast the mighty one.” The breaker-of-rings is a king. It is considered a kenning because it’s an old expression that has a metaphorical meaning which in this case means a king. Battle-sweat means blood. Raven-harvest means a corpse.
B3. One example of how Beowulf displays traditions of the Anglo-Saxons “Many a treasure fetched far from far was freighted with him. No ship have I known so nobly dight with weapons of war and weeds of battle.” This describes the Anglo-Saxon tradition because they were violent, and this quote displays how in Beowulf they portray acts of violence. An example of the rise of Christianity is Grendel “Grendel this monster grim was called, march-riever mighty, in moorland living, in fen and fastness: fief of the giants the hapless wight a while has kept since the creator his exile doomed.” Grendel is a disturber of the border, who roams over the country nearby with biblical credentials as a fiend or devil. Hoping that all Englishmen might read about him.

Elliott Johnson said...

Beowulf
By Elliott HC Johnson

Updated Version
B1 Cae-su-ra; is a break between words within a metrical foot.
Example: “Hidden evil before hid den evil.” “Burns like a torch, no one knows its bottom.”
These two examples show a break within a metrical foot.
Caesura are breaks that divide metrical footing that give you a taste of Old English and how they worded things differently. These two selections make a break between words within a metrical foot.
B2 Kenning; a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning.
Example: “In between the words like battle-sweat (sweat from battles)”
Example2: “Fighting-gear; armor. Light-of-battle (sword)”
Example3 “Hell-serf = slave of the underworld... a demon... evil spirit”
These are examples of kennings; compound expressions that have metaphorical meaning, “Hell-serf” means slave of the underworld and Fighting-gear means armor. Old English and Old Norse poetry used words that create a sort of flow to the rhythm.
B3 Beowulf is full of interesting events and has a fascinating tale along with traditions that go back to the Anglo Saxons, Anglo Saxons did not believe in one God but multiple Gods. “So the Spear Danes in days gone by and the kings who ruled them had courage.” But there was another group that supported Christianity “Afterword’s a by-child was sent to sheer a cub in the yard, a comfort sent by God to that nation.’’ The Christianization of Anglo-Saxon England was a process spanning the 7th century, due to the result of the Gregorian Mission.

Elliott Johnson said...


Canterbury Tales
Updated Version
By Elliott HC Johnson
3 pilgrims
After reading the Monk in the Canterbury Tales, I have learned the Monk is a very wise man and an outrider; “hunting was his sport. A manly man to be an abbot able, very many excellent horses had he in stable.” He was a fat greasy man wild googly eyes always rolling in his head.
Then we have the Summoner, a very nasty drunk who was so ugly he scares little children just by looking at them. “He who had a fiery-red, cherubic face, All pimpled it was; his eyes were narrow as hot he was, and lecherous, as a sparrow; with black and scabby brows and scanty beard.”
Last but not least The Pardoner, a man that wasn’t at most fair but ten dollars for a confession for a clean conscience is what he did. A scam for people who believed, but not one care was given. Long yellow wax hair he had not a manly man but maybe a mare.
C2 The rap was funny but hard to understand, based on three men, with weird hats and one guy with sunglasses. Couldn’t take these men seriously.
C3 The man talking was not speaking English or I have to get my ears checked! His accent was pretty cool though, would I want it? Nah haha
C4 The Pardoners Tale was very interesting and fun to read, but the moral of the story is greed doesn’t get you anywhere in life. All three of these men planed on getting the money in their own way. The young man was going to poison the older males until they killed the younger male and what do you know… All of them end up dying from drinking the unknown poison. Don’t be greedy! It is ironic because the Pardoner himself was a thief. Chaucer did not have a lot of respect to religious group do to the low morality

C5
These images depicts Heaven, Earth, and Hell in that order. In heaven you have God’s blessings, and on Earth we have your typical greed and nastiness and then you get to the worst place of all Hell, a place The Pardoner doesn’t think he is going because he is a “holy man.” But little does he know he’s probably on first class straight down.
Conversation Between Chaucer and The Pardoner
Hey Chaucer, when you die where do you think you’re going with all your sins?! Well Pardoner were going to the same place so Heaven and hell are two different places for I don’t believe in religion but hell is where I will go. I clean peoples sins I am going to Heaven for I am a holy man, But says Chaucer. You take people’s money and tell them lies you’re most defiantly going to hell, so let’s go… “Grunt.”

Anonymous said...

The Canterbury Tales
Mickayla Shepard
C1. The pardoner is a somewhat a rich man. Examples: “For in his bag he had a pillowcase” His appearance was that of Jesus. He had long yellow hair “in driplets hung his locks behind his head” I think this character is a priest or a pastor Examples: “as shiny eyes he had as has a hare.” “No beard had he, nor ever should he have.” “Then must be preach, and all with smoothened tongue” The wife of bath is a wealthy woman because she traveled and made her own cloths. “At making clothes she had a skillful hand” “Her head-dresses were of finest weave and ground” “Three times she had traveled to Jerusalem”. Although she had money she was not the prettiest to see. “Gap-toothed was she” “An overskirt was tucked around her buttocks large”. The wife of bath character is a woman who is wealthy because she’s good at making cloths, she’s had five husbands because she’s so obnoxious nobody can deal with her. Lastly she isn’t the prettiest of women she has money but the looks don’t match up. The Knight was actually poor “A tunic of simple cloth he possessed discoloured and stained by his habergeon” He was a perfect knight “What a gentleman” “Honoured everywhere for worthiness” “Three times in duels, always killed his foe.” As a character the knight is full of himself because in real life he is nothing but a man, everyone thinks he’s all that and a bag of chips but he’s really not.
C2. One man wearing a red Dr. Pepper shirt and sunglasses. Another wearing a stripped black brown and green shirt with a beige hat. Lastly another guy with a black shirt with writing on it with a stripped beige and blue hat.
C3. He speaks with a foreign tongue, and draws out his words. He’s kind of hard to understand. It helps because his speech emphasizes what’s going on and makes it more interesting to listen to.

Anonymous said...

Mickayla Shepard
C4. In the pardoners tale greed of the three friends became the best of them when on their search to find death. They ultimately found death because of their greed for gold. The pardoner’s moral was not to be greedy. This is ironic because here the pardoner is in real life taking money or rich goods such as rings for exchange for his “indulgences”. He’s being greedy just like the three men that’s why it’s ironic. The pardoner is a hypocrite. I believe that Chaucer things religion and morality should make a person better not greedy.
C5. 1. In the first panel I believe it’s depicting the beginning of how things began to grow AKA adam and eve possibly. People were peaceful and animals were roaming around living like peaceful wild creatures. There are mountains in the back of this scene depicting beauty of the land. The second panel is somewhat chaotic there are many more people. The mountains have been destroyed and replaced with buildings of a sort. The animals are being used to hunt and be hunted. Not as peaceful more stressful. More like a city. The third panel looks like a hell of sorts. There’s a creature on a tall chair holding a long list. People are dead/ dying, there’s even a man being eaten by a few dogs. The top of this panel is very dark. Everything from the first and second panel has been destroyed by ‘war’? Now there is nothing but hell.
2. Chaucer: This painting I believe pardoner is depicting the life of hell. People are in suffering.
Pardoner: Yes it is Chaucer, actually these three panels depict our cycle as the Garden of Eden, earth, and hell as we may know it.
Chaucer: Why are the paintings so odd and spaced out?
Pardoner: Well you see here Chaucer in the first painting depicting the Garden of Eden, so peaceful and perfect in every way. In the second painting we have fast forward a many years to when earth became complicated and overfilled with people. The last panel is showing the result of everything bad we’ve done with war and all of our sins. You see this is the result of disobeying god.
Chaucer: so you’re saying that the third panel is depicting hell?
Pardoner: That’s exactly what I’m saying, it’s because of all the bad things we’ve done disobeying god the last panel is what we will get if we don’t obey.

Melissa Potvin said...

Melissa Potvin
Beowulf
10/2/14
Beowulf




B1)Caesura- a break between words within a metrical foot “Toward that gold-shining hall. He had visited Hrothgar's...." I chose this because there is a break or pause in the line.

B2)kenning- a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning the breaker-of-rings,2 [2] Kenning for king or chieftain of a comitatus: he breaks off gold from the spiral rings -- often worn on the arm -- and so rewards his followers.

B3)” On kin of Cain was the killing avenged
by sovran God for slaughtered Abel” Everyone knows Beowulf and how this is old English. Beowulf became the ruler of spear-danes. He had an heir, the great Halfdane, whose wisdom and sturdiness guided and protected the people.





Canterbury Tales




C1) Pardoner- He is a pilgrim and is very malicious and conniving. He promises people money for their forgiveness but he ends up keeping all the money. The pardoner has long creepy hair the voice of goat.
The Monk- religious group “very fine fellow” likes the finer things in life such as good food good hunting and clothes he is part of the higher class he is also well equipped which means he can provide for himself easily. The Friar- Religious figure also a hunter has extremely well health in very good shape belongs to the middle class.


C2) The attire of the M,C’s in this video is extremely casual modern to 2014 times. Jeans and sneakers.

C3) I have no idea what any of that meant.

C4) The irony of this tale is the pardoner is telling a story about ripping people off when he actually in fact rips people off. It’s ironic because he is telling a story about what he does. Chaucer’s attitude towards religion is negative because he doesn’t believe in it.


C5) They’re discussing the photo and the depth of it. The pardoner doesn’t think he’ll end up in hell, he thinks he’ll stay on earth and the garden.

Elliot Ariola said...

Elliot Ariola
B1: A censure is a break in the middle of a line. It was written at the beginning of written language already with elements of poetry. ‘Thyself hast now fulfilled such deeds, that thy fame shall endure through all the ages. As ever he did, well may the Wielder reward thee still!’ This is one sentence that goes into a second line where ‘As ever he did, well may the Wielder reward thee still!’ starts.
B2: Kenning is imagery that restates a noun in a more descriptive way. The first example is, ‘The relict-of-files’ is a kenning for sword. Flies surround dead corpses eating its remains. The relic of the flies is something that is symbolic of killing. This could be a sword. The second example is, the ‘Breaker-of-rings’ is a kenning for a king. Someone who has many rings is most likely wealthy. A king has a lot of wealth. The last example is, the ‘weaver-of-peace’ is a kenning for wife. Woman have been described as peaceful people, and in history have been the caretakers of the household. They weave cloths for their families. The ‘weaver-of-peace’ is a combination of the two ideas.
B3: ‘LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won!’ The first few lines of Beowuf describes people in their tribe. Kings, spears, and honor are all descriptive words that relate to the Anglo-Saxon culture. Page 6 describes Scyld’s deathbed. He was sent ‘to the shelter of God’ a thought of Christian place, even though it was out at sea. Beowulf dies to the dragon but manages to kill the dragon with his sword. ‘God, gave him grace that he got revenge sole with his sword in stress and need.’ God gave him the power to fight even though he was dying.
C1: Knight: Chaucer characterizes the knight as a noble man. He has won many battles fought against foes from all around. He wore modest attire nothing flamboyant or audacious. Compared him with truth, honor and freedom, all positive and warming words. The monk: Chaucer characterizes the monk almost as a hunter, claiming that is his sport. The monk is not a normal, he goes against many monk traditions. Monks are usually calm. This monk likes fat swans as his favorite meal. The Pardoner: Chaucer characterizes the pardoner as untrustworthy and bold. He carries around a sack filled with relics. He seems to want to sell these to countrymen. He is curious of the gender of the pardoner, male or female, he does not know.
C2: One guy is wearing a blue and white bucket hat, a black shirt saying Maryknol High School, and black jeans. Another guy is wearing sunglasses, a red Dr. Pepper shirt, and blue jeans. The last guy is African American wearing a white cap, a brown and white striped shirt, and black jeans.
C3: His pronunciation of Middle English is not very good, one may think. The way he says the words allows the listeners to understand the word that sounds almost like what he said. His accent seems smooth and adds to the understanding every each word and not just what each word should sound like. The emphasis he puts on some words are nouns or adjectives that help the listener know the subject or what is going on. This is an unusual recording of the reading but none the less a good one for understanding.

Elliot Ariola (part 2) said...

Elliot Ariola
(part 2)
C4: The pardoner tells a story of three intoxicated men searching for Death, which they do eventually find. On their search the men find a pile of money. All of the brothers plan to kill one another to get the money for themselves. This is ironic for the Pardoner because he is a greedy man himself. He was teaching a lesson to the rest of the pilgrimage that greed is the root of all evil. You do not expect a greedy man to tell people a lesson about how people suffer from greed. This emphasizes the irony in the tale because readers know more amount the pardoner himself than the pilgrimage does. The tone of the story is mainly unapologetic about his life of crime. He never apologizes about his life but feels bad about his actions. He is audacious and conniving. Chaucer’s attitude towards religion and mortality is not Christian at all. All the values a pardoner should have are not exemplified. Only the cunning and quick wits are expressed. He has a low morality. The pardoner was able to stand up in front of everyone and tell a story almost of his life without anyone noticing.
C5: In the left panel there is only a few people. Animals are the dominant population here. They are living in peace. In the middle panel the human race is taking over the animals. There is over crowdedness. Humans are everywhere. In the right panel is darker than the others. This is a bad sign of the humans. They are fighting and ruining the place they live. Chaos has overrun.
RAFT: I am Chaucer and the Pardoner. I am writing to people who wish to read. I am writing a conversation. I am writing about the triptych.
Chaucer: “The humans have taken over the animal’s land.”
Pardoner: “It looks like some sort of war is happening.”
Chaucer: “Yea look in the background. There are factories, mines, and armies ready to fight.”
Pardoner: “All the corruption makes me think that they have no sense of right or wrong. I don’t blame them.”
Chaucer: “Me neither. They probably scammed one another, and they are ready to fight.”
Pardoner: “I would have too. I am pretty good at it.”
Chaucer: “They are creating their own demise.”

Johnmichael lee said...

B1. A caesura is a pause near the middle of a line. In other words it’s a sentence that stops pretty much in the middle of a line and a new one starting right there. An example of this in Beowulf is “Sore was the sorrow to Scyldings'-friend, heart-rending misery. Many nobles sat assembled, and searched out counsel…” Caesura happens more often than you think when you’re looking for it.

B2. “a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning” One Example of kenning I found was “there laid they down their darling lord on the breast of the boat, the breaker-of-rings.” This little section of Kenning translate to for king or chieftain of a comitatus: he breaks off gold from the spiral rings. Another example of kenning in Beowulf is “Stately the hall rose gabled and gilt where the guest slept on till a raven black the rapture-of-heaven blithe-heart boded.” The raven is the warrior's bird of battle, exults in slaughter and carnage; his joy here is a compliment to the sunrise. The raven is the shift from night to morning. The last example I found was “But the warrior found the light-of-battle.” This example of kenning translate to Hrunting is bewitched, laid under a spell of uselessness, along with all other swords. I like this example because it’s pretty clear that the warrior (a soldier) doesn’t see the point of fighting and thinks it’s useless.


B3. The Anglo-Saxons were people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century other known as “warriors” today. “LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won!” The people in the tribe respect what they have succeeded and the head warrior. “Gave him grace that he got revenge sole with his sword in stress and need. To rescue his life, 'twas little that I could serve him in struggle; yet shift I made (hopeless it seemed) to help my kinsman.” The men under the warrior feel like they owe something to him, they are willing to risk their own life for him. “Though him the Maker with might endowed, delights of power, and uplifted high above all men, yet blood-fierce his mind, his breast-hoard, grew, no bracelets gave he to Danes as was due.” The warrior is this powerful human that is stronger and more powerful than them all but at the same time he can be just like the men under him and succeed.

Johnmichael lee said...

B1. A caesura is a pause near the middle of a line. In other words it’s a sentence that stops pretty much in the middle of a line and a new one starting right there. An example of this in Beowulf is “Sore was the sorrow to Scyldings'-friend, heart-rending misery. Many nobles sat assembled, and searched out counsel…” Caesura happens more often than you think when you’re looking for it.

B2. “a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning” One Example of kenning I found was “there laid they down their darling lord on the breast of the boat, the breaker-of-rings.” This little section of Kenning translate to for king or chieftain of a comitatus: he breaks off gold from the spiral rings. Another example of kenning in Beowulf is “Stately the hall rose gabled and gilt where the guest slept on till a raven black the rapture-of-heaven blithe-heart boded.” The raven is the warrior's bird of battle, exults in slaughter and carnage; his joy here is a compliment to the sunrise. The raven is the shift from night to morning. The last example I found was “But the warrior found the light-of-battle.” This example of kenning translate to Hrunting is bewitched, laid under a spell of uselessness, along with all other swords. I like this example because it’s pretty clear that the warrior (a soldier) doesn’t see the point of fighting and thinks it’s useless.


B3. The Anglo-Saxons were people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century other known as “warriors” today. “LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won!” The people in the tribe respect what they have succeeded and the head warrior. “Gave him grace that he got revenge sole with his sword in stress and need. To rescue his life, 'twas little that I could serve him in struggle; yet shift I made (hopeless it seemed) to help my kinsman.” The men under the warrior feel like they owe something to him, they are willing to risk their own life for him. “Though him the Maker with might endowed, delights of power, and uplifted high above all men, yet blood-fierce his mind, his breast-hoard, grew, no bracelets gave he to Danes as was due.” The warrior is this powerful human that is stronger and more powerful than them all but at the same time he can be just like the men under him and succeed.

Johnmichael lee said...

For The Canterbury Tales:

C1: After reading the Pardoner I get the sense that he is a very high class man and has power over some people. His long lushes’ hair that is brushed back, touching his shoulder tells us that he has great pride in his hair and can afford to maintain it. All of his objects the pardoner has in his knapsack tells a story about him, he has experienced many things and has met a lot of influential people though out his life so far. The pardoner also has the latest and nicest equipment like his knapsack, one thing that was in his knapsack was a pillowcase that he said, “was Our True Lady's veil.” This may be an example of the pardoner having a sense of humor or could actually have true meaning to it.
For my second character I read “The Monk” and he is nothing like any monk I have heard about. If I hadn’t read the title before I read the passage I would have assumed it was about a hunter or some big masculine man. I say thins because the monk likes to wear fur sleeves and dresses like a hunter. The monk does love to hunt and be in the wild but also follows his religious views. Chaucer enjoys the Monk’s company with him and says a lot of nice things about him.
The third character I read about was “The Franklin” Chaucer didn’t have one bad thing to say about Franklin. Franklin has a very white beard that must be very noticeable sense it was brought up multiple times, it was also referenced to a glass of milk. Franklin is a very wealthy man and lives a stress less life. Franklin has an abundant amount of food and wine in his house. The food in his house wasn’t just snacks either; he would have different types of fish and various kinds of expensive food. Franklin also liked to dip his morning bread in wine, this tells a lot about a character and how he has money to blow.

C2: The attire of the three teachers in the music video was very casual. Two of them wearing just T-shirts and one wearing a brown button down. Two of the men had hats on, one was a bucket hat while the other teacher was wearing a normal ball cap turned sideways. The last man had big black sunglasses on covering his eyes.

C3: After listening to the audio I felt like I just listened to a different langue. It sounded almost like someone speaking French, the words flowed more smoothly and I could only understand a word here and there. How the narrator pronounced some of the words with a stronger tone felt like they were more important. The narrator was also speaking really fast which made it even harder to decode.

Johnmichael lee said...

C4: The pardoner makes his money by just listening to peoples sins and telling them that they will be forgiven if they pay him. The pardoner is just saying that they will be forgotten of their sins and doesn’t really know if Christ does. For some reason people believe this because he is from the church and thinks he means well.
When it comes around to the Pardoner’s turn to tell his story with the pilgrims he tells a story about three men trying to find death and how greed ends up killing them all. The story is painfully ironic in many different ways, one reason it is ironic is because at the beginning of the story the three men are drinking at a bar when the crazy idea of “going to kill death” comes up. The three men leave the bar with the destination of finding death when they stumble upon an old man telling them that they are crazy and should go back to the bar. The three men all say something negative to the man so the old man directs them to behind a tree where he knows there’s a pile of gold. As they walk over there they make a pact to stay to gather and defeat death. But after only a couple minutes of finding the gold they are all thinking of how they can take out the other ones so they don’t have to split the money. It’s ironic that all of their mindsets change when they find the gold and death isn’t even a problem anymore. The greed also breaks the brotherhood that was formed when they first started out seeking death.
Another reason the story is ironic is because the Pardoner is telling the story about these three men trying to steal the gold behind the tree and makes them sound like bad guys, but what the Pardoner does for a living is the same thing as steeling, just in a different form. Chaucer realizes this when he meets the Pardoner and that’s why he doesn’t put him on a pedestal like everyone else does. Chaucer also thinks that the Pardoner is taking advantage of the religion and the people who support it.

C5: The panting “The Garden of Earthly Delights by Bosch High” is a very detailed panting with a lot going on. The painting is divided up into three different panels, otherwise known as Heaven Earth and Hell. The first panel (left Side) is a more nature scene with a lot of different animals in it. The animals vary from your average birds and lion too unicorn and dinosaurs. All the animals are looking like they get along with each other. The other thing I noticed was some sort of religious god standing there with a guy and a girl.
The middle panel is the biggest and most detailed. It has a lot of different things going on at the same time with a lot of strange animals. If you look closely you can see people working together (Black and White) helping each other hunt and spot out things. For the most part everything is peaceful and people are just chilling out and getting along with each other.
The last panel is a dark and scary scene; it looks like something you’d never want to experience. You can see animals getting stabbed while flames and smoke are in the distance. A lot of crime is happening and the look on some faces when you zoom in look scared or evil. The weirdest thing is the animals that are taking over; some animals have human body parts hanging out of their mouths while other ones are haunting down the humans.

Role: Pardoner and Chaucer
Audience: Each other and anyone else around.
Format: Conversation

Topic: discussing the painting and the different lives you can end up. Chaucer thinks that the Pardoner will end up in hell for taking advantage of the people and the Pardoner disagrees. He doesn’t feel like he’s doing anything wrong and just making an honest living.

Anonymous said...


BEOWULF
Marlena Sage


B1:A caesura when the sentence stops in a middle of a stanza

”High o'er his head they hoist the standard, 
a gold-wove banner; let billows take him, 
gave him to ocean. Grave were their spirits, 
mournful their mood. No man is able 
to say in sooth, no son of the halls, 
no hero 'neath heaven, -- who harbored that freight!"
This is an example of caeura because the sentence stops in the middle.

Kenning
A compound expression in old english with metaphorical meaning.

B2: Example: “whale-road” is the ocean because he is talking about whats beyond the coasts
“blood-sweat” this means blood
“Light-of-battle” this usually means a sword.
“But the warrior found
the light-of-battle was loath to bite,
to harm the heart: its hard edge failed
the noble at need.”

B3: This is a example of the christian way because its talking about God and Cain and Abel and they are from the bible. “On kin of Cain was the killing avenged 
by sovran God for slaughtered Abel. 
Ill fared his feud, and far was he driven, 
for the slaughter's sake, from sight of men.”

This would be an example of the ANGLO-SAXON because its talking about elves and giants.
“Etins and elves and evil-spirits, 
as well as the giants that warred with God 
weary while: but their wage was paid them”

THE CANTERBURY TALES
Marlena Sage

The Miller: Has red hair and a red beard he has a very strong head that can break open doors He is wicked rude to like women and others. he is a drunk, he likes to he is a very a ugly looking man has a big mouth and he has a wart on his nose.

The Squire
He has curly hair , he is very handsome and he is young he is the knights son and he is a very big fan of dancing.
The Pardoner: The pardoner has yellow hair he wore a cap and he has a smooth face he is not very manly looking he also sounds like a goat. he goes to church and he carries around treasures.

C3:I could not really understand what they where trying to say i listened to it many times and could not get a check on what that were trying to say, all i know is that there where three guys trying to rap and my niece and nephew where creeped out when was watching it with them.

C4: The pardoners tale was ironic because of greed and in the end the three men ended up dying even though they found “riches”. so what i got out if the pardoners tail is not to be greedy he says in the beginning of the story that he was sending these three men to death and instead they found riches but they planned to kill one another and they did so he really did send them to a place of death.

C5: What I see the picture symbolizing is how life really is so i guess that would be earth then I see in second picture like a utopia so like the a perfect world with no violence every things perfect. The last picture looks like it’s dark and depressing and scary with the fires and everybody looking mad or scared.

Conversataion
Hey can you not be so mean “MILLER , being rude to women is not going to get anywhere or anyone in general.
Marlena Sage

Anonymous said...

Christopher LaPalme Part 1
B 1What is a caesura? Find an example of a caesura from the text and defend your selection (paragraph).? Find an example of a caesura from the text and defend your selection (paragraph).

1. (in Greek and Latin verse) a break between words within a metrical foot.

2. (in modern verse) a pause near the middle of a line
The line is caesura because it ands a dramatic pause to the story and leads the listener on the edge of the rock, or seat. It shows that a simple pause in wording can add meaning to words and feeling to the words.

B2 Kenning is a conventional poetic phrase used for or in addition to the usual name of a person or thing, especially in Icelandic and Anglo-Saxon verse, as “a wave traveler” for “a boat.”
Quote “there laid they down their darling lord on the breast of the boat, the breaker-of-rings,2 by the mast the mighty one.”
Meaning kenning for king or chieftain of a comitatus: he breaks off gold from the spiral rings -- often worn on the arm -- and so rewards his followers. Different people will use coracency to shown that the he respect the people by giving them rings of his own arm, the rings will mean something to the person because he wears it
Quote 2 “With fourteen men the sea-wood he sought, and, sailor proved, led them on to the land's confines.”
Kenning was used in major story telling’s because it took a simple word and change it to have more meaning. Kenning also has a langue appeal as well, different countries may have different meaning for words, ship and boat a boat can fit on a ship, and different regions may not need a ship because a boat will be big enough so when people are going fishing and they need a boat the person could big a row boat but they needed a ship. Kenning gets rid of this by stating that a sea worthy vessel that can hold ten people.

Quote 3 and had helmets cloven, doomed men's fighting-gear. First time, this, for the gleaming blade that its glory fell.
Meaning, to words that are added to state that their tribe or people are going to fight with advanced equipment, the men are wearing armor. The workers and builders are intelligent to make armor to defend themselves. From the beginning of the story of Beowulf, Beowulf has to defend himself and his allies against his enemies, he needs the armor.

B 3 Christianity in Beowulf
Quote and again, "It is a wonder to say how in His great spirit God gives wisdom to mankind, land and earl ship. He possesses power over all things. At times He lets the thought of a man of high lineage move in delight"
Meaning That God is the most powerful being in time. At this time period, Christianity was the new and only region, before it was created or founded it was I will kill or hurt you for money. Now it is I will hurt in the name of God. In argo sanan society the most important person was the warrior, now it the priest who can save lives after death.

Quote I resolved, when I set out on the sea, sat down in the sea-boat with my band of men, that I should altogether fulfill the will of your people or else fall in slaughter, fast in the foe's grasp. I shall achieve a deed of manly courage or else have lived to see in this mead-hall my ending day.
In Beowulf he is the Anglo-Saxon Hero meaning he is the most important person in the story he is the hero who is always the healer, in Anglo-Saxons society there is little or no stories about a bread maker or a housemaid it is almost always about a warrior who kills for his tribe.

Anonymous said...

Christopher LaPalme
C 1 THREE STORIES
The three people that I choose The friar is a religious person who blesses weddings his to prepared to fight Quote from Friar “His tippet was always stuffed with knives are too young and pleasing wives meaning that he hurts people who do not pay. Why would a religious men carry weapons? The friar is hiding something, why would a man of God need money when the church has enough gold to survive.
The only person is the Monk he is unlike any other Monk because when picturing a Monk I think a man who says little but does a lot. He is a little heavy and understands God. This Monk loves food he also has items that have no meaning to a Monk Gold jerwey money, The Monk also has a reddish grow under his eyes, he could be with the Devil. This Monk does not follow normal Monks and is different. That surprises the writer and respects the Monk because he if different. The Monk is a man who has more respect for his food and its appetite then his fellow man.
The Pardoner is a Nobel man who has blond hair that is yellow as wax meaning that he is handsome. The pardoner who is a rick man who has an evil agenda. The money that he gets for the church, he keeps it but he tells a story about greed, and in this story greed kills people. When the pardoner tells the story he looks drunk so when someone is not right in the mind, he words could be changed because he could be drunk. The pardoner is intelligent enough that he knows his he acts drunks to fool the people and after the story is told he ask for more money to stop the people’s sin by giving the pardoner money.
C2 The atair is simple street clothes, shirt hat pants the shirt his logo’s and companies product on it, Dr.Pepper to show that the lesson of the Canterbury Tales can be used in everyday life, don’t let greed control you.
C3 The voices of the reader had a simple undertone, pounces the words correctly and does not hesitate on what is being said Ican visualize the speakers as a old man who is around a camp fire tells the village people about the story and the meaning of the Cranbury Tales. The best way to understand a text is to find and listen to the words that you know, then try to think of the words that meet be affiliated with them, when hearing the word April I think of spring and flowers meaning that it is a change of season, meaning that it could be the end of a long winter and a new beginning. Every person who has ever speak will always put more emprises on important words that’s mean more then what is just being said you as the listener just has to listen to the tone and what words are being emprises’


C4 the pardoner’s tale is painfully ironic because the story is that greed will kill you and money will make you betray your friends and turn against your personality that made you who you are. Maybe before the pardoner found out that he can keep the money its changed he could have been an humble man before money. The one things that made the pardoner who he is will kill him in the end. The irony is the same, is showing thought all of the stories that the tales are or were a part of their life in some way. Chaucer is saying that religion and mortality are completely different religion corrupts the soul. The irony of religion is that religion is supposed to save your soul which is part of your mortality. Chancer understand what religion stands for and it’s place in the world but he does not believe in religion

Anonymous said...


Christopher LaPalme Part 3
C 5 First a personal note, the painting blown me away I could spend about two hours no every little detail but some of it just scares me a little, second who would paint this the person who did make this must be have a chip on his shoulder because parts of the paint looks normal the beetle and the water the different locations, space, water and grasslands. The title of the painting is the Garden of Earthly Delights, meaning that everything their humanity can do on this land is portrayed, it’s the past present and the future, the past there is a lot of animals and forest, the present has some animals and a lot more animals and the future has almost no animals except for that beetle most of it is darkness. The differences of the Pardoner and the Canterbury tales is that the pardoner is about a hero who has to save himself and Canterbury is about a quest that people go one. Both teach lesson about greed and how to help people, never cheat on your marriage and the final most important is trust your friends.

If you Mr. Kefor received this post then post this sentence
I revised the message from Christopher LaPalme

Ariana Bruno said...

Ariana Bruno
AP English A

B1.) Caesura is a break or a pause in a metrical foot. An example of caesura in Beowulf is in Prelude of the founder of the Danish House. “while wielded words the winsome Scyld,the leader beloved who long had ruled....In the roadstead rocked a ring-dight vessel,” This example has a caesura after the word “ruled” and before the word “In”. Many of the lines have multiple commas so that the metrical foot can run on with a melodic beat; this line however has an ellipse. The ellipse of multiple periods ends the line but with a considerable time break in between, causing the reader to pause.
B2.) Kenning is derived from Norse and Icelandic languages, it is used to take the place of one word with more figurative hyphenated words. One example from of kenning is “Whale-Path” which refers to the sea or ocean. “Mead-House” meaning seats in a hall refers to where the Danes gather to eat and be merry. “Breaker-of-rings” refers to the king who physically breaks off gold and rewards his people with it. The rings are typically worn on the arm so this may refer to bracelets that he gives out.
B3.) Much of Beowulf is described in Anglo-Saxon and old English, this may account for the vast references to Pagan Gods. In chapter II when Grendel, the demon, is ravaging Hrothgar’s kingdom the people turn to the devil before God. Christianity is introduced to the story describing how the people are heathens for not praying to the Almighty God, this Christian influence becomes known in Beowulf by comparing the Pagan and Christian religion.

Ariana Bruno said...

Ariana Bruno
AP English A

B1.) Caesura is a break or a pause in a metrical foot. An example of caesura in Beowulf is in Prelude of the founder of the Danish House. “while wielded words the winsome Scyld,the leader beloved who long had ruled....In the roadstead rocked a ring-dight vessel,” This example has a caesura after the word “ruled” and before the word “In”. Many of the lines have multiple commas so that the metrical foot can run on with a melodic beat; this line however has an ellipse. The ellipse of multiple periods ends the line but with a considerable time break in between, causing the reader to pause.
B2.) Kenning is derived from Norse and Icelandic languages, it is used to take the place of one word with more figurative hyphenated words. One example from of kenning is “Whale-Path” which refers to the sea or ocean. “Mead-House” meaning seats in a hall refers to where the Danes gather to eat and be merry. “Breaker-of-rings” refers to the king who physically breaks off gold and rewards his people with it. The rings are typically worn on the arm so this may refer to bracelets that he gives out.
B3.) Much of Beowulf is described in Anglo-Saxon and old English, this may account for the vast references to Pagan Gods. In chapter II when Grendel, the demon, is ravaging Hrothgar’s kingdom the people turn to the devil before God. Christianity is introduced to the story describing how the people are heathens for not praying to the Almighty God, this Christian influence becomes known in Beowulf by comparing the Pagan and Christian religion.
C1a.) The Pardoner is characterized by his comparison to his friend the Summoner. The Summoner is portrayed as corrupt and very ugly. The Pardoner is known to be worse than the Summoner in terms of how corrupt he is. Chaucer characterizes most of the pilgrims by their occupation, apparel and personality but the Pardoner is only described by his actions and his through the Summoner. They are singing partners and supposed lovers, implying that the Pardoner is homosexual despite the Summoner’s use of prostitutes. Both the Summoner and the Pardoner’s work involves scamming people for their money.

Ariana Bruno said...

Ariana Bruno
AP English A

B1.) Caesura is a break or a pause in a metrical foot. An example of caesura in Beowulf is in Prelude of the founder of the Danish House. “while wielded words the winsome Scyld,the leader beloved who long had ruled....In the roadstead rocked a ring-dight vessel,” This example has a caesura after the word “ruled” and before the word “In”. Many of the lines have multiple commas so that the metrical foot can run on with a melodic beat; this line however has an ellipse. The ellipse of multiple periods ends the line but with a considerable time break in between, causing the reader to pause.
B2.) Kenning is derived from Norse and Icelandic languages, it is used to take the place of one word with more figurative hyphenated words. One example from of kenning is “Whale-Path” which refers to the sea or ocean. “Mead-House” meaning seats in a hall refers to where the Danes gather to eat and be merry. “Breaker-of-rings” refers to the king who physically breaks off gold and rewards his people with it. The rings are typically worn on the arm so this may refer to bracelets that he gives out.
B3.) Much of Beowulf is described in Anglo-Saxon and old English, this may account for the vast references to Pagan Gods. In chapter II when Grendel, the demon, is ravaging Hrothgar’s kingdom the people turn to the devil before God. Christianity is introduced to the story describing how the people are heathens for not praying to the Almighty God, this Christian influence becomes known in Beowulf by comparing the Pagan and Christian religion.
C1a.) The Pardoner is characterized by his comparison to his friend the Summoner. The Summoner is portrayed as corrupt and very ugly. The Pardoner is known to be worse than the Summoner in terms of how corrupt he is. Chaucer characterizes most of the pilgrims by their occupation, apparel and personality but the Pardoner is only described by his actions and his through the Summoner. They are singing partners and supposed lovers, implying that the Pardoner is homosexual despite the Summoner’s use of prostitutes. Both the Summoner and the Pardoner’s work involves scamming people for their money.
C1b.) The Prioress is described by her personality, her appearance and her traveling companions. The Prioress comes off as very charming and delicate and we see from her table manners that she is an educated woman. She comes off as sensitive to matters involving animals, this shows that she is a caring person and unlike most for that time because the treatment of animals wasn’t top priority. She is dressed in nun’s robes but adorns herself with gold jewelry which is unlike the common modest nun to be flashy. She travels with other nuns that are her companions. The fact that there are two nuns suggests their belief in feminism.
C1c.) The Monk is described by his physical appearance and his interests. Despite the monk being on a pilgrimage it is known that he doesn’t act like a normal monk. He is dressed like one but has accented his robes with fur. He resembles a monk with his bald head but has other interests than being at the monastery. He loves to hunt and be on hors-back; he loves to travel and prefers nicer clothes. All these characteristics are ironic for a monk because he has lost all religious value, he is a lesser man of god, monks are supposed to lose interest in material items but he takes pride in them.

Anonymous said...


Beowulf

B1. Caesura is when a sentence stops in the middle of a stanza. An example is “of youthful comrades. It came in his mind” I chose this because there is a break in the middle of the line. Caesura are words that divide metrical footing that gives you a taste of Old English and how they worded things differently, it makes a break between words within a metrical foot.
B2. Kenning; a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. A couple examples are, “In between the words like battle-sweat (sweat from battles)”, “Shelter of God” That god is up in heaven protecting us, “Hell-serf = slave of the underworld... a demon... evil spirit” These are examples of kennings; compound expressions that have metaphorical meaning, “Hell-serf” means slave of the underworld and Fighting-gear means armor. Old English and Old Norse poetry used words that create a sort of flow to the rhythm.
B3. Beowulf is interesting tales and traditions that go back to the Anglo Saxons. “Creator his exile doomed. On kin of Cain was the killing avenged by Sovran God for slaughtered Abel.” It is very Christian and has a lot of imagery and language in it. The words God and Abel are Christian words. “Etins and elves and evil-spirits, as well as the giants that warred with God weary while: but their wage was paid them!” Anglo- Saxon is not Christian at all. IT doesn’t talk about anything that you would discuss in church.




Canterbury Tales
C1: Monk: The Monk is a very wise man, fat, bald, greasy, and liked fine cloths. “Hunting was his sport. A manly man to be an abbot able, very many excellent horses had he in stable.”
Summoner: A drunk who scares little children just by looking at them. “He who had a fiery-red, cherubic face, All pimpled it was; his eyes were narrow as hot he was, and lecherous, as a sparrow; with black and scabby brows and scanty beard.”

The Pardoner: Long yellow hair, not manly, sounds like goat. He was not a fair man, but ten dollars for a confession for a clean conscious is what he did. A scam for people who believed.
C2. The rap was interesting but hard to understand, based on men with weird hats it was hard to take them seriously with everything that was going on.
C3. The man talking did not speaking English. His accent was very entertaining to listen to.
C4. The Pardoners Tale was entertaining to read, but the moral of the story is being needy doesn’t get you anywhere in life. All of these men planed on getting the money in their own way. All of them end up dying from drinking the unknown poison.
C5. These images describe the garden of Eden, earth, and hell. In heaven you have God’s blessings, and on earth we have your typical neediness and rudeness and then you go to hell, a place Pardoner does not think he is going to because he is a trustful holy man, But sooner or later he will realize he is most likely going there.
Conversation:
“Chaucer, when you die where do you think you are going to go? Because heaven and hell are different places and you are not going to the place you think. You think we are going to the same place but unlike you I am a trustful person.”
“I clean peoples sins and help them begin a new start. I will be going to heaven because I have done nothing wrong, only have helped others with there troubles”
“You tell people lies and hoping that they will believe it and thank you for cleaning their sins.”

-Madison Duross

Anonymous said...

Beowulf

B1. Caesura is when a sentence stops in the middle of a stanza. An example is “of youthful comrades. It came in his mind” I chose this because there is a break in the middle of the line. Caesura are words that divide metrical footing that gives you a taste of Old English and how they worded things differently, it makes a break between words within a metrical foot.
B2. Kenning; a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. A couple examples are, “In between the words like battle-sweat (sweat from battles)”, “Shelter of God” That god is up in heaven protecting us, “Hell-serf = slave of the underworld... a demon... evil spirit” These are examples of kennings; compound expressions that have metaphorical meaning, “Hell-serf” means slave of the underworld and Fighting-gear means armor. Old English and Old Norse poetry used words that create a sort of flow to the rhythm.
B3. Beowulf is interesting tales and traditions that go back to the Anglo Saxons. “Creator his exile doomed. On kin of Cain was the killing avenged by Sovran God for slaughtered Abel.” It is very Christian and has a lot of imagery and language in it. The words God and Abel are Christian words. “Etins and elves and evil-spirits, as well as the giants that warred with God weary while: but their wage was paid them!” Anglo- Saxon is not Christian at all. IT doesn’t talk about anything that you would discuss in church.





Canterbury Tales
C1: Monk: The Monk is a very wise man, fat, bald, greasy, and liked fine cloths. “Hunting was his sport. A manly man to be an abbot able, very many excellent horses had he in stable.”
Summoner: A drunk who scares little children just by looking at them. “He who had a fiery-red, cherubic face, All pimpled it was; his eyes were narrow as hot he was, and lecherous, as a sparrow; with black and scabby brows and scanty beard.”

The Pardoner: Long yellow hair, not manly, sounds like goat. He was not a fair man, but ten dollars for a confession for a clean conscious is what he did. A scam for people who believed.
C2. The rap was interesting but hard to understand, based on men with weird hats it was hard to take them seriously with everything that was going on.
C3. The man talking did not speaking English. His accent was very entertaining to listen to.
C4. The Pardoners Tale was entertaining to read, but the moral of the story is being needy doesn’t get you anywhere in life. All of these men planed on getting the money in their own way. All of them end up dying from drinking the unknown poison.
C5. These images describe the garden of Eden, earth, and hell. In heaven you have God’s blessings, and on earth we have your typical neediness and rudeness and then you go to hell, a place Pardoner does not think he is going to because he is a trustful holy man, But sooner or later he will realize he is most likely going there.
Conversation:
“Chaucer, when you die where do you think you are going to go? Because heaven and hell are different places and you are not going to the place you think. You think we are going to the same place but unlike you I am a trustful person.”
“I clean peoples sins and help them begin a new start. I will be going to heaven because I have done nothing wrong, only have helped others with there troubles”
“You tell people lies and hoping that they will believe it and thank you for cleaning their sins.”

-Madison Duross

Kylie Barrows said...

Kylie Barrows
Beowulf
10/6/14

B1: A caesura is a break between words within a metrical foot. For example; “Hidden evil before hid den evil” “Burns like a torch, no one knows its bottom.” Caesuras are words that divide metrical footing that gives you a taste of Old English and how they worded things differently.
B2: Kenning is a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. An example of kenning is “In between the words like battle-sweat” Meaning that they’re a no words to describe what is happening. Another example portraying kenning is “Fighting-gear; armor. Light-of-battle” He is saying everyone is all dressed in their fighting gear and they are ready for a battle. Another example would be “Hell-serf = slave of the underworld... a demon... evil spirit” Hell-serf” means slave of the underworld and Fighting-gear means armor. Old English and Old Norse poetry used words that create flow to the rhythm.

B3: Beowulf is full of interesting and fascinating tales and traditions that go back to the Anglo Saxons and Christian traditions. Anglo Saxons did not believe in only one God but multiple God’s. The Christianization of Anglo-Saxon England was a process spanning the 7th century, due to the result of Gregorian Mission. I Found Christian traditions throughout the context including the following “On kin of Cain was the killing avenged by sovran God for slaughtered Abel.” I found the Anglo-Saxons are more fairytale “Etins and elves and evil-spirits, as well as the giants that warred with God weary while: but their wage was paid them!” The two of them are very different compared to each other and both were hard-core believers of what they believed in. Being completely opposite from each other they both believed in a higher figure in their lives.





Canterbury Tales
3 Pilgrims

The Monk is a very wise man everyone looks up to monks. He is large, loud, and well clad in hunting boots and furs. Monks of the Middle Ages lived in monasteries according to the Rule of Saint Benedict, which demanded that they devote their lives to work and pray and hunt.

The Summoner; is a lecherous man whose face is scarred by leprosy. He is a drunk, is irritable, He spouts the few words of Latin he knows in an attempt to sound educated. He just trys to fit in with everyone else. He isn’t really fit for his job but no one knows that.
Last but not least The Pardoner a man that wasn’t at most fair, but ten dollars for a confession for a clean conscious is what he did. He makes his living on the sin of greed. He is a very bold man who doesn’t care about others feelings. He had long yellow wax hair he had not a manly man but maybe a mare. Chaucer’s Pardoner excels in fraud, carrying a bag full of fake relics. For example, he claims to have the veil of the Virgin Mary. The Pardoner has long, greasy, yellow hair and is beardless.
C2: Personally I didn’t understand a single thing they said the entire time I had to read the dialogue just to follow along with them. But other than that it was wicked funny to think that those are someone’s teachers making raps. They all look like fools its funny. The fact they are wearing bucket hats and sunglasses I feel like they are making fun of the boys my age.

C3: The man had a very thick accent and was hard to understand and follow along. But his accent was very unique and you could very easily point out where he was trying to put emphasis on the punctuations and on each point he was trying to get across.

Kylie Barrows said...

C4: The Pardoners Tale was very interesting and fun to read, but the moral of the story is greed doesn’t get you anywhere in life. All three of these men planed on getting the money in their own way. In the end the all ended up killing each other over the fact of who gets the most of the money. One got poison to poison the other two and the two that stayed and watched the money stabbed the one that went out to get the “wine” and once they killed him they drank the wine in celebration but in the end it was the poison and they both died and nobody got any of the money. The moral is don’t be greedy and take what you can get and not anything more. Greed will kill you literally! Being selfish won’t get you any where in life. Greed is the root to all evil and money is just a temptation.

C5: These images show life and the journeys we all go through out life. The first picture shows the beginning of our lives and being born and the next picture shows all the things we experience through out our lives and shows everything we go through and do up until we pass, then the next imagine is dying and going into heaven or going to hell. Heaven is in the top corner of the picture and hell is the bottom of it. The picture it self is very odd, its not a normal picture most people tend to look at.
Conversation time: Hey Choucer, when you die do you think our sins are going to follow us after?! I’m not so sure about mine but I know your sins are going to follow you up to heaven.

Kylie Barrows said...

C4: The Pardoners Tale was very interesting and fun to read, but the moral of the story is greed doesn’t get you anywhere in life. All three of these men planed on getting the money in their own way. In the end the all ended up killing each other over the fact of who gets the most of the money. One got poison to poison the other two and the two that stayed and watched the money stabbed the one that went out to get the “wine” and once they killed him they drank the wine in celebration but in the end it was the poison and they both died and nobody got any of the money. The moral is don’t be greedy and take what you can get and not anything more. Greed will kill you literally! Being selfish won’t get you any where in life. Greed is the root to all evil and money is just a temptation.

C5: These images show life and the journeys we all go through out life. The first picture shows the beginning of our lives and being born and the next picture shows all the things we experience through out our lives and shows everything we go through and do up until we pass, then the next imagine is dying and going into heaven or going to hell. Heaven is in the top corner of the picture and hell is the bottom of it. The picture it self is very odd, its not a normal picture most people tend to look at.
Conversation time: Hey Choucer, when you die do you think our sins are going to follow us after?! I’m not so sure about mine but I know your sins are going to follow you up to heaven.

Laura said...

Part 1: Laura Carlson
B1.) In Beowulf, the author uses caesuras in nearly every line. A caesura is a natural pause or break in the middle of a line. They are often marked by punctuation, and can be represented by a double vertical line. It forces the reader to develop what is at hand piece by piece, instead of reading all the given information at once, which helps to emphasize what is written. An example from this poem is “…faring homeward, laden with slaughter, his lair to seek” (9). The reason why this is considered a caesura is because a pause follows between each detail that helps to further create the image of Grendel after he slaughtered thirty thanes. The author could’ve stated this information in a more concise, direct manner, but instead divided the details up with commas to create natural pauses that resemble everyday speech.
B2.) In Beowulf, the author often uses kennings, a type of imagery that helps to enhance the language of the poem. Kennings are poetic phrases that can be used in place of a more concrete word or noun. Some examples from the poem include “whale-path” (5), “sea-wood” (11), and “word-hoard” (12). A “whale-path” is representative of a sea or ocean because whales migrate throughout those waters, in which these folk have learned to label the idea of an ocean with something characteristic of it. “Sea-wood” is a brief descriptive phrase used to describe a ship. During this time, ships were made out of wood and travelled throughout the sea, in which the term “sea-wood” is a good symbol of a ship. A “word-hoard” is used as the equivalence of a brain because brains develop and learn new words as if it were building a stockpile of them. Overall, kennings are beautified names or poetic phrases that help to convey a sense of recognition about what is being mentioned.
B3.) Beowulf demonstrates values from both Anglo-Saxon culture and Christianity throughout the text. The story itself is written about Anglo-Saxon people and during their time, it was an oral story passed down from generation to generation until an English author decided to document it. Of course this unique dynamic must have some flaws as it was passed down from person to person and not all details from the text may be 100% accurate. Another thing to consider is the English author who documented it. Anglo-Saxons initially believed in multiple gods before English Christians began converting those who settled in England to Christianity, which is why the text offers a blend of this religion in Anglo-Saxon culture.
The first lines of the story, “LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won” (5) demonstrates the pride and honor the Anglo-Saxons take in warrior code. War to them was peace. The line describing the heirs “Heorogar, then Hrothgar, then Halga brave” (7) suggest their values of bravery linked to honor. Anglo-Saxons were very devoted to maintaining their honor, often fighting as heroes to keep it well known. During this time a kingdom was only as strong as its war-leader. When their leader passed away, they had honored him with a rich procession into the sea. During the procession scene the author mentions “the shelter of God” which begins to suggest the transition into monotheistic Christianity. Values of Christianity can be seen in the lines “He sang who knew tales of the early time of man, how the Almighty made the earth, fairest fields enfolded by water, set, triumphant, sun and moon for a light to lighten the land-dwellers” (9). This is referring to the book of Genesis in the Christian Bible of how God created the entire universe. The text also mentions the story of Cain killing Abel, which is yet another story taken from the Bible, demonstrating that whoever wrote down this story was indeed very familiar with the Christian Bible.

Laura said...

Part 2 -LC
C1.) In Canterbury tales, the prioress’s name is Madame Eglantine, meaning wild rose and she is the head of a convent. Chaucer defines her as a very pleasant, amiable, and charitable lady. She is described with having delicate table manners. Chaucer thinks she is lacking some moral sense because of the way she weeps when a mouse gets caught in a trap. She feeds her dogs the finest foods and gets very emotionally upset when others don’t treat the dogs in the same manner. Chaucer jokes about her quality of French speaking because she acquired it in a London suburb, not in Paris. She is physically described with a fine nose, bright eyes, a small red mouth, and a broad forehead. She also wears a charming cloak, coral trinkets and a sheer brooch. Chaucer’s description of the prioress seems to suggest an elegance not appropriate in a nun, in which indicates her personality to be prideful.
The physician is described as being like no other doctor of medicine. Chaucer describes him as amazing in his work seeming which he can calculate the planetary position to improve his patients’ state of health. He is described as knowing the cause of every sickness in relation to weather. In general he is described by Chaucer as magical in his work. He humorously exaggerates a list of Arabic and other medieval authorities on medicine to convey the sense of how accepted he is in his practice. The doctor eats very simple foods that are easily digestible. He mostly reads the bible and wears blue and scarlet clothes lined with taffeta and sendal. Chaucer creates a pun about his love for gold, because gold is used as a healing element, being good for the heart and not just to signify his wish for wealth.
Chaucer describes the pardoner as something unlike man. The pardoner had eyes that popped out of his head, a voice that sounded like the bleating of a goat, a smooth face, and thin blond hair that he wore under a cap that had a patch sewn on to it indicating he had visited Rome to see the veil of St. Veronica. He carried a bag of pardon letters ready to sell to the gullible sinners he often took advantage of in order to make more money. He often sang with his good friend and possibly partner in life, the Summoner. The pardoner also carried a pillow case in his bag that he claimed contained many holy items that he would use to scam country folk and priests to see. In order to get away with these things, he consistently goes to church and reads stories from the Bible. He is also described as singing the offertory song loudly and cheerfully because he knows more people will donate their money if he does. Chaucer describes the pardoner as corrupt because the reader is led to believe he takes bribes, in which he is tricking many people by his dark, greedy nature.

C2.) In the rap version of the prologue, one teacher is wearing dark jeans with a vertically striped brown shirt and a tan baseball cap. Another teacher is wearing a red Dr. Pepper T-shirt with jeans and black sunglasses. The third teacher is wearing dark brown pants with a black T-shirt and a white hat that has a blue stripe down the middle. This scene takes place in front of a graffiti wall.

C3.) The first time I listened to the prologue I was very lost and thought I was listening to something foreign. However, as I listened to it a second time and began to follow along with the text, I had an easier time trying to understand exactly what was being said. The narrator seemed to have a Danish-like accent. He spoke with a soothing voice that made the unfamiliar diction flow more fluently than it did when I had first read it out loud to myself. It was easier to visualize the description of the prologue after hearing it a few times; being able to have a good sense of what the words would have sounded like in its original form. When the narrator paused and emphasized words, the story seemed to flow better, which helped me to enhance the original way I was reading it.

Laura said...

Part 3: LC
C4.) Canterbury, England is known for its cathedrals and deep religious roots. However, in the Canterbury tales, most of the 29 pilgrims are not at all religious, including the pardoner. A pardoner is a member of the church who forgives the sins of those who truly mean their forgiveness. They are supposed to be very religious and honest, but this pardoner is corrupt of all those ideas. He is a greedy, evil, con artist who scams many people by claiming to pardon their sins for money. He also convinces many to kiss the fake religious relics for even more money. The tale he tells is painfully ironic because it is a reflection of who he is as a pardoner. In the tale he describes three roisterers who swear as brethren to find and kill “Death” for their friend it has slain. All three turn on each other, each being guilty of the sin of avarice. The idea the three broke a “brother” promise is the same idea that the pardoner has sinned against the church, in which none of them starting out so prideful thought that their temptation would cause them to lose everything including their riches. Everything that has happened to the three men, which the pardoner uses to warn many about the sin of avarice that seems only to lead to death, is everything that will continue to happen to the pardoner himself as he is continually tempted by greed. The pardoner doesn’t think he needs to take his own advice, which only adds to the irony of the tale. Chaucer seems to have a satirical tone towards the pardoner, suggesting the pardoner’s foolishness for not being able to make the connection between the three greedy men and his life. Overall, the idea there is a corrupt holy man apart of the church seems to suggest Chaucer’s opinion of religion as something bogus. By writing this tale in a satirical way, Chaucer is poking fun at religion, which also advocates his belief that the church and its morals are corrupt and that the followers are as gullible and foolish as the pardoner who can’t recognize his own sin he forgives in others every day. The idea that the members of church are greedy shines light on what messed up morals Chaucer views the church as having.
C5.) Hieronymus Bosch’s painting, “The Garden of Earthly Delights” describes the fall of man, which was used to keep people from sinning when shown a frightening image of Hell. The left panel paints a picture of what life was like at the start of man in the Garden of Eden. Animals are depicted as running around wild and free, as if it is a warning of what is destined to come. In between Adam and Eve is Jesus, the man in the robe, who seems to be blessing them in matrimony as he holds Eve’s wrist and touches Adam’s foot. Eve has an innocent facial expression while Adam looks wildly filled with lustrous temptation. Beside the two of them are the symbolic biblical tree of knowledge and the devil in disguised as a snake, which is what all Christians are familiar with as what originally tempted Adam and Eve and later cursed all humans with original sin. The middle panel paints an extravagant image of humans having fun and enjoying their sins. The fruit they all have is symbolic of the fruit that Adam and Eve ate from the tree of knowledge, providing an explanation for their chaotic behavior and foreshadowing their doom in the right panel, which is symbolic of Hell. The right panel represents the consequences man will face for the sins they committed during life, which is represented in the middle panel. The humans depicted in Hell are being tortured and those that are not yet dead have a frightened look on their faces. In it grim reapers are torturing people, many have spears piercing through their bodies, and creatures are attacking them among other disturbing images.

Laura said...

Part 4: LC
RAFT
Pardoner: Confess your sins here and I promise you that your life will not end up like this (The Pardoner points to the right side of the triptych.)
Chaucer: (Chaucer approaches the Pardoner.) No, don’t worry, I got this… YOU are now pardoned. Too bad you and your people will still all end up here (Chaucer points to the right side of the triptych and chuckles.)
Pardoner: Oh my! May God have mercy on your soul. Do you think this is a joke…this painting? Do you not believe your sins could bring you to this Hell?
Chaucer: I’d only be afraid if you pardoned me. You’re as corrupt as the gluttonous nun in that painting. Do you get it…she’s a pig…she ate too much, it’s cleverly hilarious! The only people that need God’s mercy as much as you is all the people you’ve pardoned and stained with your evil soul. Do you see those people being tortured in that painting? Those are the people you’ve blessed to go to Hell.
Pardoner: How dare you?! I am not evil. I have not sinned…I am as holy as the church can be, you fallen angel. Those people being chased by grim reapers have sinned… I have not. You on the other hand should become comfortable with spears piercing through your body and being wrapped around harps like those sinners in Hell.
Chaucer: Likewise with yourself. Have you ever wondered why the ears in the picture are depicted so largely compared to their actual size on the human body and why there is a knife going between the two?
Pardoner: What are you getting at…I’ll give you one more chance for half the price to pardon your sins; I’m starting to feel sympathy for your poor soul.
Chaucer: Well, if you listen carefully you may understand for once in your life. I have concluded that people like you even after seeing this image won’t ever listen. You pardon people for the very sin you should be pardoning yourself for, but you’ll never listen to the advice you give others. Your corruptness and the church you come from is a joke. I don’t trust any hypocrite and certainly any hypocrite with my secrets to pardon. The church is a scam for money, your morals are all wrong. That’s exactly why the “holy” nun is painted the way she is. (He raises his voice as he walks away.) Go pardon that for a dime!
Pardoner: (Blushes not because Chaucer has made a decent point, but blushes because he is embarrassed his customers may have over heard the argument.)

Laura said...

Part 1: Laura Carlson
B1.) In Beowulf, the author uses caesuras in nearly every line. A caesura is a natural pause or break in the middle of a line. They are often marked by punctuation, and can be represented by a double vertical line. It forces the reader to develop what is at hand piece by piece, instead of reading all the given information at once, which helps to emphasize what is written. An example from this poem is “…faring homeward, laden with slaughter, his lair to seek” (9). The reason why this is considered a caesura is because a pause follows between each detail that helps to further create the image of Grendel after he slaughtered thirty thanes. The author could’ve stated this information in a more concise, direct manner, but instead divided the details up with commas to create natural pauses that resemble everyday speech.
B2.) In Beowulf, the author often uses kennings, a type of imagery that helps to enhance the language of the poem. Kennings are poetic phrases that can be used in place of a more concrete word or noun. Some examples from the poem include “whale-path” (5), “sea-wood” (11), and “word-hoard” (12). A “whale-path” is representative of a sea or ocean because whales migrate throughout those waters, in which these folk have learned to label the idea of an ocean with something characteristic of it. “Sea-wood” is a brief descriptive phrase used to describe a ship. During this time, ships were made out of wood and travelled throughout the sea, in which the term “sea-wood” is a good symbol of a ship. A “word-hoard” is used as the equivalence of a brain because brains develop and learn new words as if it were building a stockpile of them. Overall, kennings are beautified names or poetic phrases that help to convey a sense of recognition about what is being mentioned.
B3.) Beowulf demonstrates values from both Anglo-Saxon culture and Christianity throughout the text. The story itself is written about Anglo-Saxon people and during their time, it was an oral story passed down from generation to generation until an English author decided to document it. Of course this unique dynamic must have some flaws as it was passed down from person to person and not all details from the text may be 100% accurate. Another thing to consider is the English author who documented it. Anglo-Saxons initially believed in multiple gods before English Christians began converting those who settled in England to Christianity, which is why the text offers a blend of this religion in Anglo-Saxon culture.
The first lines of the story, “LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won” (5) demonstrates the pride and honor the Anglo-Saxons take in warrior code. War to them was peace. The line describing the heirs “Heorogar, then Hrothgar, then Halga brave” (7) suggest their values of bravery linked to honor. Anglo-Saxons were very devoted to maintaining their honor, often fighting as heroes to keep it well known. During this time a kingdom was only as strong as its war-leader. When their leader passed away, they had honored him with a rich procession into the sea. During the procession scene the author mentions “the shelter of God” which begins to suggest the transition into monotheistic Christianity. Values of Christianity can be seen in the lines “He sang who knew tales of the early time of man, how the Almighty made the earth, fairest fields enfolded by water, set, triumphant, sun and moon for a light to lighten the land-dwellers” (9). This is referring to the book of Genesis in the Christian Bible of how God created the entire universe. The text also mentions the story of Cain killing Abel, which is yet another story taken from the Bible, demonstrating that whoever wrote down this story was indeed very familiar with the Christian Bible.

Laura said...

Part 1: Laura Carlson
B1.) In Beowulf, the author uses caesuras in nearly every line. A caesura is a natural pause or break in the middle of a line. They are often marked by punctuation, and can be represented by a double vertical line. It forces the reader to develop what is at hand piece by piece, instead of reading all the given information at once, which helps to emphasize what is written. An example from this poem is “…faring homeward, laden with slaughter, his lair to seek” (9). The reason why this is considered a caesura is because a pause follows between each detail that helps to further create the image of Grendel after he slaughtered thirty thanes. The author could’ve stated this information in a more concise, direct manner, but instead divided the details up with commas to create natural pauses that resemble everyday speech.
B2.) In Beowulf, the author often uses kennings, a type of imagery that helps to enhance the language of the poem. Kennings are poetic phrases that can be used in place of a more concrete word or noun. Some examples from the poem include “whale-path” (5), “sea-wood” (11), and “word-hoard” (12). A “whale-path” is representative of a sea or ocean because whales migrate throughout those waters, in which these folk have learned to label the idea of an ocean with something characteristic of it. “Sea-wood” is a brief descriptive phrase used to describe a ship. During this time, ships were made out of wood and travelled throughout the sea, in which the term “sea-wood” is a good symbol of a ship. A “word-hoard” is used as the equivalence of a brain because brains develop and learn new words as if it were building a stockpile of them. Overall, kennings are beautified names or poetic phrases that help to convey a sense of recognition about what is being mentioned.
B3.) Beowulf demonstrates values from both Anglo-Saxon culture and Christianity throughout the text. The story itself is written about Anglo-Saxon people and during their time, it was an oral story passed down from generation to generation until an English author decided to document it. Of course this unique dynamic must have some flaws as it was passed down from person to person and not all details from the text may be 100% accurate. Another thing to consider is the English author who documented it. Anglo-Saxons initially believed in multiple gods before English Christians began converting those who settled in England to Christianity, which is why the text offers a blend of this religion in Anglo-Saxon culture.
The first lines of the story, “LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won” (5) demonstrates the pride and honor the Anglo-Saxons take in warrior code. War to them was peace. The line describing the heirs “Heorogar, then Hrothgar, then Halga brave” (7) suggest their values of bravery linked to honor. Anglo-Saxons were very devoted to maintaining their honor, often fighting as heroes to keep it well known. During this time a kingdom was only as strong as its war-leader. When their leader passed away, they had honored him with a rich procession into the sea. During the procession scene the author mentions “the shelter of God” which begins to suggest the transition into monotheistic Christianity. Values of Christianity can be seen in the lines “He sang who knew tales of the early time of man, how the Almighty made the earth, fairest fields enfolded by water, set, triumphant, sun and moon for a light to lighten the land-dwellers” (9). This is referring to the book of Genesis in the Christian Bible of how God created the entire universe. The text also mentions the story of Cain killing Abel, which is yet another story taken from the Bible, demonstrating that whoever wrote down this story was indeed very familiar with the Christian Bible.

John Munger said...

B1. Caesura is a break in a line of poetry. Beowulf is full of Caesuras. An example of Caesura in Beowulf is when it talks about Scyld being a beloved leader. This is a great ecample of Caesura because it is a beak in the poem that allows the speaker to take a breath. This sentences breaks after it says that Scyld is a beloved leader. After the pause it talks about how he is traveling and what he is traveling in. This sentence in Beowulf is a great example of Caesura.
B2. Kenning is using a phrase or a sentence to represent an object. For example, in Beowulf they say that she lives by the whale path. This means that she lives by the sea or the ocean. They also mention the light-of-battle which means sword. Another great example is battle-sweat. This translates to mean blood. Beowulf also mentions the hilt of sword which means the handle of th sword. Breakers-of-rings is Kenning for King. These are great examples of Kenning in Beowulf.
John Munger

John Munger said...

B3. In Beowulf, there are scenes with dynamic fusion between Old English and the Anglo-Saxons. An example from the text would be, “ Forth he fared at the fated moment, sturdy Scyld to the shelter of God”. This example shows the Old English language, but it also mentions God in the uprising of Chrsitianity with the Anglo-Saxons.

C1. The Friar is charcterized fairly specifically in The Canterbury Tales,by Geoffrey Chaucer. He is a roaming preist. He is akin to taking bribes from rich men and beautiful women. He is a preist which means that he is represented in a high social class. He administers the religious ongoins in the town. He is always befriending people in hopes that they will need his services in that way he can take bribes from them. He is a very smooth man. He can if necessary bribe the poorest people in the town.
John Munger

John Munger said...

The Knight is another great character in The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer. He is a man of great social distinction and class. He dresses in a way that does not show his distinction. He dresses very casual. He has been in many deadly crusades. He is very modest about his accomplishments. He has power over a great number of individuals in the town and he does not show his control/power. The Knight and his story is very intersting.

The Pardoner is a very interesting character in The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer. He is bald with slicked back yellow hair.He had marks that showed he had recently shaved. This represents his shady attitude. He is of high class, but he commits fraud. He carries around a bag of “relics” which he claims are worth much money, but they are fakes and he tries to sell for a lot when in relaity they are very cheap. The Pardoner’s tale is a very intriguing one.
John Munger

John Munger said...

C2. The artists were wearing really casual clothes. They look like normal people who are pretending to be rap artists. They have sunglasses and hats.

C3. The voice of the narrator is very defined and clear. He pronunces the words very clearly and consicely. It makes it very easy to determine what he is saying. His narration makes it very easy to determine what he is saying to help with translation.

C4. The role of the Pardoner is to forgive or pardon sins from those who have committed. He is supposed to be a good hearted who helps in freeing peole of sins. He sins almost every day. He committs fraud with the selling of his relics. His role versus what he actually does is painfully ironic. There is plenty of irony going on in this story and there are tons of people who commit sins on a day to day basis. The Pardoner being a sinner adds to the irony in the story. Chaucer’s tone would be that of disappointment. He is disappointed in what the Prdoner preaches vesus the shady business that he does on the side. We can conclude that Chaucer feels that religion is sort of a joke. He has people committing sins all the time in the story. He feels that religion is important, but he jokes with it and dosen’t take it too seriously.
John Munger

John Munger said...

C5. The left panel is a depiction of the Garden of Eden. It is a portrait of a great life for the poeple in that panel. The right panel shows hell. There are people who are trapped. There are representations of torture that go on in hell. There are depictions of battle in bloodshed in the right panel. The middle shows just more images of life in the Garden of Eden. The panels are filled with some crazy images.

If Chaucer and The Pardoner had a conversation about the portrait of The Garden of Earthly Delights it would be about how The Pardoner belongs in hell or in the right panel. Chaucer would claim that he belongs there because of his insistent fraud on innocent individuals. The Pardoner would argue that he is just being smart. Chaucer would then say something like him not practicing what he preaches. He deserves to be tortured. The pardoner would say that he deserves to be in the middle or left panel, but realistically because he is so shifty, he belongs in hell.
John Munger

Kayla Sicard said...

B1: A caesura is a sentence ending in a middle of a line. An example is, “mournful their mood. No man is able”. This is an example because the line ends in the middle of the sentence. This shows that during the old English time, there was already signs of things that modern poetry has.
B2: Kenning is a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. An example “light-of-battle” which is kenning for sword. Kenning for the sun is “rapture-of-heaven”. Another example is “weaver-of-peace” which is kenning for wife. All of these examples use a different word for a common word now.
B3: Christianity was becoming more popular; in Beowulf, “-- 'twas judgment of God, -- or have joy in his hall.” This is saying that God saw everything. Beowulf read, “brand or buckler to bear in the fight,
gold-colored targe: but with gripe alone must I front the fiend and fight for life, foe against foe.” Anglo-Saxon was a violent culture, people were ruthless fighters. Fighting was a part of their culture, “To Beowulf over them both then gave the refuge-of-Ingwines right and power, o'er war-steeds and weapons: wished him joy of them.” These people enjoyed fighting in wars and took pride in fighting.

Kayla Sicard said...

C1: Knight: Chaucer thinks very highly of the Knight. He is man that has fought many battles and won. He saw him as a true gentleman. Chaucer likes that he believes in the ideals of chivalry and is an honest man. The Knight is truthful, faithful and only does what he thinks is right. The Knight is a simple dresser. Monk: The Monk is not an ordinary monk. He is very manly and loves to hunt. He is very cocky and sarcastic. The Monk has a bald shiny head, bulging eyes, and his skin is as dark as a roast. The Monk wears the fur of his kill. Pardoner: Chaucer mocks the Pardoner. The Pardoner has blonde hair, smooth face and a goat like voice. He is a very sneaky guy and has a way with words. Chaucer thinks he is odd because he carries around a sack of no good items. He dresses well because of all the money he has.
C2: One guys had sunglasses with a red Dr Pepper shirt. The black guy had a baseball cap with a brown stripped shirt. The last guy had a black shirt with a saying on it and a bucket hat.
C3: The narrator’s voice was very calming and easy flowing. I listened and focused hard to hear letters that stood out like F’s and S’s. Once I heard these I could follow it easier.
C4: The Pardoners tale is full of irony. The Pardoner preaches to listeners about the evils of greed. The Pardoner makes people pay him so they will be free of sins in confession. He does not practice what he preaches. In his story three men are seeking and going to try to kill Death. The men stumble upon money and decide to divide it evenly; one of them goes out to town to buy wine and bread to celebrate. While the men are separated greed starts to set in and they all want the money for themselves. The each set a plan to kill each other. What happens in the end is that all three men end up dying. This is ironic because they were all looking to find and kill Death but instead they were killed. Chaucer speaks sarcastically of the Pardoner. The Pardoner is supposed to represent the Church and God but he is the complete opposite.
C5: The first panel is a depiction of Adam and Eve and the beginning of earth. Everything looks peaceful, pretty, and calm. It also shows a nice balance between humans, animals, and nature. The middle panel is similar to panel one. In the middle panel there is a bit more going on. Some sinful things are happening. There are a lot more humans then everything else and the humans are taking over the animals. This is hinting towards things getting worse and more sinful activities occurring. In the last panel, all of the colors are dark indicating that everything has fallen to sin. People have lost all morals and let their desires get the best of them and let go of God.
Pardoner: Everyone has fallen to their sins, if they could only make up for their sins.
Chaucer: It would be too late, for there has been way to many sins committed.
Pardoner: They could have all came and confessed to me in the Church and pay off their sins.
Chaucer: They will all go to Hell for all the wrong they have done.
Pardoner: If they only could have heard my preaching’s.
Chaucer: Yea I’m sure that would have changed things. (Said sarcastically)

Anonymous said...

Beowulf:
B1. A caesura is a break, especially a sense of pause, usually near the middle of a verse. The two parts are distinguishable from each other yet still linked to one another. A caesura is used to create a strong impact through dramatic pause. An example of a caesura in Beowulf is “…by the mast the mighty one. Many a treasure…” This line is an example of a caesura because there is a break in the middle through the use of a period, creating an effective pause and distinguishing the two parts from each other. The first part includes the description of the late king who is being laid to rest on the boat. This is distinguishable from the second part but also connected because the second part includes the treasures that will be laid to rest with the king. The break adds an emotional effect to this part of the poem where the king, a man who has had a large impact on his people, has died and is being laid to rest.
B2. A kenning is a conventional poetic phrase used for or in addition to the usual name of a person or thing. An example of kenning in Beowulf is “shelter of God.” This could mean heaven because a shelter is a place seen as a sanctuary and God is associated with heaven. The “shelter of God” could be heaven, where the king Scyld goes when he dies in Beowulf. Another example of kenning is “slayer-of-souls.” This could mean devils or demons because devils and demons are often associated with killing people or taking their souls in exchange for something. In Beowulf, offerings are made to gods and, in desperation, it is asked of the “slayer-of-souls” to give aid against Grendel. Another example is “sea-wood,” which is a kenning for ship because ships at the time were made of wood and they travel on the sea. In Beowulf, the “sea-wood” is anchored after warriors travel on the sea to aid against Grendel’s attacks.
B3. In Beowulf, Anglo-Saxon culture is blended with the rise of Christianity. Anglo-Saxon cultural values included courage, loyalty, personal valor, strength, courtesy, and fame. Anglo-Saxons valued heroic ideals and they appreciated the heroic actions of warriors. These values are exhibited in Beowulf by Scyld and his descendents “Beowulf…long he ruled in fame with all folk, since his father had gone away from the world, till awoke an heir… Healfdene…Then, one after one…children four: Heorogar, then Hrothgar, then Halga brave…to Hrothgar was given such glory of war, such honor of combat, that all his kin obeyed him gladly.” Beowulf himself is the protagonist of the epic and the hero who fights Grendel, Grendel’s mother and a dragon. He possesses the Anglo-Saxon values including strength and courage. The rise of Christianity is displayed in Beowulf through the use of Christian terminology such as God, Father, and Lord, “But well for him that after death-day may draw to his Lord, and friendship find in the Father's arms!” These words are indicative of the monotheism of Christianity and it shows the influence that Christianity held when the epic originated.
Katie Folan

Anonymous said...

The Canterbury Tales:
C1. The Monk is a man who is supposed to stay at his job and remain dedicated to his life as a holy man. However he rebels against this and other rules. He does not like rule of Maurus or Saint Benedict, or other old and strict things. He prefers to follow new-world ideas and rules instead. He is a hunter and loves to ride. He would spare no cost to ride and hunt. He has many good horses in his stable; their bells jingle as loud as the bells at his chapel. The Monk doesn’t like or care that monks are not supposed to be hunters or anything other than holy men. He has lost the ideals of a holy man and now travels, hunts, and enjoys good food and fine clothes. His sleeves are made with the finest fur in the land. He has a wrought-gold pin that fastens his hood. His boots are soft. His head is bald and his face smooth. His eyes bulge, red and gleaming. The Monk is not a bad man but he is not a good monk.
The Wife of Bath is from Bath or some area near there. She is skillful at making clothes. Her wardrobe is extravagant and rich. She wears very heavy head-dresses made of the finest material on Sundays, and tightly fastened scarlet stockings with soft, new shoes. The Wife of Bath is a very large women, both personality wise and physically. Her face is bold and pale with a red hue and she has a gap in her teeth. No one dares to cross her; she likes to be the first one to make a donation at church and if someone ever goes before her, she loses her sense of charity and refuses to donate. The Wife of Bath is a worldly woman, not only in the sense that she has seen a lot of the world but also in the sense that she has had much experience in love and sex. She has been to Jerusalem three times, as well as Rome, Boulogne, Santiago, and Cologne. She has had five husbands, not including other men from her youth. The Wife of Bath is partly deaf but loves to talk. She laughs often and tells many tales of love and romance.
The Pardoner is from Rouncival. He rides with his friend the Summoner and they sing as they journey. The Pardoner is both physically revolting and repellent in terms of personality and lifestyle. He has smooth, yellow hair that hangs down to his shoulders. He has a hood but keeps it in his knapsack to stay in style. His eyes are shiny and his face is beardless and smooth. He has a voice like a goat. His knapsack is stuffed with pardons from Rome and also a pillow-case that he says was Our True Lady’s veil. He says he has a piece of the sail from Saint Peter’s sail, a brass cross set full of jewels, and a bottle of pig’s bones. The Pardoner is a corrupt and deceitful man. He uses holy objects and the church for his own benefit. He could sell his “relics” to a simple country parson and collect more money in one day than the parson in two months. With charm, deception, and flattery, he makes a fool of the parson and others. He also sells pardons for money to people who tell him their sins. He is a churchgoer who sings loudly and joyfully in order to gain money from the other churchgoers. The Pardoner’s sexuality and gender is called into question. He may be gay and in a relationship with his friend the Summoner. They ride together and sing “Come hither, love, to me,” possibly suggesting a sexual relationship. He might also be a eunuch as seen through his voice, long hair, and beardlessness, suggesting that he is not a full man. The Pardoner is placed last in the introduction to the twenty-nine pilgrims as he is the most untrustworthy and greedy of them all.
Katie Folan

Anonymous said...

C2. One of the MC’s is wearing a black shirt, dark pants, and a striped bucket hat. Another is wearing a brown striped shirt, dark pants, and a tan baseball hat. The last one is wearing a red Dr. Pepper shirt, jeans, and sunglasses.
C3. A lot of the words are like words we use today but they have extra syllables or different spellings like with Aprill (April) and Whan (when). Also, -e and –es is at the end of many of the words in both pronunciation and spelling; there is an emphasis on the endings of these words. His accent makes it difficult to understand what he is saying unless you are following along with the reading.
C4. The irony of The Pardoner’s tale in relation to the Pardoner is that the Pardoner is a corrupt and dishonest man who tells a story about a group of three crooked men, each of whom he condemns for their actions. In the tale, the three men come across gold that they don’t want to split with each other. They plot to kill one another but they all end up dead because of their greed. The irony within the tale is that the greed of the three men lead them to meet death, a foe they had originally planned on killing to avenge a friend’s death. However, death takes them and they lose their gold and their lives because they weren’t content with their share of gold. The Pardoner criticizes them for their gluttony, wickedness, and lechery, even though he himself displays these qualities as he uses his position as a church figure to make money. Immediately after sharing his tale with the group of pilgrims, the Pardoner tells them he can absolve them of their sins if they buy one of his relics or pay him to kneel before holy objects and receive pardon. Chaucer's tone as echoed through his juxtaposition of the Pardoner's story and personality could be described as comical because the Pardoner tells the tale of three men motivated to perform sinful acts by greed, while he himself is guilty of the same sin. Based on the Pardoner’s Tale, one could conclude that Chaucer’s attitude toward religion was cynical, critical, and skeptical. He has a cynical attitude toward religion and its seemingly corrupted leaders such as the Pardoner. Chaucer is critical of religious leaders as portrayed through the corrupt, hypocritical Pardoner. He is skeptical of the goodness of religion and religious leaders, as seen through the Pardoner who abuses his position and steals from the very people he is supposed to be helping.
Katie Folan

Anonymous said...

C5. Part 1: In the leftmost panel is depicted a scene of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. The scene contains animals and bizarre architecture. The picture is mostly bright and colorful; however, there is a dark portion in the back of the scene with birds circling, probably around prey. The center portion depicts a scene that is also colorful and light with similarly strange architecture. There are large birds and huge vegetation, and it contains many more people. Many of them ride on the animals, while others congregate together in various groups. The scene is overwhelming with these figures, animals, and architecture; it is altogether hectic and lively. The final scene of the right is, unlike the other two, very dark and disturbing. In this scene is a view of the different horrors found in Hell. Once again there is very strange architecture, surrounded by scenes of death and despair. The scene contains oversized instruments that appear to be used to torment the criminals. There is also a large bird eating a human, a rabbit impaling people, and other animals eating the sinners. The foreground of the picture is lighter and more crowded but as you look toward the background, the scene becomes much darker and desolate.
Part 2: Chaucer: The panel to the left is a depiction of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden and the panel to the right is an illustration of hell. In the right image, it shows all of the sinners being punished for their wrongdoings. There are a lot of sinners in the church nowadays.
Pardoner: I agree with you about the depictions in the images. The left image is light and colorful while the right panel is dark and disturbing. They all share strange buildings and large animals and plants. The sinners in the right panel aren’t necessarily members of the church, however.
Chaucer: Well they may not be religious figures but there are a lot of sinners in the church. They are people like you who take from the church and helpless people because of their greed. These people in the image have succumbed to their temptations and therefore have to pay for their sins.
Pardoner: Yes I believe their greed is the root of their evil.
Chaucer: Yes and they are paying for it in the picture. You can see in the image that they some tormented by animals and others tortured by instruments. These animals are feeding on corrupt people; many of them are probably corrupt church figures. The panel is a depiction of hell and what happens when greed and other sins triumph over morality.
Katie Folan

Anonymous said...

Beowolf
1) A pause/break near the middle of a line.

Ex) No man is able to say in sooth, no son of the halls, no hero 'neath heaven, -- who harbored that freight!

2) A kenning is a type of circumlocution, in the form of a compound that employs figurative language in place of a more concrete single-word noun.

Ex 1) “On the breast of the boat, the breaker of – rings, by the mast the mighty one.” The expression “The breaker of- rings” is kenning because it is another off his gold jewelry. And giving it to his people

Ex 2) “to bid his henchmen a hall uprear.” This quote is a kenning because instead of using something about saying men who work for him. It uses the words henchmen

Ex 3) "But the Wielder of Men granted me that I should see hanging on the wall a fair, ancient great-sword." Is an example because instead of using the words an old sword. He said “Ancient Great – Sword.”

3) Beowlf shows Christianity when things like "The fight would have ended straightaway if God had not guarded me." Are said because he mentions god guarding him. And god is associated with Christianity.

In another example Beowolf gives credit to god for helping him fight off a enemy. "But the Wielder of Men granted me that I should see hanging on the wall a fair, ancient great-sword."

The Canterbury Tales
1) The Friar: Friars are usually poor. The friar likes to hangout with wealthy landowners, barmaids, and tavern owners. He does not believe that friars should have to hang around people who are poor and he should be allowed to hang around with people who are wealthier then he is.
2)The Pardoner: Someone who has done something wrong, would give their money to the pardoner. Eventually, this “charitable” donation became a necessary part of receiving forgiveness. The pardoner works for the church taking donations.
3)The Miller- short and muscular, the Miller has a wart on his nose and a big mouth, literally and figuratively. He threatens the Host’s notion of propriety when he drunkenly insists on telling the second tale. He ruins the Host’s carefully planned storytelling order; he rips doors off hinges; and he tells a tale that is almost unbelievable, ridiculing religious clerks, scholars, carpenters, and women

C2)The Rappers in the video are wearing a red shirt. some baseball caps. A black shirt. Some sunglasses. Two white men and an African American Man.

C3)The Narrators voice is smooth. And flows with the language as he reads the text. The pronunciation of the words help the reader understand the words better and give you a hint of what they mean.

C4)The pardoners tale is Ironic because he is telling a story about how the people in the story are un trustworthy and how they are thieves but in the end it is all ironic because the people he is telling the story to think he is a trustworthy guy but he is actually exactly like the people in the story.
C5) Panel one depicts the creation of the world and god. Also Adam and Eve. The Second Panel depicts the world starting up and everyone and everything. The third panel depicts the destruction of the humans.

-Ben Giarrusso

Benjamin Giarrusso said...

Beowolf
1) A pause/break near the middle of a line.

Ex) No man is able to say in sooth, no son of the halls, no hero 'neath heaven, -- who harbored that freight!

2) A kenning is a type of circumlocution, in the form of a compound that employs figurative language in place of a more concrete single-word noun.

Ex 1) “On the breast of the boat, the breaker of – rings, by the mast the mighty one.” The expression “The breaker of- rings” is kenning because it is another off his gold jewelry. And giving it to his people

Ex 2) “to bid his henchmen a hall uprear.” This quote is a kenning because instead of using something about saying men who work for him. It uses the words henchmen

Ex 3) "But the Wielder of Men granted me that I should see hanging on the wall a fair, ancient great-sword." Is an example because instead of using the words an old sword. He said “Ancient Great – Sword.”

3) Beowlf shows Christianity when things like "The fight would have ended straightaway if God had not guarded me." Are said because he mentions god guarding him. And god is associated with Christianity.

In another example Beowolf gives credit to god for helping him fight off a enemy. "But the Wielder of Men granted me that I should see hanging on the wall a fair, ancient great-sword."

The Canterbury Tales
1) The Friar: Friars are usually poor. The friar likes to hangout with wealthy landowners, barmaids, and tavern owners. He does not believe that friars should have to hang around people who are poor and he should be allowed to hang around with people who are wealthier then he is.
2)The Pardoner: Someone who has done something wrong, would give their money to the pardoner. Eventually, this “charitable” donation became a necessary part of receiving forgiveness. The pardoner works for the church taking donations.
3)The Miller- short and muscular, the Miller has a wart on his nose and a big mouth, literally and figuratively. He threatens the Host’s notion of propriety when he drunkenly insists on telling the second tale. He ruins the Host’s carefully planned storytelling order; he rips doors off hinges; and he tells a tale that is almost unbelievable, ridiculing religious clerks, scholars, carpenters, and women

C2)The Rappers in the video are wearing a red shirt. some baseball caps. A black shirt. Some sunglasses. Two white men and an African American Man.

C3)The Narrators voice is smooth. And flows with the language as he reads the text. The pronunciation of the words help the reader understand the words better and give you a hint of what they mean.

C4)The pardoners tale is Ironic because he is telling a story about how the people in the story are un trustworthy and how they are thieves but in the end it is all ironic because the people he is telling the story to think he is a trustworthy guy but he is actually exactly like the people in the story.
C5) Panel one depicts the creation of the world and god. Also Adam and Eve. The Second Panel depicts the world starting up and everyone and everything. The third panel depicts the destruction of the humans.

Ahnya Dague said...

B1: A caesura is when there is a pause or ending punctuation within the line of a poem that is not at the end. An example of this would be on page 6, 11 lines down: “by the mast the mighty one. Many a treasure ”. This is an example of a caesura because it is an unnatural break in a line of the poem. Instead of being continuous until the end of the line, the author intentionally chose to have a pause in the poem here. It adds emphasis to the death of the clansmen’s darling lord and him being laid down by the mast of the mighty ship.
B2: A kenning is a figurative language phrase that takes the place of a concrete noun. One example in Beowulf would be on page 7 when it says “master mead-house”. Mead is basically beer so a master mead-house is an extensive bar. Next, when the author says “labored in woe”, this stands for grieving over the death of people. The last example of a kenning is “anchored their sea-wood”. Sea-wood is a ship so this means that the sailors had to anchor their ship when they went into shore.
B3: One example of this strange infusion is between pages 11 and 12 :” God they thanked for passing in peace o’er the paths of the sea. Now saw from the cliff a Scylding clansman, a warden that watched the water-side, how they bore o’er the gangway glittering shields, war-gear in rediness”… This passage shows that while they thanked God for their safe passage to land, they prepared themeselved for war. All the warriors are highly adorned in the Anglo-Saxon time yet they thank God for their safe travels. This is unique because it shows that even the most respected and gruesome individuals of the time realize that there is a God superior to all. Next is a passage from page 14 : “’Tis time that I fare from you. Father Almighty in grace and mercy guard you well, safe in your seekings. Seward I go, ‘gainst hostile warriors hold my watch.”’ In this passage, a sturdy shieldsman told others to that he wishes God looks over them while they travel and through their ‘seekings’. Also, he mentions hostile warriors in the same announcement. This shows that along with their traditional values of war and brutal fighting, God has become an influential force and a part of their everyday lives.

Ahnya Dague said...

B1: A caesura is when there is a pause or ending punctuation within the line of a poem that is not at the end. An example of this would be on page 6, 11 lines down: “by the mast the mighty one. Many a treasure ”. This is an example of a caesura because it is an unnatural break in a line of the poem. Instead of being continuous until the end of the line, the author intentionally chose to have a pause in the poem here. It adds emphasis to the death of the clansmen’s darling lord and him being laid down by the mast of the mighty ship.
B2: A kenning is a figurative language phrase that takes the place of a concrete noun. One example in Beowulf would be on page 7 when it says “master mead-house”. Mead is basically beer so a master mead-house is an extensive bar. Next, when the author says “labored in woe”, this stands for grieving over the death of people. The last example of a kenning is “anchored their sea-wood”. Sea-wood is a ship so this means that the sailors had to anchor their ship when they went into shore.
B3: One example of this strange infusion is between pages 11 and 12 :” God they thanked for passing in peace o’er the paths of the sea. Now saw from the cliff a Scylding clansman, a warden that watched the water-side, how they bore o’er the gangway glittering shields, war-gear in rediness”… This passage shows that while they thanked God for their safe passage to land, they prepared themeselved for war. All the warriors are highly adorned in the Anglo-Saxon time yet they thank God for their safe travels. This is unique because it shows that even the most respected and gruesome individuals of the time realize that there is a God superior to all. Next is a passage from page 14 : “’Tis time that I fare from you. Father Almighty in grace and mercy guard you well, safe in your seekings. Seward I go, ‘gainst hostile warriors hold my watch.”’ In this passage, a sturdy shieldsman told others to that he wishes God looks over them while they travel and through their ‘seekings’. Also, he mentions hostile warriors in the same announcement. This shows that along with their traditional values of war and brutal fighting, God has become an influential force and a part of their everyday lives.

Ahnya Dague said...

C1: For the pardoner, Chaucer characterized him as no one else. The pardoner is a loud and confident man, with a lot of power. His hair was very blonde, like yellow wax. It was smooth and hung behind his head. He carried a hood for his head but refused to wear it- which shows that he cares about his image and what people think of him. He rode in style as he kept his backpack full of pardons with him. He didn’t have a beard and his voice sounded like a goat. He shaved, which gives him a smooth face. There was no pardoner with as much grace as him. It is said that when he was on the sea, Jesus hailed for him, showing that he must be a very important figure in that time. He could read lesson and stories well in church and had a good singing voice. He preached with ease and sang merrily as people donated money to him. The pardoner is someone of upper class that holds a lot of authority in the community. He is seen as someone almost godly, meaning he is so incredible people worship him. He has long-ish blond hair and hold himself with a lot of confidence. He knows he has a lot of power of people’s lives and walk around with his head held high.
The merchant has a beard and sits on a horse with a colorful and varied gown. He wears a beaver hat on his head and his boots are neat and elegant. He was quiet when he spoke and made sure people were aware of his winnings rather than his losings. He knew how to trade so well he could do it with foreign money. He never showed that we may have been in debt and was very organized in all his trades. Yet no one knows his name. The merchant seems to be a man of upper-class that people are pretty interested in. He is well known for what he does but nothing personal is known about him. He seems to be a respectable man cares about his image and appearance.
The physician was unlike any other. He was well versed in astronomy yet practiced medicine very well. He had several patients at a time and treated them with his knowledge of astronomy and what the signs were telling him. He used the star and planetary position to determine which course of action was best for his patient. He was always prepared with all his drugs and herbs and he was close friends with his apothecaries. He knew many well respected people well. He was modest in his own diet and his study didn’t really have anything to do with the bible. He was careful with the gold he earned and loved it more than anything.

Ahnya Dague said...

C2: There are three people in this video. The African American man is dressed in a tan hat and neutral colored stripped shirt. He is also wearing grey pants or dark jeans. There is one man dressed in a Dr. Pepper shirt that is wearing sunglasses in some parts of the video but not throughout the whole thing. He is wearing light wash jeans. The last man is wearing a blue/grey /green stripped hat with a brim. His black shirt says something about a high school Japanese club of 2006. He is wearing black/dark grey jeans.
C3: The narrator’s voice is hard to understand. It makes even words I know seem foreign and hard to decipher. I honestly understood hardly any of the passage he said. I feel as though the accent did not help to decode the message at all- in fact it was quite the opposite. I didn’t decode anything new from listening to this recording. I feel as though his accent is too thick to even decipher the English that he is speaking- it all sounds like a different language.
C4: The pardoner’s tale is ironic because the three men set out to kill death, which you cannot do because its death and isn’t a person. Also, the pardoner is supposed to save people from death yet around lines 450-490, the three men are looking for death. In the end, the old man leads them to death and at the tree where death is supposed to be is a bunch of money. Although they are supposed to be leaders and faithful, they decide to steal the money and bring it home under to cover of darkness. The youngest one got the short end of the straw and now has to run into town to get bread and wine while the other two guard the treasure. When this youngest member is gone, the two remaining decide that while splitting the treasure among three would be nice, only having to split it among two wold be even nicer. These supposedly wholly men plan to steal and lie to everyone around them, including their friend. Also, they seem to be planning to kill the third party member so he doesn’t complain about not getting a cut. The boy in town wants and plans to buy poison so he can have all the treasure. After buying the poison, he puts it in his comrades wine and goes to see them once again. So after the boy was killed, the other two decided to celebrate by drinking the wine, effectively poisoning and killing themselves. Also, the pardoner criticizes the men for being greedy and is supposed to be a faithful and wholly man himself while in fact he is very greedy himself. I think that in lines 640-640 the pardoner is trading pardons for money and saying that next time, he wants more. He is taking advantage of his followers and extorting them financially. This iron compliments with the irony of the tale itself because there is much irony within the pardoner’s job and what he actually does and there is also a lot of irony within the moral of the story. This is ironic because just when the three men thought they had effectively cheated death and instead won the lottery basically, their greed got the best of them, leading to their death. The old man said that death was to be found by the tree, but it was disguised as coins (which because of the men’s greed, did end up being death in itself. Chaucer’s tone is sardonic and foreboding throughout the story. He tries to get certain points across and uses a lot of irony and foreshadowing to do that. The reader doesn’t know it till the end but everything that happens is foreshadowed before it does (death found at the tree). The irony of the story is what leads to the death of all the men, which puts a dark twist on the moral of the story. Through all of this we can conclude that Chaucer is not a fan of religion. He portrays the religious figures as fools that end up getting themselves killed over their inner sins. He seems to think that religion blinds people and eventually leads them to their own downfall through this blinding.

Ahnya Dague said...

C5: The left most panel seems to portray a heaven-like scene where a very select elite few are accepted in. There are exotic animals such as elephants and strange birds seem to be coexisting with the angelic-posed humans. The water fountain is very delicate looking and flows into a majestic pond/river. There is a lot of open room, comparatively, which brings about a sense of freedom and relaxing. The middle portion is where the majority of the people end up, neither good nor bad. There is some fighting, like around the central pond and there is also some very peaceful scenes, such as the water fountains at the top of the page. On the right most panel seems to be some sort of hell. The entire scene is black. There are a lot of alien type creatures roaming around. Also, down at the bottom, there is some human torture going on. There are a lot more pointy and brutal looking objects and creatures in the last panel. It has an overall scary feeling to it.
I don’t know how to make a conversation into RAFT style or what RAFT style even is. I tried to look it up but it involves a chart and I don’t understand how it all works holistically. However, I think a conversation would go something like this:
C: It’s all a lie.
P: What do you mean it’s all a lie?
C: I mean religion in general. We are told to blindly believe something and if we do, we are rewarded by being sent to a place like this (points to left most panel). And if we don’t, we are doomed to a place like this (points to right most panel). I just find it hard to believe that we are supposed to accept what we’re told without being able to ask why.
P: Well, a highly respected member of the church, I believe that you should follow all the teachings of God without question. Why would you have the need to question God? He is almighty for a reason.
C: I don’t think he is, though. I’m not sure religion is all it’s cracked up to be. How can we be sure any of it is true?
P: If you don’t believe in God, he’s not going to treat you well when you die and you’re going to end up in the right panel. Or you can give me money and I can make sure you end up where you want. I can pardon all your sins for the low price of five easy payments of $19.95.
C: Are you trying to get me to bride you? That’s not wholly at all!
P: Well it depends on how you look at it. I can turn a blind eye and put in a good word for you with the big guy or we can have him see all the bad things you’ve done- just depends on how generous you’re willing to be.
C: You have to be kidding me. You’re a hypocrite.

Ahnya Dague said...

C5: The left most panel seems to portray a heaven-like scene where a very select elite few are accepted in. There are exotic animals such as elephants and strange birds seem to be coexisting with the angelic-posed humans. The water fountain is very delicate looking and flows into a majestic pond/river. There is a lot of open room, comparatively, which brings about a sense of freedom and relaxing. The middle portion is where the majority of the people end up, neither good nor bad. There is some fighting, like around the central pond and there is also some very peaceful scenes, such as the water fountains at the top of the page. On the right most panel seems to be some sort of hell. The entire scene is black. There are a lot of alien type creatures roaming around. Also, down at the bottom, there is some human torture going on. There are a lot more pointy and brutal looking objects and creatures in the last panel. It has an overall scary feeling to it.
I don’t know how to make a conversation into RAFT style or what RAFT style even is. I tried to look it up but it involves a chart and I don’t understand how it all works holistically. However, I think a conversation would go something like this:
C: It’s all a lie.
P: What do you mean it’s all a lie?
C: I mean religion in general. We are told to blindly believe something and if we do, we are rewarded by being sent to a place like this (points to left most panel). And if we don’t, we are doomed to a place like this (points to right most panel). I just find it hard to believe that we are supposed to accept what we’re told without being able to ask why.
P: Well, a highly respected member of the church, I believe that you should follow all the teachings of God without question. Why would you have the need to question God? He is almighty for a reason.
C: I don’t think he is, though. I’m not sure religion is all it’s cracked up to be. How can we be sure any of it is true?
P: If you don’t believe in God, he’s not going to treat you well when you die and you’re going to end up in the right panel. Or you can give me money and I can make sure you end up where you want. I can pardon all your sins for the low price of five easy payments of $19.95.
C: Are you trying to get me to bride you? That’s not wholly at all!
P: Well it depends on how you look at it. I can turn a blind eye and put in a good word for you with the big guy or we can have him see all the bad things you’ve done- just depends on how generous you’re willing to be.
C: You have to be kidding me. You’re a hypocrite.

Ahnya Dague said...

Hi Mr. Kefor.
My entire work was too long to put in one comment so I had to split it up. I'n not sure if everything sent or if I did it right- there seems to be no verification as to if it was successful. If anything didn't work correctly, I would be happy to email my work to you.
-Ahnya Dague

Keenan Coffey said...




Keenan Coffey



Beowulf







1) A caesura is categorized as a pause or break in the text to provide emphasis or some meaning. “They were easy to find who elsewhere sought in room remote their rest at night, bed in the bowers, when that bale was shown, was seen in sooth, with surest token, -- the hall-thane's hate.” The double hyphen in the middle of the sentence is a caesura.



2) A kenning is a compound expression in Old English and has metaphorical meaning. A few examples include an “oar’s-steed” which means a ship, “a breaker or rings” is a king, and “battle sweat” which means blood.



3) The combination of Old English, Anglo Saxon values and beliefs, and the rise of Christianity create a sense of foreign history in Beowulf. The Anglo Saxon’s were a very barbaric group of people that pilgrimaged any village in sight. Their speech and language normally included very vulgar terms that always related to war in some way, shape, or form. An example of this language includes, “To Hrothgar was given such glory of war, such honor of combat, that all his kin obeyed him gladly till great grew his band of youthful comrades.”





Canterbury Tales





C1) Chaucer characterizes many different characters throughout the novel Canterbury Tales. Three specific characters that interested me were the pardoner, the wife of bath, and the knight. The pardoner had many distinct things about him that made him unique. He is a really greedy person, that only thinks of himself. The way he makes his living is both deceiving and inconsiderate. He is in a high social class because of his variety of wealth. His appearance was "that of Jesus" and had long yellow hair. I believe his character is a priest or a pastor.


The wife of bath is also very unique. She had a lot of money, and was in a high social class. She had several husbands, but they all left her because she was so annoying. She is not the prettiest woman, and that is a reason why she cannot keep a husband. She made all of her clothes, and sold them to make money. She also travels to long distant lands.


The knight was a very honorable character. He was looked at as the most noble person there was. He always killed his foe, and was incredibly brave. He had a downfall though. He is full of himself, and very confident. Everyone does look up to him, but he looks at himself as a god.


C2) The men in the Canterbury Tales video are wearing street clothes and two of them were wearing hats. One of them was wearing a bucket hat, and the other was wearing a sideways hat. They looked like urban school teachers.


C3) The narrators voice sounds very close to a Russian or Germanic accent. He over pronounced his S sounds, and sounded very eerie. The emphasis on these words tell us that the narrator typically wouldn't be a guy to mess around with.


C4) In the Pardoner's Tale the tale of greed killing all three of the men in their search for death is ironic and terrible. They found death because of their search for gold. This was ironic because the pardoner takes things for his own "indulgences". The pardoner is a hypocrite, and Chaucer portrays this story to show how the pardoner does not have many morals.


C5) 1. What scenes are being depicted in each panel? 2. Create a conversation (RAFT style) between Chaucer and the Pardoner as they discuss the image (particularly the right panel).

1) Each panel has a different and unique meaning. The panels stand for the past, present, and future. The left one shows older ways of life. The middle one depicts a utopian society without many flaws. The future is a barren wasteland with chaotic meaning.

Eric Sanford said...

Eric Sanford
AP English
Beowulf Section

B1. A caesura is a complete pause in a line of poetry or music. A masculine caesura will be followed immediately by a stresses syllable, while a feminine caesura will not. Caesurae in Old English are commonly found in the middle of a line, separating it into two halves. In Beowulf, caesurae are used very frequently in order to create rhythm. The caesurae in Beowulf separate four stressed syllables in each line, coming after the first two stresses and before the next two. A specific example from the text would be “son of Scyld, in the Scandian lands”. The caesura in this line comes between “Scyld” and “in”, with the stressed syllables (underlined) of the line being “son”, “Scyld”, “Scandian” and “lands”. In this case, the caesura was indicated by a comma, but in other cases it could be represented by a different punctuation, or not at all.

B2. Kenning is the use of figurative language rather than a concrete noun.
One example of kenning in Beowulf is the use of the phrase “whale-path” instead of “sea” or “ocean”. Another example is the use of the phrase “master mead-house” to take the place of a dining hall. A third example of kenning is the phrase “Hell-Runes”, which means “sorcerers of Hell. All three of these examples use a more complicated means of describing things. The best example of this is probably the use of “whale-path”, which seems to be an unnecessarily complex phrase to convey a simple message, but the use of figurative language over literal meanings helps to makes the poem more stylistic.

B3. Beowulf was initially conceived in a time when the culture of the Anglo-Saxon peoples was, comparatively, barbaric and savage, and is therefore rooted in these somewhat primitive beliefs. A high value was placed on strength, valor, and especially victory in battle, as is shown strongly throughout the text. One example of this is the quote “Now Beowulf bode in the burg of the Scyldings,/ leader beloved… to the chieftain of clansmen”. This quote shows that Beowulf is a well-respected leader of his clan, most likely following many brave endeavors. However, as time progressed, Christianity began to permeate the Anglo-Saxon culture, replacing the battle-oriented honors with spiritual beliefs in the Christian God, and the morals set forth in the Bible. It is this Christian influence which inspired lines such as “whom heaven sent / to favor the folk”, and "Tis time that I fare from you. Father Almighty/ in grace and mercy guard you well”, which refer to Christian beliefs.

Eric Sanford said...

Eric Sanford
Canterbury Tales Section Part 1

C1. a. The Pardoner has long waxy yellow hair, no beard, and shiny eyes, with a voice that sounds like a goat. He carries a sack which contains, according to him, the Virgin Mary’s veil, a piece of sail used by St. Peter, a cross, and a jar of pig bones. He uses these false holy items in order to prove his own holiness in order to be given payment to pardon people’s sins. In order to continue this scam, he joins in with the crowd in their merriment, hoping to procure some of their silver in exchange for redemption.
b. The Monk is a fat man with bulging eyes, who is known for his love of hunting. He disregards his own faith in order to maintain this hobby, because “hunters cannot be holy men” according to the old books he was expected to follow. He believes that he should serve the world by being in it, rather than by pouring over old texts like the other monks. He owned many horses and Greyhounds to assist him in his hunting. He wears grey furs, most likely from animals he himself had hunted down.
c. The Wife of Bath is a respectable, high-class woman who is talented at making clothes. Despite that fact that she is partly deaf and has a gap in her teeth, she has become skilled in the ways of love, and has married five times. She usually wears seemingly expensive clothing, and extravagant headdresses which appear to weigh at least ten pounds.

C2. One MC is wearing sunglasses and a red Dr. Pepper shirt, another is wearing a collared shirt with brown stripes, and the third is wearing a black shirt with white text giving a high school name and “Japanese Club 2005”.

C3. At first, this audio reading of the Introduction sounded like a lot of gibberish, completely alien to me. But after a few repeated listenings in sync with reading the text of the passage, I began to make the connections between the Old English root words and their Modern English counterparts. Several words are spelt and pronounced very similarly to their modern translations, such as “hooly”-holy, “smale”-small, “straunge”-strange, and “droghte”-drought. However, as many, if not more, words are completely unfamiliar. The emphasis on certain words helps to determine their importance in sentences, identifying the subjects from the verbs, etc.

Ryan McKenney said...

B1: caesura is a break between words within a metrical foot, it will casually occur near the middle of a poetic line it can also occur at the beginning or ending in a poem. An example of caesura in Beowulf is “toward that gold shinning hall he had visited hrothgars”

B2: A kenning is a compound expression in old English and has a metaphorical meaning. A couple examples include War Gear which means armor, bone cage is a rib cage/chest area and third example I found was worm looped patterned which is chain mail.

B3: Old English is infused with a curious blend of the traditions and values of Anglo-Saxon culture and the rise of Christianity throughout Beowulf. The Anglo-Saxons were a barbaric group of people that pilgrimaged any village in sight. Their speech and language normally was vulgar terms that are related to war in some type of way. An example of this language includes.”To hrothgar was given such a glory of war such an honor of combat that all his kiln obeyed him gladly and respected him with all their heart.
The Canterbury tales
The Pardoner, The knight and The miller are the three characters I picked. The pardoners granted papal indulgences-reprives foam penance in exchange for charitable donations to the church. Many pardoners including this one collected profits for themselves. Chaucers pardoners excel in fraud, carrying a bag full of fake relics. The knight Is the first pilgrim that chancre describes in the general prologue and the teller of the first tale, the knight represents the ideal of a medieval christian man at arms he participated in no less than fifteen of the great crusades of his era, Brave experienced and prudent the narrator admires him greatly. Finally The Miller Who is stout and brawny also has a wart on his nose and a big mouth both literally and figuratively. He threatens the hosts notion of propriety when he drunkenly insists on telling the second tale. He tells a tale that is somewhat blasphemous ridiculing religious clerks.

The rappers voice in the rap sounds very old and doesn't like there speaking english it sounds like there talking in a different language because of old english. They pronounce all words different and have different tones of voices for a lot of the weird sayings they say.The clothes they wear are very general old clothes that people would wear in the old days .

Eric Sanford said...

Eric Sanford
Canterbury Section Part 2

C4. The Pardoner’s Tale, in relation to his persona and role, is painfully ironic because it is a moral tale told by a man without morals. He preaches against greed in the tale, in which three men conspire and succeed in killing one another in order to lay claim to the treasure that they found while on a quest to kill death. The irony of the tale being told by the Pardoner compliments the irony in the tale itself, because as the three men set out to kill death, and end up bringing death to each other, the Pardoner preaches against greed, before asking for silver and gold in exchange for false redemption. I would characterize Chaucer’s tone throughout this tale as being cynical and ironic. This would lead to the conclusion that Chaucer is cynical of religion overall, portraying it as a scam intended to gain money for either the church or a false prophet like the Pardoner.

C5. 1.
a. In the left panel, the Garden of Eden is pictured, with God, Adam and Eve in the focal point of the section, surrounded by a strange but idyllic scene filled with odd animals.
b. In the center panel, the sin filled fields of human life on earth are depicted. Masses of people are depicted as partaking in intentionally lurid, obscene and sinful acts. Many of the Seven Deadly Sins are depicted in this panel, especially Lust (the numerous sexual acts depicted), as well as gluttony (the giant strawberries and raspberries being eaten), and Sloth (the many reclining figures).
c. In the right panel, the nightmarish Hell is depicted, where the sinners from the center panel are sent in agony after their deaths. This panel contains much chaotic and confusing imagery, evoking dread and terror at what waits for those who willingly sin without remorse. The plethora of oversized or misshapen musical instruments makes the image appear to be filled with a hellish cacophony that is just barely out of our range of hearing, while the many instruments of torture, weapons, and bodies being flayed, devoured, or impaled are meant to resonate deeply with the basic fear of harm to oneself.
2.
Pardoner: It is just as I said it would be, all their sins have led them to damnation eternal.
Chaucer: And what of your sins?
P: I know not the sins of which you speak. I provide redemption to the sinners of the world.
C: You know full well the truth of my words. You take money from the feeble-minded in exchange for a false absolution of their sins. It disgusts me how you and your religion work at this theft, preaching against the mortal sin of greed while pocketing the gold of your followers.
P: Lies! All of it! For that blasphemy, you shall suffer with those sinners in this painting! Unless, of course, you were to make a slight donation to secure your redemption…
C: I have no time for this nonsense. Fare thee well, charlatan.
(Chaucer walks away, leaving the Pardoner dumbfounded. He looks back to the nightmarish panel of the painting nervously before departing.)

Ryan McKenney said...

B1: caesura is a break between words within a metrical foot, it will casually occur near the middle of a poetic line it can also occur at the beginning or ending in a poem. An example of caesura in Beowulf is “toward that gold shinning hall he had visited hrothgars”

B2: A kenning is a compound expression in old English and has a metaphorical meaning. A couple examples include War Gear which means armor, bone cage is a rib cage/chest area and third example I found was worm looped patterned which is chain mail.

B3: Old English is infused with a curious blend of the traditions and values of Anglo-Saxon culture and the rise of Christianity throughout Beowulf. The Anglo-Saxons were a barbaric group of people that pilgrimaged any village in sight. Their speech and language normally was vulgar terms that are related to war in some type of way. An example of this language includes.”To hrothgar was given such a glory of war such an honor of combat that all his kiln obeyed him gladly and respected him with all their heart.
The Canterbury tales
The Pardoner, The knight and The miller are the three characters I picked. The pardoners granted papal indulgences-reprives foam penance in exchange for charitable donations to the church. Many pardoners including this one collected profits for themselves. Chaucers pardoners excel in fraud, carrying a bag full of fake relics. The knight Is the first pilgrim that chancre describes in the general prologue and the teller of the first tale, the knight represents the ideal of a medieval christian man at arms he participated in no less than fifteen of the great crusades of his era, Brave experienced and prudent the narrator admires him greatly. Finally The Miller Who is stout and brawny also has a wart on his nose and a big mouth both literally and figuratively. He threatens the hosts notion of propriety when he drunkenly insists on telling the second tale. He tells a tale that is somewhat blasphemous ridiculing religious clerks.

The rappers voice in the rap sounds very old and doesn't like there speaking english it sounds like there talking in a different language because of old english. They pronounce all words different and have different tones of voices for a lot of the weird sayings they say.The clothes they wear are very general old clothes that people would wear in the old days .

Anonymous said...

John Cormier
AP English
Period A
Part 1
1B. A caesura is a complete pause in a line of poetry or in a musical composition. An example of this in Beowulf would be the first lines of the poem “LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped,” (pg. 5). The line resolves into two basic phrases, “So! The Spear-Danes” and “in days long sped.” Between these is the caesura. An Old English bard would have paused lightly between these two half-lines as indicated by the commas that divide the line into parts. This was done to increase the importance of the line to the setting of the story.
2B. A kenning is a type of imagery that employs figurative language in the form of a compound in place of a more concrete single-word noun. One example of Kenning in Beowulf is in the opening line were the poem with the “people-kings of spear-armed Danes” (pg. 5). This is kenning for a human (as a opposed to mythical) kings who lead war bands full of Danish spearmen. However it is much more poetic and epic to phase it the way Beowulf did. Another example of kenning is the “the breaker-of-rings” (pg. 6). This is of course kenning because it can easily be stated as the king or chieftain as the annotations describe to us. A final example of kenning in Beowulf is the phase “the sea-wood he sought” (pg. 11). Again this is kenning because the noun ship is replaced by the compound word sea-wood.
3B. It is hard to ignore the Christian and pagan elements of Beowulf. As the readers are first told “how the Almighty made the earth” (pg. 8) in a not all dissimilar to the way God creates the earth in the bible yet in Beowulf’s creation story there is also the very Anglo-Saxon “Etins and elves and evil-spirits” (pg. 8). These religious elements have been uniquely combined in the poem to define the heroic warrior, Beowulf, and the evil menace, Grendel's mother. The reader is introduced to Grendel's mother through her lineage. “From [Cain] sprang many a devil sent by fate” (pg. 43). From this quotation alone we can see the fusion of Christian and pagan elements. The Old Testament character Cain and the pagan idea of fate have been merged to characterize Grendel's mother. Beowulf himself is defined in terms of Anglo-Saxon culture. Beowulf says “fate often saves the undoomed man when his courage is good” (pg. 34) just after a “signal of God, the sea became still” (pg. 34) saving the warrior from sea-monsters. The Christian God has given man free will; therefore what will happen to man is not controlled by fate, but it is controlled by God.

Anonymous said...

John Cormier
AP English
Period A
Part 2
1C. The Knight was in Chaucer’s time an important member of medieval society as only the lords and kings were higher than them. The Knight is the person of highest social standing on the pilgrimage which is why Chaucer’s narrator introduces him first as it pays respect to his position of power. Chaucer then produces to create the ideal Christian knight in this character. He is a modest hero of the Crusades who “from the moment that he first began To ride about the world, loved chivalry, Truth, honour, freedom and all courtesy.”. While even his looks give off a vibe of that of a calm seasoned veteran, who’s seen it all as all he was wearing was “A tunic of simple cloth he possessed Discoloured and stained by his habergeon”. He wasn’t in dress uniform or full plate just in his stained tunic.
The Shipman a sailor turned ship captain and is according to Chaucer’s narrator the most skilled from here to Spain. Chaucer of course describes in such a way that it gives the Shipman a sense of well-traveled old salt. He is described as being more at home on the deck of ship than on the back of a horse. Which makes sense since most of trade even today goes by sea not land so he would be unaccustomed to riding a horse. He is of course not as merciful or noble as the knight so he is not above a little larceny or piracy as we see him steal wine from the merchant. This is farther reinforced by Chaucer describing how in a sea fight he does not take prisoners but instead makes them walk the plank.
The Pardoner was a member of the catholic clergy who sold indulgences or pardons to “Some simple parson”. Chaucer obviously dislikes this practice and finds it repulsive along with the selling of false relics. So he makes the Pardoner have an unattractive appearance that he believes is fashionable “This pardoner had hair as yellow as wax, But smooth it hung as does a strike of flax; In driplets hung his locks behind his head, Down to his shoulders which they overspread; But thin they dropped, these strings, all one by one. He had no hood, it was for sport and fun,”. Through this description we great an idea that the Pardoner is genuinely pleased with the type of person he is even if he is corrupt and possible a eunuch.
2C. First MC is wearing sun glasses, jeans, and a Dr. Pepper T-shirt. One of co-rappers is wearing a tan hat, collared shirt, and dark jeans while the third rapper is wearing blue and white hat, black school shirt and jeans.

Anonymous said...

John Cormier
AP English
Period A
Part 3
3C. The narrator sounds at first to be speaking another langue like not to different from the way French flows together with all the vowels and very few hard consents. At times it was even hard to tell were one sentence ended and another began. Yet the narrators emphasis on the subjects of the sentence did help me decode the meaning.
4C. The Pardoner’s Tale is a sermon against corruption, sinfulness and most of all greed. The Irony in this story is created by the fact that the Pardoner practices all of the things that his story says will kill you and sends you to hell or purgatory. Even the theme of his story which is Radix malorum est Cupiditas, or greed is the root of all evil which if this is to believed makes the Pardoner evil. Though the Pardoner seems to not regret his actions as even after telling the pilgrims that his relics are fake he still tries to sell them to the Host. This leads me to believe that Chaucer views religion as corrupt and hypocritical as the Pardoner thus one should try to live life as they wish to.
5C.1. The painting “The Garden of Earthly Delights by Bosch” is divide into three parts. Each part is a different representation of biblical locations. The first third from the left is clearly depicting the Garden of Eden. The three figures in this plane each represent a person from the gospel starting with the nude man who is Adam which of course makes the women Eve while the clothed figure is God himself. Also if you look at the animals they are all free, wild and unhindered. Meanwhile in the middle portrait we have earth with all the carefree people who have taken control of the world. Even the animals and plants have become dominated by the people or at least abused by them. I believe that this could be one of the cursed cities that God later destroys with the great flood. Finally in the third panel we have hell where all the corrupt people are being punished by the animals they once abused. All while those that at top seen to be being punished by having to drown in ice water which could be a reference to the great flood that sent them to hell.
2. The Pardoner: It a beautiful piece is it not?
Chaucer: Yes, the detail is truly awe inspiring.
The Pardoner: That and it is simply good to see the greed of people being punished by God. It is a shame at the same time though they could have just bought a pardon or relic from me and avoided their fate.
Chaucer: Oh, yeah I am positive that that would have saved them especially if it was you selling them the pardons.
The Pardoner: What do you mean by that? MY pardons are from the pope himself thus from god himself.
Chaucer: How can someone like you forgive sins when you use your ability to forgive these sins to become sinful yourself? Your just as sinful if not more sinful then any who are in the right part of this painting.
The Pardoner: This is false I am nothing like the sinners in this work as I am doing the work of God regardless. Just because I sell fake relics does not mean that I am not helping the people I sell to though admittedly these sales do improve my own fortune.
Chaucer: See that makes you greedy like every other man who holds your position. Which makes you evil since as you yourself said “greed is the root of all evil”.

Jensen Bramwell said...

B1. Beowulf is full of many literary devices, one including a caesura. A caesura is an unexplained break or pause in the middle of a line, and it is prevalent throughout Beowulf. For example, “and long he ruled in fame with all folk” has a line break in between “ruled” and “in” in the text. Unlike the other line breaks that have at least a comma before continuing to the next line, this particular line break has no grammar before. This is considered a caesura because of the unexplainable use of the break. It doesn’t add nor take anything from the piece of work.
B2. Kenning is another device utilized throughout Beowulf. By definition, it is a conventional phrase that is used in place of the real name for a person or thing. Examples of kenning in Beowulf include, “sea-wood”, “ale-cup”, and “blade of battle”. Each of the previous phrases are more drawn out based on the object’s use compared to the way one might say it today. “Sea-wood” was a word for ship or boat because they were made of wood and belonged in the sea. “Ale-cup”, or glass, described the cup to hold their beer. And “blade of battle” is a way to say sword.
B3. The Anglo-Saxon values focused on the “warrior code” and the ideas of honor and courage. On the other hand, the Christianity side highlighted the dependence on faith. Beowulf is able to blend these two values together as seen throughout the piece. For example, when the “'twas judgment of God” is mentioned, it shows the Christian values and their belief in God. However, a line like, “how it were best for bold-hearted men against harassing terror to try their hand” shows the Anglo-Saxon side of things by honoring the bravery and courage of a man.

Jensen Bramwell said...

C1. The Wife of Bath is described as over the top and very empowered. When she is introduced the first few things mentioned included her wide hips that correlate to her wide sexual desire and her impatience that ensued if someone were to cut in line. Also, the fact that she had been married 5 times and had gone to Jerusalem 3 times adds to the fact that her character sounds exaggerated. It was very difficult for people to travel to Jerusalem and for her to accomplish it three times is extraordinary. Her depiction puts her in a high class and is added to when her clothing is described as over the top as well.
The Plowman is portrayed as a very giving character that gives his all into others. His low class but hard work results in him giving his 10% away. He is surrounded by peace and doing good because of his high spirituality. The Plowman character shows that you don’t have to have a lot to give a lot.
The Pardoner is a very deceiving character to begin with. His role is to forgive people of their sins for money, but all he really cares about is the money aspect of it. He is said to have “hair yellow as wax” that is thin and clumpy. There is also a relationship hinted at between the Pardoner and the Summoner. The Pardoner is always dressed well and has the best fashion thanks to his act of stealing from the people who want to be pardoned.
C2. The first man is wearing a brown striped button down and a baseball hat. The second man is wearing a black shirt that says something regarding a “Japanese Club” and also a blue and gray fishing hat. The final man is wearing a red Dr. Pepper shirt and sunglasses.

Jensen Bramwell said...

C3. The narrator has a very calming voice and a rhythmic tone as well. The narrator’s pronunciation is unclear and prevents the listener from completely understanding the story told. However, the accent does tell the listener that it is being told from a previous time period.
C4. The Pardoner is supposed to be honest and trustful for he is the one that pardons people of their sins. However, he is greedy and only cares about himself. He preaches about the importance of morals and becoming sin free, but then only works by the act of sin. The irony in the actual tale is the fact that the three men were only out for the money and to make their lives better and they all ended up dead. This is complemented by the Pardoner because he does the same thing. Chaucer’s tone in the Pardoner’s Tale could be considered mocking. He mocks the idea of religion and morals through the character of the Pardoner. The fact that he scams people out of money yet preaches morals shows that Chaucer is doubtful about the idea of religion.
C5. 1- In the left panel, it looks like a portrayal of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. God has taken Eve by the wrist and is introducing her to Adam and they are surrounded by animals of all kind. Some of these animals are mythical, and some atypical for such a close proximity. In the center panel, it somewhat reflects some of the pictures in the left, however the number of people animals and fruits have multiplied. There are a few lakes or pools filled with men and women surrounded by animals of all kinds. The humans and animals are roughly the same size and the fruit shown is larger as well. In the right panel, there is a much darker feel that may symbolize Hell. There are fires and animals eating people. A man that has become a tree and many other images like that show the abnormality of the image.
2- Chaucer: Look at all of those people suffering in Hell. That can’t be accurate! How can one end up in a place like that? Sinning can’t get you there, can it?
Pardoner: Of course not! The fools who come to me to get their sins pardoned are just wasting my time and their money. Everybody sins and I don’t actually pardon them.
Chaucer: Yes, you must be right. I mean small sins are just overlooked and we will never end up there.
Pardoner: we are all set, no need to worry.

Catherine Rafuse said...

B1. A caesura is a break in a line. It shows how elements of poetry were displayed so long ago. “by the mast the mighty one. Many a treasure”. This is a caesura because a sentence ends in the middle of a line instead of the end. Earls is the last word and it goes right into since on the same line.
B2. Kenning is imagery that substitutes a simple word for an enhanced description. Breaker-of-rings is a kenning for king. Kings are wealthy and they have many rings. The next example of kenning is ‘The relic-of-files’ which is a kenning for sword. The relic of the flies is symbolic of killing. Flies tend to surround corpses after they've been killed .To kill someone they used a sword, making ‘the relic-of-flies’ a kenning for sword. The last example is a ‘weaver-of-peace’ for wife. Wives used to weave the clothes for people in their family and they also used to be the peace maker.
B3. ‘LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won!’ These lines talk about kings, spears, and honor. Anglo- Saxon culture was the warrior code and the warrior code was all about kings, spears, and honor. Scyld was sent ‘to the shelter of God’ when he was on his deathbed. ’The shelter of God’ had been a Christian place. ‘God, gave him grace that he got revenge sole with his sword in stress and need.’ God helped him out by giving him grace, even though the dragon was killing him. The rise of Christianity was when people really started looking to God to help them.
C1. The Pardoner is described by Chaucer as a man with yellow hair who wore a hat. His voice sounded like a goat’s and his face was freshly shaven. Chaucer doesn’t trust the Pardoner and thinks he lacks grace. He made a lot of money off people and sung to them. He was in the clergy class. Chaucer views him as a thief, but thinks he’s good in church. He is a good lesson and story teller. He has skills of taking people’s money and Chaucer admires this about him.
To Chaucer, the Monk is a tough, manly man. He likes the Monk and classifies him in the Clergy class. He wears expensive fur and dresses like a hunter, and he is also bald. The Monk is materialistic and only cares about traveling, clothes, and good food. He’s not a good monk, but also not a bad person. He definitely has money seeing as he has his own stables. He is the total opposite of what you would view a monk to look like. Chaucer sees him as a good person and genuinely likes him.
The Clerk, skinny like his horse, was from Oxford. The Clerk studied philosophy and was very non-materialistic. He wasn't rich, but would rather have books about philosophy over gold and riches. He cared about his studies than about anything physical other than books. He never spoke unless it was necessary. Chaucer thought he was a moral man and that he was a good teacher. He was part of the clergy class because he was a cleric, a student, and a scholar. He didn’t mind being poor because he thought there were more important things than money.

Catherine Rafuse said...

C2. One of the MC’s is wearing a bucket hat with a black shirt and jeans. Another one is wearing a striped long sleeve shirt. The last one is wearing a red short-sleeve shirt with jeans and sunglasses.
C3. The narrator’s voice has an old accent. He is clear when he talks and uses a certain tone to get his point across. He has a rhythm to his voice.
C4. The Pardoner’s tale is painfully ironic to his persona because he steals everyone’s money and is extremely greedy, but in his tale he relates greed to death. He’s being hypocritical by doing exactly what describes in his story as something that leads to death. This conflicts with the irony in the tale itself because he tells a story about how being greedy and doing anything for money will get you nowhere good, but that’s exactly what he does. Chaucer’s attitude towards religion and morality is that being moral and religious is the only way for you to be a good person. If you’re not moral or religious then you’re a bad person that bad things will probably happen to.
C5. 1. The first panel shows Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. It’s showing how simple things were during that time. It shows what life was like before people started sinning. Everything is very calm and there are only a few people. The middle panel is showing Earth and life how it is now. There are many more people and animals and they aren’t being completely pure and are committing sins. Everyone in the picture is doing exactly what they want. The last panel is sending a message about what will happen when you commit these sins. It shows a world full of chaos and mischief and the path you will go down if you continue with the actions in the middle panel.
2. Chaucer: Pardoner, what do you think of this painting?
Pardoner: Well I certainly like the last panel.
Chaucer: How could you like that one? It shows death and destruction, there’s nothing good about that!
Pardoner: Those are the people that didn’t pay me for their sins. They deserve death and destruction.
Chaucer: Then how do you feel about the middle panel?
Pardoner: Well the people in the middle should really thank me. The reason they are happy and can sin is because I give them a chance to make up for what they did.

Anonymous said...

Cassandra Goyette
Beowulf
B1)
A caesura is a pause or break between a lines, an interruption. In Beowulf there are many examples of a caesura one would be on page seven lines one and two they are; “Heorogar, then Hrothgar, then Halga brave; and I heard that -- was -- 's queen.” The double hyphen is the symbol used to represent a caesura in this line there are two examples both at the end. “I heard that -- was -- ‘s queen.” There are two pauses in the line, each would be a caesura.
B2) Kenning is a compound expression in Old English and Old Nourse poetry with a metaphorical meaning.
Ex1) “On the breast of the boat, the breaker-of-rings, by the mast the mighty one.” The hyphenated expression “The breaker-of-rings.” Is kenning because it is another way of referencing a king that has taken off his golden wristlets or rings, and present them as a reward to his subordinates.
Ex2) “Its hard edge failed the noble at need, yet had known of old strife hand to hand, and had helmets cloven, doomed men's fighting-gear. First time, this, for the gleaming blade that its glory fell.” Using “fighting-gear.” Instead of body armor is an example of kenning because it has more meaning and explaining what the armor is for. Rather than just body armor, where you don’t know if it is used for fight, clothing or just to keep you warm. “Fighting-gear” is two words put together that tell you the meaning.
Ex3) “Save only the head and that hilt withal blazoned with jewels.” Hilt is another word for the handle of an object. Using the word “hilt” is kenning because it is what the handle of swords were called in medieval times, and it gets the point across that is was beautiful and jewel incrusted.
B3) One example of the rise of Christianity in Beowulf is the following quote. "The fight would have ended straightaway if God had not guarded me.” Beowulf thinks of God as his protector, and believes it was God that saved him during the battle. That if not for him he would be dead, that he earned gods protection by being a noble warrior which adds the mythological aspect to it.
One example of Anglo-Saxon values in Beowulf is. “Uprose the mighty one, ringed with his men, brave band of thanes: some bode without, battle-gear guarding, as bade the chief. Then hied that troop where the herald led them, under Heorot's roof: [the hero strode,] hardy 'neath helm, till the hearth he neared. Beowulf spake, -- his breastplate gleamed, war-net woven by wit of the smith.” This quote depicts Beowulf as this courageous, titan looking hero. It follows the Anglo-Saxon values by describing how honorable he looks and is before heading off for war. Also that these troops or followers he has demonstrate the value of loyalty, which is another main Anglo-Saxon value. The quote also gives Beowulf a sense of valor.

Anonymous said...

Cassandra Goyette
C1a) The first pilgrim Chaucer introduces to us is the Knight, that is of the upper-class. The narrator is obviously very fond of the knight by the way he talks about him, he admires him. In fact the first adjective used to describe the knight is “Worthy.” But he highlights the knights main qualities; Chivalry, honesty, honour, freedom and courtesy. Than highlights his respectful view of his military career, especially the battles and voyages he has gone on. He describes him as wearing a tunic outfit, with a chain mail coat overall a well-dressed individual. We can conclude that Chaucer admires this pilgrim for his virtues and his profession.
C1b) Another one of the pilgrims Chaucer describes is The Pardoner. A pardoner is a person who forgives sins, relieves you of your wrong doings, who is paid by and works with the church. This pardoner is intriguing because he is uses his profession for personal benefit. The “donations” given to a pardoner are typically giving to the church, but Chaucer tells us that this pardoner has more money than he should. And that leads us to believe he is a shady, untrustworthy character. Since the pardoner has more money than he should we can conclude that he is of the lower-class. He is also a hypocrite who misleads others of his personality, by tell them he is trustworthy or honest. The Pardoner has a high voice, no facial hair, and is not among the attractive type.
C1c) The Wife of Bath is one of two women that Chaucer describes within to group of twenty-nine pilgrims. She is deaf in one ear and is described as “A worthy women all her life.” Wearing red stockings and finely woven attire, with a gap between her two front teeth. She has been married five different times and have traveled to Jerusalem three total times. She is said to have large hips, and a lot of experience with “love.” The way her wardrobe is described tells us that she likes expensive, extravagant items, therefore she is rich and of the upper-class.
C2) One of the Mc’s is wearing a red dr.pepper shirt, jeans and sunglasses. The second MC is wearing a black T-shirt with writing on it, brown/black pants and one ugly plaid sun hat. The third MC is wearing a slightly sideways white base-ball cap, a striped dress-shirt with variations of brown, and black/brownish pants.
C3) The narrators voice is firm but not forceful, fluent but hard to comprehend. As soon as I heard the recording start playing I immediately thought the speaker was Irish, or a variation of Scottish. I believe it was in another language because of how strong the accent was. The way he was pronouncing the words made it difficult to discern the words. Having that strong of an accent and speaking that fluently make it hard to understand the passage but putting emphasis on some words help distinguish them.

Anonymous said...

Cassandra Goyette
C4) The Pardoner’s tale is about three men who get intoxicated, and decided to find death. They stumble upon an old man who tells them death is over the hill, but instead they come across riches. They send one back to acquire food, wine and items to transport the riches back. But the two left with the riches plot to kill the one they sent back, and the one they sent back buys poison to take the riches for himself. In the end all three end up dying therefore the moral is don’t be greedy, or greed can kill you. It’s Ironic that the Pardoner tells this story because he himself is greedy and swindles money from people. He is basically preaching against one of his defining characteristics. This irony actually compliments another form of irony found within the tale. Which is the fact that these men went looking for death and end up finding death by killing off each other. Chaucer’s tone shown through his juxtaposition for the Pardoner’s tale and his personality is a proud/clever tone, it seems to me like he is fond of the way he was able to contrast the Pardoner to his tale. I can conclude that Chaucer doesn’t respect religion and mocks it by creating the Pardoner, and his tale to reinforce his opinion towards it. Morality I believe Chaucer doesn’t create the pilgrims to follow the system of values for the time period, but at the same time creates pilgrims that do to contrast and create controversy between them.
C5.1) The first panel contains three people that could possibly be God, Adam, and Eve from the bible. Everything looks like it is just starting out, just being created. I believe panel number one is showing the creation of the world as believed by Christians, essentially the story of Adam and Eve. The second panel is showing the next stage of human evolution, in the bible. The Human race is just starting out and learning how to survive and co-exist with the land and animals. There is also some interracial aspects of living shown, with the darker human figures smiling and living happily alongside the white figures. The third panel is showing what I think is the industrial age of human history. With all of our strange new discovery’s, inventions and new forms of art. It’s more populated, has more humanistic objects like music and art. The third panel can also represent hell, or how chaotic things can get specific images on this panel represent this. For instance the upper part of the picture that is darker than the rest portrays demonic silhouettes along with a dark satanic looking gate with a crowd of people being herded into it. Along with the lower part of the panel that shows animals eating humans along with several of them being tortured.
C5.2)) Chaucer: “Isn’t the third Panel Interesting?”
Pardoner: “Why, yes it is. I quite like how it portrays hell, it really captures the odd sins people do and what will happen to them in order to make them pay.”
Chaucer: “How can you be sure it portrays hell and your silly Christian myths? It obviously shows how the lower, middle and upper class work. Showing the lower class working for their living, how the middle class work and live in communities, and how the upper class live with extravagant things but will indefinitely pay for their crimes.”
Pardoner: “The painting clearly show people suffering for the sins they have committed.”
Chaucer: “HAH! You want to talk about sinning? I guess paying for your crimes and getting paid for your crimes are two different things.”
Pardoner: “You are impossible I cannot, coherently speak with you. Always skipping to conclusions of criticizing my beliefs!”
Chaucer: “Now I regret ever writing up your character along with his personality, if I can’t have a decent argument with you!”
Pardoner: “Fine, this is over.”

Mike Travers said...

B1. What is a caesura? Find an example of a caesura from the text and defend your selection (paragraph).
A caesura is a break between words within a metrical foot.An example of a causura is “gave him gifts: a good king he!” This line contains a caesura. It is caesura because there is a break in the middle of the line.
B2. What is kenning? Find 3 examples of kenning and defend your selections (paragraph).
A kenning is a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. Examples of kennings are War-gear = armor,Whale-Road = ocean and Word-hoard = brain. Beowulf is a story that was long told before we had a written language. Once old English came out, the story was written. The examples are all metaphors.
B3. Beowulf is indicative of Old English and is infused with a curious blend of the traditions and values of Anglo-Saxon culture and the rise of Christianity. Quote and discuss passages from the text that represent this unique dynamic.
The book was written in poetry. “Forth he fared at the fated moment, sturdy Scyld to the shelter of God.” People in the Anglo- Saxon culture believed in fate. Scyld was seeking the shelter of God which led to the rise of Christianity.


For The Canterbury Tales:

C1: Click here to access the text. Read The Prologue and the Introduction in their entirety. Chaucer will introduce you to each of his pilgrims; choose 3 of them (one must be The Pardoner). Then, use this link to read the descriptions of characters. Discuss how Chaucer characterizes them: their class, appearance, character, etc. (3 paragraphs).
The Pardner is a greedy man. He has long blonde hair. He is skinny. He forgives peoples sins for money and keeps the money. He tries to look good by telling his tail. He is a hypocrite. The Pardner thinks that he is not going to Hell.

The Monk was short, fat, greedy,rolling eyes. He liked hunting. He liked having a luxury lifestyle. He has expensive horse dogs, clothes and jewelry.He was a manly man. He was overfed. He was a modern, not traditional religious figure.

The Knight did not simply express truth,honor, freedom and courtesy. Instead he “ loves them.”His appearance is humility like. There is a small separation between the Knight and the role that knights usually do. He is a worry warrier. He is wise. He is the man. He does not brag about himself.


C2: Click here to check out a dope rap version of The Prologue. Describe the attire of the MC's to verify your visit. There a guy who is wearing a black t-shirt. He is wearing a blue/ white hat. He is wearing black pants.There is a guy with a red Dr. Pepper t-shirt. He is wearing sunglasses. He is wearing blue jeans.There is also a guy with a brown colored shirt.He is wearing dark blue jeans.

Mike Travers said...

C3: Click here to hear an audio recording of The Prologue in Middle English. Describe the narrator's voice and your impressions regarding how pronunciation, accent and emphasis help you decode the passage.
The narrator’s voice sounds like he is not a native English speaker. He could possible have a European accent. Most of the words he spoke I could not understand. I do not like the way he pronounced words. Middle English sounds like another language.
C4: Click here to access the Pardoner's Tale. Read his tale (lines 375-682).Compose a response to the following prompt: How is the Pardoner's Tale, in relation to the Pardoner's persona and role, painfully ironic? How does this irony conflict or complement the irony within the Tale itself? How might you characterize Chaucer's tone as echoed through his juxtaposition of the Pardoner's story and personality? What might we conclude about Chaucer's attitude toward religion and morality?
The pardner is still a greedy man. He overestimates his intelligence. He underestimates the pilgrims intelligence. The pardner has a drinking problem. The tale is painfully ironic because the young men seek death only to find him in a treasure that had made him. This iron conflicts the iron within the Tale itself because the three guys are trying to do the right thing but one of them gets caught in something. One of them tries to poison the other two. The pardner tried to collect money but failed to. Chaucer tone is nice but it seems that he does not like the pardner. In morality, the pardner is not the typical pardner you would expect him to be. Chaucer do not like religion. Chaucer believes in morality but the pardner do not.
C5: Click here to access a link to Hieronymous Bosch's painting "The Garden of Earthly Delights". Synthesis prompt: Bosch is a Dutch painter who lived and worked shortly after the publication of the Tales. You will be able to zoom in a bit. Examine the triptych and respond to the following questions in paragraph form. 1. What scenes are being depicted in each panel?
Each panel has their own scene that is going on. In the left panel, there is Adam and Eve. The world is in peace. It is near the beginning of the creation of the world. In the middle panel, people are doing what ever they want to do. It was all fun and games until the world became corrupted in the right panel. In the right panel, you can see destruction. There a war going on. Evil has taken its place.Society had become messed up.
2. Create a conversation (RAFT style) between Chaucer and the Pardoner as they discuss the image (particularly the right panel).
P: “Oh my gosh. I need to change my ways.”
C: “ You definitely do. That will happen if you do not change your ways.”
P: “ I will use the money I stole to pay the bills for our church and donate money to the poor.”
C: “ Money is nice but more auctions are needed.”
P: “ I will begin offering free counseling with donations accepted. I will only speak the truth for now on. I will try to stop being an alcoholic.”
C: “ Do you promise?”
P: “ I promise!!!”

m.eisnor said...

Marissa Eisnor
AP Lit A Block
B1. A caesura is a break in a metrical foot between words in a Greek or Latin verse. In a modern verse it is a pause in the middle of a line. An example on a caesura in Beowulf is on page twenty “Winter's storm rolled the rough waves. In realm of sea a sennight strove ye.”. The period after “rough waves” adds a dramatic pause, adding emphasis to the nature of the waves and the realm of the sea.

B2. Kenning originated from Old English and Norse Poetry where there is a compound expression in poetry with metaphorical meaning. An example of this in Beowulf is on page six “No ship have I known so nobly dight with weapons of war and weeds of battle, with breastplate and blade: on his bosom lay a heaped hoard that hence should go far o'er the flood with him floating away.”. Another is on page eight “He sang who knew tales of the early time of man, how the Almighty made the earth, fairest fields enfolded by water, set, triumphant, sun and moon for a light to lighten the land-dwellers, and braided bright the breast of earth with limbs and leaves, made life for all of mortal beings that breathe and move.”. Page nine has another example of kenning “ The mighty chief, atheling excellent, unblithe sat, labored in woe for the loss of his thanes, when once had been traced the trail of the fiend, spirit accurst: too cruel that sorrow, too long, too loathsome.”. All three of these examples use compound expressions in order to go into depth about rather average things; a ship, singing tales, and a chief.

B3. Anglo Saxons originated from Germanic speaking people, which is where old English comes from. Values of Anglo Saxons include those of honor, bravery, and somewhat violent tendencies. Beowulf too shows these values through the description of great warriors on heroic quests, such as “the evil monsters thronging threatened. With thrust of my sword, the darling, I dealt them due return!”.

"Anglo-Saxon England." Anglo-Saxon England. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Oct. 2014

m.eisnor said...

For The Canterbury Tales,

C1:. The Pardoner (lines 671-716) is a noble man with hair yellow as “wax” which went down to his shoulders. He has a cap on his head and has a backpack in his lap. In the backpack lay pardons and relics brought from a church in Rome, he is apparently religious man. His voice like a “goat” and his face smooth which Chaucer can characterize him as possibly a young man. He sings merrily which shows he is in good spirits.
The Shipman (lines 390-412) appears to be a foil of the Pardoner. His rides in somberly wearing a thick wool cloth sailors wear so they will drown quicker and less agonizing if they fall overboard. With a long beard a dagger hangs from this travelers neck shows that he is a tired and older traveler. Often drinking wine, the man who knows so much about ships and harbors seems to have something he wants to forget.
The Monk (lines 165-207) is a masculine, bald man with bulging eyes who enjoys hunting. He owns hunting greyhounds and likes to go after hare which elegant fur can be seen around the neck and cuffs of his coat. The elegance follows with a wrought gold pin on his coat, soft boots, and in the foods he eats and the amount consumed.

C2: One man has a black tee shirt with white writing on it and a bucket hat, another is wearing a tan baseball hat with a striped shirt and a dark green shirt underneath, the last has sunglasses and a red tee shirt on.

C3: The speakers voice is soft but very hard to understand. The accent is thick and irritating when trying to decode what is being said. At the end of certain words they have a very harsh sound and many words blur together.

C4: I did not heed your advice and plan my time well so I had to choose a brave section to sacrifice to the monster we call time ):

C5: In the far left panel, scenes of what appears to be Adam and Eve. We see two bare figures, a man and woman, and a holy figure in the middle of The Garden Of Eden. Many new creatures seem to be arising from the water and land. In the middle panel it seems to be a bizarre spin on humans living on earth, The theme of people coming out of/going into eggs could symbolize the natural birth and death of man. In the last panel hell and eternal damnation is shown. Horrific disbody and disfigurements of the human anatomy are scattered all over the panel.
(RAFT style????)
The Pardoner: Certainly I will never end up as those poor sinners!
Chaucer: Well have you sinned?
The Pardoner: I have but I have bought countless relics and pardons from all over, even churches in Rome! I ask again my good man, I will never end up as those poor sinners, right?
Chaucer: When you first said that it was a statement, now a question. Do you not trust your faithful objects you spent your hard earned money on to buy and save yourself?
The Pardoner: Why of course I trust them! I bought them from a Church! I did not steal them like some desperate poor man. I bought my pardons like an honest good man!
Chaucer: Is there money in Heaven? What about Hell?
The Pardoner: Sir that is not what ask!
Chaucer: Perhaps one day you will find out.

Anonymous said...

Anna Sweeney
B1. A caesura is a break or pause in the middle of the line. In Beowulf, almost every line is a caesura. There are a lot of interruptions in the reading. The way the story is written causes there to be a lot of stopping in the middle of the line. “…by the mast the mighty one. Many a treasure…” this line is a caesura because of the period. There is a pause in the middle of the line that causes an interruption when reading.
B2. Kenning is a way of forming words together with a metaphorical meaning. Beowulf is written in Old English and uses kenning. One example of kenning is the “breaker-of-rings,” meaning king, which alludes to the king breaking the rings to use as rewards. Another usage of kenning in Beowulf is “whale-path” which pertains to the ocean or a body of water. “Battle-sweat,” in Beowulf is a kenning for blood. In a battle, a lot of blood is shed and seen.
B3. Beowulf talks about God and Christianity a lot. “Forth he fared at the fated moment, sturdy Scyld to the shelter of God. Then they bore him over to ocean's billow, loving clansmen, as late he charged them, while wielded words the winsome Scyld, the leader beloved who long had ruled,” in this they discuss a king Scyld alongside God. Scyld is a very strong and fearless leader and he is talked about with God. They are compared to make Christianity more necessary because it is talked about with their beloved king.
C1. In the prologue of the Canterbury Tales, Chaucer introduces each of the pilgrims. The Pardoner had to do a lot with forgiveness. People in church were given pardons, and reprieves from penance by the Pardoner. The Pardoner would allow people to give money to charity, the poor, or another type of good cause to obtain their indulgence. The Pardoner tells “ignorant” people that if they give money to him for a good cause, they can pay to get rid of their sins, which is against the rules and laws of the church. The Pardoner seems very sly with what he does to try and tell people that they can pay to have their sins go away.
The Summoner- Each pilgrim that Chaucer describes is very sneaky in what they do. The Summoner abuses the use of people’s money that he gets for his position. He lies, blackmails people and takes money from people. The Summoner delivers summons for accused people in court but doesn’t do it honestly. He is supposed to be helping people but he commits every crime that people are accused of.
The Clerk- The Clerk is a member of the clergy that is a student. He seems young and intelligent and was a clerk at Oxford. He became a clerk easily, and spent his time and money on learning other than what most people did. The Clerk was among few that were literate, so he was able to study and be a clerk.
C2. In the Canterbury Tales rap, one man is wearing jeans and a Dr. Pepper shirt with sunglasses, another is wearing a bucket hat with a black shirt and black pants and the last man is wearing a hat sideways, a brown striped shirt and black jeans.
C3. The narrator has a very low voice and an accent while reading. I think his accent sounds like how Chaucer would sound. He puts emphasis on every word and pronounces every syllable more than we would read in our own accent. Since he has an accent, it makes you have to listen to it more than once to understand what he is saying.

Anonymous said...

Doug McKeen
B1) A caesura is an audible pause used in poetry. It can be used to accentuate certain lines and to give the audience a short mental respite.
Now Beowulf bode in the burg of the Scyldings,
leader beloved, and long he ruled
in fame with all folk, since his father had gone
away from the world, till awoke an heir,
haughty Healfdene, who held through life,
sage and sturdy, the Scyldings glad.
Here in this excerpt of Beowulf there are caesurae in lines two through six. When read, the commas make the reader pause before continuing. These are all after similar amounts of syllables; lines two through four are after 5 syllables, and lines five and six are after 4 syllables. This makes it both visibly and audibly apparent that the pauses were formulated.
B2) Kenning is an old way of doing imagery that is very close to being metaphor.

Anonymous said...

Beowulf

B1) What is a caesura? A caesura is a complete pause in a line of poetry or in a musical composition. An example of a caesura would be. Chapter 3 "This is heard in his home Hygelac's thane, great amend Geats, of Grendel's doings." Grendel's attacks were being talked about in the nearby kingdom of the gets. Hygelac, is the ruler of the Geats. This allows the reader to understand the status of Grendel and too ensure that his title of being ruler of the Geats is known by all. Having the caesura be put in this sentence makes the audience have a better idea who the person is.

B2) A kenning is a figurative, usually a compound expression used in place of a name or noun. "Slayer-of-souls" is a kenning for Grendel. Grendel is described as a slayer of souls for his demonic and barbaric way of attacking men, He is a man-eating demon that lives in the land of the Spear-Danes and attacks King Hrothgar's mead-hall, Heorot every evening. Another example of a kenning is the "Breaker-of rings", it is a kenning for king. Kings are wealthy and they have a large quantity of rings to show their wealth. The next example of a kenning is "Wielder-of-Wonder" Which is referring to God, The people of Heorot did not know they could turn to the almighty god, lord of the heavens to ask for help.

B3) "And now the bold one from bands of Geats comrades chose, the keenest of warriors e'er he could find; with fourteen men the sea-wood he sought, and, sailor proved, led them on to the land's confines." These lines are talking about how Hygelac, the King of the Geats was a great warrior and the bravest man alive, no one compared to him and isn't going to stand aside to watch Grendel massacre the Heorots. Anglo-saxon culture was the warrior code and that is all about bravery, kingship, and battle. "God they thanked or passing in peace o'er the paths of the sea." In this line we have the brave men of the Geats reaching the end of the journey and thanking god for a safe voyage. The rise of Christianity is becoming widely spread and known throughout the world and the men of Geats know they need all the help they can get and god has an impact on their success.

- Connor McKenney

Anonymous said...

The Canterbury Tales
C1) The Knight, Which Chaucer characterizes as the noblest of the pilgrims. He embodies military skill, loyalty, honor, generosity and good manners. He belongs to the high social class of the nobility, it is said that the knight has never in all his life, spoken a harsh word to anyone. He has a beautiful horse and he's still wearing a tunic that is still stained with the blood of his last battle, showing that he literally walked straight off the battlefield and into The Canterbury Tales. The Knight displays many traits which make him too good to be true in a sense, but he represents the embodiment of the ideal man as seen by Chaucer.

The Monk, Chaucer describes as a tough, strong man. He likes the Monk and thinks of him as a very fine fellow, he classifies him in the clergy class because of taste in sport and clothes. He wears expensive fur and is a hunter who is also bald. The Monk is materialistic and only cares about clothes, good food and prefers to travel instead of sticking with the monastic ideals he set out with. The man is not necessarily a good monk but may not be a bad man, he has enough traits that are both positive and negative that make Chaucer see him as a good person and genuinely like him.

The Pardoner, is described by Chaucer as a man who is highly untrustworthy and uses his profession to gain wealth and is basically seen as a thief. He has yellow hair that is covered by a hat, his voice sounds like a goat's and his face was freshly shaven. Chaucer does not trust him and thinks he lacks grace and care for him to be working for the church, he is apart of the clergy class even though he cashes in on religion in any way he can. He does this by selling tangible, material objects like whether slips of paper that promise to forgive sins or animal bones that people can string around their necks as charms against the devil. Chaucer knows how the Pardoner gulls people into giving him their money for what they want to hear and he admires this about him.
- Connor McKenney

Anonymous said...

The Canterbury Tales Continued

C2) The attire of the MC's are simple clothing for men, one of the MC's s wearing black t-shirt with jeans and a bucket hat. Another one of the MC's is wearing red t-shirt with jeans and sunglasses, and the last one is wearing a striped long sleeve shirt with jeans and a cap but isn't always wearing it.

C3) The narrator's voice has an old germanic accent to it, I can hear the german heritage in his voice but it is clear enough for me to listen and understand the point the narrator's trying to get across. The tone of his voice is a good reading voice for this because it allows the audio to have rhythm.

C4) The Pardoner's tale is painfully ironic to his persona because of his actions, he steals everybody's money and is very greedy, but in the Pardoner's tale he relate's greed to death. He's being hypocritical by doing exactly what portrays in his story as something that leads to death. This inflicts with the irony in the tale itself because he tells a story about how being greedy and doing what it takes for money will end up getting you nowhere good, but it is exactly what he does. The attitude of Chaucer towards religion and morality is that being moral and religious is the only true way for you to actually be a good person. If you're not moral or religious then you're automatically looked upon as a bad person and bad things will ultimately happen to you.

C5) In the Hieronymous Bosch painting of "The Garden of Earthly Delights" depicts scenes of a serious of unique and mind changing pictures of our world and the naturalism in which the scenes almost appear to be coming to life and coming together as Bosch portrays scenes of half-human creatures, demons, and machines, half-human animals ,but it is said that he used it as simply tools to inflict fear and confusion in his efforts to illustrate the evil of humans. Theres scenes from the paradise of the Garden of Eden, when the moment that god presented Eve to Adam. In the painting you see Adam waging from a heavy sleep to find God holding Eve by her wrist and giving the sign of his blessing to their future. Another scene displays hell which humans have succumbed to temptations that lead to evil and the tone of the whole painting is partially inflicted to hate.

-Connor McKenney

Tony Chen said...

B1. A caesura is a complete pause in a line of poetry or musical composition. It is masculine if it follows a stressed syllable, while it is feminine if it does not. Caesurae vary in placement, but are most commonly found in the middle of a line. Beowulf makes frequent use of caesurae, as there is one in the middle of each line separating four stressed syllables. If one were to read the poem out loud, they would find themselves naturally pausing between the first two stresses and the last two. This is aided by the use of punctuation such as commas and colons, but exists even in the absence of such indicative marks. For instance, in section 5 from “Prelude of the Founder of the Danish House”, line 4 is written “Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes”. With stressed syllables in bold and the caesura indicated by //, this line is read as “Oft Scyld the Scefing // from squadroned foes”. The use of caesurae in this manner, along with abundant alliteration, is a characteristic of Old English poetry.

B2. Kenning is a poetic, figurative description of something more mundane than its description would suggest. In line 10 of section 5, the sea is referred to as a “whale-path”. This description seems esoteric, but is used artistically to match the language style of the rest of the poem. Line 10 of section 6 uses “breaker-of-rings” to describe a king. The online text notes that, in ancient times, kings would break off pieces of rings of gold to reward followers. In line 24 of section 27, Beowulf is called the “earls’-defence”. Being the eponymous hero of the poem, he is given this title to express his reputation as a hardened warrior. Although kenning is easily misunderstood or overlooked at first glance, it is included in Beowulf for both stylistic and structural reasons. For instance, a multisyllabic phrase may be used in place of a shorter one in order to fit the rhythmic structure of its line, as with “breaker-of-rings”. Kenning would be useful when describing something unfamiliar, as it fuses existing images to communicate a different idea.

B3. The initial lines of Beowulf present such phrases as “praise of the prowess of people-kings” and “honor the athelings won”. The concepts of kingly honor and warriors’ prestige were central to Anglo-Saxon cultural values. Beowulf originated from this warrior culture, and therefore is rooted in such principles. However, the poem survived through centuries of Christian influence, and consequently absorbed many Christian ideologies as it was passed down through the generations. For instance, the concept of heaven is prominently displayed in this translation of the poem. Phrases like “no hero 'neath heaven (§6L27)”, the “harbor of heaven (§17L8)”, and the “Lord of Heaven (§49L21)” are indicative of this influence. There is even a blessing in section 14 lines 16-18: “Father Almighty / in grace and mercy guard you well, / safe in your seekings.” In the original Beowulf , heaven would have served solely as a term for the skies. It was only after the rise of Christianity- centuries after the poem’s origin- that heaven as a place for the afterlife came into heavy usage.

Tony Chen said...

C1: The Knight is characterized as a hero, by his moral principles and by his many adventures in battle. Chaucer calls him “a worthy man” who “loved chivalry, / Truth and honour, freedom and courtesy”. The Knight won widespread fame in his campaigns, and his actions define him. He is to be respected as a ranked warrior. Meanwhile, his physical description is sparse; Chaucer only writes of the Knight wearing a simple tunic and stained mail with no further details. It is noted that he is dressed this way due to having just started his pilgrimage after returning from his latest voyage.
The Wife of Bath is described as a woman of good standing in her community who is strongly religious yet has had five husbands. She often insists on being the first in the offering line at church. Being of good faith, the Wife has traveled to several famous shrines. She has already been to Jerusalem three times. The Wife is somewhat deaf, but skilled in clothmaking and experienced in travel. Although gaptoothed, she is finely dressed. The red of her stockings and face reflect her somewhat boisterous nature.
The Pardoner is initially described as gentle (noble), which is ironic in respect to his nature. While a “noble ecclesiast” in church, he makes a habit of exploiting simple countrymen, awing them with “relics” and swindling them out of their money in exchange for meaningless pardons. The mention of the Pardoner’s false “relics” is indicative of his unethical lifestyle. He carries with him a pillowcase said to be Mary’s veil, a piece of cloth rumored to be from St. Peter’s sails, a cross, and pigs’ bones. The Pardoner himself has long, thin yellow hair covered by a cap in a way that he thinks fashionable, with a voice said to be like that of a goat. His face is clean because he lacks the capability of growing facial hair, and it is hinted that he might be a eunuch or a woman. The only redeeming feature of the Pardoner is his voice.

C2: There are three people in the video. One is wearing dark brown pants, a black t-shirt with “MARY KNOLL HIGH SCHOOL JAPANESE CLUB 2005” in white letters with a brown, blue, and white hat that can only be described as dreadful. Another has similar pants, a brown button up shirt with vertical stripes, and a tan baseball cap. The final rapper wears faded jeans, sunglasses, and a Dr. Pepper shirt.

C3: The narrator has a foreign-sounding accent; it almost seems as if he is speaking German. There are many sharp consonant sounds in his speech. The recording is very alien; it would be very difficult for someone unfamiliar with linguistics to decipher the words without simultaneously reading from the text. Fortunately, the speaker emphasizes rhyming syllables and often pauses after lines, allowing ample time to synchronize the ears with the eyes. His recital of the passage is rhythmic and well-rehearsed.

Tony Chen said...

C4: In the Pardoner’s Tale, situational irony is encountered when the three men find treasure under the oak tree instead of Death but ultimately meet Death at their own hands as a result of not wanting to share the treasure. However, the true irony in the Pardoner’s Tale lies in the juxtaposition of the Tale with its teller. While the Tale carries a heavy moral lesson that cautions against avarice, the Pardoner himself is characterized by his greedy and sinful exploitation of others. Yet he is still able to exclaim, “O cursed sin, full of abominableness! / O treacherous homicide! O wickedness! / O gluttony, lechery, and hazardry! / O blasphemer of Christ with villainy”. By telling this Tale through the Pardoner, Chaucer adopts a tone of critical cynicism. Chaucer’s attitude toward religion and morality is playfully sardonic as he speaks fervently through the Pardoner’s voice: “If gifts your change of heart and mind reveal, / You'll get my absolution while you kneel.” While the Pardoner himself is attempting to pass himself off as solemnly and painfully sincere, he is in reality offering a white elephant under the guise of genuine spiritual authority. The act of displaying false relics and offering inherently worthless absolution could be considered blasphemous in nature. Thankfully, the Host is all too aware of the Pardoner’s deception, saying that “I would I had your ballocks in my hand / Instead of relics in a reliquary”. It is important to note that Chaucer is not being critical of religion itself, but of the immorality and hypocrisy of those who preach yet act against their own words.

C5:
1.) The left panel depicts a scene of surreal paradise, as if in reference to the biblical Garden of Eden. Lush, green rolling hills are dotted with trees of different kinds, some bearing fruit. Strange mountains pierce the horizon as birds in linear swarms fly in curved paths, weaving in and out of a strange rock formation. Fantastical animals of all sorts (unicorns, three-headed birds) frolic around a fountain that can be likened to the fabled Fountain of Youth. A man and a woman, symbolic of Adam and Eve, are on either side of a robed holy figure whose eyes are turned at the viewer.
The middle panel is far more extravagant than the left. Where there is natural paradise on the left, the middle displays extraordinarily lavish celebration in an almost artificial environment on Earth. A throng of people have seen fit to commandeer animals for their amusement, riding on their backs in a circular procession around a shallow bathing pool. Fruits have been plucked and appropriated, balanced on heads and taken for granted. The strange blue and pink buildings that rise out of the water in the background look manmade and contrast with the earthly land as angels take wing in the skies. In short, people are exploiting what they were given on earth. They partake shamelessly in guilty pleasures, ranging from indulgence in food to poorly concealed sex.
The right panel is Hell. Black smoke engulfs the sky as a multitude of people fall victim to war and slavery, driven and tortured by demonic masters with spears in the background. The hills are charred grey; buildings are burning. Almost all is dark; where there was bountiful light in the first two panels, it now exists only to highlight the sufferings of this world’s residents. Humans are devoured alive and forced into Sisyphean labors. Musical instruments are scattered throughout the scene, as are instruments of death. Proportions no longer matter; small objects have become massive. Dismembered body parts litter the scene. A blindfolded man is in the process of being decapitated. Playing cards fall to the floor as a gambler’s hand is pierced with a knife; the demonic creature tormenting him wears on its back the severed hand of a fellow victim. This panel is full of sinners and their horrific, nightmarish punishments.

Tony Chen said...

2.)
Chaucer: So I saw this painting the other day titled “The Garden of Earthly Delights”. Hieronymous Bosch, do you know him?
Pardoner: Ah, yes! Interesting fellow. Had a little something wrong about him, don’t you think?
Chaucer: I’ve no idea what you mean. I thought he must have had a good head on his shoulders; there’s not many men can dream up something like that.
Pardoner: Aha! That is my point exactly. What sane man can conjure up something so fantastical?
Chaucer: I suppose I can understand why one would think that way. But I personally think Bosch must have had a clear purpose; that is, he knew exactly what he was painting. He must have known before he even started. All that was left was to do was paint it in.
Pardoner: Maybe.
Chaucer: So what do you think of it? The painting, I mean.
Pardoner: Well, most of it looks like fun! The left and center especially. Paradise on Earth, or should I say heaven on Earth? All that fruit, the frolicking! People and animals enjoying the world together. I think that’s what life’s about, no?
Chaucer: What about the right? Isn’t it a bit darker? Surely it must be some kind of warning. If the left is Paradise and the center is our Earth, then what is there left but hell?
Pardoner: Well, what of it? Can’t have two without the third.
Chaucer: Doesn’t it seem like a consequence? Maybe the other worlds became decadent. Maybe this is what comes after. What comes of greed, gluttony, lust.
Pardoner: But of course! I was going to say that. I definitely thought it before you did. The wicked will suffer. They must suffer! Unless, of course, they have been pardoned. Say, friend, I could do you a service. Divine forgiveness for a nominal price. Of course, I am a happy man; I don’t need any more money. But what use is it to you if you’re going to Hell? And forgiveness cannot be free; that would be too easy. So what do you say?
Chaucer: I think I will abstain for now. Thank you for the offer, though.
Pardoner: Well then.
Chaucer: I stand by what I say, the right is a warning. It seems like Bosch was a wise man. That’s the beauty in art, I suppose. It survives long after we are gone, and its message is timeless. I only hope that the world will never come to what we see in that Hell.
Pardoner: Hmph.

Anonymous said...

Emily Durst

B1: A caesura is a pause in the middle of a line. Often times this is used for emotional emphasis, such as the line “They bent them to march, -- the boat lay still,”(13). This is a good example because of the strong pause between the action of the men marching and the image of the boat. These many men, these loyal warriors are marching together for one cause. This image is so striking compared to the calm eeriness of the still ship. The caesura makes these images resonate more with the reader.

B2: A kenning is an expression that replaces a noun. One kenning found in Beowulf is “the man of war” found on page fourteen. This is a phrase that replaces the name Beowulf, who is referred to as “the man of war” because he is the hero of the story, the main protagonist. He is the leader and therefore holds an important title. The phrase “sea-wood” found on page eleven is also a kenning, since it replaces the word ship. This is an accurate name as well, given how ships were vehicles of the sea and were made out of wood. The “breaker-of-rings” refers to the king who breaks off gold to give to his loyal followers.

B3: The dynamic of Anglo-Saxon values and religious beliefs are present in the passage on page ten of Beowulf. This passage discusses Grendel’s impact on the kingdom and phrases such as “ ’twas judgment of God” and “after death-day may draw his Lord, and friendship find in the Father’s arms!” Grendel’s presence in the story negatively affects the world around him; hence “ne’er could the prince approach his throne, --‘twas judgement of God,-- or have joy in his hall”(10). The happiness and comfort of a great king is determined not just by this monster, but ultimately by the hands of his God. Near the end of the passage, religious beliefs are mentioned again when a man dies. It is said that “after death-day may draw his Lord, and friendship find in the Father’s arms!”, which can translate into a man going to Heaven and finding his salvation in God’s kingdom.

Anonymous said...

Emily Durst

C1: Wife of Bath – The Wife of Bath seems neither rich nor poor. She appears to be well off, being a skilled cloth maker and traveling to Jerusalem three times. Of course her funds may come from her previous five husbands if they left anything behind for her. She uses her free time wisely, as she has visited many cities in Europe. The Wife is a heavy set woman whose face was “Bold…fair and red of hue”(458). She wears finely woven clothes and has gaped teeth. The Wife is characterized as a jovial and wise woman who likes to “laugh and carp. Of remedies she knew perchance For she could of that art the olde dance”(474 – 476). While her story may be exaggerated, the Wife of Bath comes across as less corrupt as some of her fellow travelers.
The Summoner – The Summoner works for the church and summons those who have sinned before the Archdeacon's ecclesiastical court. He is an ugly man, with bushy eyebrows, a thick beard, boils all over his face, and lumps on his knees. According to the text, it can be inferred that he smells bad because “Well loved he garlic, onion and eke leeks”(634). Despite his involvement with the church, the Summoner is a man with plenty of vices, like employing the services of prostitutes and breaking out in drunken tirades. He and his partner, the Pardoner, make for an unsavory pair.
The Pardoner – The Pardoner is even more corrupt than the Summoner. He sells indulgences to gullible sinners in order to make money and sells garbage that he claims to be holy relics, like pig bones, a pillowcase that belonged the Virgin Mary, and a piece of Saint Peter’s sail. Like the Summoner, the Pardoner is an ugly man, with thinning, wax-yellow hair that sits in clumps. Yet he goes along thinking that “he rode all of the newe jet”(682).

C2: In the Canterbury Tales Rap video, the rappers are dressed like casual soccer dads. One man is wearing dark pants with a black t-shirt that says something like “MARYKNOLL HIGH SCHOOL JAPANESE CLUB 2005”. He is also wearing an awful looking white and blue hat. The next man is wearing a tan baseball cap, a tan and black striped long-sleeved shirt, and dark pants. The third man is a super casual soccer dad. He wears dark sunglasses with a red Dr. Pepper t-shirt and blue jeans.

C3: The narrator’s voice from the audio sounded European and his accent sounded thick and Germanic. There were certain words that I could understand better, such as “hir”, “droghte” and “licour”, because of the speaker’s accent. The narrator has a soothing, calm tone which helps the listener envision the refreshing imagery of April and springtime. His voice is cool, like April weather, and hints at the new life that grows and the new adventure awaiting our travelers. The narrator’s emphasis on words like “licour”, “flour”, “breeth” and “croppes” emphasizes the new life that accompanies springtime. This emphasis flows well with his tone, enhancing the peacefulness associated with the season.

Anonymous said...

Emily Durst

C4: The Pardoner’s Tale is ironic because the Pardoner warns his listeners of the dangers of gluttony, gambling, and greed while he is guilty of these sins himself. The irony of the Pardoner matches the irony of the Tale because the people in both instances are their own worst enemies. The Pardoner warns the other travelers about a vice, greed, that the Pardoner himself lives by. The three men in the story let this vice seal their fate. Instead of finding and killing Death, Death finds and kills them through the use of their greed and gluttony. Chaucer’s tone is ironic and humorous, as he emphasizes the Pardoner’s irony with that of the Tale. His tone can also be seen as critical, as he is criticizing the beliefs of the church. The reader can infer that Chaucer disagrees with the corruption running rampant in the church, as depicted through the Pardoner and his indulgences.

C5: In Bosch’s painting “The Garden of Earthly Delights”, the three paintings are depicting Heaven, Purgatory/Earth, and Hell. In the first panel, the Garden of Eden is depicted. Here we see that the surroundings are pristine and it is never crowded. There are an abundance of animals coexisting in peace. Near the bottom we see God standing with Adam and Eve, who are also calm. In the middle panel, we see what looks like either Purgatory or life on Earth. Here the space is crowded and chaotic, with people and animals running amok. Amid this chaos, life is being made and sustained. People are hunting, fishing, feeding each other, and loving each other. The third panel depicts Hell, as can be determined by the dark, black background. Here we see people being tortured for their sins by strange animal like creatures. They are crushed to death, tied in bondage, drowned, eaten alive, groped, and tempted by demons. One victim that stands out is known as the Tree Man, his torso is hollowed out and his feet are morphed into roots that are planted in canoes.

Chaucer/Pardoner conversation regarding “The Garden of Earthly Delights”

Chaucer: So my dear friend, look to the right of this magnificent painting. Tell me, do you really think that your work as a Pardoner saves sinners from the terrors of damnation?

Pardoner: Why of course not! To those foolish enough to fall for my tricks and to hand over their money, my work is the key to their salvation. To men like you and I, however, my occupation is simply that; a way for me to stay alive in this harsh world. If one looks upon the middle section of this painting, he sees himself amidst the chaos that is our world. In such a place, men like myself, and like yourself, must learn to survive by their own means.

Chaucer: There is some truth to what you say. But to clarify my thoughts, you preach against gluttony and avarice, even though you admit to having these traits yourself.

Pardoner: Indeed. But remember my friend, a man does not need to believe in his own words to make a decent living.

Chaucer: One last question for
you, sir. Do you think your business of selling indulgences to those less wise than yourself is going to get you to God’s kingdom?

Pardoner: Well my dear fellow that is quite the question! For those whom I make my business off of, they will reach the Lord’s kingdom if they are foolish enough to believe in the power of my holy wallet! For myself, well, if I preach and deceive enough in this life, perhaps I can buy my way into the Lord’s kingdom in the next! Just like the Pope!

Anonymous said...

1 a caesura is a break in the middle of a line of poetry and there is one in almost every line of Beowulf
2 kennings are old English metaphors that are used to describe simple things in a poetic way
3 “hilted weapon a rare and ancient sword named hrunting” putting this much importance on a sword comes from anglo-saxon origins
Chaucer and canterberry tales
1 the pardoner came from the roman church with long blonde hair, he is religious and when someone does something wrong he takes something from them
The cook cooks the best food but he is kind of a dirty person.
The shipman was always depressed but unlike everyone else he wasn’t a big drinker. But he was a very good captain and knew his way around the water
2 one guy has a bucket hat and the other has a dr pepper shirt they are all middle aged men trying to rap
3 you can barely tell that he is speaking some type of English and he has a very bad accent
4 it is ironic that they all ended up killing each other and no one got the money but it is also ironic because the person telling the story is greedy himself
5 they are having a big dinner probably celebrating something.

Kenzie stewart

Patrick Burke said...

Patrick Burke
Beowulf


B1.) A caesura in literature is a pause in the work, generally towards the middle of the line. In a lot of cases a caesura is represented by a comma. The example here shows two caesuras, one represented by the comma after winters, causes the reader to pause. As well as the semi-colon after earth causes the reader to pause,
“Full of winters, he fared away
aged from earth; he is honored still
through width of the world by wise men all.”

B2.) A kenning is a poetic synonym, typically 2 words that describes a noun with metaphors. Kennings are usually hyphenated and come from Norse and Anglo-Saxon poetry. “Battle-Sweat” is a kenning from Beowulf that represents blood. Another example of a Kenning is “Whale-Road” represents the sea. Another one that is not 2 words hyphenated but instead is 3, is Light-Of-Battle which represents a sword


Canterbury Tales
C1.) The Knight is the highest level of the pilgrimage, and the Knight is known for his ferociousness on the battlefield. His attire is usually worn down, and kind of tattered due to the intensity of battle. The Prioress is a very charming woman, who also happens to be a nun. She is a big supporter of animal rights, and also speaks French. And the Pardoner, is friends with the Summoner, but is seen as much more corrupt than The Pardoner. The Pardoner gives people the opportunity to have their sins forgiven in exchange for money. He is not consider a “Full-man” due to his lack of manlike features, and his high voice and beardlessness.
C2.) In the “dope” rap version of the prologue there were 3 men in the video, one man was in a red Dr.Pepper shirt, with jeans and sunglasses. One of the other men was wearing greyish sweatpants, a black shirt, and a white bucket hat. The last man was wearing a striped shirt, with jeans and was even seen wearing a heat at some points.
C3.) The narrators voice in the audio has an accent to it, can’t really put my finger on what kind of accent but sounds like a German, maybe Russian accent. But hearing the pronunciations of the words, helped me comprehend why certain words were emphasized by his voice.

Anonymous said...

ALEJANDRO TORRES
B1

Caesura:
“Since erst he lay friendless, a foundling”

1.Prosody. a break, especially a sense pause, usually near the middle ofa verse, and marked in scansion by a double vertical line, as in knowthen thyself ‖ presume not God to scan.
2.Classical Prosody. a division made by the ending of a word within afoot, or sometimes at the end of a foot, especially in certainrecognized places near the middle of a verse.
3.any break, pause, or interruption.

B2
Kenning:
“the sons of earth”-mankind
“the shelter of God”- heaven
“the hot surge waiting of furious flame”- the warriors waiting for the call to fight
A kenning is a much-compressed form of metaphor, originally used in Anglo-Saxon and Norse poetry. In a kenning, an object is described in a two-word phrase, such as 'whale-road' for 'sea'. Some kennings can be more obscure than others, and then grow close to being a riddle.
B3
Christianity - the love for GOD
“how the Almighty made the earth”
This small sentence in the passage make us realize that even when there are Vikings they believe in a GOD

Anglo Saxon- it refers to the values of the “Vikings” like honor loyalty bravery and courage
“the clansmen in cheer and revel a winsome life”
“she dreaded the doleful days to come, deaths endow, and doom of battle and shame”
In these passages of the text we can discover the brutality of the battles and the courage and heart that the Vikings fight with “Awake! On your feet! Who fights for me?”
Old English-
“Nor far was that day when father and son-in-law stood in feud for warfare and hatred that woke again With envy and anger an evil spirit endured the dole in his dark abode, that he heard each day the din of revel high in the hall”

C1
The pardoner’s tale
Religion Class
The pardoner is egotistical because he feels superior to other people. If we keep reading we realize that he is just a faker that preys upon the faith and people’s sins and their fear of going to hell by receiving money to “pardon” them. As the tale keep going we realize that he is also a sinner, three of him sins are the lust, the gluttony, and the drink

C2
there are three guys in the video one with a black shirt of a high school,a hat, and jeans. The second one wears sunglasses, a red shirt, and blue jeans. And the last one is wearing a striped shirt with brown jeans, and a cap.
C3
The narrator’s voice is a little bit confusing and i can not understand some words but his clearly intonation helped me to imagine what was happening. The immetry is one of the most important tools that the narrator uses to explain us and help us to comprehend the passage
C4
The pardoner’s tale: The irony in these tale consist in a church pardoner who is suppose to forgive the people for their sins ,but he is also a sinner who drink and abuse from other people ignorance and fear. Chaucer makes laugh of religion when at the beginning of the story the pardoner even though he is a church man he also commit offenses to GOD. Chaucer also touches the morality when the pardoner receive money from the pilgrims that he forgive

Emily Beauchamp said...

Beowulf

B1) A caesura is a break between words in a metrical foot. An example of caesura from Beowulf occurs on Page 5, lines 18 and 19. “Famed was this Beowulf: far flew the boast of him, / son of Scyld, in the Scandinavian lands.” In this example, the colon breaks up the line, between the words “Beowulf” and “far”.

B2) Kenning is a compound expression with metaphorical meaning. Kenning is used in Page 6, line 10 of Beowulf. “...on the breast of the boast, the breaker-of-rings, / …” The phrase “breaker-of-rings” is kenning for king or chieftain of a comitatus: he breaks off gold from the spiral rings - often worn on the arm - and so rewards his followers. Another example of kenning occurs on Page 8, line 16. “Grendel this monster grim was called, / march-riever mighty…” A “march-riever” means a disturber of the border, one who sallies from his hunt in the fen and roams over the country nearby. A third example of kenning is on Page 11, line 15. “..with fourteen men / the sea-wood he sought…” Sea-wood is kenning for ship or boat.

B3) The entirety of Page 8, especially the lower half, illustrates a shift from Anglo-Saxon culture to Christianity. Multiple references to “the Lord” and other biblical figures and events were made, including Cain and Abel; God; and the Devil, who was called Grendel in the poem.

Emily Beauchamp said...

B1) A caesura is a break between words in a metrical foot. An example of caesura from Beowulf occurs on Page 5, lines 18 and 19. “Famed was this Beowulf: far flew the boast of him, / son of Scyld, in the Scandinavian lands.” In this example, the colon breaks up the line, between the words “Beowulf” and “far”.

B2) Kenning is a compound expression with metaphorical meaning. Kenning is used in Page 6, line 10 of Beowulf. “...on the breast of the boast, the breaker-of-rings, / …” The phrase “breaker-of-rings” is kenning for king or chieftain of a comitatus: he breaks off gold from the spiral rings - often worn on the arm - and so rewards his followers. Another example of kenning occurs on Page 8, line 16. “Grendel this monster grim was called, / march-riever mighty…” A “march-riever” means a disturber of the border, one who sallies from his hunt in the fen and roams over the country nearby. A third example of kenning is on Page 11, line 15. “..with fourteen men / the sea-wood he sought…” Sea-wood is kenning for ship or boat.

B3) The entirety of Page 8, especially the lower half, illustrates a shift from Anglo-Saxon culture to Christianity. Multiple references to “the Lord” and other biblical figures and events were made, including Cain and Abel; God; and the Devil, who was called Grendel in the poem.

Emily Beauchamp said...

C1) The Pardoner as described by Chaucer seemed very relaxed and carefree, as well as slightly religious. Lines 685 and 685 illustrated his casual attitude. “It seemed to him he rode in latest style, / With unbound hair, except his cap, head all bare.” Lines 694 and 695 also exemplified his nature. “But in his craft, from Berwick unto Ware, / Was no such pardoner of equal grace.” These two excerpts portrayed the Pardoner as an adept and laid-back individual. Lines 698 to 700 illustrated the Pardoner’s more religious side. “He said he had a piece of the very sail / That good Saint Peter had, on time he sailed / Upon the sea, till Jesus him had hailed.” Lines 710 to 713 also helped portray his religious side. “He was, in church, a fine ecclesiast. / Well could he read a lesson or a story, / But best of all he sang an offertory;” The excerpts painted him as a man of deep religious belief, which means that his title could be interpreted as a priest who pardons people’s sins.
The knight was a man of honor and humility. “To ride about the world, loved chivalry, / Truth, honour, freedom and all courtesy.” Lines 45 and 46 showed that the knight loved all things that a knight should love, including honor and chivalry. He was clearly a man of noble intentions and pure of soul. The passage detailing the knight’s service to his country, from Prussia, Latvia, and Russia, to the Middle Sea and Turkey. His military service to his country showed that he was also loyal and brave. Line 72 said that “He was a truly perfect, noble knight.” He dressed humbly and plainly as well. “A tunic of simple cloth he possessed / Discoloured and stained by his habergeon; / For he had lately returned from his voyage / And now was going on this pilgrimage.” Overall, the knight was an honorable man who also possessed great humility and bravery.
The doctor was described as a competent and well-rounded individual. He relied on astronomy to diagnose and treat his patients, which made him seem slightly superstitious as well. According to the text, he know of every illness and the cure for all of them as well. He ate well, as would be expected of a doctor, yet unlike many of his peers in the story, he was not highly religious. Line 440 said, “His study was but little on the Bible.” Lastly, the doctor was said to love his gold beyond all else, which would mean that he may have overcharged his patients for their remedies.

C2) There were three men in the video. One man had light skin, dark hair, light jeans, and wore a red Dr. Pepper t-shirt. He also sometimes wore dark sunglasses. The second man also had light skin, wore a blue hat, and had a black shirt with white lettering on it. The third man had dark skin, a tan baseball hat, dark jeans, and a brown striped shirt over a brown t-shirt.

C3) (Unable to access the audio recording for some reason.)

C4) (Unable to read the Pardoner’s Tale.)

C5) The Garden Of Eden/Heaven is being depicted in the far left panel, Earth is depicted in the middle panel, and Hell is depicted in the far right panel.

Qin Yuhan said...

B1
Caesura means a break between words within a metrical foot.
By the wall then went he; his weapon raised
high by its hilts the Hygelac-thane,
angry and eager.
There is a comma between Hygelac- thane and angry, so there is a break between words.


B2
In Beowulf the author refers to the body armor as a “fighting-gear” and “battle-gear”. Gear in fighting is used to defense, and armor is used to defense too.
In Beowulf the author refers to the blood as a “battle-sweat”. When we do some sports in life we sweat, and when solder in battle they bleed.
In Beowulf the author refers to the “lake, pond, swamp” as “mere”. These words all mean a big pool of water.

B3
Hrothgar
Shows an influence of Christianity


Indicative of the Anglo Saxon value of courage.

But the evil one ambushed old and young
death-shadow dark, and dogged them still,
lured, or lurked in the livelong night



C1

1. Knight:

class:knight

character: A KNIGHT there was, and what a gentleman,
Who, from the moment that he first began
45 To ride about the world, loved chivalry,
Truth, honour, freedom and all courtesy.
Full worthy was he in his sovereign's war,
And therein had he ridden, no man more,
As well in Christendom as heathenesse,
50 And honoured everywhere for worthiness.
At Alexandria, in the winning battle he was there;
Often put in the place of honour, a chair.rage,
He never yet had any vileness said,
In all his life, to whatsoever wight.
He was a truly perfect, noble knight.

But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
A tunic of simple cloth he possessed

appearance :
But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
75 A tunic of simple cloth he possesed


2. Yeoman

class: servant

appearance :
And he was clothed in coat and hood of green.
A sheaf of peacock arrows bright and keen
105 Under his belt he bore very carefully
(Well could he keep his gear yeomanly:


character : N/A


3. Pardoner

class: bummer

appearance :
This pardoner had hair as yellow as wax.
But smooth it hung as does a strike of flax;
In driplets hung his locks behind his head,
Down to his shoulders which they overspread;
But thin they dropped, these strings,
all one by one. He had no hood,
For smooth his face as he'd just had a shave

character:
To gain some silver, preferably from the crowd;

Qin Yuhan said...

B1
Caesura means a break between words within a metrical foot.
By the wall then went he; his weapon raised
high by its hilts the Hygelac-thane,
angry and eager.
There is a comma between Hygelac- thane and angry, so there is a break between words.


B2
In Beowulf the author refers to the body armor as a “fighting-gear” and “battle-gear”. Gear in fighting is used to defense, and armor is used to defense too.
In Beowulf the author refers to the blood as a “battle-sweat”. When we do some sports in life we sweat, and when solder in battle they bleed.
In Beowulf the author refers to the “lake, pond, swamp” as “mere”. These words all mean a big pool of water.

B3
Hrothgar
Shows an influence of Christianity


Indicative of the Anglo Saxon value of courage.

But the evil one ambushed old and young
death-shadow dark, and dogged them still,
lured, or lurked in the livelong night



C1

1. Knight:

class:knight

character: A KNIGHT there was, and what a gentleman,
Who, from the moment that he first began
45 To ride about the world, loved chivalry,
Truth, honour, freedom and all courtesy.
Full worthy was he in his sovereign's war,
And therein had he ridden, no man more,
As well in Christendom as heathenesse,
50 And honoured everywhere for worthiness.
At Alexandria, in the winning battle he was there;
Often put in the place of honour, a chair.rage,
He never yet had any vileness said,
In all his life, to whatsoever wight.
He was a truly perfect, noble knight.

But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
A tunic of simple cloth he possessed

appearance :
But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
75 A tunic of simple cloth he possesed


2. Yeoman

class: servant

appearance :
And he was clothed in coat and hood of green.
A sheaf of peacock arrows bright and keen
105 Under his belt he bore very carefully
(Well could he keep his gear yeomanly:


character : N/A


3. Pardoner

class: bummer

appearance :
This pardoner had hair as yellow as wax.
But smooth it hung as does a strike of flax;
In driplets hung his locks behind his head,
Down to his shoulders which they overspread;
But thin they dropped, these strings,
all one by one. He had no hood,
For smooth his face as he'd just had a shave

character:
To gain some silver, preferably from the crowd;



Jade Qin

Qin Yuhan said...

B1
Caesura means a break between words within a metrical foot.
By the wall then went he; his weapon raised
high by its hilts the Hygelac-thane,
angry and eager.
There is a comma between Hygelac- thane and angry, so there is a break between words.


B2
In Beowulf the author refers to the body armor as a “fighting-gear” and “battle-gear”. Gear in fighting is used to defense, and armor is used to defense too.
In Beowulf the author refers to the blood as a “battle-sweat”. When we do some sports in life we sweat, and when solder in battle they bleed.
In Beowulf the author refers to the “lake, pond, swamp” as “mere”. These words all mean a big pool of water.

B3
Hrothgar
Shows an influence of Christianity


Indicative of the Anglo Saxon value of courage.

But the evil one ambushed old and young
death-shadow dark, and dogged them still,
lured, or lurked in the livelong night



C1

1. Knight:

class:knight

character: A KNIGHT there was, and what a gentleman,
Who, from the moment that he first began
45 To ride about the world, loved chivalry,
Truth, honour, freedom and all courtesy.
Full worthy was he in his sovereign's war,
And therein had he ridden, no man more,
As well in Christendom as heathenesse,
50 And honoured everywhere for worthiness.
At Alexandria, in the winning battle he was there;
Often put in the place of honour, a chair.rage,
He never yet had any vileness said,
In all his life, to whatsoever wight.
He was a truly perfect, noble knight.

But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
A tunic of simple cloth he possessed

appearance :
But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
75 A tunic of simple cloth he possesed


2. Yeoman

class: servant

appearance :
And he was clothed in coat and hood of green.
A sheaf of peacock arrows bright and keen
105 Under his belt he bore very carefully
(Well could he keep his gear yeomanly:


character : N/A


3. Pardoner

class: bummer

appearance :
This pardoner had hair as yellow as wax.
But smooth it hung as does a strike of flax;
In driplets hung his locks behind his head,
Down to his shoulders which they overspread;
But thin they dropped, these strings,
all one by one. He had no hood,
For smooth his face as he'd just had a shave

character:
To gain some silver, preferably from the crowd;



Jade Qin

Anonymous said...

B1
Caesura means a break between words within a metrical foot.
By the wall then went he; his weapon raised
high by its hilts the Hygelac-thane,
angry and eager.
There is a comma between Hygelac- thane and angry, so there is a break between words.


B2
In Beowulf the author refers to the body armor as a “fighting-gear” and “battle-gear”. Gear in fighting is used to defense, and armor is used to defense too.
In Beowulf the author refers to the blood as a “battle-sweat”. When we do some sports in life we sweat, and when solder in battle they bleed.
In Beowulf the author refers to the “lake, pond, swamp” as “mere”. These words all mean a big pool of water.

B3
Hrothgar
Shows an influence of Christianity


Indicative of the Anglo Saxon value of courage.

But the evil one ambushed old and young
death-shadow dark, and dogged them still,
lured, or lurked in the livelong night



C1

1. Knight:

class:knight

character: A KNIGHT there was, and what a gentleman,
Who, from the moment that he first began
45 To ride about the world, loved chivalry,
Truth, honour, freedom and all courtesy.
Full worthy was he in his sovereign's war,
And therein had he ridden, no man more,
As well in Christendom as heathenesse,
50 And honoured everywhere for worthiness.
At Alexandria, in the winning battle he was there;
Often put in the place of honour, a chair.rage,
He never yet had any vileness said,
In all his life, to whatsoever wight.
He was a truly perfect, noble knight.

But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
A tunic of simple cloth he possessed

appearance :
But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
75 A tunic of simple cloth he possesed


2. Yeoman

class: servant

appearance :
And he was clothed in coat and hood of green.
A sheaf of peacock arrows bright and keen
105 Under his belt he bore very carefully
(Well could he keep his gear yeomanly:


character : N/A


3. Pardoner

class: bummer

appearance :
This pardoner had hair as yellow as wax.
But smooth it hung as does a strike of flax;
In driplets hung his locks behind his head,
Down to his shoulders which they overspread;
But thin they dropped, these strings,
all one by one. He had no hood,
For smooth his face as he'd just had a shave

character:
To gain some silver, preferably from the crowd;

B1
Caesura means a break between words within a metrical foot.
By the wall then went he; his weapon raised
high by its hilts the Hygelac-thane,
angry and eager.
There is a comma between Hygelac- thane and angry, so there is a break between words.


B2
In Beowulf the author refers to the body armor as a “fighting-gear” and “battle-gear”. Gear in fighting is used to defense, and armor is used to defense too.
In Beowulf the author refers to the blood as a “battle-sweat”. When we do some sports in life we sweat, and when solder in battle they bleed.
In Beowulf the author refers to the “lake, pond, swamp” as “mere”. These words all mean a big pool of water.

B3
Hrothgar
Shows an influence of Christianity


Indicative of the Anglo Saxon value of courage.

But the evil one ambushed old and young
death-shadow dark, and dogged them still,
lured, or lurked in the livelong night



JADE QIN


Anonymous said...

C1

1. Knight:

class:knight

character: A KNIGHT there was, and what a gentleman,
Who, from the moment that he first began
45 To ride about the world, loved chivalry,
Truth, honour, freedom and all courtesy.
Full worthy was he in his sovereign's war,
And therein had he ridden, no man more,
As well in Christendom as heathenesse,
50 And honoured everywhere for worthiness.
At Alexandria, in the winning battle he was there;
Often put in the place of honour, a chair.rage,
He never yet had any vileness said,
In all his life, to whatsoever wight.
He was a truly perfect, noble knight.

But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
A tunic of simple cloth he possessed

appearance :
But now, to tell you all of his array,
His steeds were good, but he was not gaily dressed.
75 A tunic of simple cloth he possesed


2. Yeoman

class: servant

appearance :
And he was clothed in coat and hood of green.
A sheaf of peacock arrows bright and keen
105 Under his belt he bore very carefully
(Well could he keep his gear yeomanly:


character : N/A


3. Pardoner

class: bummer

appearance :
This pardoner had hair as yellow as wax.
But smooth it hung as does a strike of flax;
In driplets hung his locks behind his head,
Down to his shoulders which they overspread;
But thin they dropped, these strings,
all one by one. He had no hood,
For smooth his face as he'd just had a shave

character:
To gain some silver, preferably from the crowd;



C2.

The first MC wears a black T-shirt and a white hat.
The second MC wears a red T-shirt and a sunglasses.
The last MC wears a stripe shirt.


C3
Most stress is on the first syllable.
It impresses me Indic pronunciation.


JADE QIN

Kait M said...

Kaitlin Marroquin
A Block
Beowulf
B1- A caesura can be defined as a sudden break in between a sentence that causes you to pause, or take a breath in the middle of the sentence. An example of a caesura in Beowulf can be found in the line “Then, one after one, there woke to him, to the chieftain of clansmen, children four:” This is a caesura because there are breaks between “then” and “one”, “one” and “there”, “him and “to”, and “clansmen” and “children”. These breaks cause the reader to take a little pause in between the words, making it sound more dramatic.
B2- A kenning is an expression replacing a name, or a noun. For example, “the breaker-of-rings” is a kenning for a king or chieftain. The expression “sea-wood” is a kenning for ship. Another kenning in Beowulf is “sea-billows” which is an expression for the ocean.
B3- The Anglo-Saxons were made up of Germanic people who were always migrating. They “were primarily tillers of the soil, men and women exercising skills learned in the forest-clearing and swamp-draining of northwest Germania and in setting up new agrarian communities in the fertile river valleys of eastern”. Beowulf has a mix of these traditions of the Anglo-Saxons, and the rise of Christianity. An example of this is how the Christian story of Cain and Abel were mentioned. The quote “On kin of Cain was the killing avenged
by sovran God for slaughtered Abel”, is telling the story. The fact that this was mentioned within the stories shows some of the rise in Christianity.
Loyn, H. R. "Anglo-Saxons, Origins and Migration." Dictionary of the Middle Ages. Ed. Joseph R. Strayer. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1989. World History in Context. Web. 13 Oct. 2014.

Kait M said...

Canterbury Tales
C1-Chaucer introduces and describes each of the pilgrims. The Knight is the first one to be described, and also first to tell his story. He seems to be highly respected, and is “ever honoured for his worthiness”. He is dressed like everyone else, and does not draw too much attention to himself. He seems to be very modest judging by the way he presents himself. He also appears to be part of the upper class.
Chaucer introduces the Shipman is introduced after the cook. He appears to have traveled a lot, and is more at home in the sea than on land. He could be described as a pirate, as he doesn’t mind stealing. He is a bit of a trouble maker. Peculiarly, he does not take prisoners. He had tanned skin, and wore a long woolen coat that went down to his knees. He also carried a dagger with him, tied around him by a cord.
The Pardoner is introduced as a shifty man with waxy yellow hair, and is beardless. He effortlessly tricks people into giving him their money. The pardoner sells things that he claims are authentic. He also loves to sing loud and proud in church. Chaucer explains each of the characters in such a way that the reader gets a feel for what these pilgrims are like, and what their stories may be about.
C2- There was a man in a black shirt and dark pants. He had an interesting white hat with green and blue stripes. The other guy had a red doctor pepper shirt and jeans. He also put on some pretty thug sunglasses. The third man had a on a striped shirt and black pants. Almost halfway through the video, a tan hat appeared magically on his head.
C3- The narrator made the text sound like a different language. Some parts were read fast, some slow. Some of the words were said in such a way that it sounded almost like modern English. For example, shoures was read almost like showers. Rain showers its actual meaning. This helped me decode what some of the words might mean without looking them up.
C4- The pardoner’s tale appears to be very ironic to his personality. The three men in the tale stop a thief, and decide to keep the gold. Then they start to get greedy, and not want to share the gold. This is ironic because the pardoner is saying how gluttonous and sinful they are while in reality, the pardoner is the gluttonous and sinful one. Chaucer’s tone emphasizes how shifty and sly the pardoner really is. The pardoner then proceeds to sell the pilgrims indulgences. Chaucer’s attitude toward religion is that it is full of people like the pardoner: tricks, and money hungry people.
C5- 1) In the left panel there is a group of birds flying through a figure eight like stone. Next to that scene, there is a Blue Mountain with trees and birds everywhere. It is painted blue for some reason. The left middle square is a huge statue in a pond with some strange and some normal animals around it. Right underneath that statue is an owl, some fish, and some ducks in the mini pond. There is then a separate panel labeled “giraffe”. Surrounding it is a bunch of unique animals. There are many animals in the panel on the left and yet there are only three people. This may symbolize the Garden of Eden. The middle panel may symbolize earth, as there were many people and animals together. There are men on horses, and people sitting on top of giant birds. There is also a huge mix of chaos, confusion, and peace. The right panel looks very dark and evil. It looks like there are many people getting tortured, and chaos everywhere. It is filled with monsters, and demon looking creatures. This may be a symbolism of hell.
2) Chaucer and the Pardoner are having a disagreement about the Garden of Earthly Delights painting. The pardoner said, “This is what happens when you commit a sin! You get sent to the place where all the other sinners go: in hell. I can pardon you so that you don’t have to go there. You would have to pay a small fee though.” Chaucer replied to this with the sassy remark of “You are a liar. This painting is probably not that accurate. While I do believe in God I know that money will not get me into heaven.”

Hogan Bridges said...

B1. Caesura is a break between words within a metrical foot.
"the leader beloved who long had ruled...."
The quote from the work shows caesura in the way that it cuts off mid passage and begins a new thought line. The work continues with "In the roadstead rocked a ring-dight vessel". Caesura is the break in a work in the middle of a line, which is exactly what happens here.

B2. Kenning is a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning.
"light-of-battle"
Light of battle is representative of a sword through the use of old english wording and a metaphorical meaning just like kenning describes. The text reads "best of blades" after that, furthering the metaphor.
"fighting-gear"
Fighting gear is representative of full body armor as knights would use in battle. The old english shows this through a metaphor, portrayin kennning.
"brown-edged"
Brown edged shows a blood stained sword through an old english metaphor.

B3. "So lived the clansmen in cheer and revel
a winsome life, till one began
to fashion evils, that field of hell.
Grendel this monster grim was called,
march-riever5 mighty, in moorland living,
in fen and fastness; fief of the giants
the hapless wight a while had kept
since the Creator his exile doomed.
On kin of Cain was the killing avenged
by sovran God for slaughtered Abel."
The passage shows the traditions and values of Anglo Saxon culture, old english ideals, along with infusing the uprising of Christianity. The passage talks about hell and god, and really portrays the religious part of the time period. Aside from that, the language used, like the rest of the peice, is very much old english, and holds that same style.

Hogan Bridges said...

C1.
Chaucer characterizes the pardoner as seemingly happy sort of spirit. He seems to have no cares or worries. The pardoner goes around with his bag full of pardons without cares because of his job. He comes across as someone who can do wrong and not get in trouble for it as he is the one who pardons. His appearance only helps to back up this characterization with his long blonde hair that he merely tosses a cap over to keep under wraps.
The Monk is similarly characterized to the pardoner in the sense that he doesn't have much care. The monk is a hunter in the tale, which is completely unexpected to the reader, as generally monks are peaceful people. The tale even reads "Which holds that hunters are not holy men" implying a contradiction of his title. Physically he is a fat man, with beady glowing red eyes, clearly not the eyes of a holy man. The reader gets the sense that this monk simply owns his title but doesn't live up to it.
The Miller is mostly described to us in a physical way. The only peice of information we recieve outside of his looks, is that he "could steal corn and three times charge his fee". Otherwise we learn that he is a very hardy man, strong and big boned, always taking home the trophy for wrestling. We do learn one other peice of information about him at the end, that he plays the bagpipe well.
C2. The african gentleman is wearing a brown striped shirt and dark brownish gray pants with a tan hat tilted sideways. The man with the sunglasses is wearing a red shirt that says doctor pepper and blue jeans. The third man is wearing a fishing hat, a black shirt that says Japanese Club 2005 on it and dark pants.
C3. The narrator sounds like he is preparing to get into a long story that will take much explaining to portray the image that he wants. As for the pronounciation and accent helping me decode the passage, they didn't. The words and pronounciation look and sound like another language and hold next to no meaning to me.
C4.
C5. Panel one illustrates the begginings of a sort of world the artist is portraying. There are a few animals around, with a lot swarming out of a hole like area in the foreground of the image. The second panel illustrates a very almost confusing image of a multitude of people as the population clearly expands, and the animals become much larger. Along with it, more structures seem to arise around the area, but you get the sense that it is the same landscape only years later. In the third and final panel, the artist brings in great use of darkness and the viewer gets the sense of morbidity and decay as the people lie about seemingly hopeless.

Anonymous said...

Ariana Bruno

B1.) Caesura is a break or a pause in a metrical foot. An example of caesura in Beowulf is in Prelude of the founder of the Danish House. “while wielded words the winsome Scyld,the leader beloved who long had ruled....In the roadstead rocked a ring-dight vessel,” This example has a caesura after the word “ruled” and before the word “In”. Many of the lines have multiple commas so that the metrical foot can run on with a melodic beat; this line however has an ellipse. The ellipse of multiple periods ends the line but with a considerable time break in between, causing the reader to pause.
B2.) Kenning is derived from Norse and Icelandic languages, it is used to take the place of one word with more figurative hyphenated words. One example from of kenning is “Whale-Path” which refers to the sea or ocean. “Mead-House” meaning seats in a hall refers to where the Danes gather to eat and be merry. “Breaker-of-rings” refers to the king who physically breaks off gold and rewards his people with it. The rings are typically worn on the arm so this may refer to bracelets that he gives out.
B3.) Much of Beowulf is described in Anglo-Saxon and old English, this may account for the vast references to Pagan Gods. In chapter II when Grendel, the demon, is ravaging Hrothgar’s kingdom the people turn to the devil before God. Christianity is introduced to the story describing how the people are heathens for not praying to the Almighty God, this Christian influence becomes known in Beowulf by comparing the Pagan and Christian religion.

Anonymous said...

Ariana Bruno
C1a.) The Pardoner is characterized by his comparison to his friend the Summoner. The Summoner is portrayed as corrupt and very ugly. The Pardoner is known to be worse than the Summoner in terms of how corrupt he is. Chaucer characterizes most of the pilgrims by their occupation, apparel and personality but the Pardoner is only described by his actions and his through the Summoner. They are singing partners and supposed lovers, implying that the Pardoner is homosexual despite the Summoner’s use of prostitutes. Both the Summoner and the Pardoner’s work involves scamming people for their money.
C1b.) The Prioress is described by her personality, her appearance and her traveling companions. The Prioress comes off as very charming and delicate and we see from her table manners that she is an educated woman. She comes off as sensitive to matters involving animals, this shows that she is a caring person and unlike most for that time because the treatment of animals wasn’t top priority. She is dressed in nun’s robes but adorns herself with gold jewelry which is unlike the common modest nun to be flashy. She travels with other nuns that are her companions. The fact that there are two nuns suggests their belief in feminism.
C1c.) The Monk is described by his physical appearance and his interests. Despite the monk being on a pilgrimage it is known that he doesn’t act like a normal monk. He is dressed like one but has accented his robes with fur. He resembles a monk with his bald head but has other interests than being at the monastery. He loves to hunt and be on hors-back; he loves to travel and prefers nicer clothes. All these characteristics are ironic for a monk because he has lost all religious value, he is a lesser man of god, monks are supposed to lose interest in material items but he takes pride in them.
C2.) There are three rappers in the prologue video. One is African American who is bald and dressed in a tan and black striped shirt, occasionally he will wear a tan baseball hat. The other rapper is white with dark hair, he is wearing a red Dr. Pepper shirt and sunglasses. The third rapper is also white and is wearing a black tee shirt with the name of a school on it, he is wearing a striped fishing hat. All three men are very awkward and goofy and have no swag but I give them credit for making this “Dope” rap video.
C3.) The narrator’s voice is a deep male. He sounds like he has an Irish or Scottish accent but when reading the text seems to be speaking another language such as Spanish. The narration sounded like Johnny Depp’s mad hatter character in Alice In Wonderland. The text has many “s” sounds and they all blend together. The “c” sounds stick out especially in the word “courage”. I personally didn’t think the narrator helped translate the reading at all but in fact made it more complicated to understand because it didn’t sound like old English at all.
C4.) The Pardoner’s tale is infused with irony because the story he tells and the offer he suggests are polar opposites. The tale tells of gluttony and how sins such as swearing, drinking and murder will cause you death in the end. The pardoner tells the group of pilgrims that their souls would be saved from all prior sins if they paid him money to pardon them. The act of cheating the others out of their money is hypocritical to the story and lesson he told. The irony of the pardoner and the tale are meant to complement each other so that he makes a sale but in this particular situation the host catches on to his trick. The juxtaposition of the irony as it relates to the time the story was told and how quickly the pardoner tried to scam the others is directly related. Chaucer’s tone may directly relate morality and religion. His various characters are either religious and good people or unreligious people with no morals, such as the Pardoner.

Anonymous said...


Ariana Bruno
C5a.) The first panel of Bosch’s painting appears to be the earth in either its early stages of life or a futuristic post apocalypse depiction. There are a lot of animals that look like they are mixed with many different types of animals, this could suggest evolution. There is a cave like structure in the distance that has a flock of birds flying through it; this may suggest unity in some species. What stand out the most are the two naked humans who may represent Adam and Eve, there is another human there in robes who may be their teacher i.e. God. The first panel seems to be a serene place with many animals coexisting.
The second panel is very hectic and chaotic. There are many more humans and especially one colored human. There are animals in locations they shouldn’t be in such as the fish that are flying. In some areas the humans seem to be getting along with the animals and in some scenes they seem to be hunting them, there are a group of people on horse like creatures that have a large fish eating a smaller fish. This may suggest the coexistence between animals and animals and man has been severed. There is food in this panel such as large strawberries, which seems to be the only focus of man. This could relate to the gluttony lesson told by the Pardoner about how food and wine has destroyed mankind. This panel may suggest the world before it was saved by Jesus.
The third panel appears to be hell. In the distance it is dark and there are various demon creatures patrolling it. The humans appear to be murdered and eaten by these strange creatures. The body parts of the creatures are all miscellaneously put together. Some of the people are dressed and others are not. There is a section with large instruments that look like torture devices for some of the humans. At the bottom there is a man with a scripture on his lap he appears to be looking for comfort from a pig in a nun robe. The man behind him appears very disturbed at what is going on around him. This panel is very violent and has a lot of human deaths by the animals or demons; this could suggest hell or a post human reign.
Pardoner- This painting is quite questionable if I do say.
Chaucer- Alas it requires in depth evaluation.
Pardoner- The right panel seems to be a time when sin wasn’t as nearly present my good sir.
Chaucer- It appears you would have a hard time getting your earnings if there are no souls to pardon.
Pardoner- I shan’t agree with you there are always a soul to pardon.
Chaucer- If I was to assume this is Adam and Eve they wouldn’t have any coinage to pay you.
Pardoner- Perhaps they would have jewels or robes I could acquire.
Chaucer- I have to disagree for this was a time when no such things existed and therefore you would be out of a prize.
Pardoner- I beg to differ there are always such things a man can earn from those who are simple minded.
Chaucer- Now be humble good Pardoner you don’t want to look foolish.

brittany byrnes said...

B1: A caesura is a sentence ending in the middle of a line. An example of a caesura is, “of human hardship. Unhallowed wight”. This is an example of a caesura because the sentence ended in the middle of the line and started a new sentence continuing on that line. Also, it supports the thought of how modern English and old English have come a long way with their writing structures.

B2: A kenning is a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning. First example of a kenning found in Beowulf is “light-of-battle” which is a sword. In battles men had swords to defend themselves back then. Another example would be “the breaker-of-rings” which is for the king or chieftain of a comitatus. He breaks off gold from rings that are usually worn around the arm and rewards his men. A third example is “rapture-of-heaven” which stands for the sun. The sunrise is a reflection of the raven’s joy while he is in battle because he is the warrior’s bird and known for slaughtering and carnage.

B3: Beowulf demonstrates values of both Angelo- Saxton culture and Christianity throughout the text. For example, ‘LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped, we have heard, and what honor the athelings won!’ This piece is an example of honor the warriors had in these very long days, and about kings. Angelo-Saxton culture valued the heroic actions of warriors and their heroic ideals. “Light from east, came bright God's beacon; the billows sank, so that I saw the sea-cliffs high,” is an example of the beginning of Christianity. It shows that God gives sailors light at night so they can see.

brittany byrnes said...



C1: In the Pardoner, Chaucer describes him as a thief on the streets, but holy and good in church. The Pardoner has a great voice and sings at the church, but also describes his regular voice sounding like a goat. Chaucer describes his physical appearance as a guy with very blonde hair and well shaved and smoothed face. The Pardoner is very good at what he does, and collects a lot of money from the people. In the Monk, Chaucer describes the monk as not your average monk. The monk is someone who is tough and strong and takes on the role of a manly man. Also, Chaucer stated that he liked to hunt and ride horses and owned greyhounds. The imagine that you think of when you think of a monk is one who is bald and sits in a holy place to bring out peace, not one who goes out and hunts. The clothing he wears is not one would usually wear but instead he wore a fur coat. But the monk did have a bald head and his eyes were angry and also the monk was fat. Chaucer likes the monk because of how he acts and his attitude and says he’s in the clergy class. In the Merchant, Chaucer describes him as a wealthy man who is very well structured. He has wealth, and dressed adequately to show his role in the class. The merchant takes his job very seriously and knows exactly what he is doing and works very well with spending and collecting money. But even though he is a good man, Chaucer is not that all obsessed with them, for he can not remember his name.

C2: One of the MC’s is wearing a black shirt with a saying on it and is also wearing a white bucket hat with blue stripes on it with black pants. One of the other ones is wearing sunglasses with brown hair and is wearing blue jeans and a red doctor pepper shirt. The third MC is African American that is wearing a brown hat and a brown and white striped shirt.

C3: The narrator has a very strong old accent but speaks very boldly. Also his voice is very calming but yet the pronunciation is not very clear leaving the listener to have complications with listening to how the story is told.

C4: The Pardoners tale is painfully ironic to the Pardoners persona and role because he is supposed to be trustworthy and truthful and yet he goes and steels people’s money and is very greedy. The irony in the tale is that the three men went out in search for getting money to split with each other and to kill death and yet they end up killing each other in hope of getting all the money for themselves and no one gets it in the end. Chaucer shows the pardoner as someone who seems to think he has morals but actually lacks to have them.

C5: The first panel is showing you how life was before everything became so complex, and only two humans roamed the earth, being Adam and Eve. It shows the viewer that life was simple and that your neighbors were friendly and welcoming and also they were animals. The second panel shows how life begins to start evolving with more human life and contact and how clustered everyone is. But yet it shows how everyone is still getting along and is happy about life itself. The last panel shows the world being complex and vivid and how violent we have become and how everyone turns on each other. Also the last panel shows the hatred people have towards life and how unappreciative they are to it. It shows a world full of sins and how chaotic it has become.

Chaucer: Do you see anything wrong with any of these panels, Pardoner?

Pardoner: no, should i?

Chaucer: Well any human that has morals should know that the last panel is full of people making sins and hatred.

Pardoner: But I don’t understand, I have morals and to me that picture just shows darkness and people doing what they have to in order to survive.

Chaucer: To survive you do not have to go and commit a sin and go and kill other people. You have to believe that people have good in them, Pardoner, maybe one day you will see that.