Saturday, October 16, 2010

Seniors: The Kite Runner Frontloading



Part A (quiz): Click here to visit the CIA's World Fact Book. Peruse the site and respond to the following questions 
(due as a comment to this post by midnight October 29).

1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1? 
2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?
4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces. 
5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges). 


Part B (quiz): Click her to visit The Boston Globe's "The Big Picture: Afghanistan". View each photograph (use your judgement for the objectionable pieces) and read the corresponding footnotes. Choose the most powerful image to prompt a piece of fiction. Write a descriptive passage that embodies the "show vs. tell" technique we have discussed in class (due as a comment to this post by midnight Halloween).

Part C (quiz): Article: "Hazaras: Afghanistan's Outsiders" (9 pages). Produce a thesis statement that encapsulates the author's message and illuminates the deeper meaning of the text (due as a comment to this post by midnight Halloween).

Part D (quiz): Click here to view the Frontline Program: "The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan". Take notes and prepare for a Discussion Facilitation regarding this topic.


Extra Credit: A quiz grade of 100 will be awarded for comprehensive notes for the Frontline Program: "The War Briefing"

190 comments:

alison said...

Mr. Kefor, you're killing me...

22569 said...

Well at least you have it easy. When I was a senior we had to do like 5 times the amount of work that you are doing.

Kaylyn said...

i second what ali said....

Dan Sugar said...

Part A:


opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is #1.


2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?

44.4 years. 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births.
Deeper issues typically highlighted in these stats are healthcare and


3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?

0km. This might have made it easier for land armies to invade and control the country, just as the Soviets Union did in 1979



4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.

Terrorism from the Taliban and economic hardships like famine, drought, and unemployment



5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).

Afghanistan is a nation with a magnificent mountain scene but also with a sheer lack of resources and control of its own government.

Dan Sugar said...

part B.

I see people protesting with vigor. Protesting against the awful decision by an American church to burn the Quaran, our holy text. How dare those American savages do such a thing?
Of course, actions like this are nothing new. Ever since the terrorist attacks in 2001, Americans have never viewed us with more angst and hostility. Yet they fail to recognize that those terrorists were Muslim extremists who took the Quaran to an extreme and believed they were fighting a holy war. But most Muslims do not support this; we pray peacefully and honor the world and the Lord.
We deserve the respect of the world as a humble, peaceful religious group, not a bunch of terrorist thugs who want to destroy America and Israel.
I think these men and women have full right to protest. In fact, I want to join them. Now I know what you're thinking. I just said we're peaceful people and yet I want to protest? Well, that's just like when you all protest. It's what people do when they are upset. Difference is, we have no intentions of suicide bombings or blowing you up; we're just there to speak out against what we think is an unjust act of intolerance and arrogance.
Anyway, I am done with all this. Go enjoy your morally wrong American lifestyle of arrogance and misconception while we stand up for ourselves in this very anti-Muslim world.

alison said...

Part A:
1. The top eight agricultural products are: opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is the number one product.
2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. Some deeper issues that are typically reflected in these statistics are the state of the economy and the healthcare system of the country in question.
3. Afghanistan possesses 0 kilometers of coastline. The fact that Afghanistan lacks a coastline could contribute to the country's historically rough economic times because Afghanistan must be dependent on others for enitities which it doesn't have access to through their own land.
4. Afghanistan faces Internation disputes specifically with Pakistan, Refugees and internally displaced persons in their south and west due to drought and instability, and illicit drugs such as opiom trading.
5. While the nation of Afghanistan's history of change and instability reflect it's irregularity in governing technique it also displays a country with extreme perserverance and determination to overcome it's geographical and economic issues.

Dan Freedman said...

1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins are the top eight agricultural products. Opium is their number one product

2. The life expectancy rate for the total population is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths to every 1,000 live births. That’s almost 3 deaths for every 20 births. These statistics reflect issues such as poor medical care and poverty that is widespread throughout Afghanistan.

3. Afghanistan has 0 kilometers of coastline, meaning it is surrounded by other countries. Because of this, the country has people constantly moving through it to get from one country to another, plus it would be constantly in the middle of wars that go on throughout Asia.

4. Afghanistan has a dispute with Pakistan who has “built fences in some portions of its border with Afghanistan which remains open in some areas to foreign terrorists and other illegal activities” (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/af.html). Also it is the largest producer of opium.

5. Afghanistan is not so much a country, as it is a route for illicit activity and terrorism.

C.J. said...

Part A:
1. opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is number one.

2. Life ex- 44.4 years, Infant Mortality- 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births, Usually quality of life and the condition of the countries hospitals are reflected in the life expectations and infant mortality rate. If the country has bad facilities then both of these will be affected negatively.

3. 0km, it is landlocked. Many invaders have to go through it to get to other countries so they have had many influences in culture and have had many types of people try and take over their country.

4. Many different tribes reside in the country of Afghanistan. These tribes have different cultures and beliefs that cause the tribes to be in conflict with each other.

5. Throughout the history of the country of Afghanistan, There has always been internal and external conflict from the people who live in Afghanistan, and people who have tried to take the country over.

Anonymous said...

Part A
Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins.
Opium is #1.


2. 44.4 years
153.14 deaths/1,000 live births.

The deeper issues behind these facts could be because of how poor the nation is and how bad the healthcare is.


3. They have a coastline of 0km.
Because of this lack of coastline, it would make the country dependant on trading with over sea nations to get good that are not easily created or produced within the country.



4. This country is facing terrorism from the Taliban, economic difficulties such as famines, droughts, and lots of unemployment.

5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).

Afghanistan is a country that has major agricultural prosperity but also faces trading and aid difficulties due to the fact that the country is land locked.


AJ BASHAW

Anonymous said...

Part A
Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins.
Opium is #1.


2. 44.4 years
153.14 deaths/1,000 live births.

The deeper issues behind these facts could be because of how poor the nation is and how bad the healthcare is.


3. They have a coastline of 0km.
Because of this lack of coastline, it would make the country dependant on trading with over sea nations to get good that are not easily created or produced within the country.



4. This country is facing terrorism from the Taliban, economic difficulties such as famines, droughts, and lots of unemployment.

5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).

Afghanistan is a country that has major agricultural prosperity but also faces trading and aid difficulties due to the fact that the country is land locked.


AJ BASHAW

Anonymous said...

1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins are the top 8 agricultural products. Opium is the primary agricultural product.
2. Males live to be about 44.19 years old and females live to be about 44.61. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per thousand. Afghanistan is portrayed as a non-safe country, and when Americans are prospering until the age of 70, the Afghani people are lacking.
3. Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline, this contributes to the country’s history because it is hard for them to have international affairs. They have no ports and it limits the amount of trade. It causes them to be very isolated.
4. Afghanistan is the world largest leader in dealing opium. The Taliban and other antigovernment groups participate in and profit from the opium trade. There is a lot of illegal activity on the Pakistan- Afghanistan border. They also have 132,246 internally displaced peoples.
5. Afghanistan, has adapted their lifestyle through their geographical means, and their struggles coincide with their surroundings.


Colin Ahern

Anonymous said...

C.

The author of this article believes that Afganistan's minority group, the Hazaras, is rebounding from segregation and discrimination.

-Dan Sugar

Anonymous said...

Part A:
1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is number 1.
2. The life expectancy rate for males and females is 44 years. The infant mortality rate is 153 deaths and 1,000 live births. The deeper issue concerned with these statistics is that people are only living to a young age but so many births are taken place each year. It’s overall just not a good place to be living at.
3. 0 kilometers. It’s harder for people to transport from place to place, which means they can’t transport in as many goods.
4. Illicit drugs are some of the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.
5. Afghanistan is a nation with a beautiful landscape which is often over looked by its illicit drug rate and life expectancy.

Emma Jackson

Anonymous said...

1. opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins are the top eight agricultural products. Opium is the number one agricultural product.

2. Life expectancy rate is 44 years of age. Infant mortality rate is 153.14/1000. This means that there is most likely a lot of war and oppression.

3. There is 0km of coastline in Afghanistan. If the country has no access to the ocean they have to depend on other nations to export things for them.

4. There are lots of illicit drugs in Afghanistan, mainly opium. There are also disputes with Pakistan’s fence around Afghanistan because of illegal terrorists going in and out.

5. The Afghan nation is encapsulated in suffering and agony because of the poverty and tyranny that oppresses the country; the future looks bleak for Afghanistan.

--PHIL RIZZO

Anonymous said...

Part A

1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins and lambskins. Opium in number 1.


2. Life expectancy rate: 44.4 years. Infant mortality: 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. This says that Afghanistan has some serious national health problems.

3. Afghanistan has 0 miles of coastline. This causes trouble with foreign trade and alliances.

4. There are border disputes between Afghanistan and Pakistan being fough by terrorists. Afghanistan is one of the largest distributers of illicit drugs worldwide.

5. Because Afghanistan is set at a geographical disadvantage, the country suffers from lack of central control; thus resulting in health issues, a suffering government and excessive illegal activity.

chris bukowski

Anonymous said...

A)

1)
Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is number 1.

2)
Life expectancy rate is 44.4 years, infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/ 1,000 live births. Reveals how poor living conditions are in Afghanistan.

3)
0 Kilometers, Afghanistan is landlocked. This provides trouble for trading with oversea nations.

4)
Afghanistan encounters transnational issues involving international disputes with Pakistan, resulting in a border line fence between the two countries; a large amount of refugees and Internally Displaced Persons with statistics of 132,246 from 2007; and the most popular place to cultivate poppy, making it the world’s largest producer of opium.

5)
Despite its mountainous and spacious view, Afghanistan internally battles with issues concerning its corrupt government, despicable establishment of illegal drugs, and insufferably harsh living conditions.


Andrea Giglio

Anonymous said...

PART A:
1. The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, as well as wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is number one.

2. For male and females, 44.4 years old is the average life expectancy. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths for every 1,000 live births. Afghanistan isn’t as up to date with their technology and medical advancements as we are in the U.S. This creates a lower life expectancy and infant mortality rate.

3. Afghanistan covers 0km of coastline; it is landlocked. They can’t trade to distant lands without traveling by car. This will take much longer than boat sometimes and it is costly. Because of this their economy is hurting. They also can’t access newer technology as easily as we can because of their geographic location.


4. There are international disputes with Pakistan. Pakistan set up a fence around some of it Afghan boarders in order to keep terrorists out. Another problem is the large amount of refugees and internally displaced persons. In 2007, there were 132,246 internally displaced people. Illicit drugs also contribute to Afghanistan’s transnational issues. Afghanistan is the world’s largest producer of opium.

5. In recent years, Afghanistan has worked towards a healthier environment by creating international agreements to protect the climate and Ozone layer all the while they were allowing enough conflict to take place that their economy was badly hurt.

Kristin Murray

Tim W said...

1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?

opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins
Opium is #1


2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
Life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. Infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. There are mostly younger people since the average person lives to be about only 44 years old. You are not gaining much in your population if no one lives to old age that often.

3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?

It possesses 0km of coastline. It is completely landlocked so over the course of there history they have been able to get less resources because they do not have access to the sea. It also has affected them by maybe the migration of different types of people since they are only surrounded by land.

4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.
They have been having problems with Pakistan with terrorists and other illegal activities around their borders. They are also having problems with refugees and internally displaced persons. Lastly they have drug problems. Opium is made here and their most commonly produced drug. Heroin is also in these drug trades that is consuming Afghanistan.

5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).

Despite the large production of drugs and everlasting issues with the Taliban, Afghanistan is continuing to strive for a more stable central government and better economy no matter how long this may take.

Mike C. said...

Michael Costa
Period C
Kite Runner Part A

1) The top eight agriculture products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is the most important of them.

2) The life expectancy rate is approximately 44 years for men and women. The infant mortality rate is approximately 153 deaths per 1000 births. These numbers show that there is a bigger issue. Children are dying at birth due to the lack of medical supplies and technologies available. The reason that people are dying so much earlier than the USA can be attributed to a lack of medical care, hostile and dangerous environments, and radiation from weapons.

3) Afghanistan has no coastline, it is a landlocked country. This would explain why there have so many wars in the country. With many countries surrounding it, it is in the way of other countries advancements.

4) Afghanistan is one of the largest producers of the illicit drug opium. This is being reduced however by a massive drought that has also displaced many of the people to the south and the west. Also, because of growing tension Pakistan has set up a barricade along parts of the Afghan-Pakistan border.

5) Afghanistan’s landlocked location has given it a history of drug running and ongoing conflicts with surrounding nations.

aliciaroseperry said...

Part A:
1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is the top product.
2. Life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. Infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births.
3. 0 km Coastline. This has had an impact on their history because the country is only surrounded by other countries which could cause problems. It could also make invasion from other countries easier.
4.They face transnational issues such as illicit drug use/ dealings(opium). They also have international disputes specifically with Pakistan.
5. Based on Afghanistan’s poverty and location, it appears unrealistic for the country to revolutionize their way of life, and ultimately transform into a safer, cleaner and diplomatic place.

-Alicia Perry

Dan Freedman said...

Part B: Picture #22

The men lower their friend into his grave. Hes not an insurgent. Hes not part of the taliban. The most he has ever killed is a chicken to feed him and his son come dinner time. His friends Asa, Azar, and Fahran now have to help lower him into his final resting place. His son's no where to be found; he was lost after the NATO troops, who had already killed his father, finally ceased fire. Between the destroyed homes and burning farms, no one can find the boy. But they're used to it. The crowd gathers to help lower the dead farmer into his grave. "Just another day" they say. Just another day.

Justin Iadarola said...

1. Opium (number one), wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins
2. 44.4 years; 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births; Babies are not born in hospitals or clean environments they are mainly conceived in a mud home with a mid wife.
3. 0 km (landlocked); The country of Afghanistan would not have been able to get anything by boat which was a popular of traveling in the earlier years of the world.
4. Disputes with Pakistan, refugees and internally displaced persons, and illicit drugs
5. The history of Afghanistan, including its location and international disputes, has caused many internal issues along with strong connections amongst the Afghan people.

Becca Morse said...

Part A

1. The top 8 agricultural products are: opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins and the number one is opium.
2. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths for every 1,000 live births. The life expectancy rate at birth for the total population is 44.4 years. These show that Afghanistan is very poor and does not have well-developed technology. They have a very young population because they do not have modern medicine and technology to help keep them alive.
3. Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline. It is landlocked. The country has been involved with many government and military conflicts, which may have something to do with the fact that they are surrounded completely by other countries. They have no coastline and therefore, must always interact with other countries.
4. Afghanistan has disputes with Pakistan and Pakistan has built fences around some of its borders. Afghanistan has 132,246 internally displaced persons due to drought and instability. Also, Afghanistan suffers from corruption because of the illicit drug trade and the Taliban.
5. Afghanistan and its citizens represent a humble, desperate being, unfortunately possessed by the evils of certain individuals, causing pain and suffering for all who inhabit the country.

Lindsay said...

1. Opium is the number 1 product then there is, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins.
2. The life expectancy for males is 44.9 years and woman’s life expectancy is 44.61 years of age. The infant mortality rate is male: 156.94 deaths/1,000 live births
female: 149.15 deaths/1,000 live births (2010). The people do not live to an old age.
3. 0 coastlines. Surrounded by other countries and they have no ports for trading so they do not have any income from trading by sea. Could make the country is very poor.
4. Pakistan has built fences in some portions of its border with Afghanistan which remains open in some areas to foreign terrorists and other illegal activities
5. The Afghan nation is encapsulated because of landlocked location and all of the drugs and corruption within the country.

Lindsay said...

B.Choose the most powerful image to prompt a piece of fiction. Write a descriptive passage that embodies the "show vs. tell" technique we have discussed in class (due as a comment to this post by midnight Halloween).


The people of Afghanistan scream and shout and show their anger. There is a dark and ominous mood from the black cloud of smoke and the negative feelings and outrade the men are feeling and the result of a large fire they created out of that anger. They protest the desecration of their home. It is clear that the Afghans are fighting for a better and brighter future. They raise their hands in a prideful way as they fight for that future.

John Eckart said...

John Eckart
A.
1. The top eight agricultural produces in Afghanistan are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheep skins and lamb skins.
2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years old and the infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths for every 1000 births. These numbers shows that many people in Afghanistan are dying young because of little medical care due to extreme poverty.
3. The country has 0 miles of coastline; due to this the country is susceptible to invasion and has been involved in several wars.
4. The transitional problem that Afghanistan faces is that the country was run by corrupt Taliban rulers and now the country is in chaos because the leaders are in hiding but people are still afraid to restore order do to the fear of terrorism.
5. Afghanistan is a geographically amazing country that has faced many difficult moments in history; lately these problems have included poverty and terrorism which have torn the country apart and put Afghanistan into a case of utter chaos.

Anonymous said...

1. Opium, wheat, fruit, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins are the top eight agricultural products. Opium is their number one product.
2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per 1,000 births. Deeper issues such as the economy and how much people have to spend on health care are reflected in these statistics.
3. Afghanistan has 0 kilometers of coastline. If they had kilometers of coastline, it may have been easier to protect themselves against attacks because of the water barrier.
4. Illegal activities and foreign terrorist reside along Afghanistan’s border of Pakistan. There are approximately 132,246 internally displaced people in Afghanistan. Also, Afghanistan is the largest producer of opium, an illicit drug.
5. Although Afghanistan has a past of government and resource failure, the country has perseverance to overcome economic and geographic issues.

Emily Hastings

Paul said...

Part A:
1) Afghanistan’s top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruit, nuts, mutton, sheepskin, and lambskins. The top product being opium.
2) The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality is 153.14 deaths/1000 live births. These high death rates show a lack of adequate medicine/healthcare, education, and technology.
3) Afghanistan has no coastline. No coastline means no overseas trade or contact with coastal nations which are typically more advanced because of the income from trade.
4) One transnational issue facing the Afghani people is the open border with Pakistan which allows terrorists to easily enter and exit the country. Secondly, there are over a hundred thousand refugees centered in the south and west due to drought and instability. Finally, the drugs produced from opium fund the Taliban and their oppressive rule.
5) The Afghani people’s long history of perseverance will need to be employed to conquer Afghanistan’s current problems with terrorism, drugs,corrupt leaders, and a poor economy.

vittoriabravetti said...

1. Eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is the number one product.
2. The life expectancy rate is .4 for the total population and 44.19 yrs for males and 44.61 for females. The infant mortality rate is 156.94 for males and 149.15 females and 153.14 total. Deeper issues that reflect these statistics are a person’s lifestyle, environment, and income.
3. Afghanistan posses 0 km of coastline because it is landlocked. This might have contributed to their history, because the history may have been different and Afghanistan may be a better country today.
4. Transnational issues that Afghanistan faces are disputes internationally. Pakistan has built fences that are open in some areas to terrorists and other illegal activities. Also, they face issues with refugees and internally displaced persons. Lastly, with illicit drugs. They are the world’s largest producer of opium; they are vulnerable to drug money.
5. The Afghan nation is one that is independent, yet struggles with certain aspects in their country.

Dan Freedman said...

Part C:
Thesis: Like the destroyed statues, the Hazara's are trying to pick up the pieces to put their world back together; however, they do not have an image of the final product, making a free life seem even harder to create.

Jessica said...

PART A:
1.What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?
a.The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. The #1 product is opium because Afghanistan is the world’s largest producer of it and relies on it to make revenue.
2.What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
a.The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years of life. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths out of 1,000 live births. The issues that are typically reflected in these statistics are the diseases and ways of death that there are in Afghanistan. The degree of risk of someone developing a disease is high, which causes the life expectancy and infant mortality rate to be lower than normal.
3.How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?
a.Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline which explains why there were so many wars, around and in Kabul before it fell. It also explains the provincial instability that the government faces because the km of coastline would be helpful to the prevention of such wars and struggles for the Afghan people.
4.Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.
a.Fences built by Pakistan which gives opportunities for illegal activities and terrorists to enter.
b.The high number of refugees due to the drought and instability of the south and west.
c.Illicit drugs which lead to widespread corruption because of the people that are benefitting from the production of this drug to make heroin. Because It is a key source to the Taliban revenue, it could also cause problems between the two places regarding the production and how much money Taliban people are getting from it.
5.Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).
a.The countless wars and amount of poverty and disease that lie within Afghanistan allow it to be seen as an exceptionally strong-willed country because it remains intact and independent regardless of the struggles it has faced.

C.J. said...

Part B:
We were watching, waiting for the enemy to show their face. This jagged and desolate setting for our stake out has turned me into a hardened man. I feel that the Americans will never show and Habib and I will have wasted hours on this god forsaken rock. We were told that if we saw them we need to radio back to camp and warm them of an eminent attack. At this point i think the radio's battery will be dead before we get to see another human being cross by us. So Habib and i will wait till the pig dog Americans show up... or we run out of juice in our radio.

Ariel said...

1. The top 8 agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is the #1 agricultural product.
2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years, the infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. Diseases, birth rate, and other factors involving nurture can reflect these statistics.
3. Afghanistan posses 0 kilometers of coastline because they are landlocked. Contribution to the country’s history could be that they have a limited natural fresh water supply.
4. Pakistan has built fences around some parts that are shared with Afghanistan to avoid foreign terrorists and other illegal activities. Also, the Pashtuns and Kuchis were displaced in the South and West, due to drought and instability.
5. Afghanistan is a town of no government control, poverty, and lack of resources, among other things, but work hard to bring their country to its feet.

Anonymous said...

Tim Johansmeyer
Period G

1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins are the top eight agricultural products. The #1 product is opium.

2. The life expectancy is 44.4 years. THe infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per 1000 live births.

3. Afghanistan is landlocked and has no coastline. This may have contributed to the history of the country because they were not able to take advantage of the resources of a coastline. This would cause them to be at a disadvantage economically.

4. One of the issues that Afghanistan faces is that many of the different tribes within the country have different beliefs and conflict with each other. There are also a lot of refugees in the southern and western part of the country because of drought and instability.

5. While Afghanistan has faces many problems due to its geography and internal problems, they are working hard to overcome these issues.

Nigel Allard said...

1) The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins and lambskins and the number one product is opium.

2) The life expectancy rate is 44.4years, the infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths out of 1000 live births, and this shows that they do not have the proper medical care or medicine available to all citizens.

3) Afghanistan does not have any coastline and this shows that Afghanistan is not growing as a country because it is unable to export or import goods as quickly.

4) The transnational issues that Afghanistan faces are disputes with Pakistan, refugees and internally displaced people and illicit drugs.

5) Afghanistan is a developing country with major exports of agricultural products but problems with poverty and the Taliban have slowed their progress.

Anonymous said...

Part A:
1. The top eight agricultural products are: opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is the number one product.
2. The total life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate total is 153.14 deaths per 1,000 births. Both of these figures display deeper issues in Afghanistan society in regards to economy; by having a poor economy that cannot support healthcare, the life expectancy will be low and infant mortality rates will be high because there is not a good healthcare system available.
3. Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline. By having no access to major water, this could reduce the amount of exports to other countries causing there to be no income. By having no exports, it could have contributed to Afghanistan’s poor economic status. Also it is surrounded by other countries; therefore making it easy for other countries to invade just like how the Soviet Union did.
4. Afghanistan faces major problems with illicit drugs such as opium along with international disputes with other foreign countries. Another issue Afghanistan faces is internationally displaced persons and refugees; who are displaced in the south and west due to instability and drought.
5. Although troubled with widespread corruption and instability due to drugs and issues with the Taliban, Afghanistan is recovering from decades of turmoil and striving for a reform of government and economy.

Tory Carlson

David said...

1) The top agriculture products is Wheat, Fruits, Nuts; Wool, Mutton, Lambskins. Sheepskins, and the top product is Opium.
2) Life Expectancy - 44.4 years & 153 deaths, Infant mortality - 1000 Births.
The Level of care for those sick or pregnant, and those who cannot get help.
3) It does not Have any coast line, this translates to More land invasion, Sort of like the crossroads of the Continent.
4) Drought, Famine, Disease, unemployment, Economic system failure and Taliban Terrorism.
5) Although Afghanistan may look nice on the outside there are much deeper conflicts within the country.

- Dave Weeks

Anonymous said...

1. Opium, fruits and nuts, hand woven carpets, wool, cotton, hides and pelts, precious and semi-precious gems are the top 8 agricultural products of the country. Opium is the number one agricultural product of the country.
2. The life expectancy for the total population is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths out of every 1,000 births. The issues with this are that most of the population if they survive birth is very young because most people don’t live past their 40’s.
3. Afghanistan posses no coastline and is landlocked by 6 other countries. This could have caused them to fight other peoples to gain access to water, ports, or coastline.
4. Some of the transnational issues Afghanistan faces are surrounded around terrorism and the threat of it. Along with its unstable government which leads it to be a poorly governed country with not many rights of the people.
5. Afghanistan, is a country surrounded with conflict, even though not all people that reside in the country are guilty they are still persecuted because of this fact.
Derek Schwartz

Shawn said...

Part 1:A) Opium, wheat, fruits,nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins,lambskins. Opium is #1.
B) 44.4 years old. The infant mortality rate is about 153 deaths/ 1000 births. The economy, the healthcare system, the governmental system, and the cleanliness of the country are issues that can affect these statistics.
C) Okm, it is landlocked. Because it is landlocked there are manydifferent cultures acting on it at once, leading to different cultures developing in the region. This leads to the long lasting civil wars that have, and are, occuring in the region due to different beliefs.
D) There is conflict between Afghanistan and Pakistan, forcing some fences to be put up by Pakistan. There is also a good deal of refugees and internally diplaced persons, mostly due to drought and instability. Finally there is a large problem with the production of opium in large quantities, fueled by the Taliban for profit.
E) The geography of Afghanistan allows it to be the perfect place for the agriculture of some crops, but also allows it to be negatively influenced by surrounding countries.

Jeff Kitchen said...

PART A

1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?

The top 8 agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins; opium is at the top.

2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?

The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths for every 1000 births. Issues highlighted by these statistics are the quality of this nations health system and the ability for members of such a nation to afford this care.

3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?

Afghanistan is not on the coast. The lack of coastal access has caused economic strife throughout the history of Afghanistan because ports must be accessed through other nations. Additionally, Afghanistan lacks any coastal protection from invasion.

4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.

Afghanistan faces issues associated with the opium market. Afghanistan also holds a level of tension with Pakistan. Those of Afghanistan are bothered by Pakistan's border regulations which seem to prevent most from crossing the border, while allow terrorists to get through.

5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).

The various political and religious groups of the Middle East disregard the notion of nationalism; the clash of these groups with those who to promote Afghanistan as a united nation hinders the progress of its development.

Anonymous said...

Part A)
1) Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is number 1.
2) The life expectancy is 44.4 years. The infant mortality is 153.14 deaths per 1000 births. The reason for this is poor hospitals and care. Countries with worse care and hospitals have a higher mortality rate in most cases.
3) Afghanistan has 0 Kilometers of coastline, meaning that countries are on all sides of it. The country has a very rough and dry landscape which definitely has something to do with this. It also is a disadvantage because many resources come from the sea, including natural and resources gained from trade.
4) 4) Afghanistan is disliked by many nations, however is only in a serious conflict with Pakistan. Many problems have risen from this conflict as Pakistani people have been migrating to Afghanistan due to problems in their own country. This puts an immense stress on the Afghani government and their protection agencies.
5) While Afghanistan faces obvious challenges, they have very strong loyalty and can overcome these challenges.

Connor O'Sullivan C Class

Anonymous said...

Part A; Brianna Valeri

1. The top 8 agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is the number one product.

2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. These statistics reflect the poor healthcare and poverty in Africa.

3. Afghanistan possesses 0 kilometers of coastline. Afghanistan lacking a coastline could add to the country's historically economic times because Afghanistan must be dependent on others for necessities that they cannot access in their own land.

4. Afghanistan faces international issues such as international disputes, specifically with Pakistan. Also, a couple other issues are refugees and illicit drugs.

5. Despite the endless concerns with the Taliban, geography and the large production of drugs, Afghanistan is still dedicated to creating better government and economy.

cassie iagatta said...

1. The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton sheepskins, and lambskins. The number 1 product is opium.
2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. These statistics reflect how the country has major infectious diseases and poor living conditions, which hinder the country’s quality and longevity of life.
3. The country has 0 km of coastline. This may have attributed to the country’s lack of natural water resources, agricultural crops, and trade with other countries. It may also have caused the lack of technology.
4. The transnational issues that Afghanistan faces are the 132,246 illegally placed persons, the disputes with Pakistan at the border, and the fact that it is the world’s largest producer of opium.
5. Despite the drug issues, lack of resources, terrorists, and other disadvantages, Afghanistan still strives to find peace and stability for the country.

Sydney Colbert said...

Sydney Colbert
C Block English IV Honors
The Kite Runner Blog

PART A

1. The top 8 agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is the number one product.

2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.4 deaths. This is an issue because there are more infant deaths than births. This could mean a possible deep decline in population.

3. Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline. This number could relate to the country’s history because this is a contributing factor to the country’s economic status. There is no way to export and import.

4. Afghanistan deals with international issues and has an ongoing dispute with Pakistan.

5. Afghanistan is a country with a history of problems, and due to many different statistics, has a future with further issues.

Anonymous said...

1. Wheat, opium, nuts, fruits, wool sheepskins, mutton and lambskins. Opium is the number one agricultural product.
2. total population; the life expectancy is 44.4 years old. Male expectancy is 44.19 years and
Female expectancy is 44.61 years. 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births is the mortality rate. Deeper issues consist of

3. They possess 0 km of coastline. They lack the resources that other countries get from the coastlines.

4. They face the issue of refugees and internally displaced organs and illicit drugs

5. The minimal assets that Afghanistan has encountered is always easily taken away and outweighed by the overflowing hardship and animosity that the country is forced to face.

-Kayla Bessette

Sarah T. said...

1. The top eight agricultural products in Afghanistan are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. (This is listed in order with Opium being the #1 product.)

2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years and the infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per every 1,000 births. This creates worries because there are many deaths throughout their population. With the life expectancy being so low and the infant mortality rate so high, there is not enough of an older population to keep creating more lives. Also a poor economy, unsafe places for birth, no education to help educate children, diseases, and lack of birth control are deeper issues that are reflected in this statistic.

3. The land of Afghanistan is landlocked. This means that there is zero coastal area throughout the entire country. Without water access, this country not only could not have a direct access to drinking water, but they also could not have ports for trade with other countries. This created a disadvantage in the world market.

4. There are many boarder disputes with their neighboring country Pakistan. Pakistan has put up many different fences to solve this boarder dispute, but much of the boarder is not covered by fences and allows the entrance of many terrorists to come and invade Afghanistan.

5. With a rich culture and unique landscape, Afghanistan struggles to protect its boarders from both foreign terrorists and negative internal influences.

Sarah T. said...

1. The top eight agricultural products in Afghanistan are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. (This is listed in order with Opium being the #1 product.)

2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years and the infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per every 1,000 births. This creates worries because there are many deaths throughout their population. With the life expectancy being so low and the infant mortality rate so high, there is not enough of an older population to keep creating more lives. Also a poor economy, unsafe places for birth, no education to help educate children, diseases, and lack of birth control are deeper issues that are reflected in this statistic.

3. The land of Afghanistan is landlocked. This means that there is zero coastal area throughout the entire country. Without water access, this country not only could not have a direct access to drinking water, but they also could not have ports for trade with other countries. This created a disadvantage in the world market.

4. There are many boarder disputes with their neighboring country Pakistan. Pakistan has put up many different fences to solve this boarder dispute, but much of the boarder is not covered by fences and allows the entrance of many terrorists to come and invade Afghanistan.

5. With a rich culture and unique landscape, Afghanistan struggles to protect its boarders from both foreign terrorists and negative internal influences.

Anonymous said...

Keegan Schleicher

1)
A. The top 8 agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins and lambskins. The number one product is opium.

B. The life expectancy rate is 44 years old. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per thousand. The deeper issues that are typically reflected in these stats are how Afghanistan is not a ideal place to live. It shows the economical problems in the country when people are dying young and many babies are being lost at birth. The medicine field is lacking.

C. They have zero kilometers of coastline. This contributed to their history because they become very isolated. They have no way of developing trade by using ports and with their rough terrain; it becomes hard to trade with other nations. Also, they border many other countries which cause conflicts with neighboring territories.

D. Some of the transnational issue for Afghanistan is they are the leading opium trader around the world. The opium is the main revenue for the Taliban, which is inside the Afghanistan government. The Taliban causes widespread corruption throughout the government. Also, they have over 130,000 IDP and immigration is a growing problem for Afghanistan.

E. Although Afghanistan has an abundance of natural resources, the recovering agricultural sector and garnering foreign aid, Afghanistan progress as a nation has been extremely poor because of internal and external conflicts over the last few decades, and lack of survival needs for its citizens such as food, housing and drinkable water.

Anonymous said...

1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?
2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?
4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.
5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).

1. opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins
2. total population: 44.4 years, 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births
The life expectancy rate and infant mortality rate are so low and high respectively because of the lack of money in the country, the medical field is suffering and the country does not have to technology in order to prevent having a low life expectancy and a high infant mortality rate.
3. 0 km. The fact that the country is land locked shaped their history because with the lack of waterway access shipping is a hassle and communication and transportation is hindered.
4. Drugs, immigration, and poverty are issues that affect the nation of Afghanistan. Because of the lack of funds the fight against crime is a tiring one in which the law enforcement has barely any means of enforcing their laws. Pakistan’s lack of border control allows the flow of immigrants to be constant, disrupting Afghanistan’s protection against the problem.
5. Afghanistan’s past is one riddled with poverty and war, but a growing economy and a drive for new leadership makes a promising future seem reasonably close.

Conor Regan

Becca Morse said...

Part B: Picture #44
Everything is blurred, confusing. Red spreading across my body, soaking onto the sheets underneath me, covering the hard, cement floor. A strange man lurching over me, rubbing my wounds with unknown substances, stinging so severely, yet I am numb to it all. My face crumples with pain, yet I make no noises at all. This man has different features than me. Mine are rigid, pointed. His are softer, yet defined at the same time. He is paler than I, with rosy cheeks and a more of a beige undertone. My skin is golden, with deeper brown undertones. Now I am just coated in dirt, turning to mud as blood streaks across my now half naked body. I don’t remember the blast. Where is my father? He was with me and now he is gone. We were simply going to visit family in the near village, when something threw us across the street. I am so hungry. I remember now that I have not eaten in days. The Taliban destroyed much of my home village and food is scarce. I hear one of the men in thick military outfits mention to another soldier that I look skinny, too skinny. Another man mentions that my ribs are sticking out. I need to be nourished, or I will never survive the medicine they are giving me. I am confused. These people are not Afghani. They are not my people. Will they hurt me? Should I be scared of them? He seems to be helping my wounds, bandaging them, stopping the flow of blood. The Taliban teaches to hate Americans, but the Taliban did this to me. The bomb was meant for Americans, but it hurt their own kind. Why are the Americans here? What is this war even about? I am confused. I cannot stop crying. Where is my dad? It hurts too much.

alison said...

B.
“Where is he?” I ask again and again of my daddy. I can’t stop crying. “He can’t really be gone, he isn’t really gone,” I keep telling myself. But my tears won’t stop, my throat aches, my heart feels broken, my nose is runny, and I don’t know how I still have any tears left in me. “My daddy tells me that my brother, my Joshua, was fighting for me when his helicopter crashed. Since that moment, I have felt like I’m falling, I won’t believe him, but why would my daddy play this mean joke on me. And then I realize he wouldn’t. I’ve never seen my daddy cry before, it makes almost makes me pause before the tears come harder and faster and I want my brother back. I feel hatred for this awful country that took my brother away, he was a good boy, and they took him, and I want to get them back. I’m exhausted, but I won’t go to sleep, or my Joshua won’t come back to me. My mommy wipes me eyes and nose and hugs me so hard it hurts, and daddy comes, too. We’re all crying, we all want our Joshua back.

C.
Despite the continuous rough history the Hazara's have been subjected to, they show that they are a culture of not only persistent, but also relentlessly hopeful people.

Anonymous said...

Christopher Ruta

Part A

1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. The number one product is Opium.

2. The life expectancy rate is 44.5 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 per 1000 births. Health care and technology is not a strong area for people in Afghanistan. They do not have the means to live long or give healthy births.

3. Afghanistan possesses 0 kilometers of coastline which does not help the countries access to trade from other countries. Before airplanes, they did not have any way of transporting goods or received goods from other countries.

4. Afghanistan has trouble with terrorists and other illegal activities from bordering Pakistan. They must support over one-hundred thousand refugees from other countries, and are the largest producer of the addictive drug opium.

5. Afghanistan is home to a beautiful mountainous landscape, but is overwhelmed with poverty and lack of technological resources.

Anonymous said...

Part A:
1.a. Opium
b. wheat
c. fruits
d. nuts
e. wool
f. mutton
g. sheepskins
h. lambskins
2. The life expectancy is 44 years of age, the infant mortality rate is 153 deaths for every 1000 born, the deeper issues reflected are that the majority dies at a young age and they do not have good medical care and they are poor.
3. They do not have a coastline which means they have 0 km, this number contributes to their history because it secludes them from international trade and it makes them easier to attack.
4. The transnational issues that Afghanistan faces are that they are the world leader in opium and have major illicit drug problems and they also have immigration and border disputes with Pakistan.
5. Due to the history of Afghanistan and their current struggles with drugs and immigration the Afghan people are in trouble and need a change for a better future.

---Keegan Campbell

Anonymous said...

hiii kefor lolz. um i left part of my 2nd answer blank.. the deeper issue is the poor healthcare of afghanistan

Colleen McD said...

Part A
1. The top eight agriculture products are: opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. The most popular is opium!
2. A male usually lives till 44, and so does a female. The infant mortality rate total is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. Some deeper issues may be lack of medicine, and lack of technological advances, make the death rates/life expectancy low.
3. Afghanistan has no coastline. Because they have no coastline they are easily influenced by their surrounding countries. They can easily be taken over, so they are forced to build up their defenses.
4. Their transnational issues mostly include drugs and terrorism. Afghanistan is well known for their opium supply, but there is a decrease in the poppy seed. Also, they are known for terrorism, but Pakistan is building up fences to keep some of it out.
5. In the country of Afghanistan people often think of its bad character, but in actuality it’s a growing nation who hopes to make a better future.

Anonymous said...

Part A:
1. Wheat, opium, nuts and fruits. Wool, sheepskins, mutton, lambskins. The number one product is Opium.
2. Life expectancy is 44.4 years for the entire population. Infant mortality is 153.14 deaths and 1,000 live births. The deeper issue is the nation and its poor healthcare and issues.
3. 0 km for coastline. They may not receive many resources from the water.
4. Pakistan has built fences in some portions of its border with Afghanistan which remains open in some areas to foreign terrorists and other illegal activities
5. Afghanistan is full of beautiful aspects but the beauty is only skin deep when there are many issues within the country.


-Shannon Hansen

Brian Fox said...

Part A:
1. The top 8 agricultural products opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. The number 1 is opium.
2. Life expectancy is 44 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. The reason for these are that there is not enough medical care for the people because there is so much poverty.
3. 0 km (landlocked). The country is touching a lot of places so they have a lot of conflicts and there is no ports so long ago it was very difficult for trade and international contact.
4. Conflicts with Pakistan. Refugees and internally displaced people. And illict drug use such as opium.
5. Afghanistan is a country that is faces very hard times both due to external factors and internal factors.
Brian Fox

C.J. said...

The Hazara people of Afghanistan are a segrageted and cast out group of people, but despite thier degradation the Hazara people could end up helping the country in the long run.

Anonymous said...

Part B
The American Marine has been overseas for 3 years
now. He has seen innocent people die right in front
of him; Americans and Afghans. Explosives can
happen around any corner but this brave soldier has
never adjusted to The booms and screams of others.
Today, he sees that no one has been injured by a
surprise attack but that only briefly satisfies him. His
glasses reflect what he sees But only because he is
hiding behind the Oakleys. His Eyes would be too
easy to read of fear and longing of Being anywhere else
in the world if he chose to not block them from all of the violence around him. He decides to show others what he sees by reflecting it through the sunglasses rather than have them look into his own eyes. The reflections show what he sees all around him but they hide the messengers of his feelings kept behind the lenses.

Anonymous said...

1. The top 8 agriculture products in Afghanistan are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is the number one product.

2. 44 years is the life expectancy. The infant mortality rate is 153 deaths for every 1000 births. There are many problems in Afghanistan involving these deaths such as disease because of lack of health care and violence.

3. They do not have a coastline which means it is 0 kilometers. This makes the country more susceptible to being attacked. It is in the middle of other countries , so it is disturbed by many people going through it.

4. Some transnational issues that they face are: Afghanistan is the world’s largest producer of illicit drugs such as opium. Also foreign terrorists and illegal activities with Pakistan.

5. Afghanistan deals with many transnational issues and other factors and is still able to have a stable country.


Ben Avril

Anonymous said...

Part A.
1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is Number 1.
2. Life expectancy - 44.4 years. Infant mortality rate - 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. They are a poorer country with little medicine.
3. They have 0 kilometers of coastline. This hurts their trade because they can only go along the one river they have. It has also isolated them a lot from other countries.
4. Immigration issues with Pakistan and drug cartels.
5. Although Afghanistan is a developing countries with a lot of problems, they still have the potential to be a rich country because they are moving in the right direction.

- Michael Edward Kelly

Brian Fox said...

Part B:
Picture 18:
I fly around in the black hawk waiting to hear from the control post about who needs our help. I am the man who has to jump out to grab my brother and make sure he comes makes it back home. Although its why I am here and it makes me happy, I hate the job just as much as I love it. There is no way that I enjoy seeing my brothers hurt. The fear and terror in their eyes is indescribable. But I know when they hear the chopper, and see the Afghan dust fly up, they know we are there. We are there to save them. Even if we have no idea who they are, they are still our family. The brotherhood we all joined when we enlisted and promised we would do anything possible to keep our brothers safe.
Brian Fox

Hannah Clark said...

Part A:

1. The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is number 1 product.

2. The total life expectancy is 44.4 years. The male life expectancy is 44.19. The female life expectancy is 44.61. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per 1,000 live births. The male infant mortality rate is 156.94 deaths per 1000 live births. The female infant mortality rate is 149.15 deaths per 1000 live births. You can tell from life expectancy that they don’t have means to a higher standard of living. A deeper issue reflected in both statistics is that you can tell they don’t have enough medical doctors and supplies needed to take of their patients, pregnant mothers, and the babies that are born.

3. Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline. It is a landlocked country. Because they have no coastline, they are forced to trade with other countries which makes them more dependent on others. It is also easier for people to wander into their country since they are sort of right in the middle of the east. They would be in the middle of wars a lot as well. They also can’t make any money from ports or boats.

4. Pakistan has built fences in some portions of its border with Afghanistan, which remains open in some areas to foreign terrorists and other illegal activities. People can come through to Afghanistan through the fences. There is also a large amount of internally displaced people - 132,246. They are mostly Pashtun’s and Kuchi’s displaced in the south and west due to drought and instability. A large amount of illicit drug activity takes place as well.

5. Although Afghanistan has faced challenges in the past with terrorism and illicit drug activity, the country continues to push forward to display the positive assets it possesses to the rest of the world.

Anonymous said...

B. picture #18
I lay unmoving as a cloud of dust surrounds me from the explosion. The grenade had just landed 50 feet away from me. The shrapnel had pierced my legs as there was a sharp pain and blood on my camouflaged pants. I start to scream for help but I can’t see anyone around me. I drag my body to the nearest sand bags for cover. My best friend Jim comes over to me and calls for the medic. I tell him that I am unable to use my legs right now and that I can’t feel them. He reassures me that it will be okay and ill make. All of a sudden the medic scoops me up from the light brown sand and throws me over his shoulder. He picks me up and takes me about 1 mile to the helicopter which took about 20 minutes. I get into the stretcher on the helicopter and am sent to the nearest hospital. To this day I am still thankful for the man who carried me a mile on his shoulder through the treacherous Afghan desert.

--PHIL RIZZO

Anonymous said...

1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins are the agricultural products. Opium is the top.
2. The life expectancy is rate is 44.4. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per 1,000 births. These statistics show that the mortality rate is very low followed by a low life expectancy, thus life is hardly sustainable.
3. There is no coastline therefore there is somewhat of a lack of water.
4. The continuing provincial in stability between the government and the Taliban.
5. The Afghan nation is slowly deteriorating due to its political instability and life expectancy.

-robert Cormier

Anonymous said...

As they spend their last night together for a long six months, they lie next to each other silent. Both are thinking about the last night that this could be. Laying there side by side with their inner hands grasping each others, they had no intention of letting go. As they dread the morning their bodies move closer. Eventually they fall asleep and as the sun rises tears slowly fall down her cheeks onto his chest. As they begin to wake up, they ignore the idea of him leaving. She goes to the kitchen to make his favorite breakfast as he presumes to get into his uniform. Time is moving faster as they think about the moment of goodbye. Leaving the house he grabs her hand and the walk to the car slowly. Arriving at the infamous place, they glance into each other’s eyes and hers glisten. They get of the car looking around at the other soldiers and their girlfriends. She losses all sight of everyone and they focus in on each other. They then kiss for their last few kisses. Nothing else matters but this moment. The last moment together for six months, or forever.

- SHANNON HANSEN!

Mikey G said...

A
Question 1: What are the top 8 agricultural products; what's number 1?
Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins; opium
Question 2: What is the life expectancy rate; infant mortality rate; deeper issues reflected in these statistics?
Male- 44.19, female- 44.61; male- 156.94/1,000, female- 149.15/1,000; the country overall is not good for supporting its people for a long life
Question 3: How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this contribute to its history?
0; it inhibits the ability for Afghanstan to transport goods by means of the oceans.
Question 4: What are the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces?
Fences built on its border with Afghanistan that is open to allow terrorists to pass through, and opium distribution.
Question 5: Construct a thesis statement that contains the essence of Afghanistan's assets and challenges.
In modern times, the nation of Afghanistan is experiencing difficulties due to the combinations of its poverty rate, low birth rate, and a lack of sufficient amount of potable water to support its population, amongst other things; but still remains as being the world leader in opium manufacturing.

Jason Oliva said...

A.)
1.) Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins are the top eight agricultural products of Afghanistan. Opium is the #1 Agricultural product.
2.) Life expectancy rate of 44 years. Child Mortality rate of 157/1000 people. Issues reflected in these statistics include poor living conditions, poverty, lack of medicine, starvation, homelessness, and others.
3.) Afghanistan has no kilometers of coastline at all. This means they can only trade by land, where trade by sea is a lot more efficient. Little trade means little money and greater poverty rates.
4.) Pakistan disputes, international refugees, and illicit drug use are all transnational issues in Afghanistan.
5.) Despite the potential of Afghanistan’s agricultural economy, its lack of decent trade routes, child mortality rate, and illicit drug use renders the country completely obsolete in comparison to the United States.

Jason Oliva said...

B.) Picture (1) Rashid curled his small fingers around the trigger. He put his other hand on the barrel and aimed his shot. With his friends pressuring him on, it was impossible for him to back off now. His target was turned away, unsuspecting, almost begging to be killed. Rashid had the perfect shot, and he took it. “Bang bang bang!” Rashid yelled. The soldier turned around, looked at the children in front of him, and told them to go home. With M16 in hand, the soldier was more threatening than Rashid and his toy pistol. The three boys ran away, refusing to look back.

Jason Oliva said...

C.) Throughout most of recorded history, the Hazaras, a people descended from Mongol Invaders in Afghanistan, have not been allowed to be educated or even work for a decent amount of money until recently.

Erin said...

Part A:
1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?
The top eight agricultural products from Afghanistan are Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is number one. 
2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
The life expectancy for males is 44.19 years, for females its 44.61. The infant mortality is 153.14 to every 1,000 live births. The problem with these statistics is people are dying faster than they are reproducing. The age of death is earlier than most counties and the infant mortality rate is higher than most countries.
3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?
The area of Afghanistan takes up 652,230 sq km. This area is slightly smaller than Texas, making it the underdog or many bordering countries.
4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces. 
Afghanistan troubles with issues including disputes with Pakistan, has built said fences with the bordering country. Displaced persons due to drought and instability. Also it is a producer of illicit drugs such as, the world’s largest producer of opium, as well as a producer of heroin.
5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges). 
A nation like Afghan needs to get worse before it gets better or needs to go down in pieces all together.

Mpotvin said...

Part A:
1. The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskin, and lambskins. Their number one product is opium.

2.The life expectancy rate for the total population is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate in total is 153.14 deaths. These statistics reflect the healthcare system of the country and how little Medicare they provide. It also shows how bad the economy is because they cannot afford Medicare causing a large amount of deaths among infants and elders.

3. Afghanistan has 0 km of a coastline because it is landlocked. This number might have contributed to the country’s history because it is landlocked could have caused border problems among the surrounding countries making them hostile towards each other. Also, without water trading with other countries may have been difficult affecting their economy.

4. They have international dispute with the borders allowing an opening for illegal activity. They are also known as the worlds largest opium producer which the Taliban uses for profit and in turn causes corruption with the counterdrug efforts.

5. The high mortality rate reflects how the instability of the medicare system, which in turn shows the downturn in the economy as a result of the opium drug trade of the Taliban.

Anonymous said...

Part A:

1) #1-opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins
2) life expectancy- 44.4 years; 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births
These statistics suggest that Afghanis have poor healthcare and an unsafe living environment.
3) It has no coastline. This could have been a problem for industry and trade; all of it must have gone through parts of other countries.
4) Afghanistan has numerous issues including international ones, terrorists and other illegal activities; sociological issues, feuds of different ethnic groups and illicit drugs, huge opium industry.
5) Afghanistan’s government has failed to effectively take care of its people in numerous ways, which include financial, health-related, and homeland security purposes.

-Justin Glass

Ashlie Sprague said...

Part A:

1) The top eight agricultural pruducts are opium, wool, wheat, fruit, nuts, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Of the eight products opium is #1.
2) The life expectancy for the whole population is 44.65 years. The infant mortality rate is 151.5 deaths for every 1,000m births. Some other issues brought out in these statistics are poverty and economic success/failure.
3) Afghanistan possesses 0 kilometers of coastline, therefore it is considered "landlocked". This may have influenced other countries to try to control Afghanistan due to their dependence on other countries for support.
4)A major international dispute in Afghanistan is Pakistan building a border by using fences. Along with this dispute are the illicit drugs in Afghanistan. Being the number 1 producer of Opium consists of major illegal drug activity and money laundering.
5) Although Afghanistan has been burdened with years of instability and hardships; it maintains a spirit high enough to overcome economic struggles.

Ashlie Sprague

Anonymous said...

Part A:
1) The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins with opium being the number one product.
2) The life expectancy is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths to 1,000 live births. The deeper issues reflected in these statistics are that many in Afghanistan do not live long because they are not as far advanced in medicine.
3) Afghanistan has zero kilometers of coastline. This may be due to the fact that the land was used as buffer for the British and Russian.
4) The transitional issue that Afghanistan faces is that after trying to have a more stable government from electing the first democratic president, there are still groups that do not go along with democracy.
5) While trying to have a more stable government for a better life, Afghanistan still faces the difficulty of dealing with the people who disagree with the new government.
--Vanessa Ferreira

Anonymous said...

David Littlefield
1. opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins, their largest export is opium.
2. Life expectancy: male: 44.45 years female: 44.87 years (2010 est.) Infant mortality:male: 155.15 deaths/1,000 live births female: 147.67 deaths/1,000 live births (2010 est.) Everything from economy, to poverty, to polotics come into this, an unstable life is clearly seen within these statistics.
3.0km(landlock) this greatly reduces the countries ability to trade, and gain wealth, keeping them in perminant poverty.
4. Most of the country is lacking roads, and many of the people dont own cars, day to day transportation becomes a huge issue.
5. We can learn the most from people who are the most diffrent; Afghanistan can offer many valuable cultural, and natural benifits for us, but on the flip side, their country is in peril, and needs to be saved.

Anonymous said...

Part A:
1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?
Opium, wheat, fruit, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins; opium is the #1 agricultural product.
2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. Infant mortality rate is 153.14/1000 live births. Deeper economic issues are typically reflected in these statistics; the better economy a country has, the more likely it is that their life expectancy will go up and their infant mortality rate will go down.
3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?
Afghanistan has 0km of coastline which might explain the country’s poor economic status; it would have been difficult for the country to establish trading rights when they have no way of trading to far away countries except by land.
4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.
Illicit drugs, mainly opium, and international issues, especially with Pakistan cause many problems for Afghanistan. Afghanistan also has issues with refugees and displaced persons looking for refuge in their country.
5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).
Afghanistan, in spite of continual issues with the Taliban and extensive production of opium, is determined to establish a more stable government and a thriving economy.

Kerryn Camara

Jess W said...

1. The top eight agricultural products of Afghanistan are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins and lambskins. Opium is the most important agricultural product of Afghanistan.
2. The life expectancy for the total population is 44.4 years. More specifically for males, it is 44.19 years and for females it is 44.61 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per every 1,000 living births. More specifically, for males it is 156.94 deaths per every 1,000 living births. For females it is 149.15 deaths per every 1,000 living births. These types of issues in a country show that they are not advanced medically and suffer because of it. They have a very low life expectancy related to that of other countries, meaning that they do not have many of the necessary things required to live longer, healthier lives. They are also very high in infant mortality rate compared to other countries, which displays the same message.
3. Afghanistan possesses 0 kilometers of coastline. This number may have contributed to the country’s history because it means that is a landlocked country. Having means to a body of water help a country to develop and grow to be more successful and involved in international affairs. Without any way to do so, Afghanistan has suffered economically and in many other ways.
4. Afghanistan has faced many disputes with Pakistan because of the fence that borders Pakistan. It is open in some parts along the Afghanistan border, which allows foreign terrorists and, in turn, other illegal activities. Also, due to the fact that opium is such a huge crop in Afghanistan, there are many opportunities for drug problems in the country.
5. Although faced with adversities geographically and economically, Afghanistan proves to be a persisting and advancing nation despite its historical hardships.

Kaylyn said...

Part A:
1. The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. The number one product is Opium.

2.The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. The deeper issues usually reflected in these statistics are the fact that their life expectancy rate is not even over 45 years so most people will die before they reach fifty. Also, out of one thousand births, around 153 die. So, this means that there is still a decent amount of kids that die at birth and the ones that do survive do not live to be very old.

3.Afghanistan posses 0km of coastline because it is landlocked. This number might have contributed to the country’s history because they are constantly forced to trade with other countries because they do not have a coastline and they have a limited amount of resources. This forces them to trade regularly which allows other cultures to start to weave themselves into the original Afghanistan culture.

4. The transnational issues that Afghanistan faces are that Pakistan built fences on parts of its border with Afghanistan, but the fence does not cover the whole border, leaving them vulnerable to terrorists and other illegal activities. Also there is transnational issues due to refugees and internally displaced persons, approximately 132,246 had to be displaced in the south and west due to drought and instability.

5. Although Afghanistan faces several set backs both with their government and economy, they continue to strive to overcome these obstacles.

Anonymous said...

Robert Southworth
English C

1. The top eight agricultural products in order from greatest to least are: opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins.
2. The life of expectancy at birth in Afghanistan is 44 and a half years. The infant mortality rate is every 153 of 1000 births, the child dies. The deeper issues revolving around these statistics are that the country's population is generally young, and that there are many complications during child birth.
3. Afghanistan is completely landlocked, so the border touches no coastline. Afghanistan's transportation and economy are severely effected due to the nonexistence of coastline. With no area of open coast, a lack of exportations and resources have effected the Afghan history.
4. Afghanistan is the worlds largest producer of the illegal substance opium. Grown in the countryside, the Taliban controls the production of opium within Afghanistan. The Taliban uses the profits acquired from the sale of opium to buyers.
5. Suffering from a devastating drug infestation and an opressive militant group, Afghanistan still strives to be a dominant economic power in Asia.

Anonymous said...

Part A:

1.The top eight agricultural products in Afghanistan are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskin and lambskins. Opium is definitely the #1 agricultural product in Afghanistan.
2.The life expectancy rate in Afghanistan for males is 44.19 years and for females is 44.61 years. The total infant mortality rate is 153.14 for every 1,000 births. Some deeper issues that are reflected through these statistics would be the lack of medical knowledge and medicines to be able to treat people.
3.Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline because it is landlocked. Since the country is landlocked, it is limited to natural fresh water resources and the supplies of potable water is inadequate. Also, much of the land is desert because the remaining forest are being cut down for fuel and building materials.
4.The transnational issues that Afghanistan faces are that Pakistan has built fences in portions of its border with Afghanistan which remains open in some ares to foreign terrorists and other illegal activities. Also, Afghanistan is the world's largest producer of opium. The Taliban and other groups take part in a profit from the opiate trade. This trade creates widespread corruption and instability impede counterdrug efforts.
5.While Afghanistan remains to be susceptible to terrorists and illegal activities, it still has room for major opportunities.

Courtney Williams ya digggg

Joe Anderson said...

Part A:
1)The top 8 agricultural products of Afghanistan are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins.


2)The average life expectancy is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.14 deaths per 1,000 births. Deeper issues shown in these statistics are that it is a difficult place to live, and there is probably little medical aid in the country.


3)Afghanistan has 0 km of coastline. This could contribute to the country’s history because there is not much water, and it would have been difficult to trade with other countries in older times, which would create a bad economy.


4)There is a language issue because these are the languages spoken in Afghanistan. Afghan Persian or Dari (official) 50%, Pashto (official) 35%, Turkic languages (primarily Uzbek and Turkmen) 11%, 30 minor languages (primarily Balochi and Pashai) 4%, much bilingualism.


5)In the nation of Afghanistan there is a lower standard of living where, due to lack of medical care, there is a relatively high infant mortality rate and a low life expectancy, while the citizens love their culture and are proud of their heritage.

Anonymous said...

Part A:

1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?
The top eight agricultural products include opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. The number one product is opium.

2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
The total life expectancy rate at birth is 44.4 years. The male expectancy rate is 44.19 years and a female’s life expectancy is 22.61 years. The infant mortality rate as a whole is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. The infant mortality rate for males is 156.94 deaths/1,000 live births and for the female’s infant mortality rate is 149.15 deaths/1,000 live births. Some deeper issues that are typically reflected in these statistics are because of the economy. Because of the terrible economy it is hard to get a better education for students living in Afghanistan. An America a child of the age of 6 is more likely to have a better education and be more advanced than a 6 year old living in Afghanistan. Now without a good education it is hard to find a well paying job, which can cause one to live in extreme poverty and more likely to have a child at a young age. Many are unable to learn the dangers and consequences of having a baby at such a young age because of the limited education. Now having a baby at a young age can cause the death rate to increases at a younger age, because of diseased such as HIV/AIDS and other major infectious diseases.

3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?

Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline; landlocked. This number might have contributed to the country’s history in a part where trading overseas and exporting and importing goods from other countries is harder for them. Which causes them to produce most of their products within their own country, and not have international affairs with other nations, except for those who are directly surrounding them.

4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.
One of the transnational issues Afghanistan faces is the international dispute between Pakistan. Pakistan built fences that exist on some parts of the border with Afghanistan, which is open to foeign terrorists and other illegal activities. Also another transnational issue is illicit drugs. As you know Afganhistna is the world’s largest producer of the drug opium, and herion can be produced due to this drug. The Talibhan profit from the Afghan’s trade in opium, which is a key source for them. This can cause a widespread corruption amongst the nation.

5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).
Regardless of the challenges Afghan faces through its landlocked terrain to the mortality rate and drug quandary it still is able to overcome these challenges through the determination to generate a better economy.
~Tara Hanson

Anonymous said...

Part A:

1. What are the top eight agricultural products? What product is #1?
The top eight agricultural products include opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. The number one product is opium.

2. What is the life expectancy rate? What is the infant mortality rate? What deeper issues are typically reflected in these statistics?
The total life expectancy rate at birth is 44.4 years. The male expectancy rate is 44.19 years and a female’s life expectancy is 22.61 years. The infant mortality rate as a whole is 153.14 deaths/1,000 live births. The infant mortality rate for males is 156.94 deaths/1,000 live births and for the female’s infant mortality rate is 149.15 deaths/1,000 live births. Some deeper issues that are typically reflected in these statistics are because of the economy. Because of the terrible economy it is hard to get a better education for students living in Afghanistan. An America a child of the age of 6 is more likely to have a better education and be more advanced than a 6 year old living in Afghanistan. Now without a good education it is hard to find a well paying job, which can cause one to live in extreme poverty and more likely to have a child at a young age. Many are unable to learn the dangers and consequences of having a baby at such a young age because of the limited education. Now having a baby at a young age can cause the death rate to increases at a younger age, because of diseased such as HIV/AIDS and other major infectious diseases.

3. How many kilometers of coastline does Afghanistan possess? How might this number have contributed to the country's history?

Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline; landlocked. This number might have contributed to the country’s history in a part where trading overseas and exporting and importing goods from other countries is harder for them. Which causes them to produce most of their products within their own country, and not have international affairs with other nations, except for those who are directly surrounding them.

4. Identify the transnational issues that Afghanistan faces.
One of the transnational issues Afghanistan faces is the international dispute between Pakistan. Pakistan built fences that exist on some parts of the border with Afghanistan, which is open to foeign terrorists and other illegal activities. Also another transnational issue is illicit drugs. As you know Afganhistna is the world’s largest producer of the drug opium, and herion can be produced due to this drug. The Talibhan profit from the Afghan’s trade in opium, which is a key source for them. This can cause a widespread corruption amongst the nation.

5. Construct a thesis statement that encapsulates the essence of the Afghan nation (both its assets and its challenges).
Regardless of the challenges Afghan faces through its landlocked terrain to the mortality rate and drug quandary it still is able to overcome these challenges through the determination to generate a better economy.
~Tara Hanson

Anonymous said...

1. The top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. The number one product is opium.

2. The life expectancy rate is 44.65 years. The infant mortality rate is 151.5 deaths per every 1000 births. These statistics show that the medical system in Afghanistan is not that efficient. Cleary with the amount of infant deaths shows that the medical staff at hospitals must not be that well trained or qualified. With the life expectancy rate being so low, it shows that the medical system can’t be that good for anyone. They do not have the equipment or training to control a hospital that can take care of the patients.

3. Afghanistan has zero kilometers of coastline. It is completely surrounded by land. Because they are completely surrounded by land, it makes it more difficult for other countries to make their way into the country.

4. One transnational issue is that Pakistan has created some fences on their border with Afghanistan, but left some areas open for terrorists. Another issue is with internally displaced people. Pashtuns and Kuchis are displaced in the southern and western parts of their own countries. A third transnational issue is the production of opium in Afghanistan. This is their number one agricultural product and if the entire crop was processed then “648 metric tons of pure heroin potentially could be produced”.

5. While Afghanistan is strong agriculturally, it is imperative for the country to improve medically and politically.

Jaron Cote

Anonymous said...

For part B, what do you mean when you saw show vs. tell..... we never discussed this in class. I dont understand what you want us to do exactly.....

aliciaroseperry said...

part b:

Photo number 26: The image shows a young local girl and her father, escorted by two Marine Corps. soldiers, going to a med evacuation helicopter (which is not shown). Though the girl is wounded the father seems optimistic in his facial expressions because they are receiving medical attention immediately so the girls life will be spared. The soldiers escorting her are determined to help and not to cause further damage; they know who the true victims of this war are. It shows that the war in Afghanistan is being fought between two factions: the U.S. and the terror cells lying in wait, yet the victims are those who live in this war torn part of the world.

-Alicia Perry

Anonymous said...

Part B:
In the first picture there is a soldier who is located in Afghanistan and in the background there are young children who are playing with a toy gun. The government is not stable in Afghanistan, therefore, the country and lives of people there are not stable as well. The young boys with the toy gun have seen many real soldiers with real guns all around them anywhere they go. Since they see these soldiers all the time, it is not unusual for them. With the soldiers dressed in uniform, with weapons, like guns, the young children of Afghanistan almost seem to look up to them because it is something they see on a day to day basis. Therefore, when the young boys were holding the toy gun it was not anything random because that is what the country of Afghanistan is used to seeing.

Part C:
Within the article, the author mentions the idea that although the Hazaras are apart of Afghanistan, they are looked upon as outsiders.

--Vanessa Ferreira

Anonymous said...

Part B) The image is an image of French soldiers entering a house containing Al Qaeda soldiers. The French and American soldiers really need to leave Afghanistan. As they continue to destroy our country, more and more Afghanistan families are torn apart. The women in this photo has nothing to do with the horrible situation yet has to go through the awful affects of it. The continuation of the departure of thousands of American and French troops should help, but Afghanistan is still flooded with troops.
The French troops in this photo were also very cruel and abusive once they arrested the soldiers. Brutality will not help Afghanistan get better. Instead of coming in and being tyrants, the American and French governments should have set up a system to rebuild through peace. As the soldiers arrested the Al Qaeda members they shouted “This will never end,” which is a bad sign moving forward. These specific member of Al Qaeda should have been arrested in my opinion because they are criminals, however regular Afghani citizens are being punished.
I believe members of Al Qaeda should be executed to the fullest extent of the law. I do believe however, that our own government can handle them and we don’t need other countries to help. The women of Afghanistan, including the women in this photo, should not be bothered because the majority have done nothing! The US and French should be taken out of Afghanistan and we should be left to handle it ourselves.

Part C) The view of a bright future provided by Hazara children has influenced the idea of a optimistic future for the Hazaras.
-Connor O'Sullivan C Class

Sarah T. said...

Part B:
With the taste of sweet tea filling his mouth, he fills with joy when hearing the laughter of his little girl in the back yard. She had been playing there for what seemed like hours until there was an unmistakable sound coming from her location that was nothing like the lively laughter before. Grabbing the cloth off the counter, he begins to picture the foul people that had done this to his family. What could possibly make someone bring this horrible act on an innocent little girl who is not going to be disfigured for her entire life? As he wipes the swollen eyes of his little daughter, he gently embraces her and goes out in search of aid for this precious angel.

Part C:
After enduring a crippling past, the Hazaras have triumphed over their suppressive environment in order to gain equality within the world and then progress toward equality within their surrounding ethnic groups.

Anonymous said...

Part C:

Being separated by geography and faith, tortured and oppressed by the Taliban, the Hazara people are Afghanistan’s best chance at repairing its fractured past.

Tory Carlson

Anonymous said...

Part B


Picture Number 5

The citizens of Afghanistan have reached their threshold of rage towards foreign occupants. Since the Russians invaded their country during the cold war, Afghanis have never had full control of their country. Now, American churches are burning their religious literature because it it’s not Christianity they are practicing. Yelling and protesting with absolute anger, the Afghans cannot believe what is happening. What right does a small American church have to burn their belongings? The sorrow in their eyes, rage in their heart makes one feel the greatest sympathy. What did these innocent people ever do to America? Who are we to say what they can preach and what they cannot preach. These Afghanis have every right to should anti-American slurs and make their point anyway possible.

Christopher Ruta

vittoriabravetti said...

B. Picture 19.
Sometimes we don’t realize what is actually going on in the war in Afghanistan until we see actual images. We here stories and facts about it and never know what to believe. This picture is of a U.S Navy Corpsman HN named Ikaika McCallum of Kaneohe, Hawaii. He is wounded by a bullet to his face and is in a helicopter. The bullet tore his lip and went through his cheek. This man is lucky it did not do more damage than it did. In the war, he was probably be shot at by the soldiers from Afghanistan and was hit in the face, now that we see this actual image, it really shows us how terrible things must be there and how the stories we here are true. This mans face will probably never look the exact same and he will always have a scar to remember the incident by. When we hear stories like this, images really prove to us what is going on rather than just hearing it.

C. Phil Zabriskie emphasizes that the Hazara people have been through more than they deserve and should be treated equally in their country because in the end, they have accomplished becoming successful, well- educated, strong people.

Anonymous said...

Christopher Ruta

Part C

Although the Hazaras have been faced with the most sufferable challenges, they demonstrate through determination, faith, and hope that anything is possible and a group of hard working people can overcome any obstacle put in their way.

Tim W said...

Part B.

It was a hot and dry afternoon in the heart of Afghanistan. The soldiers go about their normal days. They protect and guard the local prison containing several Afghani rebels. The Italian soldier stands watch as the day’s growing sun beats down upon his tanned face. Barbed wiring surrounding them all day, it is almost as if the soldiers are trapped inside the prison themselves. The soldiers aren’t trapped in the prison; instead, they are trapped within the country of Afghanistan inside this war. There is no escape for them right now. Some may say it is better than being in the prison, but it is just as bad. Children sit and watch from outside the wires of death. The little boys do not see the meaning behind these walls of the prison. It does not make sense to them why their own people are sitting, being guarded by these foreign soldiers. This is a game to them. Laughing and playing right outside the prison is what they do on a day to day basis. One holds a weapon himself, not knowing the destruction that these can cause. The toy which he clutches in his hands is what is destroying the country. They emulate what they see in their front yards and in the street, being corrupted by their neighbors. Will these kids see that this is wrong? Pointing the shot at the soldier, the child sees him as the rebel



Part C.

In a society being harassed by the Taliban, containing limited freedom, and harsh winters, Zabriskie portrays how for some Hazara people, there is still hope, hard work, dreams, and a push to make life better for themselves in Afghanistan.

Brendan C said...

1.
Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium is the number one product of the country

2. Life expectancy at birth is about 45 years old. The infant mortality rate is around 151.5 deaths per every 1,000 births. Some typical deeper issues that are reflected in theses stats are usually health care and the economy.

3.It has 0 km of coastline. It is easier to be attacked and easier to defend because it is all land in warfare. Also trading is harder to get income and imports due to that most countries can’t directly export to them.

4. The Taliban performs terrorism on the country. The environment and climate hurts the economy due to drought and also the economy has been damaged from the war.

5. Although Afghanistan’s history has had internal and external conflicts, the country finds prosperity through agricultural and trading though being neglected of advantages.

Anonymous said...

-Top Eight Agricultural Products

1. Opium
2. Wheat
3. Fruits
4. Nuts
5. Wool
6. Mutton
7. Sheepskins
8. Lambskins

-Life Expectancy: Population – 44.4 years, Male - 44.19, Female – 44.61

-Infant Mortality: Population – 153.14 Death to 1,000 live births, Male – 156.94 deaths to 1,000 live births, Female – 149.15 Deaths to 1,000 live births

-People are dying early due to malnutrition or the like since so many babies are dying. The life expectancy problems show that people are dying in their middle ages; I would submit thtat this is due to many infant mortalities or children dying at a younger age, while people do also indeed live much longer.

-Afghanistan possesses 0 kM if coastline; it is entirely landlocked. Without a viable means of transportation out of the country, without passing though another country of course, The Afghans are locked in their land

- Afghanistan faces two major issues. One is a dispute with the Pakistani building fences on the border of the two countries. How does this effect Afghans? The landlocked issue comes into play. If the borders get blocked they are fenced in and cannot leave the country. The second issue is opium. Opium is the largest export of Afghnaistan, and it is an illicit drug. They are literally making money off of someone else’s addiction. The opium trade starts wars, making the rick richer and the poor poorer. Whoever controls the opium controls the country.

Afghanistan, while once being the center of the Asian world, has been torn apart by opium and the greed based wars it has begun.

-Christopher Schatvet.

Justin Iadarola said...

“I just want to see him again daddy. Why did he have to go over there?” protests a young boy. Zachary never believed it could possibly end like this, and all he has to remember him by is a picture and some memories. If Zachary knew this was going to be the result he would have never let him go. Never let him fight in such a pointless war, never let him leave his arms the last time that he said “goodbye”. Zachary continues to think of all the memories he could possibly remember of the fallen Sergeant while his father whispers in his ear. Even with his father comforting young Zachary he still cannot stop the water from flowing down his cheeks, off his face and onto his father’s shoulder. See for Zachary, Sergeant Joshua was no ordinary Sergeant; he was Zachary’s biggest influence, his only role model but mostly importantly Joshua was Zachary’s only brother, his only sibling and now he was gone.

Lindsay said...

Part C
Phil Zabriskie’s “The Outsiders” gives people a glance into the oppression and discrimination the Hazaras face by the Taliban in Afghanistan and the hope of the Harazas that one day they will be of equal stance with Pushtuns with perhaps a new generation of Afghan leaders to lead people beyond the mindset of war.

Anonymous said...

B. This image shows the hostility and anger of the Afghanistan people. This image shows a bunch of Afghani men, blocking something, almost as if they are protesting. They are most likely protesting the U.S. interference in their country. The people are screaming most likely chants against the U.S and they show anger through their faces and action. It shows smoke in the background; extremely black smoke, which one can assume was either an explosion, or rubber being burned. These people are clearly against American involvement in their country, and they want the Americans out; and for that reason, they protest.


C. The Hazaras of Afghanistan are considered as outsiders of the country due to their religion and their appearance, but they are known as having the safest region in Afghanistan and provide a good model for how Afghani’s should behave as outlined by Shafaq, a young Hazaran scholar.

-Colin Ahern

Anonymous said...

Part B. The picture shows SGT Tyrone Jordan caring Marine LCpl. David Hawkins to a Medevac helicopter near Marja, Afghanistan on September 24, 2010. They very real picture shows more to the viewer then actually telling them. The action of the photo really lets the viewer experience the action taking place. Tyrone has David on his back rushing to the helicopter due to a wound caused by a blast from an IED. Tyrone’s facial expressions are remarkable. There are more than one thought going through his head by looking at his face. He looks very confused, frantic, upset, and angry all at the same time. It shows the intensity of the picture and what goes on in these wars. It also shows how much they care about each other and never leave anyone behind. The guy that is hurt looks like he is in so much pain because it looks like he is biting down to lessening the pain. Due to the people and scenery on the background, the feeling you get is unforgettable. You just feel a sense of chaos and a place you never want to be.

Ben Avril

Anonymous said...

(PART B) They were on their way back from checking out a small side street in downtown Kabul. Driving their humvee down the dusty roads. Then without warning a grenade exploded beside their vehicle, knocking it to its side. The three men inside were severely injured. The humvee behind them halted and rescued the injured soldiers. They rushed them back to base where they could be treated. However their injuries were too severe so they needed to be moved to a field hospital. There wasn’t much time so Sergeant Buckly took matters into his own hands and moved the patients to the helicopter.
(Part C)
Although oppressed in the past, due to recent events the Hazara people are finally working towards a new era of equality.
-Robert Cormier

Anonymous said...

Part B:
The night is filled with a measurable silence, a silence that seems to ring out, filling the ears of a solitary man desperate to do his job, keep his comrades safe through another night. In the distance, clouds emerge from the barren terrain. The bright stacks of rolling dust fill the sky, drowning out the glittering lights that were visible only moments before. Alert for any sight, and sound, he turns quickly towards the brilliant illumination clogging the air in the distance. In a second he is already turning, assessing the situation. Adrenaline seizes through his body, making him jittery, ready for anything. Blood pounds through his veins, pulsing in his neck as he turns quickly towards the glowing clouds. A part of him is left behind in that moment, almost visible against the deep blue backdrop sprinkled with flecks of light. Who he was a mere second before has changed, he is a new man now faced with a new situation, a new crisis that he must avert or deem harmless.

Kerryn Camara

Anonymous said...

Part B:

With adrenaline rushing through his arteries, the stillness of the morning is overwhelmed by the eerie veil of a stratus cloud. The air, perfumed with the savory smell of the pomegranates, mixes with the nervous sweat that is seeping from his pores. Gingerly walking through the orchard, avoiding the crunching leaves and twigs by weaving amongst the pomegranates that blanket the floor; his objective: to remain silent. Fearful for his life as he patrols, scrutinizing the field, observant for the enemy; the enemy who has no set descriptions, the enemy who is part of the orchard and remains a mystery, a ghost. Meandering through the orchard alone, alert for any sound or sight of movement: knowing that in a second anything can happen, knowing that his life can flash before his eyes, knowing that he has to do his job for his fellow comrades who are anxiously awaiting the news, the whereabouts of the enemy. Perplexed with the beauty and stillness of the morning, the rays of the sun that illuminate the winding trees shine as a beacon of hope for the war’s end.

(picture # 47)
Tory Carlson

Mike C. said...

Michael Costa
Part B: Photo 26

It felt amazing to be able to be the personal escort that made sure the young girl was able to make it to the helicopter safe. After she sustained horrible wounds from the shrapnel that flew off of the RPG impact, I knew that there was only a certain time span that we would have to get here to the chopper. Many people don’t understand the true lifestyle of the Afghan people like us soldiers do. We see every day the struggle that they must endure from the barbaric war that has strangled their lives and cut off their oxygen supply. There is a majority that thinks these innocent civilians are terrorists, but after seeing this young girl struggle for her life I can tell you that is completely wrong. She is an innocent girl who must survive in a war torn pit of hell. She’s not the only one, there are more people here who need help and that’s why my fellow soldiers and I am here; We are not here to kill innocent civilians, we are here to eliminate terrorist threats that have caused this unfair discrimination.

Anonymous said...

Tim Johansmeyer
Period G

Part B:

It was early in the afternoon and the sun was scorching down on the troops. All had been quite that day, almost too quiet. All of the sudden the troops heard bullets wizzing by them and frantically searched for cover. All made it cover but one, who was too slow. A bullet shot through his dry, parched mouth and exited through his stubbly cheek. Luckily a helicopter was nearby and rushed to the scene. One on board, the soldier tended to the gapping hole in his mouth. He will be scarred for the rest of his life, but he is grateful to be alive.

Shawn said...

Standing, watching,always attentative, ready for whatever danger lurks around the corner. This Italian soldier with a stony visage, stands, sentinel like, at the perimeter of a prison, awaiting orders. Behind him, a fence of tangled barbed wirepreventing outsiders from comming in. Behind this fence of maiming dismemberment, a hoard of young Afghni boys surrounding the youngest boy of about 7 or 8 years of age, taking aim at the unawares soldier with a toy pistol. His peers around him grinning, enjoying this little game of good guy versus bad guy. One boy, shrouded in white robes as if he is a god, smirking, his mouth spread ear to ear as his young freind pretends to fire upon this soldier, knowing, someday, that he very well may meet this stramger on the field of battle. In their mind these boys have a pupose, they have a hatred for these strangers who came to their land, destroyed their homes, and killed their families. They want these people out of their homeland and want them out of their lives.

Anonymous said...

PART B:
In my opinion, picture number 39 was the most powerful piece in the collection of photos. It shows the results of the war at home and how difficult it is to handle the loss of a loved one. At age five, Zachary Powell had to attend his 25 year old brother’s funeral. At the top right of the picture there is a picture of a true hero, Joshua D. Powell, Zachary’s older brother. Joshua is pictured in his military uniform with the American flag hanging slightly over his picture. Below the picture, there is some writing, which is probably a short, written remembrance of his life. The primary reason for this picture is to depict the loss of an American veteran, something that happens too often in this county. Zachary is grieving from such a great loss in his life and is being comforted by his father, David Powell. Both father and son Powell are dressed his clothing that you’d typically wear to a funeral. While military personnel suffer overseas, their families suffer at home and somehow try to make up for the lack of their presence. This will forever ring true in the Powell family after the loss their son and brother.

PART C:
“Hazaras: Afghanistan's Outsiders” highlights the problems the Hazara’s have faced in the past, due to their ethnicity and how the Afghan government is slowly improving the way that the Hazara’s live.

Kristin Murray

Shawn said...

The destruction of the Bamian Buddah statues by the Taliban symbolizes the destruction of the will and rights of the Hazara people.

Anonymous said...

B.
Angry protesters swarm the streets the Afghanistan. Major highways are blocked off because of the vast number of enraged Muslims protesting against the United States. Chaos has broke lose as a massive cloud of black smoke engulfs the air. The crowd of protesters is heard from far away and will not retreat unless they get their way. (Picture 5)

John Eckart

Anonymous said...

C.
Through complete force, the Taliban tries to oppress the Hazara people due to the difference in physical appearance and religious practices.

John Eckart

Mike C. said...

Michael Costa
Part C:

The Hazaras’ are a group of people with a diverse ethnic background and, although having been plagued by the Taliban for decades and suffering immense prosecution, have been given a shroud of hope since September 11th as their land is becoming safer and education has been on the rise.

Anonymous said...

Picture #42

Life in the past couple years has been dramatically different. I faintly remember that September day 9 years ago. Everyone seems to have a different stance on it. My mother and father refuse to talk about it with me, but the people of the village are glad to voice their opinion. Ever since then, Sefidbar has never been the same. I have grown accustom to the roar of fighter jets soaring past our small village. In a way, their sound is almost comforting. I have known this sound almost all my life. The people of the village tell me that these jets are on their way to destroy our country and do bad. Although they are considered the enemy, I’m not sure I believe this. The Americans are always polite when the seldom pass by. They sometimes give me candy or small toys. It’s hard for me to think that they could possibly be killing or fighting with anyone in Afghanistan.

chris bukowski

Anonymous said...

C.

Althoug the Hazaras of Afghanistan have been racially descriminated against for years, they are playing an increasingly important role in Afghanistan's society as citizens.

chris bukowski

Mpotvin said...

Part B
Photo #37

Taken from his home and brought to a desolate refugee camp, lost everything he had. He found a boy about his age and they soon became friends. Everyday they would see each other finding new ways to entertain themselves with what little they had. A rock was all they needed to have fun, playing soccer, or even baseball if they found a stick somewhere in the desert. But that was very rare. They would lay in their tents at night thinking to themselves why did they have to come here, and what is next. As the week went on each day seemed to become longer, fighting the heat, and boredom. Until one day Radio Free Europe distributed crank-powered radios to people throughout the camp. Once the boys saw the radios their faces lit up with excitement. They had not seen such item, amazed at how voices came out a little metal box. Although, the only thing the radios announced was war propaganda they boys listened to them everyday learning something new, and appreciating the little things they have.

Jeff Kitchen said...

PART B

I have lived here my whole life. Under these trees my family has carried on in the home here I have built. In the murky fog beneath the canopy of this foliage I have picked the fruit of the trees to support them. I have lived honestly and rightly through the study of the Quran and through my tending of this orchard. My whole village lives and supports ourselves through these trees. We live peacefully; our interpretation of the Quran would never lead us to the violence of which we have no need. This morning I awoke to an American soldier resting underneath my trees. He threatened me at first and seemed confused. I rely on agriculture to feed my family without bothering anyone. The Americans have kept away the suppressive rule of the Taliban, yet do they really understand any of us?

Mpotvin said...

Part C:
Although the Hazaras of Afghanistan are considered the minority; many Hazaras make up the educated population and may be the only hope for the future improvement of their nation.

Jeff Kitchen said...

PART C

Due to their history of suppression and inequality, the Hazaras have become a potent force in the representation of equality and pluralism in an a Afghanistan still filled with racial and ethnic bias.

Jessica said...

PART B:
It was a normal, sunny day in my household in Afghanistan. I was bored at home so decided to take a walk outside. As I was walking through the neighborhood, I heard people screaming. All I could think was that another attack was taking place. How many attacks could one country take in so little time? It felt like every time I took a step outside there was more and more chaos. Disregarding the screaming, I continued my walk through the not-so-scenic park. All of a sudden, it felt like my body was on fire. I heard an extremely loud noise and I saw pieces of my skin flaking off. The pain was so intense that it was hard to even feel what was happening to me. I tried to open my eyes, but blood covered my entire face and I was in too much pain to even make an effort to move. Apparently, I was rushed to the hospital in a green truck, but that I do not remember, although I wish maybe I could repress all the other memories and only remember that old green truck. I opened my eyes and looked around to find myself in a white room. Was I in heaven? Did I die? I hadn’t died, but was in the hospital recovering from an explosion that caught me on my walk through the not-so-scenic park. I guess there was more scenery than I thought.

JESSICAHERRERA

Anonymous said...

Part B:
Living in fear of their lives is all they knew how to do for the past couple years. Leaving is the only logical answer. Not only will it free them of their worries, but it will give their family a chance. Abhay, the father, knows that any day, his family could be taken away from him. Abhay and his wife walk away from the past to create a better future for their two children.

Part C:
After years of being looked down upon, the Hazaras look past the mistreatment and let it help them be something greater.

Courtney Williams

Jessica said...

PART C:
Despite the hardships and struggles that the Hazaras faced due to their difference from other Afghani people, they remained faithful to their culture and today, are some of the most successful people in Afghanistan.

JESSICAHERRERA

Becca Morse said...

Part C: The Hazaras of Afghanistan show that with determination, any feat can be overcome, no matter the intensity.

Anonymous said...

Part B:(First image)
The watchful eye of a soldier is looking into the camera, acting as though he knows what the world is about. He acts as though everything will be alright, that everything going on is normal. The fierceness of his expression behind his dark glasses hides the fear that he will not return home. He does not know for sure what is going to happen next year, tomorrow, or today. All that he knows is his job. His job is to protect his country and the people who he is fighting for. He can only look forward, look to things that he does know.
The cheerful children behind the man are smiling and having a good time. Smiling and having a good time as they point a pistol at a soldier. True, the pistol is not real and a toy, but these children are not stupid. As they are young, they are also full of knowledge. They know what it means to be watched over, to not have the freedoms that other children do. The boy holding the toy gun knows what the gun does. He knows how the gun sounds when it is fired; he knows what the effects of the gun looks like. He points the gun at the man as if he knows what damage it will do, but does not care.

Emily Hastings

Anonymous said...

PART C:

The well known Hazaras, once Afghan
s outsiders, are now benefitting from their previous label and becoming new models of Afghanistan.

-Shannon Hansen

Anonymous said...

Sydney Colbert
C Block English IV Honors
The Kite Runner Blog

PART B

I chose picture number 47. This picture encompasses so many emotions, yet there are few actions going on. A soldier stands alone in the middle of the dark pomegranate orchards. You can’t see his face that well yet it is plain to see this soldier is sad, yet somehow happy. Pomegranates have become a symbol of hope all around Afghanistan. 80 percent of Afghan’s rely on the agricultural part of the land. This picture represents some form of hope. There is a future to look forward too.

Anonymous said...

B)

The days when I was privileged to actually look into the eyes of my mother seem now so foreign. It feels as though having a family was simply a dream I imagined years ago. Nothing about this place is consoling, nothing offers comfort; happiness seems a lifetime away. In fact I wonder if that emotion still even exists, for I can no longer remember how it once felt. Those austere eyes that pierce straight through me, I wonder if those same eyes belong to the men accountable for my mother’s disappearance. Even if they are not responsible, their companions are. Hatred, loathing, and disgust penetrate my mind, intertwine throughout my thoughts. I hate their imperishable boots, covered in layers of sand. I hate their checkered camouflage uniforms, providing more than enough protection from the detrimental conditions, while I struggle to fix a mere cloth to wrap within my whole body. I hate their rock solid helmets, sheltering even their heads. Mostly I hate their AK-47s, suspended across their torsos, commencing mass chaos. More than anything I want to lash out at them, destroy them as they have done to me. I want them to know they are not the only ones who suffer. But I know better, I must detain my emotions to solemnly my thoughts; I am the only one who understands. But then, my thoughts wander, perhaps optimistically, as I gaze at the flock of pigeons above me. Unaware of the freedom in which I envy of them, they blissfully soar deep into the uniform sky ahead. I wish more than anything that I could fly away with them, regardless of their destination; anywhere would be better than here.

C)

Despite the perpetual battles which constantly interrupt their lives, the Hazaras retain their persistent optimism by hoping to one day be granted with the education, job, and residence that they genuinely deserve.


Andrea Giglio

Anonymous said...

Sydney Colbert
C Block English IV Honors
The Kite Runner Blog

PART A

1. The top 8 agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool, mutton, sheepskins, and lambskins. Opium is the number one product.

2. The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality rate is 153.4 deaths. This is an issue because there are more infant deaths than births. This could mean a possible deep decline in population.

3. Afghanistan possesses 0 km of coastline. This number could relate to the country’s history because this is a contributing factor to the country’s economic status. There is no way to export and import.

4. Afghanistan deals with international issues and has an ongoing dispute with Pakistan.

5. Afghanistan is a country with a history of problems, and due to many different statistics, has a future with further issues.

Anonymous said...

Sydney Colbert
C Block English IV Honors
The Kite Runner Blog

PART B

I chose picture number 47. This picture encompasses so many emotions, yet there are few actions going on. A soldier stands alone in the middle of the dark pomegranate orchards. You can’t see his face that well yet it is plain to see this soldier is sad, yet somehow happy. Pomegranates have become a symbol of hope all around Afghanistan. 80 percent of Afghan’s rely on the agricultural part of the land. This picture represents some form of hope. There is a future to look forward too.

Anonymous said...

Sydney Colbert
C Block English IV Honors
The Kite Runner Blog

PART C

Although they are considered to be a minority group, the Hazaras are a group of people who are trying to recover from a history of discrimination and segregation.

Colleen McD said...

patr B
“I don’t like those guys. They walk around our city thinking they own the place. You see that man right there? Yeah him, he took my dad away from us, when my dad didn’t do anything wrong. My dad went to work every day and came home; he provided an income for our family. I don’t understand why those men are even here, all they do is tear people apart. I don’t like them one bit. My daddy told me that those men, over there, they’re going to pay one day. Something is being planned and they don’t even know it. My dad knows what he’s talking about, believe me… I don’t know what it is but it’s going to be good, and I can’t wait for that day. BAM BAM.

Anonymous said...

Part B:
The bullets whizzing through the air as corpses fly all around. The blood stained sand will never be the same, as for these troops they will never forget this day. Three dead and one wounded was more than enough to see for General Cooper. With Corporal White moaning in pain only one man was healthy enough to carry him, and that was Lieutenant Smith. With his brow dripping of sweat and his legs aching in pain from the running, he became a man and carried Cpl. White until the enemy could no longer be seen. The best sight of the day for Lt. Smith was the sight of the medical man coming to the rescue with a stretcher for Cpl. White. As Lt. Smith was about to fall the Meds took Cpl. White from him and put him on the chopper. It was a day worth forgetting for the soldiers, but one they never would.

---Keegan Campbell

Anonymous said...

Part C:
In this article the author shows that he believes the Hazaras are on the rebound and are recovering from the segregation and the discrimination they have faced.

---Keegan Campbell

Anonymous said...

Part C:
Despite past dilemmas, Phil Zabriskie believes that the Hazara people will strive to be the newfound hope that Afghanistan needs to evolve into a more successful nation.
Emily Hastings

Jess W said...

C. As I stand in the corner I am invisible. Not because of where I am but because of my condition. As my picture is projected above the alter I watch the tears roll down the face of my young brother. It breaks my heart. My father tries to comfort him and I wish I could help. I always knew what to do to make him smile; every time I returned home his face would light up. It’s the worst feeling in the world to know that I will never get to see that moment again. Although it all hurts, I know they are proud of me. I understand that everybody in attendance this day knows that I was fighting for them, especially my mother. She was resistant to let me go, and now I know why. The hurt in her eyes makes me feel guilty for a moment, but I know she is proud. All I want is one more moment, one more day. My heart continues to break as I watch those who are so dear to me mourn for me. There is nothing I can do to help but I know my little man can’t cry forever. Some day he will smile that smile so familiar to me. It will never be for the same reason, but he will be okay. The tears will end.

D. Phil Zabriskie shows through the comparison of the Haraza people and the country of Afghanistan that the opportunities and possibilities of success of the Hazara people foreshadow a similar future for the country itself.

Anonymous said...

Part B:
Picture #6
I am scared of what today’s events might bring. As I got dressed this morning I thought about how it could be my last time. I left my house and said goodbye to my family hoping that today’s event would go smoothly and that I would be safe. When I arrived at the bare, cement-slab building, I was directed to an empty chair behind an old, warped, brown table. In front of the table, there was a blue bin, which allowed you to see the ballots inside. I was warned to watch out for any suspicious behavior and to report anything I saw. As each voter approached the bin, I was frightened that they might do something, anything, and that it might be the last person I see alive. The day dragged on slowly, but as the day became darker and there weren’t any more voters, I was thankful that I was still living. Although no harmful event happened to me or my voting area, I am sure that around my country, there were events that I could not even imagine. When I arrived home, my family greeted me and I felt safe.

Jaron Cote

Jaron C. said...

Part B:
Picture #6
I am scared of what today’s events might bring. As I got dressed this morning I thought about how it could be my last time. I left my house and said goodbye to my family hoping that today’s event would go smoothly and that I would be safe. When I arrived at the bare, cement-slab building, I was directed to an empty chair behind an old, warped, brown table. In front of the table, there was a blue bin, which allowed you to see the ballots inside. I was warned to watch out for any suspicious behavior and to report anything I saw. As each voter approached the bin, I was frightened that they might do something, anything, and that it might be the last person I see alive. The day dragged on slowly, but as the day became darker and there weren’t any more voters, I was thankful that I was still living. Although no harmful event happened to me or my voting area, I am sure that around my country, there were events that I could not even imagine. When I arrived home, my family greeted me and I felt safe.

Jaron C. said...

Part C:
Although the Hazaras have gained some rights, especially in education, tradition causes the hardships they continue to face everyday of their lives.

cassie iagatta said...

Part B. (picture 30)

It was an ordinary Monday morning, except today Veronica Adkinson was at a funeral; her husband’s funeral. The world kept spinning around her, the birds kept chirping and the bees kept buzzing; yet, her world had been stopped, shattered. She was never supposed to watch her twenty-six year old husband being lowered six feet into the ground. It was too surreal. She remembered the day he left for Afghanistan. He had been so sure of his return. He had promised her he would be back. But he would never be back. She would never hear his powerful laugh, or see his shining smile ever again. He would never get to actually live the life he had wanted. He had wanted to travel around the world with her. That had been their plan when he got back home. He had been to Afghanistan twice before. It had been his last time there. If only he could have made it home once more.
Veronica wiped the tear running down her cheek. The funeral was coming to a close. She turned to Vinson and Robin beside her and gave them each a hug goodbye. She felt their pain of having to watch their son being buried. Her husband had died in a foreign country fighting for peace. Maybe one day there would be peace there. Maybe one day there would be peace for her as well.

Anonymous said...

Part c:
The current administration in Afghanistan is holding onto the past custom of neglectful policies toward the Hazara people, failing to see that the Hazaras are the sole group of people who are sympathetic to the new vision the government has for the country.

Kerryn Camara

cassie iagatta said...

Part C.

After years of discrimination and violence from the Taliban to the Hazaras in Afghanistan, a new era is hopefully arising, which will comprise of equally educated and fairly treated Hazaras in the government and in society.

Hannah Clark said...

Part B: Image #26.
“What happens now,” I ask myself as my dad carries me from our home. I never would have expected this to happen to me. Earlier in the day, I remember playing with some neighborhood friends; we were running around, playing tag. Next thing I know, I feel the ground shake beneath me and see a bright flash of light. Then I’m on the ground with blood pouring down my face. I remember my dad running to my side with two soldiers right behind him. He picks me up while talking to the soldiers. I feel like there are pieces of metal stuck all over my body. It hurts to move. The soldiers are talking to each other in a language I cannot understand. I can’t open my eyes, but my dad is whispering to me, saying that everything is going to be all right. I want to believe him, but I’m scared. He tells me that we are being taken to a helicopter where I’ll be transported to a hospital to receive help. Maybe these soldiers aren’t the bad guys like the adults keep telling me. Maybe the bad guys are the ones who hurt me. I hope these soldiers getting me help find the bad guys who hurt me and hurt them in return.

Part C:
Facing oppression from the Taliban, the Hazaras have endured hard-pressing times, but continue to fight for equality, and could potentially be the bright future that Afghanistan is looking for.

Anonymous said...

Tim Johansmeyer
Period G


Part C:

In “Hazara’s: Afghanistan’s Outsiders” the author suggest that through all of their struggles, the Hazara’s serve as an inspirational model to all Afghans.

Paul said...

Part B: Picture #30

Veronica rolled onto her side and glanced at the clock for the twentieth time. 4:20 AM, still another hour until she would have to get up. Rolling back over, Veronica jumped at the wetness on her cheek. Just another tear soaked tissue that hadn’t made it off the bed. Shivering, she pulled the blankets up close to her skin. Without Vinson lying next to her, the nights felt even colder. Another glance, 4:21.
Vinson Jr. sat behind the wheel of his F-150 staring blankly at the gear shifter. Reverse, now if only there were one of those for life. His son’s dog tags seemed to keep his head permanently arched downwards. He cupped them in his hand, reading the etched letters: “Vinson Adkinson III.” BEEEEEEEEP, “green means go!” yelled the driver behind him. Vinson slammed down on the gas and headed towards his daughter-in-laws with tears in his eyes.

Part C:

The newest better-educated generation of the always resilient Hazaras hope to use the new democratic system to defeat Pashtun discrimination towards them.

Erin said...

Part B:
Today I watched a profusion of balloons being released at an International Peace Day ceremony. Innocent faces of smiling Afghan children scrambled around the balloons trying to catch them as they drift away. I began to ponder why I am here, for I found this scene contradictory. Oftentimes I feel the hostility and wrath in the atmosphere while I am here fighting; then again, I am here fighting and the children are excited at the idea of peace. Why does the human mind become so corrupt over a lifetime? If we had the pure and innocent, unbiased minds of children, how world our world be different? What makes us not like something or someone? How they look, how they smell, how they act? How they are different. These questions fluttered around in my mind while I continue to watch the balloons fly away while the children tried to catch them. I realize the balloons symbolize the distant idea of world peace. It’s funny how one can trick themselves into believing violence can lead to a peaceful outcome.

Anonymous said...

Part C

Phil Zabriskie believes that Afganistan's minority group, the Hazaras, is beginning the elongated and unsympathetic road to recover from segregation, prejudice, and discrimination.

AJ BASHAW

Anonymous said...

Part B:
Many strong healthy men leave the United States only to come back to the country deceased. A young boy looks up to his dad for grievance for he is distraught about losing his brother to the war. The father holds on tight to his son and tries his hardest to stay strong for his son. This is a dad’s worst nightmare coming true, now he only has the memories of his son to live with.

Emma Jackson

Ashlie Sprague said...

PartC:

The Hazaras, along with other Afghan people, have perservered; as explained by Phil Zabriskie in "The Ousiders" there has been many obstacles in way of the Hazaras peace, but they have been able to overcome these challenges and better their lives.

Anonymous said...

Part B:
The Great War has rocked our village. We tried to stay out of the fight but it was brought to us eventually. My father is a great man that has cared for me in all my times of need. Without him I don’t know if I would have survived the event. Although, I’m not hat tall and don’t weigh that much I survived a missile attack on my small village in Afghanistan. I was hurt badly when it hit me and couldn’t walk with cuts from my face and a badly wounded foot I wanted to just crawl into a corner and lie there. But where my lack of strength left off my father came to my rescue and showed me the way to safety. The extremists had finally gotten what they wanted the Americans out of our village. However, I took a different route becoming their friend and I learned that they are decent people only looking out for our best interests. Without their help I don’t know if my father could have even gotten us out of the war zone. The shrapnel cut through our legs as we ran for safety and made it a close call of life and death. But we did it and I thanked god when we reached safety he must have a special plan for me. When we got to that open clearing with no extremists to be found my American friends John and Todd called in a flying machine that too k me too a makeshift hospital in a camp. I thank them for everything they had done for me and hope one day to return to my village in a peaceful world.

Derek Schwartz

Anonymous said...

-Brianna Valeri
B. In my opinion, the most powerful picture is number 39. This photo includes Zachary Powell, a 5-year old boy, being comforted by his father at the funeral of his older brother, Sgt. Joshua D. Powell. Sgt. Powell died in a helicopter crash in Zabul province, Afghanistan at the age of 25. This picture would evoke sadness for the viewers. The sad expression and tears on the boy’s face truly shows that his brother is a hero and means a lot to him. This photo also shows the great tragedy of the death of young soldiers fighting in Iraq.

C. Although Hazara people are separated geographically and socially by other Afghans, “The Outsiders” written by Phil Zabriskie presents the efforts of this secluded group and considers them one of the last hopes Afghanistan has for a better future.

Anonymous said...

In “The Outsiders” by Phil Zabriskie, the Hazaras, although geographically and socially isolated, are the only future for a more improved Afghanistan.


Ben Avril

Anonymous said...

Part C: The Hazara’s are a persecuted race of Afghan people, despite being a very intelligent and kind people they are hated by all other Afghans, But in this new regime of government they will finally be allowed to prosper.

Derek Schwartz

Justin Iadarola said...

Part C.
The Hazaras of Kabul not only need a much different way of living but they need it quickly before the Hazara community dies off from starvation and disease.

Mikey G said...

Mike Gillis

Part B
Photo 23



A young boy, who has faced a difficult life, now finds himself within a junkyard, waiting to see what happens next in his life. He has not had a home for several weeks now, as his parents have been killed by accidentally stepping on IEDs while commuting. For refuge until he can find a more permanent resting place, he currently seeks refuge in this dilapidated junkyard. While not an ideal location, by any means, for him; this place must do for now. In the high heat, he must sweat it out and find a way to keep himself hydrated for as long as he needs to.


Part C
Thesis Statement

Despite the relatively low population of the Hazaran people within Afghanistan combined with their negative perspective by other social groups, they remain a proud people, and have accomplished much despite what other groups may think of them, and look to have a promising future.


Part E
Comprehensive Notes

*The possibility of the U.S. winning Afghanistan is viewed by some to be “a dream”
*Afghanistan has become deadlier than Iraq
*There are 33,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan; 160,000 in Iraq
*More soldiers are needed in Afghanistan; more effort should be focused there than in Iraq
*Red smoke signals friendly helicopters that there is hostile fire in the area
*The Taliban have significant control over narcotics in Afghanistan, and have made significant profits from it
*American bombers have mistaken weddings, funerals, and other activities for those that are done by insurgents
*Not all Taliban are enemies
*The better an American is at eliminating Al Qaeda cells, the more likely the tribes will cooperate because they see the Americans as being the winners
*There are 45,000,000 Pashtuns
*Afghanistan and India are nemeses
*Pakistanis are enraged with Karzai, the Afghan president
*Suicide bombings took place soon after new president’s speech, including her death

Ashlie Sprague said...

Part B:

23)
A pained young boy stands in what looks like a junk yard. He is burdened by insecurities and fear. He never knows what each day will bring him. He has so many quesions. Scared and alone he waits but never finds answers.

Although unable to prevent it, he sees his nation falling. If given opportunities he could acheive greatness. He containes so much potential but will never amount to anything.

This young boy is held back from all the opportunities life could bring because of where he lives. Living in Afghanistan is a constant struggle. Growing up in a place with no chance of success, he will always wonder. He will wonder why he was cursed to live in such a poverty-born nation. He will wonder why he was not given opportunities to be someome, to mean something. He'll always wonder.

Anonymous said...

Robert Southworth
English C

Part B).
Image 26

Pain, corruption, and death. Ever since the U.S. and NATO’s involvement began in Afghanistan, the pain, corruption, and death Afghani’s face every day have been exposed worldwide. Yes, terrorist organizations exist in Afghanistan, but not every Afghani is the enemy. However, the distinction between terrorist and citizen are not easily apparent and numerous and innocent people are injured as a result. For instance, a recent Marine patrol was involved in a firefight that resulted in serious injuries to a child who happened to be in the wrong place at wrong time. Happy, however, is her father that his daughter will be able to leave the area of war, hopefully allowing her to one day lead a normal life. The young soldiers who aided her rescue, not much older than a high school seniors, have a immense amount of responsibility and commitment to the Afghani citizens to only target the enemy, not the innocent. But who really is the enemy?

Part C).
Despite recent accomplishments and gains, the Hazara population still faces discrimination and a unpredictable future in Afghani society; however, a prosperous upcoming has lead to more favorable conditions.

Jill Wry said...

A. 1. Opium, wheat, fruits, nuts, wool mutton, sheepskins, lambskins
2. Life Expectancy: 44.4years
Infant Mortality Rate: 153.14 deaths/1,000 births
It shows that the medical care is not very advanced which implies that the hospitals do not have enough funds. The lack of funds for essentials, like good health care, shows that the economy is most likely not very good.
3. Afghanistan has 0km of coastline. It could have affected the country’s history because there were not as many resources available to them. It could also have affected their trade with other countries because water was the major means of transporting goods.
4. Afghanistan faces transnational issues in the way of disputes with Pakistan, refugees and internally displaced peoples, and illicit drugs.
5. Despite its breathtaking landscapes and amazing ability to persevere, Afghanistan always has, and most likely always will, struggle with both economic and geographical difficulties.

David said...

Part B:
As Hamish Carries his daughter to a med-vac helicopter for help; he can only think of how his wife urged him to move somewhere else: “before the Marines tear our family apart.” she was not talking about how the marines would hurt them physically, but just there presence was enough to attract more and more of the Taliban. This was the fate for Hamish’s wife, An RPG fired at marines that ended up at her body. Luckily for Hamish, he would not lose his daughter to the same fate, because the RPG that was fired only him a building and it was the shrapnel that got his daughter. The marines quickly rushed to her side to protect her and told her father to carry her to a helicopter as they covered him. Hamish might think again about moving to another country or a safer place.

Part C:

Phil Zabriskie’s article The Outsiders shows how Hazaran Citizens are still struggling to live free; Phil tells a story about Shafaq and how even though he is discriminated against, he still finds a way to teach and have hope.

Nigel Allard said...

Part B:

BOOM! Another mortar round gets launched into the night sky and the darkness vanishes for a split second. Pvt. Robert stumbled around trying to regain his balance as his head continued to ring from the last launch. He had been launching 120 mm mortars for the past ten minutes. He had been doing this for the past few days at Rocco Combat Outpost as it was his job to provide cover for his fellow marines in Operation “Glued Finger 2”. Pvt. Robert joined the 68th Regiment Africa Artillery to avoid face to face combat. He didn’t want to see the people that he was killing. He didn’t want to be haunted for the rest of his life by the image of the men he killed. By serving in the 68th Regiment he could protect his country but avoid seeing the death and destruction. However, he was haunted by the fact that he didn’t know who he was killing with his artillery. He could have killed enemy combatants, innocent civilians or worse, his fellow soldiers. He tried to reassure himself that the mortar rounds didn’t kill anyone and that they landed in open fields but he knew this was not true.

Part C:

Hazaras are segregated from normal Afghanis and treated as lower class because of their appearance and religion.

Brian Fox said...

Afghanistan's Hazara population has faced many hardships over the countries history but in the present day are overcoming struggles and making a name for themselves; much like African Americans in America.

Brian Fox

Anonymous said...

Part C.

The future looks optomistic for the once oppressed Hazara people of Afghanistan.

--PHIL RIZZO

Kaylyn said...

Part B:
So you’re trying to keep the peace? Your soldiers risking their own lives to help the people of Afghanistan. These soldiers will never be viewed as heroes, just an enemy to most. Look what you’ve taught the children, they learn by observation. War is a vicious and never ending cycle. What is the purpose of this, you’re not helping anybody. Your actions are being passed down generation to generation. Because of you, our children will never understand peace, only war because that is how they were raised. Your close-mindedness will cost some of these children and the next generation of NATO soldiers to die. Look at the children, they’re happy. How is this something to be viewed with a smile? Children aimlessly pointing guns and laughing at the fact that people are dying around them. Your actions are costing many lives and the violence will never end.


Part C:
Most commonly remembered and recognized as outsiders, the Hazara people are constantly striving to break past misconceptions from those around them.

Erin said...

Phil Zabriskie is stressing to the reader that international differences in culture and physical features can effect the outlook on one nation to another. Zabridski exemplifies volunteering the discriminating viewpoint of the Taliban to Hazaras to emphisize his point.

Anonymous said...

Photograph 19

The taste of dust and dirt arouse my taste buds. My face feels as if I was just hit with a sledgehammer. I reach to my lip and feel the soft tissue and realize half of my bottom is lip is gone. My fellow soldiers are trying to bandage me up, but I crack as smile because I am alive. A bullet came very close to ending my life, so it taking some of my lip is a fair trade in my book. I can still feel the dry blood on my face as I board the helicopter, and then I see a man with a camera. I agree to the picture because it will be a good souvenir. I still smile, and my lip feels gruesome, but nothing some cosmetic surgery can not fix. I am happy to be alive.

-Keegan Schleicher

Joe Anderson said...

Part B:
Picture #24- This picture of the Canadian soldier chasing a chicken seconds before being grenaded by enemy troops is too difficult of a feeling to describe in words. This picture also goes to prove that you always need to expect the unexpected. War is a very emotional ongoing concept, where words just do not do justice for what is happening. To actually grasp what is actually going on during a war you need to see it, whether it be in person, in pictures, or in videos, and even still sometimes you cannot grasp what is actually happening around you. The soldiers in this photo probably had no idea what was going on for a few seconds after the attack started, and each of their stories probably would prove so, but they still could not completely, truthfully tell their story because of that adrenaline factor where they completely forget about what is going on around them and just mix things up in their memories when trying to remember that day.

Joe Anderson said...

Part C:
Phil Zabriskie’s article, Hazaras: Afghanistan’s outsiders, describes that, despite the areas tragic and sad past, there is a brighter future to the Hazaras considering the recent aid from America and its allies, and through their hopes to rebuild their community from the destruction caused by the Taliban.

Anonymous said...

Part B:
Boom! A loud noise is heard from miles away as a bright light illuminates the night sky. A French soldier from the 68 Regiment African Artillery (RAA) has to duck and cover his hears to overt the damage that can be caused to his ears or eyes. The 120mm Mortar creates a small dust storm in the small Rocco Combat Outpost as a projectile is shot into the air. The XM931 Practice Round is shot off into the desolate African landscape where only some animals may get hurt. The 5 man French crew deploys it to perfection and they are now ready to get out of the practice field and on the real fight. Afghanistan.

Part C: The Hazaras, Afghanistan’s outlaws, have face many tough challenges but have kept their head up through determination and a hope that through their hard work and sticking together through it all they can overcome the rough times they have faced and move forward.

- Michael Edward Kelly

Anonymous said...

Part B: Picture 44

I stand here in this dessert of a country. Filled with violence and hate, and I wonder why I am doing here. Many days I help innocent children whose lives are forever changed by this ongoing conflict. After all, what did these children ever do? These people are taught to kill me at all costs, no matter what the damage, nor who the damage affects. A country full of terror, and what seems to be an everlasting hate toward our involvement
Little Abdul Qar, a bright young boy that I always saw selling DVD’s to us soldiers, suddenly drenched in blood from an I.E.D intended to take my life. Instead, it takes his innocent fathers live and potentially Abduls. While he and his father were walking to the market, Abdul and his father stepped on this explosive unfortunately killing his father instantly. Abduls uncle proceeded to bring his bloody body to me. I looked in his eyes, as he screams for his father, helplessly squirming as the pain overtakes his entire body, and I think back to the day I enlisted. Many of the reasons I enlisted for had suddenly changed. In that brief moment, I understood what I was here to do. At first, I was fighting for my country. Now I am fighting for little boys like Abdul, who don’t have the luxury of leaving this country when this war is over. I’m fighting for each and every innocent person whose lives have changed drastically since our presence. I realize the original objective is far from what really needs to be done, and as of this moment, my life and my morals have been forever changed.

-Joey Wilkes

Anonymous said...

Part B
Crack, Crack, Crack, Crrrr, the gun jams. “Fix it and make it work!” is all I hear from the commanding officer as I try to prepare the gun for war. There is no place in this battle for an unreliable gun. I must figure out how to get this to work flawlessly. I can’t let a faulty gun cause the loss of my fellow soldier’s lives. I know in my heart that as I stay here at Observation Post Coleman, my fellow soldiers are out risking their lives with guns that they need to work. Knowing that they are trusting on these guns to work when called upon is a huge baron on my soldiers. I waste tons of resources for every misfire or barrel jam this gun uses. And at .50 cal, it is a very costly jam. This gun is meant to take out a car carrying a bomb or to stop anything dead in its tracks, and one failure could lead to a major casualty number. And as I test it, the lives of the people I am saving is the only thing that keeps me motivated. As I realign the barrel and fire again, Crack, Crack, Crack, the gun seems to work now. But I must be certain as I let loose another burst of shots. Crack, Crack, Crack, the gun sounds almost rhythmic as it lets loose the bullets. My commanding officer walks towards me and slap my back. After forgetting to put my earplugs in, I try to read his lips. I can tell from his face that he is proud of my work and he takes the gun and sends it off. On to the next one I say as my hearing is finally coming back. He laughs and shrugs saying hopefully this will all be over soon due to your help!

AJ BASHAW

Anonymous said...

Part C

Despite segregation and discrimination the Hazara people face in Afghanistan, their values of intelligence, perseverance and being strong-willed is the main attribute that could help Afghanistan recover from decades of civil-war.

-Keegan Schleicher

Brendan C said...

B)
The United States troops located in Afghanistan are always at risk when placed in an enemy country. In the first picture the solider, though not in danger, is looked upon negatively by the citizens at all ages. The boy is pointing a fake gun at the soldier thus signifying the importance of keeping their head on a swivel at all times. The photo shows how even at a young age the citizens in Afghanistan are taught to hate opponent countries during times of war in which is the U.S. in this case. The photo signifies hostility and hatred between the countries although the U.S. is not shown retaliating in this case it shows the tension that exists. We do not know by the picture if the soldier has any recognition of the incident occurring that is photographed, but we could say that the photo shows a possible drastic scene if this event is taking as a serious threat.
C)
The Hazaras use conformity within their people to build respect, although their country negatively impacts them making them the lowest rank of people in all the land.

Anonymous said...

Part B:
Tears running down his face and out of him eyes, trying to wipe them in hope no more will come. But the more he wipes them the more he remembers his courteous, older brother. He grips his little hands to his dad’s suit for comfort and love as the memories of his brother comes to mind. Being only the age of 5 he still has a feeling of wretchedness and remembrance of the man he was longing to be. Neither the boy nor his dad was prepared for this. They’d never expect something like this to happen. This man had four times the number of years ahead of him, but life had ended today. It ended with determination, dignity, and honor. It ended for his love of the United States.

Part C:
Whether one’s living in Iran or in the U.S. one will still be effected with the growth of the Taliban and your life may be not the way you had planned it to be.
-Tara Hanson

Anonymous said...

Part C
the Hazaras of Afghanistan need to achieve above all standards just to be slightly noticed by their society in any way; they need to re-locate just to be accepted.

-Kayla B

Anonymous said...

Part B:
Image: 42

This all encompassing image depicts something that could never be fully expressed in words. Image #42 shows a group of "villagers look on as an Ilyushin II-76TD aircraft flies over the village of Sefidbar, south of Herat, western Afghanistan." They look on as this machine, capable of killing thousands of people fly's above their head, over their home, without even showing the slightest bit of fear. This simple picture exposes so much in the people, and the culture of Afghanistan. These people have probaly been exposed to this type of warfare for their entire lives. Which, understandably has forced them to get used to it. Because of this the economy must not be fully functional, and probably down. Because of this you can assume an average of a higher infant mortality rate, and a lower average lifespan. Because of the highly unstable environment, education would be interrupted. You can tell so much about a country by a day to day image. This one in particular, captures so much wrong and injustice which is why its so powerful.
David Littlefield

Jill Wry said...

B. Picture 19:
The sound of the helicopter as we take off from this war-ridden land takes a backseat to the ringing still in my ears. My mouth is dry, as though I have just gone for a six mile run through the Margow Desert. I notice the stiffness in my arm as I lower it from my face. I look down at my hand and I see my glove is now a deep shade of red, the gauze in my hand seems to have met a similar fate. As the gauze falls to the floor, I pick up a canteen and pour the water into my parched mouth. I feel a cool sensation as water dribbles out of the hole that used to be my left cheek. A tear falls from my eye and I feel the sting of the salt in my open wound. Embarrassed, I grab a new piece of gauze, quickly wipe the tears away, and pull my sunglasses over my eyes before anyone can see. Guys die out here every day, I can’t be seen crying over a flesh wound. So I suck it up and wait for us to land at the nearest Combat Support Hospital; I’ll be fine.

Anonymous said...

Part C:
Depicted within Phil Zabriskie's, "The Outsiders" the main theme is the political, and social improvement that that Hazaras are experiencing

David Littlefield

Anonymous said...

Part B: Picture 26:
Sometimes I wonder who they think they are. I wonder what gives them the right to come to our country? But right now I know why they are here. They were sent from above, for a bigger meaning. They are not ignorant or self-righteous. They are simply, saviors. They know we need help and are trying to rid our nation of evil. But right now, when I need them, they are here. Risking their lives for my boy, a boy whom they do not know. They want to save my boy, then save the country he calls home. Please don’t leave us until the horror is done. Please help save our nation.

Part C: In a country filled with war and hate, the peaceful but oppressed Hazaras provide a ray of hope for Afghanistan’s future.

Conor Regan

Jill Wry said...

C. In Zabriskie’s National Geographic article, “The Outsiders”, the story of the Hazara people illustrates the unfortunate truth that, despite great advances made by an oppressed people, nothing will change unless society in general, usually those that oppressed them, is ready to accept them as equals.

Anonymous said...

Part B- Image #44:
It was a typical day; my father and I were walking in the dusty path just outside the city. He asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up; I could not respond because I did not know what I could be. He told of a land of opportunity in America, where anyone could be anything. Such a fairy tale place seemed too good to be true, and then the Taliban took him. He stepped on an explosive devise, which killed him instantly, and I was severely injured. It would seem now that all hope was lost and such a place is inconceivable to try to reach; however, a United States soldier, of the land that my father spoke of, picked me up and treated me. I cried for my father, telling him to come see who had arrived to my rescue, but there was no response.

-Justin Glass

Anonymous said...

Part B

As I sat in the dark backseat of the armored truck gazing into what seemed empty space bigger thoughts were rushing through my head than my body language portrayed. Inside I was dying; outside I may have appeared nervous, but inside I was in fear of my life. “Any moment now that armored door would open.” I thought to myself. What if I was shot? Who back home would care? Would I ever see my wife again? Would I ever have the chance to set eyes on my new born daughter? The questions rushed through my head, but no answers would be given. I just sat in the armored truck gazing stupefied into what seemed like thin air.

-Chris Schatvet

Ariel said...

Part B: The image of the afghan villager’s burying seven of their people after NATO attacked their village is powerful in that it shows how things have been taken too far. I see the villagers of Afghanistan as very upset and sad about the invasion of their village. Innocent people are dying due to the Taliban. The victims may have not been involved with the Taliban, but the soldiers would never know because they just launched a bunch of weapons into the village and killed several people.

Anonymous said...

Despite intense animosity from the Taliban and the Pashtuns, the Hazzaras have risen to the occassion by seizing new opportunities that have been given to them by the humanistic movement.

-Justin Glass

aliciaroseperry said...

Part C: While in "The Outsiders" National Geographic Magazine reveals the improvement of life in Afghanistan for the Hazaras, it also shows tragedies from the past through events including the Taliban and others stories.
-Alicia Perry

Anonymous said...

PART C

While the Hazara are indeed starting to be treated more equally, they still have much farther to go before they can be considered full blown citizens of Afghanistan.

-Chris Schatvet

Anonymous said...

No matter what discrimination or hatred you may face, strength and perseverance will allow you to overcome any obstacle and will allow you to do anything you put your mind to, even if it involves rebuilding an entire lost culture from scratch.

Joey Wilkes

Ariel said...

Part C:
Afghanistan is filled with minority groups,Hazaras, this causes discrtimination and sgregation; similar to the black slaves.

Paul said...

Part A:
1) Afghanistan’s top eight agricultural products are opium, wheat, fruit, nuts, mutton, sheepskin, and lambskins. The top product being opium.
2) The life expectancy rate is 44.4 years. The infant mortality is 153.14 deaths/1000 live births. These high death rates show a lack of adequate medicine/healthcare, education, and technology.
3) Afghanistan has no coastline. No coastline means no overseas trade or contact with coastal nations which are typically more advanced because of the income from trade.
4) One transnational issue facing the Afghani people is the open border with Pakistan which allows terrorists to easily enter and exit the country. Secondly there are over a hundred thousand refugees centered in the south and west due to drought and instability. Finally, the drugs produced from opium fund the Taliban and their oppressive rule.
5) The Afghani people’s long history of perseverance will need to be employed to conquer Afghanistan’s current problems with terrorism, drugs, a poor economy, and a corrupt government.

Erin said...

ugh why did i just watch that

Anonymous said...

Part A: 1.)opium, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, mutton, sheepskins, lambskins. Opium.
2.) 44.68 years old. 151.5 deaths/1,000 live births. The deeper issues are that these people are poor and aren't leading healthy lives.
3.) none. they're landlocked. They didn't do well in wars because they dont have anything to protect.
4.)Pakistan has built fences in some portions of its border with Afghanistan which remains open in some areas to foreign terrorists and other illegal activities. Also terrorism from other countries.
5.)The Afgani nation is a poor country that is in desperate need of help.

Gina B

Anonymous said...

Part B: The picture that i chose is of s young Afgahni boy pointing a toy pistol at an IOtalian soldier. War is all that these children have seen; it's all that they know. The man with a real gun does not even scare the poor boys who are surrounded by barbed wire. The italian soldier doesn't even sem surprized by this. This picture is the most shocking to be because it shows what these children have to grow up and live in.

Gina B

Anonymous said...

Part C:
In the report, the author says that due to the constant deiscrimination of the Hazars, they're finally fighting back for what they deserve ad are rising up in the eyes of many.

Gina B