Tuesday, November 8, 2011

"The Street" Analyses

Seniors: please post your analysis here.

145 comments:

Anonymous said...

Chris Robinson
The Street Analysis

Shifting from setting the scene to the story of the main character in The Street, Ann Petry portrays the idea that even in the hardest of times, one should continue to push forward, even if the “wind [pushes]” them away, defining the creation of artful personification, dark imagery, and a cautious selection of detail.
Petry produces a mind, and body, a person, for the wind through personification to communicate that the wind is trying to prevent those outside, especially Lutie, from accomplishing their goals. The wind presents itself as a road block in Lutie’s path, almost as if it were the difficult situation she is going through. The wind forced the girl to shiver as “[its] cold fingers…touched the back of her neck, explored the sides of her head”, almost as if it were a dominant male pushing her back to her current living location, suggesting that the wind has a body. Petry also portrayed the wind to do everything possible to “discourage the people” walking on the streets, by finding “chicken bones and pork-chop bones”, and “every scrap of paper along the street”. Petry intended for the wind to have a mind, as it was forcing people back to their sanctuaries. The art of Petry’s personification can be further reflected upon through another crucial tool: imagery.
Petry further induces the reader’s recognition to fantasizing the imagery set by the forceful wind’s attributes, which hold back any who face it head on. The “violent assault” of the wind forced not only Lutie, but also every other pedestrian on the street back to their homes, their sanctuaries, as it grew “difficult to breathe”. The sinister characteristics of this beast set a sort of bleak scene and atmosphere for the reader, also indicating that the wind is a hardship that one must face outside of their cozy, warm home. The structure of the scene’s imagery is amplified to a higher degree through Petry’s selection of detail in the excerpt.
Petry continues to support her claims by laying out a varied selection of detail to catch the reader’s eye. Most of the details are primarily aimed towards the win and what it is doing to the scenario, such as when it “sucked [the] window shades out through the top” of opened windows, and “stuck its fingers” inside of people’s coat collars. In other words, the wind is deliberately interfering with its surroundings, creating a stressful situation where one would need a sanctuary to avoid the sinister gusts. The selected detail also pertains to setting the imagery and atmosphere of the scenario, though still pertaining to the wind. The “flapping” of the shades, “every scrap of paper” being thrown against the people on the streets, and “dirt and dust” being lifted into the air “making it difficult to breathe”, creating a chaotic atmosphere. Petry’s deliberate efforts perfectly outline the characteristics of the wind, while portraying the imagery and atmosphere of the setting.
In The Street, Petry creates the idea that in hard, stressful times, one needs a sanctuary to avoid “the wind” of life’s powerful gusts. Through three crucial, subtle components, personification, imagery, and selection of detail, the purpose of the story was perfectly conveyed.

Matt Kelley said...

Shifting from a lost to a satisfied tone. In The Street, Ann Petry utilizes dark personification, violent imagery, and terrifying selection of detail to compare the “cold November wind” to life’s obstacles.
The wind can be described as Lutie’s enemy with all of it’s actions aimed towards slowing her down. The wind attacked the people and made everyone rush inside with a “violent assault” on the street. Dirt was being kicked up by the wind and no one could be outside because they were afraid to get dirt in their noses. The wind left the street sign with a mark that was a “dark red stain like blood”. The wind attacked the street and especially harmed the sign to purposefully get in Lutie’s way and take her off the street like everyone else.
The wind is attacking anything and everything on the street. The wind “drove” the people on the street inside their homes. The wind “rattled” garbage cans and “sucked window shades out through the top of open windows”. The wind aggressively “grabbed their hats” and “stuck its fingers inside their coat collars” of all the people on the street. It “took time” to attack the people on the street and “forced” them to run away and hide.
The author’s choice of terrifying details illustrates the wind as the protagonist of the story. The wind seems to want to scare everyone off the street. It “found” as many objects that it could grab and shake or pull away. The wind creepily “lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair” and made her feel “naked” and exposed. The people on the street were scared of the wind and the wind seemed to want to stop Lutie in her pursuit for a hotel.
The wind is the protagonist of the story and a villainous monster. The wind assaults the people on the street for its own reasons. It tries to slow down Lutie and stop her from completing her mission. Lutie’s main problem is fighting the wind to find a hotel. People face many obstacles throughout their life and it seems like inanimate objects are trying to stop them from getting what they want. The “cold November wind” is used by Ann Petry to be compared to life’s obstacles that many people face every day.

Chengqi Gao said...

Shifting from the wind to the perspective of Lutie in The Street, Ann Petry utilizes intellectual personification, complex imagery, and intimate characterization to establish how the wind develops a relationship between Lutie and the building of “three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, and respectable tenants.”
Petry’s use of personification gives the wind an ability to think for itself. The wind “discourages” the people, it “grabs” and “pries” and “blows” coats, hats and scarves, almost as if it were trying to tell the people something. Petry further gives the sense of an intellect in the wind by making it “lift Lutie Johnson’s hair” and then “exploring the side of her head.” The wind, by “pushing” the sign away, and “holding it still” is trying to warn Lutie about the building. But Lutie is able to read the sign anyway, and embraces the building, while trying to hold the wind back.
Petry further exemplifies the winds relationship with Lutie through a complex description of imagery. The wind is shown to have a close relationship with Lutie through its actions. It “lifted” her “hair away from the back of her neck” so that “she felt suddenly naked and bald.” The image one gets is that of the wind stripping her down so that you see into her soul. The imagery depicts a dark, bleak building in which “years of rain and snow had finally eaten the pain off” making a dark stain on the wall that looked “like blood,” which further develops Lutie’s connection to the dismal building.
The author also employs an abrupt, intimate characterization between the characters, the wind and the building. The wind is characterized through its “violent assault” as “discouraging” as it “found all the dirt and dust” and “lifted it up” as to “make it difficult to breathe.” The wind also attempts to use its “cold fingers” to touch Lutie’s back and the “sides of her head.” Petry further develops the wind and Lutie through their interaction in front of the old building.
The wind, Lutie, and the building all form a complex relationship in The Street, in which Ann Petry utilizes intellectual personification, descriptive imagery, and a personal characterization to emphasize their interconnectedness.

Kendyl Cutler said...

Shifting between a struggling tone to a slightly positive tone in "The Street", Ann Petry uses realistic imagery, forceful personification, and descriptive diction in order to express to the reader that life is hard and may feel like "there wasn't any point" to move on.
Petry uses imagry that puts a picture in the reader's head of the harsh, aggressive wind and how it affected the people and things that swarmed the streets. A few "pedestrians...bent double in an effort to offer the least possible exposed surface to its violent assault". People were depicted as ducking and dodging the horrible, forceful weather that surrounded them. Lutie Johnson notices a sign of "metal and the metal had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood" which helps the reader see the depressing sight that Lutie had seen. It gives a creepy, desperate feeling on the reader and it's almost as though the reaster was there as Lutie Johnson.
The wind is projected to the reader as though it has a mind and a body. By the way the wind was "fingering its way along the curb" and "grabbed" people's hats, reveals how the wind is given body parts. Eventually, "It found every scrap of paper along the street", explaining how the wind would have to be able to think in order to find anything. These descriptions are alluded in the reader's mindas a moving, living, thinking thing. It enhances the violence of the wind when it is personified this way.
Diction may be a bit hidden throughout the snippet of the novel, but the parts that are there make the reader feel as though they are in the time frame that is set. "theatre throwaways, announcements of fances, and lodge meetings, the heavy waxed paper that loaves of bread had been wrapped in, the thinner waxed paper that had enclosed sandwiches, old envelopes, newspapers" aren't very common things one would see today in a city. There are not very many plays and dances around these days, unless you go to a college. Bread was very popular then, but mostly Americans buy their bread at the grocerie store in a plastic bag. "Chicken bones and pork-chop bone" are also not very common things to see these days. Back then, people were slaughtering animals more openly than we do today and that's how they made their food fresh. A lot of the food today is not so much as fresh as it use to be.
From the harsh imagry put in the head's of readers to the wind being personified and the vision of old New York a reader has a sense of the depressing reality that was throughout the novel. The wind was extreamly violent showing no hope in the streets. It had a mind and body of it's own and could not be controlled, just like life it self cannot be controlled. The picture of bones and old papers flying around on the streets give a creepy feel and a feeling of desperation, but there may be some hope for Lutie Johnson.
-Kendyl Cutler

Anonymous said...

Giving the wind physical then mental ability in "The Sreet," Ann Petry establishes Johnson's relationship to the urban setting through the use of dark imagery, intreging personification, and important figurative language to show how a place can be a "violent assualt" on "the people on the street."

Petry's use of imagery in the excerpt forces the reader to imagine a city street setting. As people sparsely walk by they are somewhat frightened by the "rattled...tops of garbage cans," and the "dirt and dust and grim on the sidewalk." Since the author is using such complex imagery mixed with some simple imagery, as well, it gives the wind a physical image to the reader. It is ironic that Petry portrays the wind as a physical thing because wind cannot be seen. The wind is made to have a dark, mean feeling. This gives it an evil relation to it. It goes around by the author's different word choice which, also, makes it seem human.

By giving the wind the pronoun "it" repeated throughout the excerpt, it makes the wind seem like a physical person. In the beginning, the wind "rattled" things, "sucked window shades," and "drove most of the people off." It seems to gain more power from those actions and beings to develop an intellectual or mental part to it. This draws the reader in to see how Johnson deals with this type of setting. The wind, then, starts to, "[find] every scrap of paper," and "finger it's way along the curb." When it establishes the ability to find things and "take time" it adds a living, breathing ability and that brings out its humanistic qualities. The way the wind seems to tourment people has to be digested to find what the true meaning to the words as literal or figurative.

Using personification sometimes can lead to different meanings of objects. The wind is not really doing all of the things that Petry says it is in a literal way. Figurative language takes a big role in making the wind seem more real to the reader. The figurative language takes place when the wind is making the lives of the people miserable. The wind lifting the "hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked" is not literal but it adds more to what the sentence actually means. It gives the setting a creepier feel, and the people on the street are feeling awkward and uncomfortable. The wind is causing trouble and is putting a strain on the everyday lives of these people. Petry puts a humorous and scary feeling too it by having "the wind twisting the sign away from her" so she couldn't see which way to go. This shows that Johnson is not adjusting well to the setting.

Petry is trying to show the reader that urban settings can be difficult to live in at times. They can feel scary and have hard times when living there. By using the imagery, personification, and figurative language it only becomes that more alive and real to the reader. Giving the reader the true feel of how Johnson is adjusting to the setting, as an unwelcomed outsider and everyone, including the wind, does not go out of the way to be warm welcoming.
-Allie Zelinski AP English (D)

Hannah Lavendier said...

Transitioning from the subject of the wind to the characterization of Lutie Johnson in The Street, author Ann Petry integrates the devices of deliberate personification, ominous foreshadowing, and urban imagery to illustrate the ability of nature “to discourage” Lutie Johnson from having a positive relationship with the environment.
The intentional personification used by Petry effectively introduces the power of nature, which resists a positive relationship between the urban environment and Lutie Johnson. The wind’s “violent assault” on the city’s pedestrians, including Lutie Johnson, establishes nature’s physical presence. The verbal expressions of personification, ranging from “[rattling] the tops of garbage cans” to “fingering its way along the curb”, help to create a presence that is unable to go unnoticed by the reader. Ann Petry also makes “an effort to offer” glimpses of the wind’s mental capacity. The reader recognizes nature’s desire to resist Lutie Johnson from obtaining a positive experience in the urban setting when “it did everything it could to discourage” her from staying at the desolate inn. The wind’s decision to “[twist] the sign away from her” is evidence of the mental abilities it owns. The personification of the wind proves to be powerful in physical strength, powerful in mental capacity, and powerful in creating an impactful effect upon the reader.
Further emphasizing nature’s ability to negatively influence Lutie Johnson’s relationship with her surroundings, Ann Petry includes an essence of doomful foreshadowing. The “original coat of white paint” represents the innocence and purity of Lutie’s experience in the city thus far. By adding in the element of the paint being “streaked with rust”, Petry subtly creates an ominous feeling. This feeling is created because rust is created over time, suggesting that Lutie’s experience will progressively become worse. A more violent use of foreshadowing, a more violent use of figurative language, is the simile comparing the metal’s rust to “a dark red stain like blood”. The naturalistic element of the rust hints to the reader what is to come- it alludes to Lutie Johnson’s uncertain future in the urban environment.
This urban environment inspires imagery specific to the setting, which completes the speaker’s belief of nature being the ultimate force in deciding Lutie Johnson’s relationship with her surroundings. The natural conditions of the city cause Lutie’s eyeballs to be “bathed in a rush of coldness”, resulting in her needing “to blink in order to read the words on the sign”. This imagery demonstrates the “cold November” climate, and how it is attempting “to discourage” Lutie from staying in the inn. Moreover, the climate resists her stay by targeting her eyes, which represent clarity and vision. The urban environment more broadly affects the relationship between Lutie and the setting by sending “a barrage of paper [swirling] into the faces of the people on the street”. This represents that the climate and weather are not only directly trying to resist Lutie from staying in the city, but they are additionally utilizing physical and tangible items.
The Street uses many devices to develop the role of nature in deciding whether or not the protagonist of Lutie Johnson has good relations with her urban surroundings. The devices all tie into the weather and the strong sense of setting and character, yet also differentiate between each other is small ways. Combined, these devices lure the reader into becoming intrigued with the piece, ensuring for a successful representation of nature’s abilities.

Hannah Lavendier said...

Transitioning from the subject of the wind to the characterization of Lutie Johnson in The Street, author Ann Petry integrates the devices of deliberate personification, ominous foreshadowing, and urban imagery to illustrate the ability of nature “to discourage” Lutie Johnson from having a positive relationship with the environment.
The intentional personification used by Petry effectively introduces the power of nature, which resists a positive relationship between the urban environment and Lutie Johnson. The wind’s “violent assault” on the city’s pedestrians, including Lutie Johnson, establishes nature’s physical presence. The verbal expressions of personification, ranging from “[rattling] the tops of garbage cans” to “fingering its way along the curb”, help to create a presence that is unable to go unnoticed by the reader. Ann Petry also makes “an effort to offer” glimpses of the wind’s mental capacity. The reader recognizes nature’s desire to resist Lutie Johnson from obtaining a positive experience in the urban setting when “it did everything it could to discourage” her from staying at the desolate inn. The wind’s decision to “[twist] the sign away from her” is evidence of the mental abilities it owns. The personification of the wind proves to be powerful in physical strength, powerful in mental capacity, and powerful in creating an impactful effect upon the reader.
Further emphasizing nature’s ability to negatively influence Lutie Johnson’s relationship with her surroundings, Ann Petry includes an essence of doomful foreshadowing. The “original coat of white paint” represents the innocence and purity of Lutie’s experience in the city thus far. By adding in the element of the paint being “streaked with rust”, Petry subtly creates an ominous feeling. This feeling is created because rust is created over time, suggesting that Lutie’s experience will progressively become worse. A more violent use of foreshadowing, a more violent use of figurative language, is the simile comparing the metal’s rust to “a dark red stain like blood”. The naturalistic element of the rust hints to the reader what is to come- it alludes to Lutie Johnson’s uncertain future in the urban environment.
This urban environment inspires imagery specific to the setting, which completes the speaker’s belief of nature being the ultimate force in deciding Lutie Johnson’s relationship with her surroundings. The natural conditions of the city cause Lutie’s eyeballs to be “bathed in a rush of coldness”, resulting in her needing “to blink in order to read the words on the sign”. This imagery demonstrates the “cold November” climate, and how it is attempting “to discourage” Lutie from staying in the inn. Moreover, the climate resists her stay by targeting her eyes, which represent clarity and vision. The urban environment more broadly affects the relationship between Lutie and the setting by sending “a barrage of paper [swirling] into the faces of the people on the street”. This represents that the climate and weather are not only directly trying to resist Lutie from staying in the city, but they are additionally utilizing physical and tangible items.
The Street uses many devices to develop the role of nature in deciding whether or not the protagonist of Lutie Johnson has good relations with her urban surroundings. The devices all tie into the weather and the strong sense of setting and character, yet also differentiate between each other is small ways. Combined, these devices lure the reader into becoming intrigued with the piece, ensuring for a successful representation of nature’s abilities.

Cassie H. said...

This is so bad, but I don't know how to make it better.


Cassie Hynes
AP English Literature D
“The Street” Essay

Shifting focus from the setting to Lutie Johnson in “The Street”, Ann Petry verifies Lutie has not been in the city “for a long time”; Lutie’s newness to the area is affirmed through the author’s combination of detailed imagery, elemental personification and subtle characterization.
Petry embellishes her depiction of the setting, and the occurrences in it to best communicate to the reader the environment one would be used to if one were well acquainted with the city, such as the “scrap paper” (line 10) that can be found all along the street. She incorporates details about the “cold November” (line 1) including how “[the wind] drove most people off the street in the block between Seventh and Eighth Avenues except for a few hurried pedestrians who bent double” (lines 5-8) and that coats, hats, and scarves are commonplace. As Lutie is unused to the chill of the city, she wasn’t wearing a hat, and “shivered” as she felt the wind. Structural details are also provided by the author—“it had been there for a long time” (line 51)—rust and faded paint hint at the age of the surroundings. The attention to the sign Lutie is looking at gives the reader an impression if it’s importance. The sign indicates a vacancy with three heated rooms, translating to the reader that Lutie is looking for a place to stay, and is indeed new to the urban environment. Much the same effect can be found in Petry’s use of personification.
The personification of the “wind blowing through 116th street” (lines 1-2) is most prominent. The wind has a physical and intellectual presence, as it can do things both with force and with thought. Through the qualities of body, the wind “rattled” (line 2), “pried” (line 32), “grabbed” (line31), and “lifted” (line 23). Yet, the wind, with more consideration, also “found” (line 10) papers and dirt, “finger[ed] its way” and “even took time” (line 18). Lutie is not familiar with this wind: “She shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck and explored the sides of her head. It even blew her eyelashes away from her eyeballs so her eyes were bathed in a rush of coldness” (lines 38-42). The wind is not the only aspect of nature that is personified, however. The “rain and snow” (line 53) also are credited with having “eaten the paint off” (line 54) of a sign. Since Lutie Johnson is so unaccustomed to the forceful, humanistic elements of the city, and feels “naked” (line 36) in them, one can safely assume that the girl is not originally from the city and has only been there a short while.
Though the author only allots a brief section of the excerpt to the character, much can be determined about Lutie Johnson from the subtleties of the writing. Noting that Lutie felt “suddenly naked” (line 36) in the wind, one can draw that she feels vulnerable in the strange city. Other people, those from the city, “cursed deep in their throats, stamped” (lines 27-28) and “kicked” (line 28). It can also be easily established that Lutie is intuitive by the fact that “Even with the wind twisting the sign away from her, she could see it had been there for a long time” (lines 49-51). Inflexibility can be sensed through Lutie’s acceptance of three rooms only. By “read[ing the sign] rapidly”, one can tell that Lutie is educated. Lutie is also a determined character, as when others from the city are discouraged by the wind, she “explored” (line 39) nonetheless. Overall, Lutie seems “Reasonable” (line 61), though one can identify her as an outsider.
In order to ascertain a relationship between Lutie Johnson and her new, urban environment, Petry relies on her thoughtful assimilation of specific imagery, overwhelming personification, and clever characterization. Petry attempts to demonstrate the character’s unfamiliarity with her surroundings but expects the reader to draw conclusions about the relationship between the two.

Cassie H. said...

This is so bad, but I don't know how to make it better.


Cassie Hynes
AP English Literature D
“The Street” Essay

Shifting focus from the setting to Lutie Johnson in “The Street”, Ann Petry verifies Lutie has not been in the city “for a long time”; Lutie’s newness to the area is affirmed through the author’s combination of detailed imagery, elemental personification and subtle characterization.
Petry embellishes her depiction of the setting, and the occurrences in it to best communicate to the reader the environment one would be used to if one were well acquainted with the city, such as the “scrap paper” (line 10) that can be found all along the street. She incorporates details about the “cold November” (line 1) including how “[the wind] drove most people off the street in the block between Seventh and Eighth Avenues except for a few hurried pedestrians who bent double” (lines 5-8) and that coats, hats, and scarves are commonplace. As Lutie is unused to the chill of the city, she wasn’t wearing a hat, and “shivered” as she felt the wind. Structural details are also provided by the author—“it had been there for a long time” (line 51)—rust and faded paint hint at the age of the surroundings. The attention to the sign Lutie is looking at gives the reader an impression if it’s importance. The sign indicates a vacancy with three heated rooms, translating to the reader that Lutie is looking for a place to stay, and is indeed new to the urban environment. Much the same effect can be found in Petry’s use of personification.
The personification of the “wind blowing through 116th street” (lines 1-2) is most prominent. The wind has a physical and intellectual presence, as it can do things both with force and with thought. Through the qualities of body, the wind “rattled” (line 2), “pried” (line 32), “grabbed” (line31), and “lifted” (line 23). Yet, the wind, with more consideration, also “found” (line 10) papers and dirt, “finger[ed] its way” and “even took time” (line 18). Lutie is not familiar with this wind: “She shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck and explored the sides of her head. It even blew her eyelashes away from her eyeballs so her eyes were bathed in a rush of coldness” (lines 38-42). The wind is not the only aspect of nature that is personified, however. The “rain and snow” (line 53) also are credited with having “eaten the paint off” (line 54) of a sign. Since Lutie Johnson is so unaccustomed to the forceful, humanistic elements of the city, and feels “naked” (line 36) in them, one can safely assume that the girl is not originally from the city and has only been there a short while.
Though the author only allots a brief section of the excerpt to the character, much can be determined about Lutie Johnson from the subtleties of the writing. Noting that Lutie felt “suddenly naked” (line 36) in the wind, one can draw that she feels vulnerable in the strange city. Other people, those from the city, “cursed deep in their throats, stamped” (lines 27-28) and “kicked” (line 28). It can also be easily established that Lutie is intuitive by the fact that “Even with the wind twisting the sign away from her, she could see it had been there for a long time” (lines 49-51). Inflexibility can be sensed through Lutie’s acceptance of three rooms only. By “read[ing the sign] rapidly”, one can tell that Lutie is educated. Lutie is also a determined character, as when others from the city are discouraged by the wind, she “explored” (line 39) nonetheless. Overall, Lutie seems “Reasonable” (line 61), though one can identify her as an outsider.
In order to ascertain a relationship between Lutie Johnson and her new, urban environment, Petry relies on her thoughtful assimilation of specific imagery, overwhelming personification, and clever characterization. Petry attempts to demonstrate the character’s unfamiliarity with her surroundings but expects the reader to draw conclusions about the relationship between the two.

Anonymous said...

Stephen Burrill
The Street Analysis

Shifting from a devious to urgent tone in “The Street”, Ann Petry uses forceful personification, intimidating imagery, and sudden characterization to convey that life gives one split second chances and if one doesn’t take advantage one will be “standing at an impossible angle” in life.
Petry, utilizing strong personification, makes the wind a symbolic figure to further prove that uncertainty leads to the loss of opportunities. The wind is “fingering its way along” which is used to show that things are always lingering in your life waiting to take away the opportunities you receive. The wind is almost portrayed as a bully that “grabbed” and “touched” and had its way with Lutie. Petry uses the strong personification to portray that much like the wind; many people cross one’s life and try to “bully” them away from a favorable decision. The personification of the wind when it “held it still for an instant in front of her” and then immediately “swooped it away” is further proof that chances may be available for a split second but are soon to disappear so you’re left with just “chicken bones” and “pork-chop bones.” Throughout the novel Petry employs commanding personification in order to highlight the unfortunate occurrence of lost opportunities.
In “The Street” Petry uses the intimidating imagery of the wind to evoke that the wrath of the real world has the ability to ruin split second chances and “discourage people walking along the street” known as life. Petry immediately instills raw, yet dynamic imagery to portray “a cold November wind blowing through 116th street.” The wind “pushed (things) away from her” and “found every scrap of paper” which further validates the winds physical and mental prowess. PEtry directly uses Lutie to act as proof to the winds power by describing Lutie’s struggle with the wind. Lutie’s “eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness” accurately manifest the winds innate ability to make people uncomfortable. Petry utilizes these discouragements of the wind to further prove that throughout life you must be able to overcome the many challenges and inconveniences that are put in front of you.
Petry exercises the abrupt characterization of Lutie to expose the hard truth that life suddenly throws one curves that one must flawlessly counter. The characterization of Lutie made it clear that she was adversely effected y the wind. The wind had made Lutie “(feel) suddenly naked” and she now has to find a way to combat the wind. Throughout the selection Lutie is searching for rooms to stay in, she needs three rooms “but if it said two- why there wasn’t any point” which shows that Lutie has children. This piece of information further shows how Lutie must struggle against the wind while at the same time protect her children. Although the wind was howling and “(blowing) her eyelashes away from her eyes”, Lutie still managed to find three rooms to stay in. Although the room wasn’t the nicest option around it was the only “reasonable” option for Lutie. The use of abrupt characterization to describe Lutie helps support that if you react properly to sudden challenges in life, you will be rewarded with “reasonable” results.
No matter who you are or where you come from, you will experience problems in life that must be solved. Everyone experiences unfortunate events throughout their life. A person’s character is built by how they react to these circumstances. If you choose to let these circumstances devour you, that is when you will truly be at a disadvantage. You must always make the best of what you have, regardless of the circumstances. If you fail to capitalize on the split second chances granted to you, then you will never be able to experience the glory of success.

David A. said...

Shifting from an ambiguous to a distinct setting in “The Street,” Ann Petry utilizes distinct personification, detailed imagery, and bleak foreshadowing in order to discuss the effects of the “cold November wind” on Lutie Johnson’s “rusted” and uncertain decision making.
Petry induces the reader’s focus on the weather through direct personification of the wind both physically and emotionally. Her physical personification of the wind describes it as “[rattling],” “[sucking],” and even “[twisting].” These physical attributes paired with emotional, such as “[exploring]” and “[discouraging],” lead to the overall negative connotation of Petry’s personification of the wind. Through the wind, Petry creates the unease of Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting. Petry further establishes Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting by revealing the use of detailed imagery.
Through “cold,” detailed imagery, Petry establishes Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting. She creates the “cold November wind blowing through 116th street” to discuss the overall atmosphere surrounding Lutie Johnson. Even through her violent description of the “rusted,” “red [stained] sign,” Petry solidifies her images of the “twisted” fate awaiting Lutie in her new urban setting. She describes the apartment as “reasonable,” and nothing too spectacular. Petry furthers her stance on the relationship between Lutie Johnson and the urban setting through foreshadowing Lutie’s fate.
Bleak and “rusted,” Petry’s use of foreshadowing induces the reader’s recognition of the future relationship between Lutie Johnson and the urban setting. She reveals the “twisting” and “uncertain” future awaiting Lutie with the “sign swaying back and forth over her head.” Petry completes her foreshadowing with further description of the “rusted” and “dark red [stained] like blood sign.” Petry’s foreshadowing, paired with her imagery and personification, induces the morbid future relationship between Lutie Johnson and the urban setting.
Ann Petry cleverly combines many literary elements, such as personification, imagery, and foreshadowing, to stress the overall impact of the setting of her piece. Through her setting, Petry is able to discuss the effects of Lutie Johnson’s surroundings on the fate of the relationship to her new urban setting.

Anonymous said...

Shifting from a detailed narrative to curious descriptions in “The Street”, Ann Petry utilizes though-provoking imagery, diverse personification, and simple figurative language in order to establish the Lutie Johnson's relationship with the urban setting around her; although the other characters mentioned briefly did not like it, she thought it to be “reasonable”.
Ann Petry utilizes thought-provoking imagery to capture the reader's attention to detail of the urban setting. The imagery such as “rattled the tops of garbage cans” and “set the bits of paper to dancing high in the air” creates a clear picture of how the “violent assault” of the wind affects its surroundings. This concise imagery helps the reader imagine a street where wind causes chaos anywhere it travels. Details like these will create action and catch the reader's eye.
Ann Petry utilizes diverse personification to give the nature around the main character as many human-like features as possible. By doing this, the reader's attention is drawn to the nature of the setting and how it acts compared to the people around it. “It did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street”. This further explains the relationship between the people, the nature, and how they affect each other.
Petry also utilizes simple figurative language in order to give the narrative a cold and concrete outlook of the setting. The wind was so strong that “a barrage of paper swirled into the faces of the people” and “found all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk and lifted it up”. This use of language and writing makes the story more creative and imaginative. It further helps the reader to distinguish how great and powerful the wind is on “the street” and its affects on the objects it comes across.

Alex Gallant

Kristen Tenglin said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Emily said...

Emily Boockoff

Shifting from a physical to emotional tone in “The Street”, Ann Petry utilizes environmental imagery, violent personification and ominous foreshadowing to demonstrate the influence of setting and weather such as “a cold November wind”, in the lifestyle of a person.
Petry utilizes physical personification to express the clash between Lutie Johnson and the Urban setting. The selection of climate and weather is an important detail in the atmosphere of a story. The wind is personified “fingering its way along the curb” and “twisting”, making Johnson uncomfortable. This establishes an unfriendly relationship between her and the setting. “The wind lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she suddenly felt naked”. The wind made her uncomfortable in her surroundings, like she should not be there. When she arrived at the house she wished to visit, “rain and snow has finally eaten the paint off”. The weather made the location seem quite unappealing. The personification used in “The Street” demonstrates an uncomfortable atmosphere for Johnson.
Morbid foreshadowing is used throughout “The Street” to show the negative relationship between Lutie Johnson and her atmosphere. As Lutie approached her destination, the wind “did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street”. The wind bothered the people, attempting to keep them away from the vicinity. As she approached the house, “the wind pushed [the sign] away” so she could not even see if the house would accommodate her. As she came closer, she saw the metal on the house “had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood”. Everything about the atmosphere and house appeared foreboding and foreshadowing demise.
There is an abundance of outdoor imagery depicting an unwelcoming scene for Lutie Johnson. “There was a cold November wind” that “rattled tops of garbage cans [and] sucked window shades out”. This imagery sets the tone of the foreboding location Lute is in, between Seventh and Eighth Street. As she approached the house, she could see “it’s original coat of white paint was streaked with rust” from the rain and snow. The environment added to the dangerous image of the house. The imagery of an are influences the culture as well.
As Lutie Johnson found, setting plays into the comfort of an environment. An Moines setting can foreshadow a bad situation for a character. The imagery and atmosphere of a setting demonstrates the comfort one with have in it.

Anonymous said...

Colleen Burke

The Street - Analysis

Contrasting between naturalistic and personified wind, Ann Petry conveys earthy imagery, “blinded” selection of detail and “original” personification to portray the difference between the internal and external worlds.
Petry further examines the two divergent worlds to communicate that starting over is made complicated when the environment put itself in the way. “Fingering its way along the curb” the wind sends “bits of dancing paper high in the air” and devastates the external world while also ruining the internal world of Johnson, simultaneously. Johnson’s search for security is put in jeopardy when “the wind pushed it away from her.” Determined and forcing, “the wind held” her security in front of her face so it is out of her reach.
Petry then, conveys “blinded” selection of detail by depicting the wind in a compelling way, by utilizing diverse characteristics revealing that the wind makes it clear that, “it” wants Johnson and the rest of the “people” to not be able to feel secure. The detail in which Petry elects throughout the excerpt shows that “it” would do anything in “its” power to “rush into doorways and areaways” to put “itself” in Johnson’s path to discourage Johnson from finding the safekeeping she is after. “Making it difficult to breathe” the wind takes over every aspect of the peoples’ bodies and minds terminating their escapes.
Determinately, Petry overall exercises “original” personification by presenting the wind as “it”, personifying the wind as if “it” possesses legitimate humanistic qualities as it takes over the entire population of town by “making it difficult” for them to sustain their sense of security. “It did everything it could to discourage the people” as they were “walking down the street” leaving the people with no other option but to escape to the best of their ability. Whenever Johnson believed “she had the sign in focus” the wind then “pushed it away from her” leaving her discouraged and realized that her well-being is right in front of her eyes but there is nothing she is able to do about it, at that point in time.
Overall, Petry exemplifies that “the wind” has various humanistic qualities while illustrating earthy imagery, “blinded” selection of detail and “original” personification to convey the idea that the contrariety of the two painstakingly distinct worlds of internal and external. By personifying the wind not just by giving the wind human-like characteristics but also by giving it a body, this shows a sense of realism, depicting it as something that is uncontrollable and will do whatever it pleases.

Allie Capprini said...

Allison Capprini
Shifting from physical to intellectual figurative language in “The Street”, Petry incorporates deliberate, sinister personification, excessive imagery, and subtle hyperbole to accurately portray the effect of setting on characters.

In “The Street” Petry carefully utilizes an abundance of personification to describe the effects of “the wind” on the main character Lutie Johnson. At the beginning of the selection the wind is physically personified, giving it the ability to “set” and “[rattle]” items as it moves through the streets. The personification quickly shifts however, giving the wind intellectual properties such as being able to “[find]” every scrap of paper.” Petry also has the “cold fingers of the wind” interact with Lutie affecting her ability to go along normally. Giving the wind “fingers” and allowing it to interact with Johnson shows the importance of the urban setting in the selection. In order to successfully portray the personification of the wind, Petry incorporates an abundance of descriptive imagery.

Petry goes into great detail when describing the “cold November” setting of “116th street”. In the selection Petry describes everything from the “dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk” to the “heavy waxed paper that loaves of bread has been wrapped in”. This close attention to every small detail proves the importance Petry places on the urban setting of this book. This excessive imagery also plays a role in describing the hyperboles integrated within the details of the setting.

When describing the urban setting in “The Street” Petry subtly added a few hyperboles to portray the hardships Johnson was having when trying to adjust to the new setting. She was not used to the urban setting, so when “the dust got into [her] eyes” it “blinded” her, however one who was used to the climate most likely would not have been affected in such a way. Also, the personification of the wind used in the selection could also be considered a hyperbole. The wind could not really take the “eyelashes away from her eyes”, however this portrays the real effects “the wind” and setting have on Johnson.

The figurative language Petry uses throughout the selection greatly allows her to successfully establish the urban setting of “The Street”. By combining sinister personification, excessive imagery, and subtle hyperbole the reader is able to understand how much the urban setting of the novel affects the main character, Lutie Johnson.

Anonymous said...

Joshua Willis
Period A
Shifting from the wind to Lutie Johnson’s point of view in The Street, Ann Petry incorporates extensive personification, perceptive imagery and dramatic symbolism to depict the comfort and security of a home from the “violent assault” that is the outside world.
From the onset of the excerpt, Petry places a clear focus on the wind. She utilizes a controlling personification of the wind. Through this personification, it is evident that the wind is ensuing chaos on the pedestrians; “dust got into their eyes and blinded them.” This complete and utter chaos represents the disorder and violence of the outside world. The wind tries to prevent Lutie from finding security by “twisting the sign from her attention.” This also suggests that the wind is not only a physical force but it is given the ability to rationalize. Although the wind “held it for an instant”, it was ultimately up to Lutie to realize that the home was a “reasonable” safe haven.
Veering from just the detailed personification of the wind, imagery is continuously complimented with it throughout the excerpt. The aftermath of the wind’s forceful assault on the street depicts a gruesome scene. A “barrage” of “every scrap of paper” is just the beginning of this scene. An empty street is what comes to mind after the wind “drove” everyone away. Petry continues to describe this chaotic aftermath with the mangled trash of “chicken bones” and “pork-chop bones.” This horrific image represents the world is awful just as the street is in the excerpt, further proving that the home is a comfort zone away from “The Street”.
The sign represents a savior from the horrors that are occurring on the street. It is a symbol that Petry designs to represent a way out from the cold, brutal outside. Seeing as the wind is able to deter Lutie from reading by “twisting the sign” so that she cannot see it matches the personality given to the wind. The wind’s controlling personality will not allow for Lutie to seek shelter. However, Lutie was able to make out the sign for “an instant.”
Through the overpowering personality of the wind, Petry is able to depict the outside world as chaotic and along with Petry’s symbolism of the sign; Lutie was able to find her shelter, a home.

Jamie Tyree said...

Transitioning between a hopeless and a struggled mood in “The Street”, Ann Petry displays creative personification, fierce imagery, and dreary foreshadowing in order to present to the reader the difficulties in succeeding a start to a new and “reasonable” lifestyle compared to one’s current lifestyle.
Petry’s intense use of personification helps highlight the winds “violent” actions throughout the town. Her use of the verb “found” gives the wind a feeling of human-like features, such as, in this case, a mind. As the wind moves through the town, “fingering it’s way along the curb”, it begins to show progression as it “grabbed their hats” and “pried their scarves from around their necks.” The struggles that “Lutie Johnson” feels against the humanistic wind thus gives the reader a clear image of the issues it is causing.
The gloomy setting of “a cold November wind blowing” throughout the streets focuses the reader’s attention on the events of the winds actions. As it finds “chicken bones and pork chop bones and pushed them along the curb”, the reader may picture that the town is feeling victimized. The weakened feeling that comes across “Lutie Johnson” as she struggles against the blows of the wind brings her to feel “naked and bald”, visualizing how, although she is losing against the wind, it foreshadows how she is losing against something deeper, as well.
After later escaping the negative activities nature has brought on her, Lutie finds herself in a new environment, filled with wretched foreshadowing. Once seeing the room of her destination, there is the “original coat of white paint” which acts as the beginning of her new start on her conflicted journey against nature. The further implication that the room has been “streaked with rust” suggests how Lutie’s experiences will eventually lead to a downfall. Lutie’s finding of this “reasonable” environment with the “stain like blood” of rust foreshadows how her future may become unpleasant.
“The Street’s” use of literary devices depicts the deeper meaning of the harsh realities one must live through in order to find the true happiness that is longed for. The environmental connection that is displayed in “The Street” gives the wind a body and mind that clashes with the everyday struggles for success.

Anonymous said...

Emily Christy


Shifting from a dull to a sinister mood in a selection from “The Street”, Ann Petry incorporates swaying personification, grim imagery, and hasty characterization to express how the “wind” is working against everything else.
Forceful and sinister, the wind “rattled” the swaying personification. Petry uses many verbs to personify the “wind”. At the very beginning, the wind is known as an “it”. But as she develops, there is a mind, searching for something, “fingering its way along the curb.” But slowly it becomes forceful, giving “it” a body; “lifted”, “dancing” and “grabbed” at the people. By using the wind and describing it like a person Petry allows the reader to view the wind with our next tool: imagery.
The grim imagery used throughout the selection allows the reader to be “wrapped in”. Petry uses “bones” to show a deathly side, and to illustrate that a gust of wind can rattle the bones of anyone or thing. Not only does she use bones, but she states, “slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood.” But she uses it to prompt the fact that the wind is victimizing objects on “the Street”. The wind is forcing the people to be “hurried”. Proving that the wind is bullying the people of that street. Leading into the emboldened use of characterization.
Petry uses hast characterization to encourage the use of how “wind” is a challenge to an everyday person. Throughout the beginning Petry uses the wind as the person, and then she develops into a real person. She discusses Lutie Johnson and the “wind” together to show a unique bond. “It” “blew her eyelashes away” “and she had to blink in order to read the words on the sign.” Petry causes a shift; giving Lutie responsibility in the first few lines she is mentioned. “If it was three, why, she would go in and ask to see it, but if it said two-why, there wasn’t any point.” To show that even though the wind is being aggressive towards everyone it gives a view of hope that she will either find sanctuary or not find it there.
Ann Petry gives her readers exactly what they need to read at the beginning of a book. She covers many great ideas, a few being personification, imagery, and characterization. To express that the “wind” is challenging the people who are searching for sanctuary. And to the people looking for a fresh start, giving them a hard time, possibly foreshadowing that what they seek isn’t what they want.

Anonymous said...

Emily Burgess
Petry “The Street” Analysis

Shifting from a figurative character to a literal one in “The Street,” Ann Petry employs dreary imagery, sinister personification, and subtle characterization to articulate to the readers the dismal effects, “the dirt and dust and grime,” an urban setting has on one, Lutie Johnson, when trying to find shelter.
Petry’s use of imagery is done artistically in two different ways, both of which come together to portray the bleak image of a very gloomy city. The wind’s finding of bones and ability to “[push] them along the curb” gives the reader auditory imagery. This sound imagery is used again when the newspaper becomes “entangling” which causes people to “[curse] deep in their throats.” Auditory imagery is coupled with imagery the reader is most familiar with, visual imagery. The sign, “streaked with rust,” portrays the image that it is old and weathered. The dual use of imagery utilized by Petry aides her in her portrayal of this gloomy urban setting.
Partnering dreary imagery with sinister personification, Petry finds two uses of this seemingly simple device to better develop her setting and the mood she wants to create. At first the wind is given a body and the ability to “[rattle] the tops of garbage cans.” Later in the text, the wind evolves and has the ability to think, the wind is given a mind and “it even took time.” The wind is personified throughout the text with words such as “fingering,” “entangling,” and ‘twisting.” These words have the ability to evoke feelings of malevolence or wickedness in the readers so they understand that the wind is doing nothing but “[discouraging] the people walking along the street.”
Dreary imagery and sinister personification are combined with subtle characterization to complete Petry’s portrayal of this miserable urban setting. Towards the end of the passage Lutie Johnson is briefly introduced. Her physical characteristics are described through the wind’s actions. The wind blew her hair that “had been resting softly and warmly against her skin,” providing the image of a girl with seemingly long hair. Based on her inner thoughts the reader is able to understand that she is desperately in need a place to stay with at least “three rooms.” The reader also gets a taste of her standards based on the fact that “three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants” are considered, by her, to be “reasonable.”
Petry masterfully incorporates subtle characterization, sinister personification, and dreary imagery together in “The Street” to illustrate the effect a dreary urban setting has on someone. Through the combination of these elements she is able to directly pinpoint the correlation between a dreary city and the effect it produces on her test subject, Lutie Johnson, who ultimately proves her theory true: an urban setting has dismal effects.

Dalton Weir said...

Shifting from the effect on the entire street to a lone character, in “The Street” Ann Petry utilizes mysterious imagery, aggressive personification, and an obscure mood in order to depict the effect nature has on its environment; furthermore, the effect is negative, able to “discourage the people.”
Riddled with a dark, magical sense of imagery throughout, a sort of eerie and compelling aura is conceived “through 116th Street.” The people of the street, though not specifically described physically, are expressed as afraid of the wind as they search for the “least possible exposed surface to [the wind’s] violent assault.” The imagery displayed brings forth curiosity and the feeling of an overbearing presence due to the wind and its actions, when it “pushed [the bones] along the curb” and “found all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk.” This debris “got into [the people’s] noses, making it difficult to breathe,” illuminating the empowerment the environment, in this case the wind, has on the people on this day in “cold November.” The repeating of well distributed imagery reiterates the macabre feeling, being complete with a sign with years of age and weather, “making a dark stain like blood.” This feeling continues and growths in strength while coupled with another device, personification.
Beginning with and continuing throughout the entire section, the personified and powerful wind adapts and fuses itself with people on the street. With a belligerent attitude, the wind physically “drove most the people off the street” by “fingering its way along the curb.” Petry gives the wind tangible abilities, allowing it to “discourage the people walking along the street.” Transforming from an entity only physically abusive, the wind takes on mental capabilities as well. Choosing how it goes about pestering the people of the street the wind, “even took time to rush into doorways and areas” suggesting that a sense of control is given to the wind. It even went as far as to have “grabbed their hats, pried their scarves,” creating the inevitable feeling of a sinister body, choosing and conducting itself as it pleases. This overall state of personification leads imminently to the creation of a curious mood, articulating the wind’s movements.
Each element of the selection combines and adds on a new aspect to the piece, culminating into a section with a mood which gives the wind a menacing characterization. The scene depicted is filled with the terrorizing of the people on the street as “dust got in their eyes and blinded them,” and newspaper blown their way “entangled them.” The inescapable characteristics of the wind and its nature to disrupt the street goers as it “blew their coats away from their bodies” shows the unhappy feeling for those on the street as the unstoppable force blowing down the street continues as it wants. The “rush of coldness” is persistent and imperial, further implementing the dark, pessimistic mood cascading throughout the scene.
The combination of the main devices used, imagery, personification, and mood propel the story to show the power of the wind. In an even larger sense, the capability nature has on whatever habitat it may be occupying. Ann Petry’s “The Street” surely yet cleverly empowers the wind on 116th Street, portraying the force as the commanding entity it is.

Anonymous said...

Michelle Carignan

Shifting from a poetic to a character-based style, Ann Petry employs dynamic personification in conjunction with gustful imagery and abrupt diction in “The Street” to embody the security and shelter one needs from “the cold November winds” of our harsh world.
The extended and dynamic metaphor embedded throughout the excerpt demonstrates how the personified wind represents the harshness that people need to protect themselves from. To show the effects the wind had on “the street”, the author has the wind “rattle the garbage cans” and “suck window shades”, suggesting that it has strength and arms to do these actions. As the wind progresses down the street, it obtains more human-like qualities, such as when “the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck” and as it “lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away”. Petry goes as far to give it the very human ability to “discourage the people walking along the street”, which enables the wind represent the harshness of nature and even of human nature. Petry is able to show that people need a safe haven from the unpleasant realities of the world by personifying the wind to represent these these realities.
Throughout the passage, Petry further describes the setting through her harsh use of imagery in order to portray how the wind correlates to the bitter surroundings. The rather typical street is described as effecting the protagonist, Lutie Johnson, in a very atypical way; by committing actions when “the wind touched the back of her neck” and bathed” her eyeballs in “a rush of coldness” to show this descriptiveness. These few simple words become eloquent because she employs precise verbs to communicate the specificity of the wind’s actions. Petry does the same to the rusty inn’s door by not only simply describing it, but also by saying the rust made “a dark red stain like blood”. Here, the author furthers the setting by giving it a more dynamic element, rather than leaving the setting as a dull description about a street. With these tools employed, Petry is able to establish a setting with emotive imagery that enables the reader to understand the harshness of Lutie Johnson’s world, as well as ours.
In “The Street”, Ann Petry tends to write in a fluid and artistic manner, but at times, she reverts to an abrupt syntax to present facts and to emphasize the smugness of a scenario. When Ms. Johnson finds a place of residence, Petry utilizes phrases to demonstrate the decisiveness of her decision. The list-like nature of the description of the inn is describes as “three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants” to elude to the fact that Lutie Johnson decided on this place by assessing the advanatges. To further this decision, Petry makes her diction even more blunt by stating that the place is “Reasonable.”. This one word is an entire sentence, or rather a fragment. With this abrupt technique, Petry is able to convey that this place of residence gave her security and shelter that everyone, including Lutie Johnson, needs from the bitterness of nature.
Despite the techniques Petry employs, she is able to convey the sense of security and shelter that everyone strives for to protect themselves from the harsh realities of this world. In this excerpt of “The Street”, Petry utilizes dynamic personification, gustful imagery, and abrupt diction to show Lutie Johnson’s struggles on the surface of this novel. However, when the meaning deeper than the surface is explored, it is quite clear that Petry is trying to convey the harshness and bitterness the world entails in contrast to the security and shelter humans need in protection from our world’s inevitably harsh realities.

Anonymous said...

Christina Domaldo
The Street analysis

Contrasting despair with reality in “The Street”, Ann Petry infuses prevalent personification, austere imagery and sinister characterization to emphasize how the wind takes on humanistic qualities such as mind and body, it “touched the back of her neck, explored the sides of her head”.
Petry continually personifies the “cold November wind blowing through 116th street”, by giving humanistic qualities to the breeze. The author expresses how the wind “found every scrap of paper along the street”, as if it was searching for it. She makes the reader believe the wind has a mind of its own, making it sound as if it deliberately “did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street”. Utilizing malicious personification, Petry conveys the wind as “cold” or “violent”; which made “it difficult to breathe”, for those on the street. The deliberate use of personification is balanced by Petry’s use of an equally important tool: imagery.
Throughout the excerpt the reader is able to visualize what is occurring on the street, on this “cold November” day. Imagery is a prevalent tool scene throughout this passage; the author strategically uses image evoking words such as “fingering”, “pried”, and “sucked’. Petry described how the wind “rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades”, allowing the reader to visualize how vicious the wind can be. This powerful breeze “found every scrap of paper along the street”, allocating the audience to envision the wind as having humanistic like qualities. Examining how the wind lifted up “dirt” and “making it difficult to breathe”, displays the personified imagery throughout this excerpt. Petry deliberately uses tools that merge together well, although imagery is recurrent throughout, characterization is just as significant.
When one hears characterization they may believe it is describing a human, but in this instance it is portraying the wind. All through the excerpt one is able to visualize the wind, and understand the characteristics it carries. It takes on a malevolence personality, “it even took time to rush into doorways and areaways and find chicken bones”, illustrating the wind as a villainous character. “It did everything it could to discourage the people walking down the street”, the wind is portrayed as having a very devious mind, using it’s intelligence to harm the people on the street. The vicious acts of the wind are described in detail throughout “it wrapped newspaper around their feet entangling their feet”. The vivid characterization throughout the excerpt gives specific detail of the wind, allowing readers to feel as if they know the wind.
Petry skillfully utilizes personification, imagery, and characterization throughout her well written story to exemplify the wind as a devious character. All through the excerpt the reader is able to visualize, and understand the wind as if it is a real person, making the narrative that much more applicable to everyone. The author does a wonderful job of illustrating the wind, shown through her novel “The Street”.

Anonymous said...

Shifting from the focus of the wind to the character in “The Street”, Ann Petry emphasizes deliberate personification, tedious mood and destructive imagery in order to analyze how nature corresponds on how one lives and “[does] everything it [can] to discourage the people walking along the street.”
Throughout the excerpt, Petry uses personification to indicate how the wind has a mind on its own. The wind “[grabs]”, “[lifts]”, “[fingers]” and “[sucks]” as if its actions are human-like actions. Also, by having the pronoun “it” throughout the excerpt signifies that the wind is a real person. “As the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck”, indicates that the wind has physical and human features. Petry arranges “an effort to offer” glimpses of the wind’s mental capacity. The wind’s ability to ”[twist] the sign away from her” indicates that the wind has a mind on its own and can make decisions for itself. The powerful personification impacts the readers better understanding of how the wind “[holds]” a mind and actions of humans.

Petry portrays how the wind “[rattles]” out the mood from “people of the street.” While the wind blows “every scrap of paper” “into the faces of the people on the street”, makes the scenery more dreary and the reader can see how the wind is affecting them by “[discouraging] the people.” The wind “drove” everyone and everything off the streets and made the atmosphere more secluded. As the pedestrians continued their journey on the dismal sidewalk, the wind blew the hats, scarves and “coats away from their body.” The powerful wind depicts the mood of “the people off the street,” which corresponds with the naturalistic imagery of Petry’s work.
The “cold November” induces the reader’s recognition of naturalistic and disastrous imagery. The “violent assault” of the wind makes the reader realize that Lutie Johnson and the other pedestrians are affected by the wind and the nature around them. As the wind ”[lifts]” up the dirt and grime from the sidewalk makes the pedestrians “difficult to breath” and “ [stings] their skins.”This makes their life more complicated and crucial. The “rush of coldness” prevents Johnson’s ability to see and reflect of the world.
Distinguishing from the wind and the character, in “The Street”, Petry identifies how nature “discourages people” and how it affects the way they live their life. By using many literary devices, such as personification, mood and imagery helps the reader get the full aspect of how the nature “[offers]” insightful characteristics that affect one’s day by day actions.

Kim Lynch
The Street Analysis

Anonymous said...

Brittany Harnedy
11/17/11
AP English Literature
Petry Analysis

Shifting from general actions to a specific storyline in The Street, Ann Petry establishes a relationship between character and setting by combining naturalistic personification, urban imagery, and selective details in order to verbalize the impact of nature on its surroundings.
By fusing nature with humanistic qualities and characteristics, Petry strengthens and emphasizes the effects of nature. “It rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows, and set them flapping back against the windows.” Purposefully describing the November wind with actions of a living creature, Petry stresses the significance of the wind in her novel. Providing the wind with these features confirms the strong influence the wind has over everything around it. It’s behavior interferes with others’ behavior and course of action. ”It did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street.” By using the word “discourage”, Petry establishes not only a physical comparison but also an emotional or mental one.
By using descriptive details to describe the urban scenery, the author establishes the setting of which nature impacts. “It found every scrap of paper along the street- theater throwaways, announcements of dances and lodge meetings, the heavy waxed paper that loaves of bread had been wrapped in, the thinner waxed paper that had enclosed sandwiches, old envelopes, newspapers.” Petry joins the personification of the wind with the imagery of the city by describing the actions of the wind while illustrating what’s happening around it also. “Even with the wind twisting the sign away from her, she could see that it had been there for a long time because its original coat of white paint was streaked with rust where years of rain and snow had finally eaten the paint off down to the metal and the metal had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood.” Petry does not just describe the effects of wind, but of rain and snow too. Nature slowly tears apart it’s surroundings.
Selecting certain details that only support the universal meaning of the novel helps Petry get her opinion across without confusing the reader. “There was a cold November wind blowing through 116th Street.” This is the only hint of where the novel is taking place that Petry gives in the excerpt; however, it’s enough for the reader to understand that it’s cold, November, windy, and taking place outside on a street in the city. “The wind held it still for an instant in front of her and then swooped it away until it was standing at an impossible angle on the rod that suspended it from the building. Three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants. Reasonable.” The small amount of information about the room and how the character made up her mind so quickly say a lot about her. It also shows her fight against nature and that she doesn’t let anything get in her way.
Fusing all of these techniques and devices together allows Ann Petry to make her point clear yet concise. This transfixes the reader and keeps them interested by not boring them with unnecessary information.

Panos N said...

Transitioning from a comprehensive rendering of the wind to the actions of Lutie Johnson, Ann Petry employs abrupt characterization, vile personification, and tempestuous imagery to elucidate that determination is unconquerable despite how much obstacles may “discourage” a person.
The use of tempestuous imagery by Ann Petry establishes the excerpt’s foundation. The established setting is described as, essentially, the remanence of the wind’s “violent assault.” The “cold” wind that blew right threw 116th Street left an apparent mess. The wind drew “chicken bones and pork-chop bones”, “dirt and dust and grime”, and “rattled the tops of garbage cans.” Petry uses such in-depth and picturesque imagery to intensify the destruction caused by the wind. However, Petry also uses tempestuous imagery to describe how the weather, not just the wind, but rain and snow have also played a role in the description the setting, claiming that the rain and snow caused the metal of a sign to “rust…making a dark red stain like blood.” Petry’s use of tempestuous imagery leaves the reader with a peculiar, yet crisp image.
Petry’s use of vile personification serves of vital importance to the plot. The wind did everything it could to “discourage people walking along the street.” It would wrap one’s feet with newspaper, lifting up “dirt and dust and grime” so that it would get into one’s nose, “making it difficult to breathe”, and even “lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck”, causing a sense of coldness. The personification of the wind is never once seen as a protagonist, but rather as a disrupting force. Petry is able to create a character that serves as an antagonist to Lutie Johnson’s adventure. By “push[ing]” and “twisting” the sign away from Lutie, the wind undertakes the role of an obstacle for Lutie to overcome.
The use of tempestuous imagery and vile personification are used to enhance Petry’s use of abrupt characterization in defining Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the setting. The wind is portrayed as a “violent” and “discourag[ing]” antagonist. As previously stated, Petry establishes the wind as an obstacle to Petry’s quest to determining what the sign says. Petry defines the wind as such a disruptive and powerful creature to bolster the amount of effort that is needed by Lutie Johnson to determine what the sign says, although Petry does exaggerate to a certain extent on the actual strength of the wind. Despite its seeming “violent” nature, the wind is not capable of destroying buildings or power lines. However, the wind is just powerful enough to cause enough discouragement among the people, especially Lutie Johnson, but is weak enough to be conquered by determination, thus the wind serves as a significant antagonist to the plot.
Ann Petry’s use of abrupt characterization, vile personification, and tempestuous imagery are vital in defining Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting. The description of the wind as a hostile obstacle to Lutie Johnson’s quest truly defines her relationship to the urban setting. Petry’s utilization of the wind as an antagonist proves to be very unique and effective.

Amanda S. said...

Shifting from the impersonal to personal effects of the wind in The Street, Ann Petry utilizes overt personification, natural imagery, and indirect characterization to display the weather’s “violent assault” and its power “to discourage” one from acting as they so normally would.
The author’s use of obvious and extended personification leads the reader to feel as though the wind is a character in the novel with the capabilities of assault, discouragement, and other humanistic actions. The story begins with the general assault of the wind against humans; it “grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks,” and “wrapped newspaper around their feet.” Then the wind proceeds to attack and discourage one character in particular, Lutie Johnson. “The cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck, explored the sides of her head.” This transition not only serves to introduce the main character, but also to explain the power of the weather over one individual. Lutie tries to read a for-sale sign, but “the wind pushed it away from her” causing her great difficulty. If it were not for the wind, Lutie would have simply read the sign and gone on as normal. However, the wind’s power and capabilities diable her from acting as one usually would. In personifying the wind in The Street, Ann Petry exemplifies the immense amount of control the weather has over the defenseless human being.
The scenic images created by the author through careful selection of detail, depict the power of the weather to affect the normality of a human being’s daily life. The setting is so vividly described as having “dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk.” This is lifted up by the wind, into the air, making it difficult for people to breathe. The for-sale sign “was streaked with rust,” illuminating the length of time in which the house has been desolated. If not for the weather, Lutie Johnson would have simply read the sign and taken a look at the house. However, it is almost as though the weather is warning her against the house by “twisting the sign away from her,” so that she cannot read it. These simple yet detailed images are able to clearly depict the weather’s ultimate power over humanity.
Ann Petry uses the narrative of the wind to indirectly characterize Lutie Johnson and establish her relationship to the urban setting. It is learned that Lutie requires a house with three rooms, because “if it said two--why, there wasn’t any point.” This indirectly tells the reader that Lutie most likely has children. The passage never directly states Lutie’s purpose, but the reader can infer that she is looking to buy a house with “three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants.” Judging by her composure during this scene, the reader can infer that perhaps Lutie is not very well acquainted with the urban setting. She “felt suddenly naked and bald,” displaying the weather’s way of welcoming someone into a new environment. Lutie’s character is developed in an indirect manner, to keep from disrupting the fluid narrative of the wind, enhancing the conveyance of the wind‘s power.
The use of obvious personification, scenic imagery, and indirect characterization in The Street, serves to enhance Ann Petry’s establishment of Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting and the power of the weather upon her.

Anonymous said...

Dan Kehoe

Balancing the characterization of the inanimate wind and a human in “The Street”, Ann Petry intertwines powerful personification, tarnished imagery and powerful ambiguity in an effort to convey that nonhuman forces affect people’s behaviors or decisions, and “push them along” in unforeseen directions.

From the onset of the novel, Petry uses strong, forceful personification in order to bring the wind to life as a destructive force that’s sole purpose is to drive “most people off the street” and direct them to a new path. Taking on a persona of a human with hands, the win fingers “its way along the curb” in order to fulfill its purpose of pointing people in a different direction away from “the street”. The wind “grabbed”’, “lifted” and “pushed” its way through the street in an attempt to steer everyone away. Consistently throughout, the wind savagely forced it self into the way of the people traveling the street, but it changed and took a subtle approach to altering people’s view, personifying the wind even further showing its ability to change its approach, and thus giving it a “mind”. This personification creates an image of a cruel and harsh street in which there is no possible way through it, so one has to change direction.
In order to create a picture of a battered and worn street in the reader’s mind, Petry uses ragged imagery in an attempt to show that nature, in “its violent assault”, will alter the path of a person by force. Petry illustrates the worn out street with its “dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk” to purposely convey the toll nature is paying on this street to steer everyone away. In the reader’s mind the picture of a rundown abandoned street is painted, where no one wants to be. This use of imagery helps to portray the affect of nature on human and inanimate beings leaving them “swaying back and forth” on an unguided path. With the mental pictures painted due to the insightful imagery, the ambiguity of what the wind is trying to force the people to do is illuminated.
Petry utilizes an omniscient ambiguous force in the wind, that leaves to question the motive of the wind. Ambiguity is presented in the form of whether the wind is either just being brutal to the people “between Seventh and Eighth Avenues” or rather steering them purposefully in a different direction or a reason. The wind focuses solely on Lutie Johnson and leaves to question as to whether it purposefully “held it still for an instant” or if it was by chance. This ambiguity allows the reader to fully grasp the power of the wind on people’s decisions.
The wind, being personified, shows the sheer brute force it has and its ability to direct people down different path’s. Petry allows the ambiguity to have the motives of the wind taken into question and whether the “grabbing” and “forcing” were intentional to changing peoples directions. This personification plays into the imagery of “The Street” leaving it withered and worn, which steers people away from walking down this street. The wind is a symbol for all natural forces that act on humans everyday, causing them to lead different lives than expected.

Gabbie said...

Gabriella Healey
The Street Analysis


Balancing from the wind to the character’s point of view, in the story “The Street” Ann Petry utilizes victimizing imagery, overpowering personification and unfortunate foreshadowing in furtherance of explaining the determination of Lutie Johnson commencing her new beginning in the “cold November wind”.
Petry clarifies the use of destructive imagery by explaining the harsh conditions of the potent wind, opposed by the pedestrians. The “exposed surface to its violent assault” direct the adapted people to plow through the dreadful “block between Seventh and Eighth Avenues.” In addition to characterizing the wind, Petry further analyzes the appearance of Lutie Johnson and the winds’ effect upon her. In stating that “her eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness” insinuates that the wind is affecting her as well as the surrounding people. Conjointly to the catastrophic imagery that is found within the excerpt is overwhelming personification.
Subjugating personification throughout the narrative indicates the wind possesses a mind and body. “Fingering its way along the curb” proposes the wind has a hand. By Petry contributing a mind to the wind “It found every scrap of paper along the street” and came across “everything it could do to discourage the people.” Additionally bestowing the wind arms, it brought about a shiver to the pedestrians, “And then the wind grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars, and blew their coats away from their necks.” Accompanying the detrimental personification continues with inauspicious foreshadowing.
Ultimately, contriving clever but unsuccessful foreshadow in the selection, Petry describes the intent of Lutie Johnson by foreboding her deplorable luck. The winds devastating actions and the people’s appalled reactions are only a few samples of her hapless fate. Petry distinguishes Lutie Johnson is comforted by two other characters when she decides she must take a look at the apartment if it had three rooms “but if it had two-why, there wasn’t any point”. Searching for security and safety, she read the sign “rapidly. Three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants. Reasonable.”
Attaining the use of many different devices, Petry applies harmful imagery, vanquishing personification and lamentable foreshadowing in order to pursue the idea of Lutie Johnson motivating herself to find her new beginning along with her company. Exploring her surroundings, Lutie Johnson finds protection and sanctuary during the horrid weather conditions that Petry establishes in the urban setting.

Kate ledbetter said...

Kate Ledbetter
The Street Analysis

Transitioning from severity to distraction and abrupt complacency, Ann Petry of "The Street" employs descriptive imagery, broad personification, and innovative hyperbole to illustrate Luties Johnson's desperate search of contentment in a time of a "violent environment" and extreme danger.
Imagery is utilized throughout making the work extremely easy to imagine for the reader. It gives the reader a clear view of how the "wind" is affecting "pedestrians who bent double in an effort to offer the least possible exposed surface to it's violent assault." Pertaining to how dangerous the weather really was on "116th street." Lutie's view of the sign "twisting" away from her, that she wished said "three rooms" gave an image to the reader, a desperate comfort that Lutie was looking for in a time of despair.
Petty writes about the wind as it being a person that is haunting Lutie Johnson with giving it human characteristics. The wind almost seems angry at Lutie "she shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck". The wind being personified as having such characteristics gives notice to the reader that it is capable of many things, "the wind pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck it's fingers inside their coat collars, blew their coats away from their bodies." Petry makes the wind seem much more powerful by doing this.
Ann Petry's use of hyperbole is very bleak but quite creative. The way she uses it makes her work more intriguing and makes the reader use their imagination to fully picture what she is writing. Like her use of personification it exemplifies the fact of how strong the "wind" really is, "it wrapped newspaper around their feet entangling them...the wind blew it back again and again until they were forced to stoop and dislodge the paper with their hands." When Lutie is trying to read the sign "swooping" above her "the wind pushed it away from her." Petry makes it seem like the wind is trying to tantalize Lutie and the other "pedestrians" on "116th street."
This incident on 116th street written by Ann Petry opens her work with an alarming story that is told through her ingenious use of imagery, personification, and hyperbole. It sets up the reader with a knowledge of what the power of the wind looks like through their own imagination, how powerful and human-like the wind really is and what it is capable of doing, and how her exaggeration gets across how strong in unbelievably is. It also leaves the reader with Lutie Johnson characterized as someone who looks for something good out of some kind of mess, and how maybe not like the other pedestrians effected, she still has hope and motivation.

Katie Durst said...

Katie Durst
English Honors A Block

Transitioning from the action of the wind to the main focus on Lutie Johnson, in The Street, Ann Petry wrote the opening of her novel using literary devices such as excessive personification, intense imagery, and dominant characterization to express how the strong and forceful wind can have a mind of its own, due to its “violent assault”.
Ann Petry took advantage of personification to point out how the wind presented human-like qualities to increase its intensity, blowing through the city. We cannot view what the wind looks like; we can only see the destructive and forceful movement it is causing to other fearful citizens and different items all over the street. The agonizing wind shows off its power and glory as it can “discourage the people walking along the street” and “blinded them” from all the dust being blown around. The amount of actions taking place hands the reader a mental depiction that the wind obtains the structure of a human body, or as if there were to be a figure roaring through the city. In the end, these humanistic actions delivers to the reader an overall idea that the wind can be considered a character in itself, due to exerting personification in Petry’s story.
Petry also sets the opening scene employing her diligent imagery, as a way to promote the rage of the compulsive wind, as it’s “blowing through 116th street”, and the rest of the burdened city. The extremity of then wind is beyond overruling, that it’s actually causing major destruction to the city, as well as every anxious individual in it. The pedestrians on the street were constantly being disrupted when the wind “grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars”, and “blew their coats away from their bodies.” The intensity drew everyone back home, as the rowdiness became very “difficult to breathe” within the frigid streets. The setting became chaotic and raunchy as the wind “found every scrap of paper along the street” “dancing high in the air” and littered through the town.
The characteristics of the wind are very distinct and match up with the qualities of an average human being. Exquisite verbs such as “rattled”, “sucked” or “blinded” gave those specific qualities of a human being to the wind that has no body or visual appearance. As Lutie Johnson felt “suddenly naked and bald” the wind made her feel as if everything was abducted from her. The wind even “blew her eyelashes away from her eyes so that her eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness”. In a way, Lutie Johnson was harassed by the wind, tearing down everything that she is, both physically and mentally. These few cases indicates and characterizes the way Lutie Johnson felt disturbed from the winds crucial attacks, as if she was in some sort of harm. The harsh, acrid wind was given total control, and was sold as a physical threat to anything and anyone that came into its path.

susan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
susan said...

Susan Meyer
The Street

Nature is often found to be a significant aspect of our lives, without it we would not be able to survive. However, nature also can sweep away the lives of many in a very short period of time. Shifting from a fearful to threatening tone, in, “The Street”, Ann Petry uses violent characterization, pervasive personification, and abrupt selection of detail to show how Mother Nature has the strong capabilities to powerfully “metal” with society.
Petry uses violent characterization to emphasize the threatening power of the wind, as well as nature as a whole. The wind violently “found all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk and lifted it up so that the dirt got into their noses, making it difficult to breathe; the dust got into their eyes and blinded them: and the grit stung their skins”. The wind strongly demonstrates its power by violently harming these innocent citizens. It powerfully “grabbed” and “pushed” things away from people, stripping them of their belongings. Petry characterizes the wind in a violent way to emphasize its fearful power.
Pervasive personification is used in the passage to give the wind a mind and a body, of its own. Petry writes, “the wind grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their collars, blew their coats away from their bodies”, giving the wind human characteristics to emphasize the threats that nature can bring to a society. The wind “took time to rush into doorways and areas and find chicken bones and pork-chop bones” by using intellect. The bones described by the author allude to the fact that nature can take the lives of many in a fraction of time. Petry uses the mind and body to give the wind a powerful image, because nature is a very strong force that will always have its way.
Giving the passage an overall violent message, the author uses abrupt selection of detail to give allusions of death and terror. The wind tortures the citizen, they “cursed deep in their throats, stamped their feet, kicked at the paper”, fearing what was next. The wind warns the citizens throughout the poem causing them to fear its power. To Lutie Johnson’s surprise, the wind “lifted…the hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked and bald”, giving the wind the power to steel away one’s personally comforting belongings.
Powerfully, in the short passage, Petry uses violent characterization, pervasive personification, and abrupt selection of detail to display Mother Nature to be overpowering and fearful. The author uses the wind to explain these powers. By choosing the wind, the author took something simple to show how compellingly fearful it can become. Mother Nature holds society in its palms, it can grasp the lives of many instantaneously.

Brianna Barrows said...

-I'm not done, I still have to complete my conclusion paragraph.

Shifting from discouraging to sudden hope of tone in “The Street,” Ann Petry utilities direct characterization, austere imagery, and convincing personification to illustrate the attempt of starting a new beginning and how every time Lutie Johnson tried “the wind pushed it away from her.”
In “The Street,” Petry applies blunt characterization to portray the techniques and characteristics of the developing wind. Throughout the poem, the revealing of the wind’s effect on others, its thoughts and feelings, and its actions have become the major emphasis on how the wind becomes characterized. Even though the wind is not a human being, the author gives it the aspects and actions of a human. The characteristics and actions come together and link with one another to push everything away from Lutie and initiate her to think “why, there wasn’t any point” in trying. Petry exploits a process to reveal the personality of the wind and to show how the wind affects Lutie.
Ann Petry uses distinct imagery to illustrate that everything is victimized by the wind, including innate objects. The wind and its actions evoke a concrete image for the audience to have a greater understanding of the meaning in the poem. The author is able to give the wind human-like qualities and a sensation to portray a visual image. When the wind was “twisting the sign away from her,” she noticed “the metal had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood.” The sign, which had been given a visual description, was pushed away from her so she wasn’t certain what it said became a way of the wind making it impossible for her to start a new beginning. Imagery not only helps the audience get an imagination of what is going on, but also gives the poem a deeper meaning.
Persuasive and detailed, the author is able to give the wind a body and have the ability to have mind distinctions. Personification is a use of language to give the innate object, the wind, thoughts and feelings. Petry heavily personified the wind by giving him the actions of “rattling, lifting, pushing, entangling, grabbing, etc.” Using abrupt personification gives the poem a more active and informational diction. All of the wind’s actions are put together at the end to show the meaning of the wind pushing away Lutie’s strive to move on. The personification the author utilized had all individual meanings and explanations, but came together as one idea.

Anonymous said...

Kendyl Cutler
(Not complete, will be finishing the rest later)
Analysis of Emily Burgess' Petry.

Burgess uses 3 very descriptive literary devices such as “dreary imagery, sinister personification, and subtle characterization”. As for dreary imagery, a suggestion is to use a different adjective in order to describe the imagery going on throughout the poem. It’s understood why the adjective was used because Ann Petry does indeed make it sound like a bleak place, but there is a lot going on in “the street” and the definition of dreary is lifeless and dull. “sinister” and “subtle” fit perfectly with the literary devices they were matched with, though. Petry does personify the wind as sinister and evil and the characterization of Lutie Johnson is quite hard to figure out from the small selection of the novel.
The way Burgess incorporates her quotes fit amazingly with the rest of her sentences. She also uses “dual” imagery, which is interesting and different. The only flaw is that “The wind’s finding of bones and ability to ‘[push] them along the curb’” does not really show how it is “auditory imagery”. That is more along the lines of visual imagery. It is true that the people who “’[curse] deep in their throats”’ is auditory imagery.
“Partnering dreary imagery with sinister personification” is a great way to transition into the next paragraph. Again, she uses “two uses” of the same device (personification), which is very unique.

Anonymous said...

Brian Loud did not finish. WILL FINISH LATER
Shifting from the focus of everyone on the street to one individual in “Question 2”, Ann Petry uses invading personification, obscure imagery, and chilling mood to show how the “violent” environment has an effect on an “exposed” person.
Throughout the opening of “Question 2”, Petry gives the wind human characteristics. The wind uses these human characteristics to prevent the people on “116th street” from accomplishing their aspiration.

Anonymous said...

Marco Orlando 11/18/2011
Block A Petry Analysis

*Did not finish yet, but will be completed later today.*




Shifting from a frantic presentation of a “cold November wind” devastating city streets, to the abrupt introduction of an apparent, struggling mother, Ann Petry's “The Street”, is constructed with raw imagery, inducing personification and an abundant selection of detail in order to convince the reader that despite the current situation, no matter how unreal and horrific, dedication to an appropriate cause will result in a promising future.

Throughout the opening of “The Street”, it is clear that Anne Petry's initial focus is to deliver specific emotion through raw and powerful imagery. The reader is reading, quite obviously, yet it produces a mental movie, with complete and predetermined scenes in which depict a very gloomy and frenzied November day, dominated by forceful wind; “ It rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows and set them flapping back against the window.” Her constant use of simplistic adjectives, “her hair had been resting softly and warmly on the back of her neck” and depictive actions, “ it wrapped newspaper around their feet entangling the”, fuse together almost perfectly, producing a desired image in which constructs her entire plot throughout. As she personifies the wind, she must focus on detail to do so in which secures her imagery and deems it necessary. In order to convey her overall ideals of adversity, she must penetrate emotion into the reader, and what better way to present images of raw devastation through her complex and attentive focus on imagery.

Anonymous said...

Steve Burrill- Not finished

In this essay, Christina Domaldo incorporates superior structural flow but fails to integrate diverse quotation use as well as support her beliefs with an intuitive deeper meaning which results in a 7 for the essay.
Christina’s superb knowledge of the excerpt is clearly portrayed through her utilization of quote integration and intense vocabulary. Christina accurately uses prevalent personification to set up a wonderfully flowing first paragraph. The use of great quote integration perfectly sets up the first paragraph and makes it easy for the reader to understand. Christina also

Anonymous said...

-Evan DaSilva. blah

Shifting from the depictions of of human like winds to the emotional Lutie walking in “The Street”, Ann Petry uses extended personification, vivid imagery, and structural diction in order to convey the idea the Lutie’s experiences with the environment does not make her favor the urban setting.
Petry’s use of extended personification throughout the section to show that the wind makes the urban setting less appealing to Lutie Johnson. The use of personified wind is shown when Petry says “It found every scrap of paper on the street”; this gives dismal feeling to Lutie and the audience on the perception of the setting as an unclean, unappealing area. As the text progresses, the narrator states “it wrapped newspaper around their feet.” This shows that Petry is attempting to emphasize the image of the wind throwing different objects around the dirty setting. The wind can also be symbolic to the trouble associated with the urban setting, expressed in “The wind grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks”; this gives people the stereotypical image of a troubled urban setting. The use of imagery among the personification structurally enhances the excerpt.
Imagery is used throughout the excerpt in order to further enhance the idea that the environment and Lutie do not go well together. From lines 30-31, Petry states “They were forced to stoop and dislodge the paper with their hands”; from the beginning, it is clear that the looks of the street are not appealing to Lutie Johnson in any way. Petry later states “for her hair had been resting softly and warmly against her skin.” This is explaining how Lutie’s hair once was before the wind ruined it. As the section concludes, Petry states “its original coat of white paint was streaked with years of rust”; this shows the in depth image of how the walls of this urban home are far from what Lutie finds acceptable. Petry combines a third element, diction, to the mix of devices to further enhance her piece.
Diction is used throughout “The Street” to convey further that Lutie doesn’t like the idea that the area brings to her. Petry says “It…lifted it up so that the dirt got into their noses, making it difficult to breath”; when the author says this, she uses her diction to further indicate that the quality of life isn’t well, even though the dirt does not play a significant role. As the text progresses, the narrator says “her eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness and she had to blink in order to read the words”; the word choice within this quote gave the reader a clear idea to what Lutie was feeling as everything occurred to her. As the excerpt concludes, the narrator says “She read it rapidly. Three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants. Reasonable.” This shows the reader that Lutie will subdue to something that she might have not of been looking for at the time.
The use of personification, imagery, and diction help Petry convey the idea that Lutie does not like the area or the environment to her reader. By doing this, Petry helps enhance Lutie’s beliefs to the reader so that the audience can understand firsthand what Lutie must endure.

Melanie Huynh said...

Shifting from a personified “character” to a physical character in this excerpt from The Street, Ann Petry combines blatant personification with chilling imagery in order to present the idea that setting has a major influence on one’s emotional and mental experiences.

To start off this passage, Petry personifies the “cold November wind” as an intense, persistent character who gives no mercy; not caring who he/she affects with “its violent assaults.” Petry uses words such as “found”, “discouraged”, “grabbed”, and “lifted” repeatedly in order to emphasize the wind’s power. The wind “[wraps] newspaper around their feet entangling them until the people cursed deep in their throats.” By personifying the wind so vividly, it gives the image of the wind being a predator, determined to leave the streets empty behind its wrath.

Utilizing imagery to describe the harsh surroundings Lutie Johnson must endure while searching for a home, Petry gives the reader a sense of somberness and fear. The scenic imagery further illustrates the unavoidable “cold”. Using figurative language, the wind “fingering” through the desolate streets is similar to Johnson seeking a home among the “dirt and dust and grime” of the setting. One is able to feel the “cold fingers of the wind [touch] the back of her neck” and “[explore] the sides of her head.” Petry’s selection of detail allows the reader to truly understand the dilemma Johnson is facing; desperate, cold, and in need of shelter.

Humans, constantly needing and wanting, must not only battle other humans but also overcome their surroundings. Our surroundings have the ability to intimidate us, to “[twist]” and “[sway]” us away from our goal. Shifting from a personified “character” (the “cold November wind”) to a physical character (Lutie Johnson), Petry combines blatant personification with chilling imager in order to present the idea that setting has major influence on one’s emotional and mental experiences.

Katie Durst said...

Katie Durst
English Honors A Block

Transitioning from the action of the wind to the main focus on Lutie Johnson, in The Street, Ann Petry wrote the opening of her novel using literary devices such as excessive personification, intense imagery, and dominant characterization to express how the strong and forceful wind can have a mind of its own, due to its “violent assault”.
Ann Petry took advantage of personification to point out how the wind presented human-like qualities to increase its intensity, blowing through the city. We cannot view what the wind looks like; we can only see the destructive and forceful movement it is causing to other fearful citizens and different items all over the street. The agonizing wind shows off its power and glory as it can “discourage the people walking along the street” and “blinded them” from all the dust being blown around. The amount of actions taking place hands the reader a mental depiction that the wind obtains the structure of a human body, or as if there were to be a figure roaring through the city. In the end, these humanistic actions delivers to the reader an overall idea that the wind can be considered a character in itself, due to exerting personification in Petry’s story.
Petry also sets the opening scene employing her diligent imagery, as a way to promote the rage of the compulsive wind, as it’s “blowing through 116th street”, and the rest of the burdened city. The extremity of then wind is beyond overruling, that it’s actually causing major destruction to the city, as well as every anxious individual in it. The pedestrians on the street were constantly being disrupted when the wind “grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars”, and “blew their coats away from their bodies.” The intensity drew everyone back home, as the rowdiness became very “difficult to breathe” within the frigid streets. The setting became chaotic and raunchy as the wind “found every scrap of paper along the street” “dancing high in the air” and littered through the town.
The characteristics of the wind are very distinct and match up with the qualities of an average human being. Exquisite verbs such as “rattled”, “sucked” or “blinded” gave those specific qualities of a human being to the wind that has no body or visual appearance. As Lutie Johnson felt “suddenly naked and bald” the wind made her feel as if everything was abducted from her. The wind even “blew her eyelashes away from her eyes so that her eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness”. In a way, Lutie Johnson was harassed by the wind, tearing down everything that she is, both physically and mentally. These few cases indicates and characterizes the way Lutie Johnson felt disturbed from the winds crucial attacks, as if she was in some sort of harm. The harsh, acrid wind was given total control, and was sold as a physical threat to anything and anyone that came into its path.
Because Ann Petry portrayed the following literary devices, they give the reader a mental idea that the wind can be seen as a live human, whether it has a visual appearance or not.

Joel said...

Shifting from physical to emotional affect in the excerpt from “The Street”, Ann Petry “barrages” the reader with pest personification, inhospitable imagery, and figurative language to convey the message that a “cold November wind” can in “an instant” “rust” and “Stain” the search for shelter and warmth.

Petry’s plaguing personification characterizes the wind as a force with malicious intent. “The cold November wind” “took time” doing “everything it could to discourage people” from “walking along the street”. Using aggressive tactics physically “fingering” its way through crowds and into peoples jackets while making sure to get every doorway and “swoop” around “rapidly” pushing people away. The emotional and mental decision that the wind appears to make in choosing to make peoples lives miserable places it in the malicious category.

The impossibly hostile imagery exhibited in the environment in the excerpt from “The Street” lends an air of foreboding to the search for warmth and shelter. The sinister flow of air through the street presents images of a dark and stormy night. The whirlwind of papers “swooping” through the air and rattling the trashcans are images of an angry spirit. The “rust” and “stain” that the wind causes upon many of the surfaces is representative of the overall effect of the wind on the people of the street. The wind is portrayed as a wraith in its howling “violent assaults” and allows for the picture of a supernatural being.

The figurative language in the excerpt from “The Street” gives a sense of inevitability to the inherent difficulty that November winds present. The use of words such as “rapidly”, ”swooping”, and ”assault” contributes to the immediacy of the aggression displayed by the wind. The description of the wind as an adversarial opponent in the struggle on the street defines the challenge that anyone would face as difficult at best.

Physical and emotional affect in the excerpt from “The Street” allow Ann Petry to “barrage” the reader with personification, imagery, and figurative language in the most in agreeable fashion to impart the reader with the knowledge that a “cold November wind” can in “an instant” “rust” and “Stain” the search for shelter and warmth.

Anonymous said...

Sara Pishdadian
AP English Period: C

Abruptly shifting from the wind's to Lutie Johnson's actions in the excerpt from The Street, Ann Petry draws upon vivid personification and creates startling imagery to suggest the cautionary signals such as the wind's "fingering its way along the curbs" that the environment sends to its inhabitants.
Assigning human derived characteristics to the wind, Johnson's selection of detail creates a sinister force that is adamant on achieving its goal of removing pedestrians. The personification is accomplished primarily through verb usage but it is versatile. It can be an intellectual force and literally doing "everything it could to discourage the people" while it also is said to have "rattled", "drove", "wrapped", "grabbed", and "lifted" in a rough, physical manner. The intention of the wind may appear malicious, but as the wind "pushed it away" in reference to the sign that is later described as having "a dark red stain like blood" it is clear that the wind simply desires to help Johnson by not allowing her to stay in this neighborhood. Petry pulls the reader into the novel by illustrating such a passionate, alive setting that literally "explored the sides of her head" and "touched the back of her neck" in the excerpt, which only illuminates the significance this three room housing with "steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants" will have in the piece of literature.
The figurative language serves in conjunction with stark imagery to immerse the reader into "The Street" where people face a particularly cruel wind the makes "it difficult to breathe" and causes a "grit" that "stung their skins". The disturbing images the language depicts such as the "chicken bones and pork-chop bones" that are positioned "along the curb" support the powerful presence of the wind in the environment and through extension, the presence of the wind in all of the people's lives. The imagery creates a force in the wind that clearly has intentions which are shown in the way it "explored the sides of her head" and "found every scrap of paper". The intentional selection of diction and syntax by Petry creates a passage that is aesthetically pleasing yet alarming, where characters are said to feel "suddenly naked and bald" and a experience where their "eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness". These mental images alludes to an urban setting that is interactive, dangerous and most importantly, forceful.
Petry's usage of the human's sense of life and perception are what allow the wind to become a determined guardian in the passage. By fabricating an environmental force as a being with personality, the wind transitions from a mere situational cue to an active contributor to the plot. Inference can be made that, as all people do, the wind has a motive behind its actions and due to the sinister demeanor and behavior the wind is displaying-the conclusion is left that the wind is protecting Johnson, and others nearby. The crude and border-line harmful manner in which it is assisting Johnson is symbolic of the limited means all people, as well as physical forces; have in order to accomplish their goals.

Anonymous said...

Amanda Murphy

Shifting from descriptive to story-telling diction in “The Street”, Ann Petry uses grim imagery, extensive personification and a specific selection of detail to capture Lutie Johnson’s desperate search for security in finding an apartment in the “cold November wind.”
Readers approach the recognition of the earth’s menacing force through the author’s use of hopeless imagery. She paints the picture of Lutie Johnson “blinking in order to read the words on the sign swaying back and forth over her head.” Illuminating to the audience the struggle Lutie is experiencing to find safety. The imagery portrays a bleak, gloomy building in which “years of rain and snow had finally eaten the paint off” making a dark stain on the wall that looked “like blood,” to further reveal how desperate Lutie is to find some form of shelter, or better yet, security. Petry eloquently ties her use of imagery with an equally important tool: personification.
Guiding her audience further, Petry attributes unique human characteristics to wind, using direct personification. She uncovers its ability to “finger its way along the curb” and “rattle the tops of garbage cans.” The author continues to personify the wind, bridging the physical characteristics of a human with the intellectual characteristics of a human, articulating the wind’s power to “discourage the people” and “find all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk.” This approach proves the strong effects the setting has on characters. Petry’s personification symbolizes, despite her characters best efforts, they surrender to the potency of nature. Petry further brings her readers closer to the cognition by tying in her particular selection to detail.
Petry uses creepy details to illustrate the wind as the antagonist of the novel, seemingly wanting to stop Lutie in her pursuit for an apartment. The wind is characterized through its “violent assault” as it “lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked and bald” because her hair was once “resting softly and warmly against her skin.” Nature is going out of its way to make Lutie’s search as difficult and unforgiving as possible. As she tries to focus in, to finally find warmth and security, she looks to read a sign but “the wind pushes it away from her.” This description of the wind lets readers know, Lutie Johnson’s search will not be easy.
“The Street” portrays many devices in order to convey what a difficult search it can be for one to find security. Ann Petry lures readers in by combining these devices.

Anonymous said...

Abruptly shifting point of views from the wind to that of Lutie Johnson in “The Street”, Ann Petry syndicates evolving personification, a morbid, symbolic sense of foreshadowing, and harsh, bare imagery in an attempt to expound upon the ability a person’s archaic environment has to “discourage” them.
Furthering the idea of the impact an environment can place onto an individual, a stringent use of foreshadowing signals the bleak future of Johnson in the city. The sign of the boarding house had once been white, but over the years it had become “streaked with rust”. Lutie Johnson can be likened to the white coat of paint; although she hasn’t been in the city long, her years of living will have eventually “eaten” her just as the elements have down to the paint. The city will have turned Johnson into one of the many pedestrians who offer the “least possible” resistance to the wind; although she initially offers resistance to her environment, it will break her down in time. The very nature of the rust alludes to this fact, because it is described as building up over “years”. The weather plays in instrumental part in harboring a harsh environment.
Utilizing flurried, cold imagery, Petry further highlights how a harsh and uninviting environment can compromise any person. Grit “stings” and “blinds”pedestrians as they wallow through the tormenting wind. As they seek shelter inside themselves they only find a fresh “barrage” of everything the city can throw at them. The only shelter the people have, their clothes, are stripped away by the enviornment. The fact that the wind begins “twisting” and “swaying” the sign is to prevent Johnson from finding shelter from this wintery onslaught. The personifying nature of the wind is another factor in the impact of the environment.
The evolving nature of the wind brings the idea of how an environment purposefully and personally breaks down its people. The wind begins its life innocent enough as it only “rattled” garbage cans and “sucked” in window shades. As the work progresses the wind evolves like primal man; it develops both heightened intelligence and even a sense of “time”. Now the wind actively seeks to “discourage” the people through its actions. Citizens “double in” as they are subjected to flying “dirt”, “dust”, and “grime”. In order to make for a greater effect the wind takes to stealing away hats, scarves and whole coats “from their bodies”. The wind “fingers” around Johnson like a scientist to a peculiar specimen, for she is the only one pressing any resistance. Through foreshadowing it can be conceived that this sense of opposition is surly temporary.

-Matt Remick
D Period

Anonymous said...

Danielle MacDermott
The Street Analysis

Shifting from physical to an emotional mood in “The Street”, Ann Petry utilizes subtle foreshadowing, morphing personification, and insightful imagery to show one’s struggle for security and shelter in their life which always sways “back and forth over her head.”
Petry utilizes hints to give the reader the idea that Lutie is in need of a safe haven and one can interpret that by the weather bombarding her with its elements. The wind “stuck its fingers inside their coat collars” which shows how they have no personal space and place to just be comfortable. Every time Lutie thought she could read the sign “the wind pushed it away from her”, the wind does not want her to find a security to hide and every chance it gets it tries to pull her farther away from reaching it. “The wind set the bits of paper to dancing high in the air”, almost teasing Lutie as if the wind has control over her and her ability in finding security. “Three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants” this shows a shift in the wind no longer having control over Lutie and she is able to finally be able to break free from the harsh world to find her own.
The wind in this excerpt is personified as if it is a person which is interacting with Lutie. “It wrapped newspaper around their feet entangling them” this shows the wind having human qualities like the sense of touch and being able to make contact with the people on the street. The wind “touched the back of her neck” which wind is not alive and therefore can not physically touch a person. The wind also invades her personal boundaries like its fingers that “explored the sides of her head” and “blew her eyelashes away from her eyes” which covered her eyes in a rush of cold air. She has no boundary between her and the wind, which constantly tries to push the limits of how far it can go. It found animal bones and “pushed them along the curb” which personifies the wind as cynical, cold, and boundless. Petry personifies the wind as a cold, shady character in contrast to Lutie who is only trying to find shelter from its harsh antics.
Petry takes advantage of the scene to help portray the message that people are always looking for a shelter whether it if from the weather or anything else that people feel they need to escape from. The wind “blew their coats away from their bodies” which gives the image and sensation of being cold and wanting warmth. Therefore showing Lutie’s need for comfort and talks of the white paint rusting which makes a “dark red stain like blood”, puts an image in one’s head of the sign and also foreshadows that Lutie might not ever find complete security from the wind. The insightful but small amount of imagery adds to the “violent assault” that the wind is causing to the people walking on “116th Street.”
Ann Petry utilizes foreshadowing, personification, and imagery in “The Street”, which shows one’s struggle for safety and comfort from the harshness of the world. Petry hints that Lutie may never fully get shelter from the “wind” and may always be running. The wind gets personified as a sharp, cold character that physically and emotionally toys with Lutie and tries to prevent her search for finding shelter. The small scenes of imagery further give the sense of a cold setting and the harshness that Lutie has to endure on her journey for a warm, comforting room away from the wind. In the world, people are always searching for a safe place to escape where it is not “difficult to breathe.”

Hayley Beaucage said...

Exploring the winds characteristics from physical to mental abilities in “The Street”, Ann Petry employs compelling personification, interconnected imagery, and abrupt characterization to compare the “blinded” effects of the “cold November wind” and the security of a home.

In “The Street”, Petry emphasizes the environment’s affect on the individuals through the intriguing personification of the winds human physical attributes. Through this personification, it is apparent that the wind is causing chaos on the city’s pedestrians, including Lutie Johnson by making it “difficult to breathe”; establishing nature’s physical presence. She reveals its ability to “grab their hats” and “wrap newspapers around their feet.” Further along in the excerpt, Petry assigns human intellect to the wind. The growing wind is now able to “discourage the people” and “take time.” The reader recognizes nature’s ambition to withhold Lutie Johnson from obtaining a positive experience in the urban setting when it “pushed [her] away” from staying at the inn. This bond created with the winds increasing human attributes mentally and physically is evidence of the winds presence and how it “[entangles]” the pedestrians.

Petry further induces the reader’s recognition of the negative effects and influences of the individual’s surroundings through the interconnected imagery. The ominous feeling given off the elements of the wind “[driving] most of the people off” is created just at the beginning of the scene. Petry adds the dark element of the “dark red stain like blood” to give off the feeling that the pedestrians and especially Lutie’s experience will become progressively worse. The execrable images of “dirt and dust and grime”, are added to describe the further chaos within the city. These potent effects prove “The Street” has a “rush of coldness”, establishing that one’s home can be their hideout for safety.

The blunt introduction of Lutie Johnson serves to expose the difficulty of fighting against the “violent” urban environment conditions. The character of Lutie elucidated the fact that she was affected by the winds characteristics. From the start the wind “lifted [her] hair away from the back of her neck” causing her to feel “naked and bald”, suggesting now that she has to find a way to become untangled from the wind. The character of Lutie become more established as the excerpt progresses, showing that she needed to stay in a place with “three rooms”, suggesting that she has other people to look after. Despite the “deep” atmosphere of the street, Lutie continues to seek a “reasonable” comfort within the urban environment which is rewarded from surviving the challenges in life.

Ann Petry employs many literary elements, such as personification, imagery, and characterization to show the impact of nature on Lutie Johnson’s relationship with her urban environment. The bond between the physical and intellectual human attributes of the wind intrigued the readers, stressing the representation of nature’s abilities to entangle the individuals caught in it.

Caisey Calabro said...

Growing from body to mind in “The Street” Ann Petry utilizes sinister personification, sensual imagery, and shifting characterization in order to show the struggles of life and how one has to settle for what is “reasonable.”
Petry uses malignant personification to convey the theme of evil throughout the poem.The wind is always battling against Lutie and toughing her with it’s “cold fingers.” The sign was the one thing that Lutie wanted to read. With the wind blowing and with the “dark red stain like blood,” it was hard for Lutie to do so. It even tried to “blind” her so she could not read the sign. She further emphasizes the affects of the wind through the use of sensual imagery.
Tangible imagery is used by Petry to further illustrate the almost human presence of the wind. The wind seems to be physical because it is “grabbing,” “fingering,” and “wrapping” the people and other elements outside on the street. Petry also adds what appears to be some sort of intelligence to when it “sets,” “drives,” and “discourages” the people who are walking along. By “finding,” “lifting,” and “taking” everything and anything it could, Petry establishes more of a permeance to the wind through her use of imagery. By shifting characterization Petry starts to develop the affect the wind has on just one person, Lutie Johnson.
Petry merges the characterization of the wind and Lutie to show that the wind is essential a part of Lutie that she cannot escape. She begins by talking about the “cold November wind” and then transitions to talk about Lutie. She had “shivered” and felt “naked” when the wind blew on her neck. This further acknowledges the fact that she is not comfortable with the wind and it seems to frighten her. She needed to “rapidly” make a decision in fear of the wind taking it away in an “instant.”
Petry uses the plethora of devices such as personification, imagery, and characterization to describe Lutie’s relationship with the wind. She also establishes a setting that is crucial to the poem because it reinforces the feelings of cold and evil behind the wind.

Catherine said...

Transitioning from a focus on the harsh winds of the city to a focus on Lutie Johnson’s search for a home in “The Street”, Ann Petry utilizes stormy imagery, extreme personification, and flawless diction to convey the idea that one’s environment can play a major role in the events of their life.

Petry employs a variety of simple, yet concise vocabulary used to describe the images of conditions of the setting, intensifying the meaning and role of the mischievous wind upon Lutie Johnson. As the wind “touch[es] the back of her neck, explore[s] the sides of her head”, it is evident that Lutie is constantly in contact with the wind. Through this use of imagery, the reader may clearly visually exactly the situations of the scene, and the contact of the environment with the main character. This imagery is “swirled” throughout the entirety of the excerpt, “twisting” the scene into a clear interaction between the wind and Lutie, further making the setting a significant aspect within the excerpt.

Personification is noticeably evident throughout the entirety of the excerpt of “The Street,” helping to portray the “cold November wind” as a character of the story, rather than an element of the weather. By adding emotion and actions to the wind, Petry transforms it into a character, developing it as a major feature and important aspect of the story as a whole. As the wind “lifted” and “pushed” the objects of “the street,” it guided the main character of Lutie Johnson to a possible new home, an object clearly of her desires, possibly changing her life for the better or for the worse. This factor of the environment, the wind, is portrayed as a personality, and an influential aspect upon the events in the life of Lutie Johnson.

Ann Petry’s selection of particular vocabulary within “The Street” supports the main idea by adding the most precise and appropriate words necessary to communicate it to the reader. Petry not only sets the scene with this careful variety of diction, but uses it to complete the necessary imagery and personification utilized throughout. This diction is in no way out of place, but seems “warmly” welcomed within the piece. Lutie’s interaction with her location is depicted with only vocabulary that is well-know, simple, and concise. With this easy to read, but rich, diction, the reader can clearly follow the wind and its interactions with the protagonist.

Overall, Ann Petry’s “The Street” is written with three main literary components: imagery, personification, and diction, all three of which are equally as important in the conveying of the main idea of the piece: that one’s environment can play a crucial role in their life.

Taryn Kitchen said...

Focusing in from the effects of the wind on the whole city to its effects on one specific individual in the opening of The Street, Ann Petry combines harsh personification, calculated urban imagery, and a subtle foreshadowing to characterize Lutie Johnson’s sentiments towards her urban atmosphere as critical and flawed, yet decidedly “reasonable”.
As the subject throughout most of the excerpt, the city’s wind dominates as not only part of the setting, but as a character as well. It starts with physical actions, “rattl[ing] the tops of garbage cans” and “suck[ing] window shades”. The wind seeks to torment the city in ways that are not able to be ignored. The wind’s sinister actions then take on a deliberately thought-out plan, showing that it not only has a body, but a mental capacity as well. The wind is able to “discourage the people walking along the street” and it “even took time”, which is a capability beyond that of even humans. Eventually, the wind finds a specific victim, choosing to target its “violent assault” on Lutie Johnson. It “lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked and bald”, exposing her to the harsh urban environment.
Johnson’s environment is riddled with litter and urban decay, furthering her animosity towards it. Petry characterizes the city inhabitants by deliberately covering the street with items characteristic of a city: “theater throwaways, announcements of dances and lodge meetings, the heavy waxed paper that loaves of bread had been wrapped in, the thinner waxed paper that had enclosed sandwiches, old envelops, newspapers”. She then puts a more disturbing twist on the street’s litter by adding “chicken bones and pork-chop bones” to its collection. They are all very common items of typical lives, yet they are cast in a disgusting light without cleaner or positive objects to balance them out. When Johnson focuses on the aged sign, Petry details that “its original coat of white paint was streaked with rust where years of rain and snow had finally eaten the paint off down to the metal and the metal had slowly rusted”, suggesting the overall decay of the city and its inhabitants. Nothing Petry describes is clean or has been properly sustained and everything described has deteriorated. With the detailed imagery she has chosen, Petry creates a setting that is less than appealing to both Johnson and the reader.
While not blatantly stated, Petry suggests a lot in her opening paragraphs of events to come. By initiating the novel with an embellished description of the environment, Petry implies that it will likely have a strong impact on Lutie Johnson’s story. Whatever events are about to take place could only happen in the “cold November wind blowing through 116th street”. The “dark red stain like blood” on the sign creates an ominous sign of imminent violence. She could have chosen any “red” analogy, but in choosing blood, Petry suggests some sort of violence, whether literal or figurative. Furthermore, this damage was caused by the wind, further proving the negative effects that the environment will have on Johnson’s character and story. Petry additionally implores basic plot foreshadowing as Johnson searches for a new apartment. For some currently unknown reason, Lutie is in need of a new apartment with “three rooms”, and this reason will assumedly be unearthed as the novel progresses. Lutie Johnson seems willing to settle for just “reasonable”, and is likely a settler in many other aspects of life.
The deteriorating and unappealing urban setting Petry creates reflects Lutie Johnson’s relationship with it. Any sort of environment has an immense characterizing effect on those living within it, and the harsh wind and decaying city warrant only animosity. While searching for a new home, Lutie hopes to find a welcoming new place, but after being tormented by the “cold November win”, Lutie must come to terms with her new urban setting and settle for relatively satisfactory.

Jackie Toomey said...

Jackie Toomey
11/17/2011
English D
Petry Analysis

“The Street” By Ann Petry
Shifting between physical and intellectual characteristics when describing the “wind” in “the street”, Ann Petry uses a “cold”, uninviting tone coupled with sinister personification and menacing imagery in order to solidify the common idea that despite the large amount of people, city streets never fail to “discourage” newcomers with all their “dirt”, “dust”, and “coldness”; just as they did to Lutie Johnson.
Throughout the entirety of the excerpt, Petry consistently leaves the reader with a sense of “coldness” in regard to the tone of the piece, which she develops through the use of forbidding, inhospitable diction. She describes how, in it’s rage, the wind “drove most of the people off the street...except for a few hurried pedestrians who bent double in an effort to offer the least possible exposed surface to it’s violent assault”, which, in itself, contributes various different instances where the diction she chooses aids in the creation of the harsh, brutal tone. She also accounts for the way that the wind “did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street. It found all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk and lifted it up so that the dirt got into their noses, making it difficult to breathe; the dust got into their eyes and blinded them; and the grit stung their skins.” In doing this, Petry further exemplifies that there is nothing hospitable or welcoming about the wind described in the excerpt; only cold, merciless tone that chills the reader down to their very bones.
Working along with the cold tone she has developed early on, Petry makes use of dark, ominous personification in order to develop a sinister personality that she attributes to the wind throughout the excerpt. She gives life to it by describing the way it “rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows and set them flapping back against the windows.” Her utilization of humanlike actions such as “rattled” and “sucked” aid in showing just how uninviting the wind can make a city seem. By exemplifying how the wind “drove most of the people off the street”, it further shows that “the wind”does not welcome those who do not belong there. In order to show the inhospitable characterization of the wind, Petry uses dark, sinister personification that illuminates the depth surrounding the intensity the personification adds to her excerpt.
The dimension added to Petry’s excerpt through the use of ominous, menacing imagery is one that is essential to the development of her universal idea. Right from the start, Petry wastes no time with sugar coated descriptions of happenings in her work, instead she does a wonderful job of evoking emotion from the reader when she describes how the wind “wrapped newspaper between their feet entangling them until the people cursed deep in their throats”, and how it “grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars, blew their coats away from their bodies.” In this instance, it is fairly easy for the reader to develop a vivid image in their mind of the happenings that have taken place at that particular point in the section. She further adds to the balefulness of the piece by telling how the wind in it’s actions made it so difficult that those around it “cursed deep in their throats, stamped their feet, kicked at the paper”, and became generally very uncomfortable. Just as Lutie Johnson experiences, the wind can have a daunting effect on the confidence of someone lost and alone in a large, populated city.

Anonymous said...

Stacie Linfield
11/17/11
AP English: D
The Street Analysis

Shifting from focusing on the fiendish wind to the character Lutie Johnson in “The Street”, Ann Petry uses personified symbolism, refined diction, and “cold”, icy imagery to reveal the inhospitable, “dark” environment that is the city.
The wind takes on an evil role as a forewarning force to Lutie. Its personified and symbolic warning casts a sort of darkness upon the city that she roams in search of a home. The wind constantly “assaults” pedestrians in the street as it is “fingering its way along the curb”. The wind gives off an eerie sensation to the reader as to what its devilish intentions are. “It did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street”because the wind is a mean creature. It is cruel to everyone within its chilly grasp, bullying them in whatever way it can. Petry also personifies the papers being blown along the street saying that it was “dancing high in the air... swirled into the faces of the people”, as if it were aiding the wind in cruelty. The cautionary weather and bitter winds are almost trying to dissuade Lutie from the city and its “violent” streets. Besides the admonishing role of the wind, the refined diction plays an important guise in the evil environment of the city.
The pristine language in this literary work adds to the darkness of the city because the author keeps a consistent theme in the diction they choose. Petry uses a lot of unwelcoming words like “violent”, “assault”, and “exposed” to set the mysterious mood to the setting. Petry continues a long string of similar words all throughout to add to the feeling of alienation . This makes the reader understand the detachment of the city and the people who reside within. It also gives a sense of vulnerability when Petry described the “cold fingers” of the chilly wind touching Lutie, making her feel “naked”. The whole story has an almost inhumane feeling to it, as if everything is void and without any kind of warmth or care. Besides the interesting symbols and diction, Petry uses an immense amount of imagery to portray the cruel city accurately.
The chilly imagery really ties all the devices together to make the evil city visually evident. Petry paints an image of lonely streets with “hurr[ying] pedestrians” and swirling litter. The detachment of the story is evident as the nameless people are “assault[ed]” by the wind. Even when Lutie Johnson is introduced there is no sense of friendliness or warmth. She is violated by the wind just like everyone else, but hers is described more in depth, giving a sense of vulnerability to the reader. The story is cold and unforgiving.
Petry portrays the city as a dark evil place. There is no hope, no mercy, and almost no chance. With use of the personified wind, choice of diction, and icy imagery, Petry creates an inhospitable environment known as the city.

Eric Forman said...

Smoothly shifting focus from a menacing “November wind” to the seemingly foremost character in “The Street”, Ann Petry unleashes personifying imagery, a deliberate use of climax, and an overarching selection of detail to dramatize the mind-blowing sensation one has upon visiting an ominous city and calling it home.

Petry scrutinizes the “violent assault” of a windy day as a way to allow the reader to place themselves in a setting similar to that of the character Lutie Johnson. “Fingering its way along the curb”, the wind encapsulates Johnson, delaying the actual progress of the story, just as Johnson stalls her movement toward “the building”. The wind “grabbed” the attention of Johnson as to direct the reader in understanding the contrasting relationship between “the street” and Johnson’s “swaying…focus” upon it. Trying to “discourage the people walking along the street”, the wind is being utilized as a deterrent to those living in the surrounding area and mainly towards Johnson, further exemplifying the idea that one’s first experience of the city or of an unfamiliar location is always evocative, prevalent, yet hesitant.

Furthermore, Petry’s deliberate use of climax of Johnson’s “impossible” focus leads to accentuate the troubling effect a location has upon its newest inhabitants. Petry chooses to engross the reader with the “swooped” sign in the excerpt to interpret the aggravating and uninviting sensation that Johnson has when desperately in search of a roof over her head. Petry progressively elaborates upon the facets of the sign as the wind is blowing to deliberately provoke the reader in feeling the probable frustration that which Johnson herself is having upon her attempt to read it. Reading “it rapidly”, Johnson hunts to find cover and stability within the city beyond this severe environment as she clearly is not yet acclimated to it. “Reasonable” enough for Johnson, Johnson most likely enters into the building, after the end of the excerpt, that which includes “Three rooms [and] steam heat”; highly suitable enough for a new resident when engulfed in a “twisting” wind.

The wind not only targets Lutie Johnson though, but also “every scrap of paper along the street”, the fa├žade of the buildings, and the people aligned with them, thus creating an overarching selection of detail within the passage. Petry further induces his claim upon the reader that a new city or location may be staggering at first by examining the apparent strength the wind has on its surrounding various objects. The speaker cunningly reveals the wicked nature of the wind in order to daunt the population, whether new or old; the wind precisely makes it “difficult [for the residents] to breathe” and to see. Inherently evil, the wind does all that it can to bother the people, but “a few hurried pedestrians” just like Johnson, are able to march through it, protecting themselves from harm, escaping “all the dust and dirt…and wrapped newspaper”. Illustrating the effect that the wind has on the debris and life on the street, Petry is able to further explain to the reader that an astonished reaction to such a location as this one is inevitable, certainly if visiting for the first time.

Interestingly, Petry is able to construct a passage that enthralls the reader in such a way that is both reminiscent of what is dealt with Johnson, the people of "116th Street", and of those visiting a mysterious city for the first time. In this case, Johnson, like others, must learn to deal with the seemingly cumbersome environment she is forced to be involved with in order to confidently call it home. Therefore, Petry has successfully conveyed the confounding sensation one has upon visiting an ominous and unfamiliar location and calling it home through the use of a deliberate climax, personifying imagery, and an overarching selection of detail.

Peter L. said...

Shifting between diabolical to mischievous characterizations in “The Street”, Ann Petry emphasizes the use of evolving personification while balancing violent imagery and palpable descriptions to suggest the influence of nature over an individual even at the individual’s insistence of control.

The wind in this passage exists not only as a dynamic force but as a character in itself. Its nature is harshly aggressive, as personified by the “rattled… tops of garbage cans,” and its “[discouraging] the people walking along the street.” Such actions hint at a darker, more violent state, lending to the passage a greater sense of foreboding. Petry further develops the character of the wind through granting it a cognitive mind where now it has the ability to “[take] time to rush though doorways”. This implies an evolution from a mindless force to a being capable of executing decisions to the end of creating difficulties and annoyances. Its final stage is marked by its interactions with Lutie. Already, the reader may be able to note how its actions betray cognition. To an even greater degree, it now interacts with a human on an almost intimate level; at first, it “pushed [the sign] away from her”, yet concedes when it “held it still for an instant in front of her” as if granting her reprieve from its own sinister tomfoolery. It may be debated either the symbolic submission of the wind to Lutie, or the acknowledgement of her dependence on its whim. In both cases, with the conclusion of this passage, it can be noted the authority of the wind over her.

Due to the nature and magnitude of the wind both as a character and as an aspect of setting, Petry devotes much effort into its description. It would not be a far stretch to replace the wind with an imp or minor demon; its “violent assault” and “barrage” against the people and environment is a testament to this. By “[finding] all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk” and assailing those vulnerable with the aforementioned, Petry’s use of descriptions places the reader in the environment, making him feel what the characters feel. Similarly, it can also be seen that the wind takes pleasure in causing discomfort and pain, as when it was “making it difficult to breathe” for the pedestrians, and when it “lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked and bald”. Such details would be apt for a scene of torture. This suggestion further reveals the dark intentions that nature deigns to subject man to.

Kristen Tenglin said...

Transitioning from the detailed description of the wind to the abruptly indirect portrayal of Lutie Johnson in “The Street”, Ann Petry employs permeating personification and seasonal imagery which culminate in the sudden characterization of the protagonist in order to illuminate the “difficult” human search for comfort in the midst of a “violent environment”.
Personification encompasses the entirety of the work in order to stress the conflict between an individual and a “cold”, inhospitable environment. Petry vividly portrays the wind as having the ability “to discourage the people” as it “[fingers] its way along the curb”. “Entangling them”, the “violent” wind is capable of demoralizing the individuals as they walk in its midst. At the beginning of the work, the author depicts the wind as being able to “[open] windows” and “[drive] most of the people off the street”. The personification of the physical is then enhanced by the addition of mental capabilities, such as “[taking] time”. Furthering this embodiment, Petry stresses that the wind has the capacity to recognize an individual’s dream and then “[sweep] it away” like a sign. Imparting humanistic characteristics on the wind, the author illustrates the toilsome human quest for ease, and this portrayal is enhanced by the author’s utilization of seasonal imagery.
Employing scenic images of the bleak fall, Petry furthers her illustration of the formidable search for solace among inhospitable surroundings. The “cold” wind which sweeps the barren streets portrays the emptiness of those who seek shelter from its wrath. By describing that the scene occurred in “November”, Petry implies that the “violent assault” of the harsh season has an unyielding impact on those it encounters. Images of desolation that are associated with winter express the ominous nature of the environment and the inability of “pedestrians” to survive comfortably within it. The “dirt and dust and grime” of the setting are characteristic of the unbearable season. The bitter, arctic imagery is furthered by lucid characterization in order to advance the depiction of an inhospitable atmosphere which is incapable of sustaining life.
The abrupt introduction and description of Lutie Johnson serves to supplement the ideal of the “difficult” nature of surviving amongst “cold” and unbearable environmental conditions. Lutie’s character is established as the “wind lifted [her] hair from the back of her neck”. She is searching for ease amid a formidable and “violent” setting. However, every time comfort seems to be within reach, the “wind” sweeps “it away” until it appears to be “impossible” to obtain. The author characterizes Lutie’s continuous struggle with her surroundings, alluding to the fact that it is not “reasonable” to seek stability within such an environment. The setting augments Lutie’s disposition by asserting her willingness to endure harsh conditions as she resists the “twisting” and swaying” of “the wind” in order to obtain what she desires. Despite the “heavy” and unbearable atmosphere of “the street”, Lutie continues to seek comfort and survival within its confines, shedding light on the human exploration for consolation amid ferocity.
In a world which is scarred by the troublesome search for relief, humans must toil with their surroundings. The atmosphere, including those within it, has the capacity to consume and “[entangle]” an individual, and “pedestrians” are often forced to fight back against that which encircles them. “The Street” exemplifies this clash between the individual and the “violent” environment through the persona applied to “the wind”, the abrupt depiction of Lutie Johnson, and the encapsulating portrayal of the “cold November” day.

Sarah N said...

Sarah Nordstrom
The Street Analysis

Shifting from an impersonal to personal tone in The Street, Ann Petry applies phantom personification and immortal imagery to convey that through the subtle “cold fingers of the wind” nature can warn of danger that exists inside a “Reasonable” old building.
Petry’s personification of the wind gives it a mind of its own, as it “fingers it’s was along the curb” it “did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street”. As the wind takes on the role of an out of control prankster moving along as it “grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck it’s fingers inside their coat collars” it begins to take on a humane and genuine caring as it reaches Lutie Johnson looking for a place to go. Just as the wind finishes with those on the sidewalk it suddenly “lifted” Lutie’s hair from her neck “so that she felt suddenly naked and bald” the wind has the ability to penetrate Lutie’s soul and expose the vulnerability that lies inside of all of us. While venturesome Lutie braves the chilly November night searching for a home, the mischievous wind toys with a sign for a creaky old apartment “the wind pushed it away from her so that she wasn’t certain whether it said three rooms or two rooms.”. The wind however gives Lutie her own chance to make her own choice when it “held it still for an instant in front of her”.
Petry depicts a bleak and frigid November night on a run-down city street, through ghostly imagery Petry first introduces the wind as it “rattles the tops of garbage cans” and “sucked window shades through the top of opened windows.” The wind becomes the factor that unites all of the city dwellers and as the wind “found every scrap of paper along the street” the city appears much more desolate and the people much more alone. Lutie wanders along a vacant street and the wind sweeps along as if it were an old friend, taking on that image when it’s “cold fingers” touch her in a frigidly familiar way. As Lutie nears the old building, it is obvious that it has been there for ages, the “white paint streaked with rust” portrays an image full of hard times and dilapidation. The danger of the building is also noticeable through the obvious imagery of the “dark red stain like blood” adds uncertainty of the building.
The personification and imagery used by Petry are exemplary instances in which the contributing factors of the environment can tie together the relationships between the setting and the subjects of the story.

Anonymous said...

Kristen MacGray
The Street Analysis

Shifting from a climatic to a human subject in “The Street,” Petry incorporates suggestive characterization, combative imagery, and vast personification to foreshadow that Lutie Johnson should stay where she is and there isn’t “any point” in looking because every time the “wind pushed it away from her.”
Through the use of suggestive characterization, there’s a further understanding of Johnson’s character and the reason why she should stay put. Petry uses an abrupt shift to describe the character of Johnson by suddenly stating how “her hair had been resting softly and warmly against her skin.” Since “there wasn’t any point” in looking at a place with only two rooms, it suggests that she may have someone else who is staying with her. This could be foreshadowing that there may be an unexpected event where she will not need a new place.
The combative imagery throughout the excerpt is a representation of how Lutie looking for a new place could be a bad idea. The metal that “had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood” on the sign is a gloomy and dark image to create a sense of danger or alertness. “The wind twisting the sign away from her” demonstrates that Johnson should not see it and searching for a new place to live is a bad thought.
Petry personifies the wind in an angry manner to further expose why Johnson should not look for another place. She provides the wind with a body. The wind “rattled the tops of garbage cans,” “sucked window shades” and “grabbed their hats.” Petry also administers the wind with a mind of its own. She does this by allowing the wind to “find chicken and pork-chop bones” and to “discourage the people.” In these two distinctions of the wind, Petry further induces why Johnson’s idea was “over her head” and she should stay where she is.
Throughout, “The Street,” the wind is exposed in a violent and inconvenient way. Johnson is “suspended” from doing what she ultimately wants to do because of the “violent assault of the wind.” The “cold November wind” symbolizes the inevitable events that transpire throughout one’s life and the competency of them to communicate a message. The message that Lutie Johnson derives from the wind is meticulously displayed through the use of suggestive characterization, combative imagery, and vast personification.

Hannah Lavendier said...

Petry Analysis of Analysis
Hannah Lavendier of Panos Nikolos

Shifting from concrete to more figurative devices, Panos Nikolos successfully elicits sophisticated vocabulary and appropriate quotations, yet renders the greatness of his analysis by providing a weak third technique to analyze Ann Petry’s “The Street”.
The eloquent and sophisticated vocabulary chosen by Panos creates a credible feel to the overall analysis of Petry’s “The Street”. The diction is used to “intensify” and specify the multiple claims made. The rich vocabulary, including adjectives such as “tempestuous”, “picturesque”, and “peculiar”, are not overly challenging to the reader, yet are precise in expressing the viewpoints of the claims. The verbs within the analysis also prove to be strong; they “elucidate” the Panos’ knowledge of the English language without being too overt. At no points in the analysis are the eloquent words clustered together in a fashion that would seem forced- instead, they are casually inserted into sentences.
The richness of the analysis is further enhanced through the appropriate and effortless usage of quotations. In his thesis, Panos claims “that determination is unconquerable despite how much obstacles may ‘discourage’ a person”. This thesis, and use of the quote “discourage”, is simple, yet powerful. By adding in a single word from “The Street”, Panos pinpoints the tone of his analysis as well as Petry’s writing. At other points in the analysis, striking quotations such as “‘rust…making a dark red stain like blood’” and “‘violent assault’” are used to emphasize the type of style that Petry demonstrates in her writing. He is able to analyze the “tempestuous imagery”, “vile personification” and “abrupt characterization” effectively through his efficient quotes.
After his superb analysis of the imagery and personification, the third analyzed device, characterization, seems weaker than the previous. The topic sentence of “‘the use of tempestuous imagery and vile personification are used to enhance Petry’s use of abrupt characterization” gives the impression that the third device could have been sub-categorized under the first two devices, rather than be a device alone. This is because he states that the characterization of the main protagonist in “The Street” only exists due to the combining of the other two devices. If the topic sentence had been worded differently, a different impression would be made. Although this blunder does not ruin the analysis as a whole, it distracts the reader of the otherwise excellence of the writing and subject matter.
On the Advanced Placement analysis rubric, Panos would receive an eight. This is because his writing is fluid, well-organized, and rich in analysis and content other than the third device, yet there are several grammatical mistakes. These mistakes include the use of “threw” instead of through, and the past tense use of “did” instead of the present tense of does. Even despite his subtle mistakes, Panos Nikolos analyzes Petry’s writing effectively and thoughtfully, creating an analysis worthy of a good score.

Anonymous said...

Shifting between the wind's actions to Lutie Johnson's actions in the The Street, Ann Petry utilizes vivid personification and realistic imagery, and figurative language convey Lutie Johnson’s desperate search for security and warmth in the “cold November wind.”
Petry uses malicious personification to convey the evil theme of the wind throughout the poem. The wind is always fighting against Lutie. In the excerpt, Lutie wants to read the sign but with the wind blowing and the “dark red stain like blood”, it made it even more challenging for her to do so. The wind even tried to “blind” her so she could not read the sign. Lutie “shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck”. The wind only worked as an enemy to Lutie. As she tried to read the sign the wind “blew her eyelashes away from her eyes so that her eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness”. In order to read the sing she had to blink as it was “swaying back and forth over her head”.
Petry also utilizes realistic imagery in The Street. The wind victimizes Lutie and the people on the street by “grabbing”, “fingering”, and “wrapping” them outside on the lonely street. The wind also “discouraged” people walking alone on the street. It found “all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk and lifted it up so that the dirt got into their noses, making it difficult to breathe”. After the wind had made it hard to breathe and blinded them it “grabbed their hats, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars, and blew their coats away from their bodies”. Petry’s use of imagery conveys the meaning and realism of the ferocious winds on “a cold November” night.
Lastly, Petry uses great symbolism to show the good verse evil effect in The Street. The wind works as the evil, acting on the innocent Lutie. As Lutie searches for warmth and security the wind finds terrible ways to stop her from her goal. Lutie and the people of the street have done nothing to deserve evil. Sometimes that is the way it works, evil powers over the good. Evil can be expressed for no reason at all and can do great harm to an innocent young people like Lutie Johnson.

-Jenna Aries
The Street Analysis

Anonymous said...

Jenna Aries
The Street Anaylsis
THE RIGHT ONE THIS TIME

Shifting between the wind's actions to Lutie Johnson's actions in the The Street, Ann Petry utilizes vivid personification and realistic imagery, and great symbolism to convey Lutie Johnson’s desperate search for security and warmth in the “cold November wind.”
Petry uses malicious personification to convey the evil theme of the wind throughout the poem. The wind is always fighting against Lutie. In the excerpt, Lutie wants to read the sign but with the wind blowing and the “dark red stain like blood”, it made it even more challenging for her to do so. The wind even tried to “blind” her so she could not read the sign. Lutie “shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck”. The wind only worked as an enemy to Lutie. As she tried to read the sign the wind “blew her eyelashes away from her eyes so that her eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness”. In order to read the sing she had to blink as it was “swaying back and forth over her head”.
Petry also utilizes realistic imagery in The Street. The wind victimizes Lutie and the people on the street by “grabbing”, “fingering”, and “wrapping” them outside on the lonely street. The wind also “discouraged” people walking alone on the street. It found “all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk and lifted it up so that the dirt got into their noses, making it difficult to breathe”. After the wind had made it hard to breathe and blinded them it “grabbed their hats, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars, and blew their coats away from their bodies”. Petry’s use of imagery conveys the meaning and realism of the ferocious winds on “a cold November” night.
Lastly, Petry uses great symbolism to show the good verse evil effect in The Street. The wind works as the evil, acting on the innocent Lutie. As Lutie searches for warmth and security the wind finds terrible ways to stop her from her goal. Lutie and the people of the street have done nothing to deserve evil. Sometimes that is the way it works, evil powers over the good. Evil can be expressed for no reason at all and can do great harm to an innocent young people like Lutie Johnson.

Amanda Sullivan said...

Amanda Sullivan
"The Street" Analysis

Transitioning from the topic of the wind to the introduction of a new character in “The Street”, Ann Petry manipulates forceful imagery, natural personification, and direct characterization to show the “violent assault” caused by Mother Nature that often “discourages” civilians and inhabitants.
Ann Petry masters the art of imagery while proceeding to explain the wind’s course of action. The wind begins by “rattling” the garbage cans and “sucking” window shades. Because of the harshness of the wind, “hurried pedestrians” leave the streets to avoid the “violent” environment. Petry describes how the wind “found every scrap of paper”, whether it be advertisements, announcements, or old sandwich bags. Also, when Lutie Johnson is introduced, the writer illustrates how the hair flies away from her neck, making her suddenly feel “naked”. Petry skillfully utilizes the violent imagery, which should directly relate to most readers. Almost every person has most likely fought a battle with the wind, or Mother Nature in general and ultimately lost. Nature has a way of frustrating all inhabitants in one way or another. While providing the reader with a mental picture of the weather on this given day, Petry also employs direct characterization, specifically of Lutie Johnson.
The passage begins with most attention directed towards the wind, rather than any actual characters. Towards the middle of the passage, Ann Petry familiarizes the readers with Lutie Johnson, a woman searching for an apartment, but having a hard time because of the violent wind. The wind first lifts the hair from Lutie’s neck, making her feel “naked and bald”. Because the wind is so forceful, it blows her eyelashes from her eyes, and her eyeballs are “bathed in a rush of coldness”. Lutie Johnson is simply trying to read a sign giving information about an apartment, but the wind is causing her to lose “focus”, and she is unable to clarify if the apartment has two or three rooms. Settling for a moment, the wind allows Lutie to read the sign “rapidly” before “swooping” it away again. By carefully placing Lutie Johnson in the passage, Petry is illuminating the ideas of how nature can affect and potentially ruin one’s day by its violence.
Perhaps the most important and significant device the Petry applies is natural personification, which is essentially the personification of the wind. In the first paragraph, the wind has a body because it “rattled”, “sucked”, and “drove”. As the reader continues with the passage, the wind begins to develop not only a body, but a mind to go along with it because of its ability to “find”, “finger”, and “even take time”. In addition to these things, the wind could “discourage the people walking along the street”. Throughout the passage, Ann Petry is successfully exerting the use of personification by committing the wind with very humanistic qualities and characteristics. She explains how the wind is personally being bothersome to homes, pedestrians, buildings, and essentially anything that the wind is willing to aggravate. When Lutie Johnson is brought into the writing, the wind’s “cold fingers” extended and touched the back of her neck and head. Petry intentionally displays the wind as a human that is able to distress more things than one.
Ann Petry masterfully reveals the cruel ability of nature to destroy a person’s day through her use of imagery, characterization, and personification. Nature has its own way of discouraging people or things at some point during a day. There is not much a person can do but suffer through the annoying ways of nature, and hope that the day will not be affected too much.

Anonymous said...

Marco Orlando
The Street Analysis

Shifting from a frantic presentation of a "cold November wind" devastating city streets, to the abrupt introduction of an apparent, struggling mother, Ann Petry's "The Street", is constructed with raw imagery, inducing personification and an abundant selection of detail in order to convince the reader that despite the current situation, no matter how unreal and horrific, dedication to an appropriate cause will result in a promising future.
Throughout the opening of "The Street", it is clear that Anne Petry's initial focus is to deliver specific emotion through raw and powerful imagery. The reader is reading, quite obviously, yet it produces a mental movie, with complete and predetermined scenes in which depict a very gloomy and frenzied November day, dominated by forceful wind; " It rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows and set them flapping back against the window." Her constant use of simplistic adjectives, "her hair had been resting softly and warmly on the back of her neck" and depictive actions, "it wrapped newspaper around their feet entangling the", fuse together almost perfectly, producing a desired image in which constructs her entire plot throughout. As she personifies the wind, she must focus on detail to do so in which secures her imagery and deems it necessary. In order to convey her overall ideals of adversity, she must penetrate emotion into the reader, and what better way to present images of raw devastation through her complex and attentive focus on imagery.
As mentioned above, lies the underlining goal Petry so clearly pursued; forcing emotions consisting of those revolving around adversity at its finest. As the writing progresses, so does her focus on the development of the wind's human qualities; both physically and mentally. Combining the two most dominant attributes of human, projecting upon an already inflicting force of wind, only secures the emotions in which she pursues to deliver. By implanting fingers upon the wind, "Fingering it's way along the curb, the wind sent papers dancing through the air.", the wind is almost projected as a beast, rather than an annoyance of weather; something a struggling mother does not seek to make acquaintance with. By providing a mind for the wind, "It found all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk and lifted it up so that dirt got into their noses.", suggests that the destructive wind obtains the ability to think, and make decisions, depriving any random action and denouncing any luck; the wind is more an opponent than an obstacle or distraction. The personification of the wind that Petry seems to perfect, is designed to insure that the wind is more of an enemy, a beast, rather than an everyday occurrence. Aside from the women's struggles as is, lies the battle between her and this beast; progressive adversity amongst of time of hardship.

Anonymous said...

Marco Orlando Pt. 2

Detail is most important in the initial development of Petry's use of imagery and personification. With that being said, an abundant supply of details, ranging from adjectives to specifics, delivers a more developed, structured plot in which edits the 'mental movie' from any imperfections. "Each time she thought she had the sign in focus, the wind pushed it away from her so that she wasn't certain whether it said three rooms or two rooms." As the quote suggests, detail adds to the emotion, in which reflects the use of imagery and personification, in which then underlies her entire overall message of adversity and the constant struggle against it to ensure a better tomorrow. There is not much more to be said about why her heavy use of detail is as crucial as anything else. The detail provides a clearer presentation of the other literary techniques used to provide emotion and ideals, and fills in any voids that deprive the writing of vital aspects pertaining to the story. "She shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck, explored the sides of her head." From emotion, to the clear and extensive depiction of crucial literary technique, Petry includes an abundant selection of detail to project and support those aspects; the backbone of "The Street". (Well there's some more personification for you.)
Shifting from a frantic presentation of a "cold November wind" devastating city streets, to the abrupt introduction of an apparent, struggling mother, Ann Petry's "The Street", is constructed with raw imagery, inducing personification and an abundant selection of detail in order to convince the reader that despite the current situation, no matter how unreal and horrific, dedication to an appropriate cause will result in a promising future. Despite the women's already difficult position, Petry takes it a step further and conflicts the 'entity' of wind, against the women with nothing to lose. The battle is undetermined; "The wind held it still for an instant in front of her and then swooped it away until it was standing at an impossible angle on the rod that suspended it from the building." A friend or foe?

Anonymous said...

Kendyl Cutler
Full Analysis of Emily Burgess

Burgess uses 3 very descriptive literary devices such as “dreary imagery, sinister personification, and subtle characterization”. As for dreary imagery, a suggestion is to use a different adjective in order to describe the imagery going on throughout the poem. It’s understood why the adjective was used because Ann Petry does indeed make it sound like a bleak place, but there is a lot going on in “the street” and the definition of dreary is lifeless and dull. “sinister” and “subtle” fit perfectly with the literary devices they were matched with, though. Petry does personify the wind as sinister and evil and the characterization of Lutie Johnson is quite hard to figure out from the small selection of the novel.
The way Burgess incorporates her quotes fit amazingly with the rest of her sentences. She also uses “dual” imagery, which is interesting and different. The only flaw is that “The wind’s finding of bones and ability to ‘[push] them along the curb’” does not really show how it is “auditory imagery”. That is more along the lines of visual imagery. It is true that the people who “’[curse] deep in their throats”’ is auditory imagery.
“Partnering dreary imagery with sinister personification” is a great way to transition into the next paragraph. Again, she uses “two uses” of the same device (personification), which is very unique. She does a fantastic job explaining how Petry characterizes Lutie Johnson by saying how “the wind blew her hair that ‘had been resting softly and warmly against her skin’, providing the image of a girl with seemingly long hair”. The only thing that could be different is the fact that Lutie Johnson is the one being characterized, not the “miserable urban setting” that was explained in the topic sentence.
The analysis was very descriptive and well organized on Burgess’ part. It helped explain what was going on in the short passage given in class. Burgess used three extremely good literary devices and got the point across clearly. There were only a few little flaws, but other than that everything else fit perfectly. This essay defiantly deserves a “8”.

Anonymous said...

Allie Zelinski's Analysis of Michelle Carignan's Analysis of Ann Petry's "The Street"

Shifting from the investigation of personification, to imagery, to diction in “The Analysis of The Street”, Carignan is “eloquent” in using creative quote integration, and sophisticated diction but could work more on varying sentence structure in order to analyze the work of Ann Petry’s “‘The Street.’”
One of Carignan’s main strengths in her essay for The Street is using “specific concrete details and reference to the text” to answer the prompt. By slowly incorporating how “the author has the wind ‘rattle the garbage cans’” shows how she can add quotes without having too much ambiguity and also not having too much summary. As she continues she shows the authors use of “extended and dynamic metaphor embedded throughout the excerpt.” She analyses how the author uses personification to add “more human-like qualities” that sometimes “‘discourage the people walking along the street.’” Carignan does a great job with picking the right words to work in the “unpleasant realities” of the novel.
The flowing and continuous diction she uses to analyze the way the author uses “dynamic personification…gustful imagery” and “abrupt diction” is so carefully chosen “to portray how the wind correlates to the bitter surroundings.” By taking apart each thing Ann Petry uses “to embody the security and shelter one needs…[in] our harsh world” she combines it with well thought-out, “precise verbs” like “allude,” “employs,” and “explore” not making her essay “a dull description” of Ann Petry’s work. She “furthers this decision” by analyzing Petry’s diction in her novel. Although Carignan did a great job using both quote integration and diction, she tended to struggle with different sentence structure in her essay.
Unlike Ann Petry’s writing, Carignan’s paper was, at times, lacking varied syntax. A lot of the types of sentences she uses are based on the same structure. Using great diction was a big part of her paper but it seemed to have some repetitive parts to it. Constantly using words like “convey,” and “employ” could be changed with different synonyms, for example, support and conduct, or engage and exploit. Carignan could use different sentence types that change around the orders of the words. By doing this small correction in her practices she can very easily gain the score of a “9” on the Advanced Placement Rubric. One thing that could possibly be keeping her from reaching that is her lack of sentence variety in this essay. The wizardry sentences Mr. Kefor gave his class would be a good place to start to practice different sentence structure types.
Throughout Carignan’s essay analyzing Ann Petry’s “The Street”, she does a superb job in using many different components that are listen in the “9” section of the AP rubric. The one thing that kept her from receiving that “9” would be the lack of sentence types. After reading the essay and using the rubric to score it, the essay was given an “8” based on the content that the rubric requires. Her essay was well thought-out and very nicely written. It showed a lot of time and effort went into the essay as a whole. She also showed that she did a lot of annotating the actual work to conclude to reasoning and universal idea that she came to. Overall, Carignan seems to be a strong writer with just a few minor things to work on.

Anonymous said...

Ryan Consentino
The Street Analysis

Shifting from scenes of a swirling wind to those of a “cold” Lutie Johnson walking in “The Street”, Ann Petry utilizes seasonal personification, poignant figurative language and a solemn mood in order to convey the “coldness” that nature can have on an individual.
Petry heavily personifies the wind throughout the passage and gives it a life-like body that “swirled in the faces of the people on the street”. As the wind is “fingering” through the street, it is apparent that it is searching to make people feel “suddenly naked”. Petry shows the wind as a human figure that is hurrying people along as it “pried their scarves from around their necks” and blew their coats away”. In this way, the wind is acting coldly on the people by making the street a less than desirable place to be. While the wind is given a type of body, it is also given a certain intellect for its “violent assault” on the people. The wind is shown “twisting the sign” so that it was difficult for Lutie to read it easily. Also, each time she thought she could read it, “the wind pushed it away from her”. In this way, the wind seems as though it is thinking of how to make Lutie’s life difficult by complicating simple things. The way in which the wind is personified shows how harsh and “heavy” nature can be and how it can complicate even the easiest of things in a person’s life.
Petry also expertly incorporates figurative language and uses it to describe each and every effect nature, wind especially, has on people and their environment. With the “cold November wind blowing” throughout the excerpt, it is described in great detail with the diction and syntax used throughout. The wind is compared in the largest sense to a chilly hand because of all of the things it does. It is “fingering” down the street and “lifted” filth off of the ground to fling it into people’s faces and discourage them further. The wind is also shown as a hand when it “grabbed their hats” and “stuck its figures inside their coat collars” in order to make them “cold” and disturb their day with the forces of nature. In this way, the wind is compared to a hand with all of its movements and actions that it imposes onto people to frustrate them.
Petry gives the passage a very somber mood through all of the gloomy descriptions of the night as well as those of the discouraging wind. The wind is what makes the night truly glum as it “rattled the tops of garbage cans” and found “theater throwaways” to fling about the street and confound any vision that people had. The people in the street are “hurried” along in an attempt to keep out of the dreadful night. The mood is very heavily affected by the wind and Lutie feels these direct effects. She is discouraged by the wind when she is unable to read it clearly. This gloominess is created by the extremely swirling wind of the night and it creates a very solemn time for peopled to be out on “The Street”.
Petry heavily uses personification in this excerpt of “The Street” in order to convey a sense of the effects that nature can have on life. Whether spring or fall, weather can always make or break a day. In this excerpt, people are doing all that they can to get out of the harsh November wind and into a warm comfort area symbolizing how one must adapt to any new situation they are placed in.

*~Brittany Anteski~* said...

Brittany Anteski
"The Street" Analysis.

Shifting from physical to intellectual, in "The Street", Ann Petry utilizes pervasive personification, bleak imagery, and abrupt character in order to convey that the wind and “its violent assault” represents the environment’s influence and affect on people.
Petry utilizes pervasive personification to show how the wind engages in a person’s life. The personality of the wind created a dark and violent mood that surrounded those on the streets. Doing “everything it could to discourage the people”, its malicious and sinister flutters terrorized those like Lutie Johnson . Metaphorically, the wind has a mind and agenda to complicate the lives of others. The primary goal of this personified object is to disrupt the natural order of things in a completely organic manor. Leaving no room for argument, playing comical games with its subjects, though eventually “held it still for an instant” showing environments deliberate act to further aggravate the public “it even took time”.
The imagery used in “the Streets” helps create a moving picture for the wind and the destruction it causes. Starting from dark ominous descriptions to deliberate evil the wind and its manipulative personality terrorize the young and old walking around the streets. Describing the “scrap of papers along the street” or the “cold November wind blowing through 116th street”. The imagery helps create the eerie setting and works its way up to one being a potentially mentally and physically disorientating. The imagery creates the story because the wind, that is being personified, is acting with human characteristics as long as setting a constant picture throughout ones mind.
Abrupt characters like Lutie Johnson are tormented by the wind and its swirling behavior. Most of the story is about personifying the wind and how its devious actions take a hold of the streets. Then quickly and affectively, Lutie Johnson, is thrown into the mix and the shift is completely to her. Showing how the environment can most certainly influence and aggravate people but people can still grab hold of the environment and counter act it’s gruesome acts. Lutie is majorly affected by the wind and its disorientating gestures that “blew her eyelashes away” and “swaying back and forth”.
Pervasive personification, bleak imagery, and abrupt character all help to describe the wind and its dark, malevolent and deliberate actions. Using an agenda to distort the lives of those walking in the streets. Using thick, graphic statements on the actions. Also, in the life of the character, Lutie Johnson is thrown and used by the wind’s cruel sense of humor. The environment has its own way of influencing the people just as the people have their own way of influencing the environment.

*~Brittany Anteski~* said...

Shifting from physical to intellectual, in "The Street", Ann Petry utilizes pervasive personification, bleak imagery, and abrupt character in order to convey that the wind and “its violent assault” represents the environment’s influence and affect on people.
Petry utilizes pervasive personification to show how the wind engages in a person’s life. The personality of the wind created a dark and violent mood that surrounded those on the streets. Doing “everything it could to discourage the people”, its malicious and sinister flutters terrorized those like Lutie Johnson . Metaphorically, the wind has a mind and agenda to complicate the lives of others. The primary goal of this personified object is to disrupt the natural order of things in a completely organic manor. Leaving no room for argument, playing comical games with its subjects, though eventually “held it still for an instant” showing environments deliberate act to further aggravate the public “it even took time”.
The imagery used in “the Streets” helps create a moving picture for the wind and the destruction it causes. Starting from dark ominous descriptions to deliberate evil the wind and its manipulative personality terrorize the young and old walking around the streets. Describing the “scrap of papers along the street” or the “cold November wind blowing through 116th street”. The imagery helps create the eerie setting and works its way up to one being a potentially mentally and physically disorientating. The imagery creates the story because the wind, that is being personified, is acting with human characteristics as long as setting a constant picture throughout ones mind.
Abrupt characters like Lutie Johnson are tormented by the wind and its swirling behavior. Most of the story is about personifying the wind and how its devious actions take a hold of the streets. Then quickly and affectively, Lutie Johnson, is thrown into the mix and the shift is completely to her. Showing how the environment can most certainly influence and aggravate people but people can still grab hold of the environment and counter act it’s gruesome acts. Lutie is majorly affected by the wind and its disorientating gestures that “blew her eyelashes away” and “swaying back and forth”.
Pervasive personification, bleak imagery, and abrupt character all help to describe the wind and its dark, malevolent and deliberate actions. Using an agenda to distort the lives of those walking in the streets. Using thick, graphic statements on the actions. Also, in the life of the character, Lutie Johnson is thrown and used by the wind’s cruel sense of humor. The environment has its own way of influencing the people just as the people have their own way of influencing the environment.

*~Brittany Anteski~* said...

Shifting from physical to intellectual, in "The Street", Ann Petry utilizes pervasive personification, bleak imagery, and abrupt character in order to convey that the wind and “its violent assault” represents the environment’s influence and affect on people.
Petry utilizes pervasive personification to show how the wind engages in a person’s life. The personality of the wind created a dark and violent mood that surrounded those on the streets. Doing “everything it could to discourage the people”, its malicious and sinister flutters terrorized those like Lutie Johnson . Metaphorically, the wind has a mind and agenda to complicate the lives of others. The primary goal of this personified object is to disrupt the natural order of things in a completely organic manor. Leaving no room for argument, playing comical games with its subjects, though eventually “held it still for an instant” showing environments deliberate act to further aggravate the public “it even took time”.
The imagery used in “the Streets” helps create a moving picture for the wind and the destruction it causes. Starting from dark ominous descriptions to deliberate evil the wind and its manipulative personality terrorize the young and old walking around the streets. Describing the “scrap of papers along the street” or the “cold November wind blowing through 116th street”. The imagery helps create the eerie setting and works its way up to one being a potentially mentally and physically disorientating. The imagery creates the story because the wind, that is being personified, is acting with human characteristics as long as setting a constant picture throughout ones mind.
Abrupt characters like Lutie Johnson are tormented by the wind and its swirling behavior. Most of the story is about personifying the wind and how its devious actions take a hold of the streets. Then quickly and affectively, Lutie Johnson, is thrown into the mix and the shift is completely to her. Showing how the environment can most certainly influence and aggravate people but people can still grab hold of the environment and counter act it’s gruesome acts. Lutie is majorly affected by the wind and its disorientating gestures that “blew her eyelashes away” and “swaying back and forth”.
Pervasive personification, bleak imagery, and abrupt character all help to describe the wind and its dark, malevolent and deliberate actions. Using an agenda to distort the lives of those walking in the streets. Using thick, graphic statements on the actions. Also, in the life of the character, Lutie Johnson is thrown and used by the wind’s cruel sense of humor. The environment has its own way of influencing the people just as the people have their own way of influencing the environment.

Merry said...

Meredith Davern
Petry Analysis

Shifting from weather to woman “The Street”, Ann Petry utilizes human personification, immense detail, and bleak imagery to give the wind character and “discourage” Lutie from remaining on “The Street”.

The life like personification of nature draws Lutie off of the street, and into the safety of a new home. The wind “drove most of the people off the street” and tries to “discourage” Lutie from remaining outside. “Fingering its way” through buildings and being physically violent; “the wind grabbed their hats…stuck like fingers inside their coat collars”. The wind makes its subject feel uncomfortable, and “naked”. The wind “twisting the sign” at first away from Lutie, but then the wind “held it still”, but only for a moment so that she could read the sign. Realizing her search was over, Lutie found her apartment, and a new warm home.
The use of great detail shows the winds true intrusiveness and power over the story. “The wind lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck…she felt suddenly naked, and bald, for her hair had been resting softly and warmly against her skin.” The wind did just blow past her, but the detail helps to create the winds character. Describing such exact details like feeling “naked” alludes to an uncomfortable feeling out on “The Street”. The exact time of year and street “November wind blowing through 116th street” helps the reader to feel the “rush” of the cold fall wind. The precise use of adjective lends a hand to the feel of the wind not just blowing past people, but violating them. The wind “rattled”, “fingered”, “pushed”, and “grabbed” at pedestrians. The detail makes the windy day seem like an attack. The details truly encourage Lutie to find a warm place to be.
Imagery throughout “The Street” creates a melancholy tone, and really gives the reader the true feel of being there. The detail throughout the passage also helps to create an image. The image of a cold “November” day comes to mind as the wind “rattles the tops of trashcans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows and set them back against the windows.” Not only the images come to life, but so do the sounds. Someone reading would only be able to image a cold autumn day with “violent” wind causing trashcans to rattle and shades to whack against buildings. The image of leaves and scraps of paper “heavy waxed paper that loaves of bread had been wrapped in, the thinner waxed paper that had enclosed sandwiches, old envelopes, newspapers”, and “hats” rolling along the sidewalk. All the imagery shows how uncomfortable and “naked” Lutie felt searching for a new home. “The Street” is portrayed as a “violent”
“The Street” is a tough force to recon with. The wind’s “violent assault” helps to “discourage” Lutie, but the hope of a new home keeps her going. Realistic imagery paints the picture of an unforgiving wind on a cold November day. The use of great detail shows the winds perseverance and determination. The personification makes the wind into a character instead of just a force of nature. All elements are trying to get Lutie off of the “The Street”, and into the safe haven of a new home.

Allie Capprini said...

Allison Capprini's Analysis of Jenna Aries Analysis

Combining insight in imagery, analysis of symbolism, and examples of personification, Jenna utilizes smooth quote integration, could use more sophisticated diction, and should possibly reconstruct the last paragraph in her analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street”, earning her a five out of nine due to good but vague insight, and little variety but adequate sentence structure.
Jenna Aries makes use of descriptive but simple adjectives throughout her analysis that could be improved to more advanced words to help enhance her writing. The use of “vivid”, “realistic”, and “great” in her thesis to describe the devices may be changed to malicious personification, earthy, realistic imagery, and contrasting symbolism to better describe the poetic devices analyzed throughout. In the third paragraph “the wind” is repeated too often, and at the beginning of most sentences. She may replace “the wind” in some instances with pronouns such as “it” to minimize repetitiveness. When describing symbolism Aries uses the adjectives “good” and “evil”, these can be replaced with words such as noble and immoral or innocent and sinful to make the analysis sound classier. This diction could surround the quotes sprinkled evenly during the course of the analysis.
Quotes are strategically placed to help furthermore prove a point. She carefully picks a quote from the excerpt to show an example of the devices, such as how “Lutie ‘shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck’” proves the use of personification. She also integrates adjective from the excerpt to explain how the wind is “’grabbing’, ‘fingering’, and ‘wrapping’” people on the street which exemplifies the use of imagery. The setting is also described as “ferocious winds on ‘a cold November’ night” through the use of a well incorporated quote. There were many examples of perfect quote integration; however the fourth paragraph did not contain any quotes.
The fourth paragraph of the analysis does not contain any quotes and is lacking some detail about “great symbolism”. This paragraph may need to be split up into two paragraphs, one for symbolism and one for a conclusion. Aries ends the analysis by analyzing the effect of the “evil” wind on Lutie Johnson rather than summarizing what she has written about in a well-constructed manner. It may be wise for Aries to either add a few more summarizing sentences at the end of the fourth paragraph, or to add another whole paragraph for a conclusion to allow the reader to see all of the ideas summed up. Also, the paragraph dedicated to the effects of symbolism on the main character does not contain any quotes to back up her reasoning. Where she says “the wind finds terrible ways to stop her from her goal” may be a perfect place to add a quote with an example of something the wind has done to stop her.
With some minor changes and enhancements to this analysis the grade can be brought up without difficulty. Aries had some, but not serious grammar and spelling errors, her thoughts were organized and she had an adequate thesis statement that was a little overly generalized. This analysis has earned a five out of nine due to the lack of a conclusion, average diction, and swift quote integration.

David A. said...

Analysis of Analysis:

In her analysis of “The Street,” Cassie Hynes utilizes proper integration of quotes and a strong analysis, but suggests a weak universal idea in order to convey the effects of the urban setting on the character of Lutie Johnson.
Throughout her analysis, Cassie Hynes employs appropriate and varied uses of her quotes. She incorporates “details about the ‘cold November’ (line 1) including how ‘[the wind] drove most people off the street in the block between Seventh and Eighth Avenues except for a few hurried pedestrians who bent double’” (lines 5-8). Hynes’ varied use of quotes adds to the overall description of the setting. Hynes also uses varied quotes in order to describe the personification of the wind. Hynes states that, “the personification of the ‘wind blowing through 116th street’ (lines 1-2) is most prominent.” Throughout the course of her writing, Hynes consistently uses a varied integration of quotes in order to convey the effects of the urban setting on the character of Lutie Johnson.
Hynes’ strong analysis adds to her overall ability to discuss the effects of the urban setting on Petry’s character, Lutie Johnson. In her first body paragraph Hynes suggests that, “the attention of the sign Lutie is looking at gives the reader an impression of its importance. The sign indicates a vacancy with three heated rooms, translating to the reader that Lutie is looking for a place to stay, and is indeed new to the urban environment.” In her second supportive paragraph, Hynes concludes that “since Lutie Johnson is so unaccustomed to the forceful, humanistic elements of the city and feels ‘naked’ in them, one can safely assume that the girl is not originally from the city and has only been there a short while.” Hynes also vindicates the authors “subtle characterization” by supporting the idea that “one can identify [Lutie Johnson] as an outsider. Had these elements been paired with a stronger universal idea, Hynes’ paper would be indestructible.
Hynes mastered writing style could reach the overall score of a nine had she implemented a stronger universal idea. Hynes’ thesis states, “Shifting focus from the setting to Lutie Johnson in ‘The Street,’ Ann Petry verifies Luties has not been in the city ‘for a long time;’ Lutie’s newness to the area is affirmed through the author’s combination of detailed imagery, elemental personification and subtle characterization.” Hynes nails three key elements of Petry’s piece, but does not fully express the universal idea of Petry’s piece; however, Hynes strongly discusses her three tools and devices.
Although Hynes uses a weak universal idea, her supportive paragraphs strongly vindicate her thesis. It is safe to assume that Hynes would be given a score of seven on her analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street.”

sarapish said...

Sara Pishdadian
Analysis of Matt Remnick’s Analysis


Shifting from a strong thesis to ambiguous supporting paragraphs, in his analysis of the “The Street”, Remnick utilizes strong devices as well as appropriate adjectives to deliver his perspective, but his argument is diminished by his lack of structural organization.

Remnick chooses “evolving personification”, a “morbid, symbolic sense of foreshadowing” and “harsh,bare imagery” as his devices which are suiting for the excerpt and well-supported. His adjectives precisely classify his tools, which gives the reader a specific depiction as well as creating distinctions in the large topics which could be overwhelming. His explanation of the how Lutie Johnson “hasn’t been in the city long, her years of living will have eventually ‘eaten’ her just as the elements have down to paint” is logical, detailed and incorporates quotation well. Remnick utilizes a vocabulary that is sophisticated and suiting, The support is overall superb, and it is clear here that the symbolism of the imagery and personification are being explained.

The transition in the paper from potent thesis to confusing structure creates a rift between the eloquence of Remnick’s argument and its perception. The three devices leads the reader to believe there will be three supporting paragraphs, in the order of “personification”, “foreshadowing”and “imagery”, yet the first paragraph discusses the physical appearance of the sign, followed by imagery and the last sentence of the paper concludes with a discussion of foreshadowing. There is a clear lack of flow, and the argument is diminished since the points trying to be made are not clear but jumbled together. To solve this issue, a distinction between devices is necessary which can be done by creating paragraphs with clear purposes and elaborating more on each topic.

Remnick’s analysis of Petry’s excerpt is interesting as it presents a debatable interpretation. The reasoning behind the claim is fair, and all the proper tools of analysis are present, which is the most difficult aspect of such a a paper. With a greater emphasis placed on the cohesion of the paper, this could be a exquisite essay.

Anonymous said...

Shayna Rahwan
"The Street" Analysis

Transitioning from the general action of the wind to a new character in "The Street", Ann Petry manupulates assulting personification, forceful imagery and abrupt characterization to show the "violent assault" caused by nature that has an effect on civilians.

Petry's use of assaulting personification effects the excerpt by portraying inanimate objects as something real. In the first paragraph, the wind "rattled the top of the garbage cans", "sucked window shades out", and "drove most people off the street". This gives the readers the idea that the wind has some sort of body or body parts. As the excert goes on, the wind starts to develope a mind. The wind gets the ability to "find", "finger" and "take time". Petry is exerting the use of personification by giving the wind human like characteristics. The wind is displayed as a Hunan that is able to do more things than one.

Petry uses the art of imagery to explain the winds actions. At the beginning, the wind is able to "rattle" the top of the garbge cans "suck" window shades. While the wind asserts it's actions, "hurried pedestrians" leave the streets to avoid the "violent" environment. The wind finds "every scrap of paper", such as announcements or advertisements. When Petry introduces Lutie Johnson, she explains how Lutie suddenly feels "naked" when her hair flies off her neck. Most of the characters lose to the wind. The wind has sound it's way to disturb the characters in the excerpt one way or another.

The excerpt beigins with the attention directed on the wind rather than an actual character. In the middle of the excert, Petry focus' the attention on Lutie Johnson, who is trying to find an apartment. She is having a hard time with finding one because of the visious disturbance of the wind. She become uncomfortable with the wind when it lifts her hair off of her neck, making her feel "naked and bald". The wind bothers her eyes making them feel like they are "bathed in a rush of coldness". The wind keeps making Lutie lose focus on everything, such as the sign giving information about an apartment. The wind then settles for a moment giving Lutie the chance to read the sign "rapidly" before "swooping" the sign away. Petry shows how mother nature affects one's day by showing how violent it can be throughout the excerpt.

     

Hayley Beaucage said...

Petry Analysis of Analysis
Hayley Beaucage of Susan Meyer

Shifting from the significant use of characterization, to personification, to selection of detail in “The Analysis of The Street”, Meyer successfully “entangles” sophisticated diction, and strong supporting sentences, yet needs to work on a more fluid direction for quote integration and paragraph transitions to analyze Anne Petry’s “The Street.”

The sophisticated vocabulary employed by Meyer “emphasizes” the overall feel being portrayed in the analysis of Petry’s “The Street.” The rich and continuous diction she uses to analyze the way Petry utilizes “violent characterization, pervasive personification, and abrupt selection of detail” helps specify the claims made by Meyer. Meyer combines her essay with compelling words such as “intellect,” “allude,” and “compelling” to add some variety to help the richness of her essay and to express her viewpoint of the claims she has made. Meyer’s choice of words and usage of this diction did not seem forced throughout her analysis; instead they were strategically placed into her sentences.

Meyer further enhances her analysis through her strong supported sentences. In her first supporting paragraph Meyer incorporates the sentence “The wind strongly demonstrates its power by violently harming these innocent citizens. It powerfully “grabbed” and “pushed” things away from people, stripping them of their belongings.” She then continues to explain this quote and relates it to the universal idea by stating “Petry characterizes the wind in a violent way to emphasize its fearful power.” By explaining her quotes it adds the concrete effect of relating the universal idea that “the mind and body to give the wind a powerful image, because nature is a very strong force that will always have its way.” Meyer’s strong supporting sentences shows she knows what she is talking about and can relate her concepts to the overall idea of “The Street.”

Even though Meyer encapsulates sophisticated diction, and strong supporting sentences, her quote integration and paragraph transitions were much weaker. Starting off some sentences with “Petry writes” is seen as a lower level and so she should first write about what she’s proving and then lead into the quote that helps prove that point. Meyer should try using the technique of sporadically placing one or two word quotes throughout her analysis more often to help portray a variety of sentence structure. The transitions between paragraphs are also lacking some variety and richness. Meyer writes “Petry uses” and “Pervasive personification is used” to start off two of her paragraphs, Meyer should change those transitions into a more a fluid way of switching from one paragraph into another. Meyer should change “Petry uses” to” In “The Street”, Petry emphasizes” just by adding the title and the word emphasizes already makes it sound more sophisticated and less staccato. Using more powerful verbs and adajectives would help Myer’s analysis greater and would make it more fluid.

Throughout Meyer’s analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street”, she does a wonderful job using techniques and components that are incorporated in the high ranked section of the AP rubric. It was just the quote integration and the transitions between paragraphs that kept her from receiving the “9” on the rubric. After going through the essay while also looking at the rubric to help me score it, I would give Meyer a “7” based on the requirements. The essay through was strong with supporting ideas and was well written. She also showed that she understood the universal idea which was showed throughout her essay. Overall, Meyer seems to be a very good writer with just a few minor techniques to add to her work.

Brianna Barrows said...

Shifting from discouraging to sudden hope of tone in “The Street,” Ann Petry utilities direct characterization, austere imagery, and convincing personification to illustrate the attempt of starting a new beginning and how every time Lutie Johnson tried “the wind pushed it away from her.”
In “The Street,” Petry applies blunt characterization to portray the techniques and characteristics of the developing wind. Throughout the poem, the revealing of the wind’s effect on others, its thoughts and feelings, and its actions have become the major emphasis on how the wind becomes characterized. Even though the wind is not a human being, the author gives it the aspects and actions of a human. The characteristics and actions come together and link with one another to push everything away from Lutie and initiate her to think “why, there wasn’t any point” in trying. Petry exploits a process to reveal the personality of the wind and to show how the wind affects Lutie.
Ann Petry uses distinct imagery to illustrate that everything is victimized by the wind, including innate objects. The wind and its actions evoke a concrete image for the audience to have a greater understanding of the meaning in the poem. The author is able to give the wind human-like qualities and a sensation to portray a visual image. When the wind was “twisting the sign away from her,” she noticed “the metal had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood.” The sign, which had been given a visual description, was pushed away from her so she wasn’t certain what it said became a way of the wind making it impossible for her to start a new beginning. Imagery not only helps the audience get an imagination of what is going on, but also gives the poem a deeper meaning.
Persuasive and detailed, the author is able to give the wind a body and have the ability to have mind distinctions. Personification is a use of language to give the innate object, the wind, thoughts and feelings. Petry heavily personified the wind by giving him the actions of “rattling, lifting, pushing, entangling, grabbing, etc.” Using abrupt personification gives the poem a more active and informational diction. All of the wind’s actions are put together at the end to show the meaning of the wind pushing away Lutie’s strive to move on. The personification the author utilized had all individual meanings and explanations, but came together as one idea.
In the poem, “The Street,” the author applies many devices to portray the universal meaning of Lutie trying to start a new beginning. Everyone eventually goes through a period in time where they would like to start over, but something or someone holds them back. Petry uses specific characterization, solemn imagery, and demonstrating personification to show the real meaning of the poem and to create a distinct and original piece of work. Everyone eventually goes through a period in time where they would like to start over, but something or someone holds them back.

Joe Cavanaugh said...

Shifting from the nature’s provocative mood towards reality to the mood of those that are getting suffered in The Street, Ann Petry unifies natures mind which, “pushed (existence) away “ to distract people with numbing chilliness exposing their behavior, dramatizing dreary imagery, ominous personification, and blurring characteristics to the dreaded setting throughout the streets. From the imagery that Petry displays, she presents a gloomy scene of the streets with the wind being the antagonist drifting over the people creating a deathful experience. The wind “rattled the tops of garbage cans” that “drove most of the people off the street” to scare them and to let them know that it owns the streets. It attended the “pedestrians” to flee the streets in fear using “violent assault” against them. From all the years of rain and snow, it composed dark red stain like blood over the years the weather conditions nibbled away at the paint.
Exploiting ominous personification, Petry further emphasizes the deep darkness of nature’s awareness. As the wind is “fingering its way along the curb”, it sways through the streets bounded the bits of paper to swirl into the faces of the people. Nature displays physical feelings such as the “wind touched the back of her neck” addressing a “rush of coldness” against Johnson’s body. The wind begins “twisting” and “swaying” the sign is to counteract Johnson from findings somewhere safe and warm from the blistering cold. Furthering into the character, Petry illustrates the feelings and emotions of the people. From the “dust” and “dirt” that was lifted in the air by the wind, it got into their noses making it difficult to breathe resulting in blinding them and grit stung their skin. The wind “grabbed” their hates, “pried” their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their clothing and blew their coats away attending the people to flee the streets. Petry suppresses dreary imagery, ominous personification, and blurring characteristics to sum up the nature’s feelings toward human society.

Hannah Chisholm said...

Hannah Chisholm
Petry Analysis

Shifting from the scenery to the characters in “The Street”, Ann Petry utilizes malicious personification, metropolitan imagery, and decrepit foreshadowing in order to portray her character, Lutie Johnson, as a character with enough strength to fight the decay and veneer of the urban setting.
Petry is able to show Lutie’s fight against the setting using the personification of the spiteful wind. The wind constantly “pushed” things to and from people and did things like rattling “the tops of garbage cans”. Petry gave it a distinct personality. Right away, it made it clear that Lutie should be there. The wind seems quite territorial, taking a sign and “[pushing] it away from her” so that she could not read it. It was almost as if it wanted to keep her there. It “touched the back of her neck” and even “explored the sides of her head”. Through all of this however, Lutie keeps going. She is able to find the strength to resist the masquerade of “The Street”. The humanistic capabilities give the wind an almost foreshadowing effect, warning of difficulties that will assuredly come in the not so distant future. The wind is a malevolent force that, as Lutie is sure to learn later in the novel, is not to be reckoned with.
Urban imagery contributes to an overall dreary tone that seems impossible for Johnson to overcome. This street had a wind that “drove most people” away and there was “dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk”. These images alone are enough to deter the average person.
Lutie, as Petry consistently persists, resists. She walks through the street ignoring the wind even as it continued “its violent assault”. She was alone on the street “except for a few hurried pedestrians” all of which were hunched over in a struggle to avoid the wind. Lutie made a sincere effort to hold her own. With paper flying through the air, seemingly victims of the wind as well, Lutie made her way to shelter.
The entire excerpt is masterful foreshadowing by Ann Petry. She is able to hint at the future in ways where the reader would almost not even notice. For instance when she describes a sign “streaked with rust where years of rain and snow had finally eaten… the metal” lets the reader know how old of a place this is. While that may be true, it is also true that it is a completely new place for Lutie. The already terrible damage on the sign alone shows the destruction of the past and can only show exactly the condition of the future. Based on this, Lutie was not in for an easy time.
Ann Petry dexterously employs windswept personification, gloomy imagery, and despondent foreshadowing to show Lutie Johnson’s strength in avoiding disaster in her downcast situation.

Anonymous said...

Joshua Willis
Analysis of Hayley Beaucage’s analysis
In her analysis of “The Street”, Hayley Beaucage employs strong support of her thesis and controlling quote integration but however lacks a fine adjective for “imagery”, making the transition between the 1st and 2nd supportive paragraph weak and receiving an overall grade of “7” on the AP scoring guide.
Hayley consistently proves and supports her main idea in almost every sentence. She includes concrete evidence that is not off topic. She relies on restating her main idea without using the same phrase, thus avoiding repetition. She first describes the “‘blinded’ effects” of the wind on the pedestrians. Hayley then continues to analyze and compare these “effects” to “the security of a home”. Also, Beaucage excellently informs the purpose of Lutie’s “blunt introduction” to support her claim.
Furthermore, Hayley utilizes exceptional quote integration. Beaucage demonstrates quotes from the text without having them take all of her claim. She develops good quality sentence structure with carefully placing the quotes for an added variety. However as her analysis progresses, there is a lack of relevance for some of her quotes. These quotes provide no extra significance to her sentences which is a mild problem that Hayley could easily change.
Lastly and most importantly, Hayley’s weak transition from the 1st to 2nd supportive paragraph. From the start of her excellent introduction sentence of the second paragraph, it slowly becomes weaker and weaker. Because of her use of “interconnected” as the adjective for imagery, it doesn’t provide a good distinction between imagery and personification. It seems as though it is just an extension of the 1st paragraph. Because of this, it allows the paragraph to lose some of its strength that the first and third paragraph evidently contain.

Amanda S. said...

Not sure if this is where we are supposed to post the "analysis of analysis" ...but here is Amanda Schleicher's analysis of Kristen Tenglin's analysis...

Directly addressing the appropriate prompt regarding Ann Petry’s excerpt from The Street, Kristen Tenglin utilizes an accurate depiction of the author’s universal idea and an exquisite dissection of the most crucial literary devices, but overwhelms the reader with too many quotes in order to create an analysis that receives an 8 on the Advanced Placement Response Rubric.

Kristen Tenglin finds the universal idea of The Street to be “to illuminate the ‘difficult’ human search for comfort in the midst of a ‘violent environment’.” This idea is an extremely accurate depiction of what the author has intended the main focus to be. Tenglin also does an exceptional job at relating her literary devices to her universal idea. She relates the main idea to “permeating personification” by discussing how the “humanistic characteristics” of the wind illustrate “the toilsome human quest for ease.” Tenglin relates the idea to “seasonal imagery” through the “formidable search for solace among inhospitable surroundings” that is emphasized in the images of the “bleak fall.” Finally, “distinct characterization” is related to the universal idea in Tenglin’s conclusion of “shedding light on the human exploration for consolation amid ferocity.” Overall, Tenglin’s universal idea of The Street is accurate and meritorious, creating strong cause for receiving an 8 on the Advanced Placement Response Rubric.

In her analysis of The Street, Kristen Tenglin considers personification, imagery, and characterization as the main literary devices used by Ann Petry. Not only are these devices crucial in establishing the universal idea, but also in creating a uniqueness to Petry’s story. Tenglin’s analysis of these devices is an excellent dissection of how each one serves to enhance The Street. The permeating personification is brilliantly described as “imparting humanistic characteristics on the wind,” including both physical and mental qualities. Describing the excerpt’s imagery as seasonal, Tenglin stresses the “images of desolation that are associated with winter.” In order to describe the characterization, she emphasizes “the abrupt introduction and description of Lutie Johnson.” Tenglin furthers these devices in such a pristine way that creates an analysis deserving of an Advanced Placement Response Rubric grade of 8.

Although Kristen Tenglin accurately portrays the author’s universal idea and brilliantly describes the effects of the most important literary devices, her overwhelming incorporation of quotes is slightly distracting. Some phrases such as, “the ‘wind’ sweeps ‘it away’ until it appears to be ‘impossible’ to obtain,” incorporate three or more quotes from The Street that are only one or two words in length. Quotes such as these feel forced and not naturally incorporated. Quotes such as “violent,” “wind,” and “heavy,” can easily have been taken from any text. It is the more unique quotes such as “[fingers] its way along the curb,” that serve to enhance an argument specifically for The Street. Tenglin’s excessive use of quotes from the excerpt explain why her analysis receives an 8 on the Advanced Placement Response Rubric as opposed to a 9.

Although Kristen Tenglin attempts to incorporate too many quotes into her analysis, the authenticity of her universal idea and the perfection of her device dissection allow her to receive the near perfect score of 8 on the Advanced Placement Response Rubric.

Emily said...

Emily Boockoff
Analysis of Katie Durst’s Analysis

Pairing a well formatted essay with a less profound message, Katie Durst’s analysis of Ann Petry’s excerpt “The Street” demonstrates strong quote integration, but poor word choice and a weak universal idea resulting in a grade of a “6” on the Advance Placement Rubric.
Quotes are utilized in various, efficient ways throughout Durst’s analysis. Quotes are integrated in the middle, end and beginning of different sentence structures. The violent assault of the wind was efficiently described using the quote integration. When describing the pedestrians on the street and the assault of the wind the quotes “‘grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from their necks, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars’ and ‘blew their coats away from their bodies’” effectively demonstrate the winds effects on the pedestrians. Some quotes were long in length, such as the previous and others were short such as “‘rattled’”, which demonstrates knowledge of good quote integration. Overall, all quotes were used in a good manner through the analysis.
Through out the essay, adjective-noun pairing, along with the choice of some words, could have be improved. In the thesis statement, stronger adjectives could have been used to describe the devices. In the analysis, characterization is not even discussed as a main point, although it is chosen as a main device. There are parts of the essay that do discuss the characterization, but they are not extensive. Characterization would have been a better shift in this aspect. At the end of the first body paragraph, it says “in the end, these humanistic actions”. Characteristics would have helped support the device of characterization. Although there are some words that strengthen the essay, the word choice overall could be improved.
Although the universal idea does make sense, it is too specific to this excerpt. In the universal idea it says “the strong and forceful wind” which is implying the wind from the excerpt, not even wind in general. A tie into the Urban setting of the excerpt would have strengthened the universal idea, since the original question had to do with the setting. The analysis does tie back to the universal idea well, though. In the first body paragraph, the last sentence “In the end...Petry’s story” ties directly back to the universal idea. This technique is very good, and would have been perfect, if the universal idea was stronger.
Overall, Durst’s analysis is effective to the prompt, and insightful. Good quote integration helps to effectively add detail and evidence to the analysis. There is adequate diction, but it could be easily improved. The universal idea is not as effective as it could be, adding to a somewhat weak analysis. This criteria gives Durst a “6” out of “9” on the Advance Placement Rubric.

Dalton Weir said...

Dalton Weir, A
Analysis of Amanda Sullivan’s Analysis

Shifting from descriptive elements more so about the setting to the effect and importance of the wind itself, in her analysis Amanda Sullivan uses precise details and makes satisfying use of quote integration often, but is repetitive with some of those very quotes and a few words each paragraph.
Evident from the beginning of her analysis, Sullivan utilizes an articulate flow to her words and persuasiveness, leading to further examination of not only her work but that of Petry. When talking about the street in general, she describes its “‘hurried pedestrians’” as they “leave the streets to avoid the ‘violent’ environment,” giving even more detail to the story as, “‘the wind found every scrap of paper’, whether it be advertisements, announcements, or old sandwich bags.” Sullivan then delves into making accurate inferences into the original story, still with good use of description saying, “the wind begins to develop not only a body, but a mind to go along with it because of its ability to ‘find’, ‘finger’, and ‘even take time.’” Confident in her analysis and supported by detail, Sullivan further argues her points with statements such as, “[Petry] explains how the wind is personally being bothersome to homes, pedestrians, buildings, and essentially anything that the wind is willing to aggravate.” The use of these truthful and factual details allows for the main idea to remain authentic, helped also with a nice use of quote integration.
Sullivan not only integrates quotes well, but does it from a wide variety of areas of the original piece, and very often in her own analysis. Starting immediately in her thesis saying, “to show the ‘violent assault’ caused by Mother Nature that often ‘discourages’ civilians and inhabitants,” she already has integrated quotes into the argument and it is merely the first sentence. One of the styles of integration is a use of single words from the original work right after one another, giving the facts flat out saying “the wind has a body because it ‘rattled’, ‘sucked’, and ‘drove.’” This form of integration is well informative and unable to be counter argued due to the fact that three quotes were used as one essentially. Another technique incorporated by Sullivan takes a much longer strand of words and finishes of the sentence, allowing the information to once again stand its own argument. This only persuades the argument further towards Sullivan as the quotes are irrefutable, telling how, “…the wind could ‘discourage the people walking along the street.’” Sullivan’s great job and strong detailing with quote integration does her well, but does lead to some instances of repetition.
(PART 1)

Dalton Weir said...

Though it is not a major hindrance to the overall persuasive details Sullivan writes with, there are, at points, sequences of perhaps a repeated quote or adjective. Starting right out at the beginning with two of the devices in her thesis, characterization and personification are hard to not repeat anything of the same nature, seeing as how they are so alike and both speak about the wind. Even though not all of the words repeat, the sense the wind being described twice is subtle but noticeable. There are two instances where almost exact repetition does take place, the first coming from the paragraphs about imagery and characterization. The line, “the hair flies away from her neck, making her suddenly feel ‘naked,’” is very similar to “The wind first lifts the hair from Lutie’s neck, making her feel ‘naked and bald.’” The word “naked” is used both times, though accurately in both cases, still be avoided. The second act of repetition comes from not two separate sentences, but one. The opening sentence of the third supportive paragraph reads, “Perhaps the most important and significant device the Petry applies is natural personification, which is essentially the personification of the wind,” which could be somewhat confusing and certainly redundant. Just stating that natural personification is used in the story suffices for analysis. These minor improvements hardly diminish the overall great job done by Sullivan in her analysis.
With great details and enough evidence to support her thesis, Sullivan does an exquisite job bringing together imagery, characterization and personification to show the power of Mother Nature. Sentence after sentence is packed with sure fact and nearly every sentence has some sort of quote integration furthering the validity. Even with a few minor repetitions, Sullivan’s analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street” simply proves the argument that nature plays a major role on civilians and their habitat.
(PART 2)

Anonymous said...

Alex Gallant
Period C
Analysis of Stacie Linfield's Analysis

Transitioning from a solid thesis to detailed supporting paragraphs in “The Street” analysis, Stacie Linfield employs concise adjectives, persuasive quotes, and direct ideas to utilize her interpretation and analysis of Ann Petry's “The Street” in an organized structure.
Following her strong thesis, the first supporting paragraph was very well explained and analyzed through good quote integration and interpreting the wind's “evil role” in “The Street”. She utilizes how the wind has a “personified” and “symbolic” warning on the pedestrians and buildings on “The Street.” Quote integration is what stands out the most because she is using them in a way of interpreting how the wind “assaults pedestrians” rather than throwing in a quote and then explaining what it means. This further helps the reader understand how the wind affects everything in the city and has clever quotes integrated into the analysis to make it more sharp and interesting.
In the second supportive paragraph, Linfield discusses the kind of language and vocabulary Petry uses in “The Street”. She also employs how the language influences the “consistent theme” and “setting” in the story, integrating the “unwelcoming words” such as “violent” and “assault”. Linfield continues to explain how these chilling words affect the reader's grasp of “vulnerability” given in the story. The impressive analysis of how the story gives off an “inhumane feeling” allows the reader a better understanding of the story summed up a few short words. At the end of the paragraph, it is reminded to the reader one last time a summary of how Petry uses “interesting symbols and diction”.
Linfield utilizes the “chilly imagery” in the last supporting paragraph and how it “ties all the devices together” to give the reader a visual understanding of how Ann Petry's imagery affects the outlook on the city. Although there isn't as many quote integrations as the paragraphs before, she relies more on her analyzing skills rather than using clever quotes to explain the story. The “cold and unforgiving” feel given to Lutie Johnson was briefly but adequately explained to the reader through Linfield's analysis of how there is no “friendliness or warmth” described about her and the city.
In closing, Stacie Linfield repeats the message given of her thesis in her closing paragraph and briefly explains how the environment of the city is “inhospitable” and introduces the diction, imagery, and personification used in “The Street” one last time to the reader as a closing.

Anonymous said...

Evan DaSilva's Analysis on Kristen MacGrays Analysis!


Shifting from suggestive characterization, to combative imagery, to finalizing with vast personification, in her analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street”, Kristen MacGray is successful with quote integration as well as strong literary devices, but could have been more efficient with a stronger use of diction throughout her piece.
Throughout her analysis, MacGray has a smooth transition when it came to quote integration, which was foreseen as her strongest attribute to the essay. Within her second paragraph, Macgray states “Since ‘there wasn’t any point’ in looking at a place with only two rooms”; this is a clear indication right from the start of her supportive paragraphs that she is efficient with the integration of her quotes. Later in her analysis, MacGray continues her smooth quote integration as she says “The wind ‘rattled the tops of garbage cans,’ ‘sucked window shades’ and “grabbed their hats.”; this shows that Macgray is not getting lazy throughout her piece, and she continuously uses a strength of hers to her advantage to ultimately benefit her writing. Along with strong quote integration were her literary devices, which were the strongest she could have possibly used in relation to this piece.
Kristen uses characterization, imagery, and personification efficiently to the extent that she has the ability to reinforce the universal idea that there “’isn’t any point’ in looking”. MacGray states that “Petry uses an abrupt shift to describe the character of Johnson by suddenly stating how ‘her hair had been resting softly and warmly against her skin.’”; the use of characterization in this aspect helps the reader understand what is going on, which emphasizes the characterization that she is trying to get across. MacGray also ties in imagery in her piece, shown in “The metal that ‘had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood’ on the sign is a gloomy and dark image to create a sense of danger or alertness.”; Macgray is further progressing on the imagery that Petry is getting across in her piece. Her device that she concluded with was personification, which she used efficiently, shown when she states “Johnson is ‘suspended’ from doing what she ultimately wants to do because of the ‘violent assault of the wind.’”; MacGray uses the constant personification to her advantage in getting the universal idea across, but her diction throughout holds her analysis back from being and 8 or a 9 on the AP scale.
MacGray has great structural and analytical skills, but her vocabulary is the one thing standing in her way from achieving the ultimate goal on the AP scale. She uses words like “bad” in her first supportive paragraph, which in context could easily be replaced with unfavorable or poor, which would make it sound more sophisticated. As the analysis progresses, MacGray continues to use simple vocabulary, which hurts her essay to a slight degree, but with her structure and style, she can still do well on the AP exam. Good job Kristen

Anonymous said...

Petry's Analysis of Analysis
Kim Lynch of Matt Kelley

Balancing from the significant use of personification, imagery and selection of detail in “Analysis of the Street”, Matt Kelley successfully “aimed towards” strong parity quote integration, appropriate adjectives and sophisticated diction, but yet lacks transition between paragraphs in order to analyze Anne’s Petry’s “The Street.”

The fluid direction of quote integration produced by Kelley “attacks” the overall concept of how the “‘cold November wind’” compares to “life’s obstacles.” He picks out rich quotes to sprinkle in his analysis and to show examples of the devices. For example, “the wind left the street sign with a mark that was a ‘dark red stain like blood,’” proves the use of personification. The wind shows human like features which corresponds in the quote. By integrating verbs from the excerpt into his analysis helps show how the wind “rattled”, “forced” “sucked” and “grabbed” the people off the street which demonstrates imagery.

Kelley employs relevant adjectives to show his perspective of the analysis. By using the adjectives “dark”, “violent” and “terrifying” shows that the wind is a “‘violent assault’ on the street.” The adjectives shows the outline of the whole piece of writing. Kelley combines sophisticated vocabulary such as “villainous”, “illustrates”, “aggressively” and “pursuit” to complete his ideas of the analysis. Instead of having the adjectives in one place, Kelley tactfully spread them out in his supporting sentences.

Even though Kelley has strong quote integration and sophisticated diction, he lacks on paragraph transitions. By linking all the devices together would make it more fluid and be constructed as a whole. This would help with the organization of the whole structure and come up with more variety of sentence structure. Making the transitions through one paragraph to the next allows the analysis to be more fluid.

Throughout Kelley’s analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street”, he does a astonishing job employing enhanced techniques and components. Even though there was a few minor mistakes with the transition between paragraphs, the overall analysis showed high level of writing skills. He gave supported examples to get a better understanding of the universal idea. I would give Kelley an eight based on the AP rubric.

Anonymous said...

Kristen MacGray
Analysis of Emily Bookoff's Analysis

In Emily Bookoff’s analysis of “The Street,” she efficiently incorporates a comprehensible structure and appropriate adjectives but fails to integrate her quotes in a fluent way leading to an overall grade of a 7.5 on the Advanced Placement rubric.
The comprehensible structure of Emily’s analysis allows for a better understanding and an easy read. She sets the analysis into separate paragraphs for each device. She dedicates three body paragraphs for each of the three devices. This dedication of structure allows one to fluently read the analysis without complications.
The chosen adjectives that Emily integrated to her devices help the reader in further understanding the “The Street.” She implements “environmental imagery, violent personification and ominous foreshadowing” in her analysis. “Environmental” is strongly associated with imagery throughout the story. The imagery relates to ‘a cold November wind’ throughout so environmental is a key word for it. The wind ‘rattled tops of garbage cans [and] sucked window shades out’ which is affiliated to Emily’s choice of violent to describe the personification. Ominous is utilized to describe foreshadowing which is correctly used because ‘the wind pushed the sign away’ indicating that something may happen causing her not to have to move. Applying applicable adjectives to her devices is a strong quality to Bookoff’s writing.
The inept addition of quotes generates an overall lacking effect to the analysis. She includes whole sentences such as ‘the wind lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she suddenly felt naked’ which adds a deficient effect. Instead, she could integrate part of a quote for better quality. Emily also follows up a quote with a frequent explanation directly after. A phrase like “this imagery” deteriorates from the quality of a piece of work. Rather than explaining a quote with a conventional claim, include a quote within an explanation. Also, the use of short quotes is more fluent rather than a whole sentence. By fixing the integration of quotes, the overall grade would be higher.
Emily Bookoff’s exertion of a comprehensible structure and appropriate adjectives helps to further demonstrate her universal idea of “The Street.” The analysis lacks an eloquent integration of quotes which reduces the overall grade. The combination of these elements deserves a grade of a 7.5 on the rubric.

Anonymous said...

Colleen Burke's Analysis of Samantha Gaglio's Analysis

Shifting from apprehension contributed by continuous quote integration to disconnected sentences in her analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, Sam Gaglio appropriately applies forceful quote integration and in-depth analysis but fails to conjoin her sentences together to get her point across, making the analysis somewhat choppy, earning a grade of “7” on the Advanced Placement Rubric.

Gaglio’s dominant quote integration depicts her ability to drop bits and pieces into her analysis, making the quotes flow nicely. “It viciously ‘grabbed their hats, pried their scarves’ off the people”, this sentence alone shows Gaglio’s imperative integration, making it seem as if this sentence does not contain a quote. Each individual quote is simply added into each intelligibly recognizable within each integration.

Her in-depth analysis illustrates her absolute understanding of the excerpt. “Petry’s portrayal of the characters with use of personification and imagery” depicts the image of what is happening within the story and displays a clear picture of the literary devices used in the excerpt. Gaglio’s intricate attention to detail throughout her analysis makes the dissection of this section of The Street more substantial because the reader can pull apart and understand the story just from reading a condensed analysis.

Gaglio’s analysis lacked connection between her sentences, sometimes making it hard to follow what exactly was being said and how she was trying to say it didn’t always make the most sense and could have phrased certain sentences differently, making it easier for the reader to follow. Even though, her quote integration was on point when used almost in every instant, the sentences still seemed to be rather choppy, leaving the reader to try and decipher what exactly the sentence is trying to portray.

Continuously throughout her analysis, Gaglio uses thoughtful quote integration, thorough analysis to subsequently paint the reader a picture of what Petry is trying to describe to her readers that nature will do whatever it can to stop individuals from getting what they want and makes their lives very difficult. However Gaglio’s choppy sentences made a good analysis of a particular excerpt rather hard to pull apart because of the difficulty of following what she is trying to say.

Chengqi Gao said...

Analysis of Peter Le's Analysis
(Assigned person has not yet finished)
Shifting from a simple harsh assault on the wind to a more satanic description, Peter Le utilizes descriptive adjectives, relevant comparisons, and a thought provoking points to validate his idea of the nature’s “influence” over “an individual,” even at times when the individual is in control.
Le starts out by giving a simple, direct description of the wind, stating that it is “harshly aggressive” and having a “dynamic force.” Building off from this description, he leads one to draw the conclusion that there is a “greater sense of foreboding” than Petry gives. The wind having “its own sinister tomfoolery.” He gives an accurate example of such tomfoolery, when the wind had ‘time to rush through doorways’ and the ‘pushing’ of ‘signs’ away from Lutie.
The utilization, as well as explanation of relevant comparisons contributes to his analysis of the universal idea. He compares the wind to that of “an imp or minor demon.” This accurately describes the “nature and magnitude of the wind” as imps or minor demons are generally known to be launch ‘violent assaults’ and ‘barrage’ people.
Peter Le further develops his topic through constant quotes that give support to his points. He states that the wind “takes pleasure in causing discomfort and pain” and parallels that with “a scene of torture.” Although he gives an excellent example of supporting evidence, he deviates from his thesis of “the influence of nature” to that of “the dark intentions that nature deigns to subject man to.”
I award Peter Le, in accordance with the AP scoring rubric, a score of seven. He gives an intelligent analysis, with an effective thesis that is logically ordered. However, he misses the “how” and the “why” tending to concentrate more on the “what.”

Eric Forman said...

Petry Analysis of Analysis:
Eric Forman of Colleen Burke

Beyond the graceful and various sentence structures within her analysis of “The Street”, Colleen Burke’s delivery of ambiguous adjectives of the chosen devices and insertion of lackluster quotes lead to the unfortunate downfall of an interesting and unique interpretation of the passage’s “internal and external worlds”.
Priming the course of her analysis of “The Street”, Burke employs ambiguous and bland adjectives to describe each of the devices used, leading to a lack of definitive variations of support for her universal idea in each of her paragraphs. Choosing “’blinded’ selection of detail and ‘original’ personification” as her devices, Burke causes her analysis to become confusing and misconstrued. Precisely, the reader is left wondering what in fact “blinded” has to do with the selection of detail and why “original personification” is utilized when personification is always original, no matter the work alluded to. Oddly, Burke decides not even to acknowledge the supposed “earthy imagery” in the analysis and treads lightly upon the devices she actually had used. If indeed her first body paragraph was meant to define the “earthy imagery”, “the curb” and “the dancing paper…in the air” isn’t entirely “earthy”. Simply, Burke should use more specific adjectives to describe the devices; this would make the analysis much easier to express.
“Forcing” lackluster quotes into her analysis, Burke inadequately describes the purpose of each of the devices used in “The Street. When analyzing the selection of detail within “The Street”, Burke inaccurately and redundantly uses “it” as to support the device. Coalescing better with the personification of the passage, “it” is used more as a pronoun for Burke than a corroborating quote when used to support her paragraph about the selection of detail. To enhance this paragraph, Burke should actually reference the detail instead of mentioning what “the detail…elects throughout the excerpt”. In general, Burke should try to quote words and phrases that which add to her validation of the device rather than inserting random quotes from the passage.
Fortunately, Burke uniquely expresses a universal idea of “The Street”, declaring that there are “internal and external worlds” that which are portrayed; the one that which is the mind of Lutie Johnson and the one that which is the seemingly humanistic environment. Although not coherently conveyed much within the analysis, Burke still maintains a universal idea that reasonably envelopes the main idea of “The Street”.
Progressing throughout the analysis, Burke makes many valid points regarding “The Street”, but unfortunately does not successfully support her unique and sensible universal idea enough to convince the reader of her analysis; she employs feeble adjectives to describe the devices and lackluster quotes. Burke is still successful though in designating diverse sentence structures to make her analysis flow and her facts within these sentences do somewhat pertain to the devices of each of the paragraphs. Yet, because of her vagueness and “painstakingly” subtle connection from the facts to her universal idea, I would award Burke a 5 on the AP rubric. I believe that if Burke had used less imprecise facts and quotes, utilized better adjectives for her devices, and related back to her universal idea more often, then she would have easily earned a 7 or even an 8 on the AP rubric.

Anonymous said...

Shifting from setting description to character development in The Street, Ann Petry employs stark imagery, tangible personification, and elegant figurative language in order to establish Lutie Johnson's connection to “every scrap of paper along the street.”
Through the use of such vivid imagery, the world of Lutie Johnson explodes to life. The blustery scene is set with window shades [sucked] out through the tops of opened windows” and “bits of paper dancing high in the air”, creating a very bleak mood within the passage. This descriptive language serves to augment Lutie's relationship with the metropolis she calls home.
Petry is highly adept at imparting human qualities to inanimate objects, and does so perfectly in The Street. The most notable use of personification is in the description of the wind, which “[fingers] its way along the curb” and “[rushes] into doorways and areaways”. Wind does not rush, and it certainly does not finger; Petry uses this technique to bring the scene to life in the mind of the reader.

- Ian Mallor

Brianna Barrows said...

Brianna Barrows
Analysis of Emily Christy's Analysis

Shifting from a transparent and simple thesis statement to distinctive and more expressive body explanations in her analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street,” Emily Christy portrays the utilization of quotes and specific adjectives describing the literary devices but fails at providing accurate sentence structure and flowing paragraphs.

The equitable and rigorous exertion of quotes extracted by Emily gives the analysis of Petry’s “The Street” more of a sense of knowledge and direct meaning. The technique of quotes helps bond the analysis and excerpt together and create an overall understanding. The explanatory quotes including, “lifted,” “dancing,” “slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood,” and “if it was three, why, she would go in and ask to see it, but if it said two-why, there wasn’t any point,” show that they may either be brief or sustained because both ways have their own distinct and complex explanation. Having more than one quote per a paragraph demonstrates Emily’s concrete knowledge and analysis techniques of “The Street,” which give her work more emphasis. Throughout the analysis, there were no points where the quotes were not correctly used or not needed to show explanation.

The rich and enhanced use of adjectives and vocabulary directly illustrate the importance of specific sentences and create a visual imagination. The adjectives suppressed, including “hast,” “dull,” “sinister,” and “forceful,” are not excessively denouncing to the audience but give the analysis particular meaning. Emily presents herself as knowing how to suggest simple, yet symbolic adjectives for literary devices to value the phrase. The in-depth vocabulary vacillates comprehensive feelings and understandings toward the excerpt and reveals a certain, unique diction. She is able to present informative and eloquent vocabulary without heavily overpowering the technique and precisely using it where needed.

After successfully selecting objective quotes and embellishing vocabulary, Emily chooses uncertain sentence structure and portrays weak flow throughout the analysis. Sentences starting with “but,” “proving,” and the beginning of a quote produce an unprofessional language and makes the reader think the sentence isn’t constructed properly. The explanation of a quote, saying “to show that even though the wind is being aggressive towards everyone it gives a view of hope that she will either find sanctuary or not find it there,” comes off as if it should be a part of another sentence and consist of a meaning towards something. If some of the quotes had direct quote integration and had phrases before conjunction words, a more successful response would be made towards the analysis. Even though these indiscretions didn’t give the entire piece a work a negative perspective, it diverts attention from the overall meaning and hard work put into it.

Emily Christy provides certain requirements and techniques assimilated in the high-weighted Advanced Placement Rubric throughout her analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street.” She would earn a “7,” for she made a few mistakes throughout her work. Even though her writing was consistent and powerful analysis, there were several punctuation errors with putting a period where it doesn’t belong; paragraph four, between “point” and “to.” Some of her quote integrations were not properly portrayed and became a factor of keeping her from getting a “9” on the scale. Emily has some minor mistakes in her analysis, but the overall meaning and information that comes from her work produces a positive impression.

Katie Durst said...

Katie Durst
Catherine Worrall's Analysis

Based on Ann Petry's work of “The Street”, Catherine Worrall applied to her analysis using the appropriate literary devices to create exceptional supporting paragraphs; however, her universal idea and use of quotes were not as strong and apposite to achieve a perfect score.

While writing her analysis, Catherine Worrall employed strong literary devices that helped her in writing well supportive paragraphs. Her use of “stormy imagery”, “extreme personification”, and “flawless diction” all supported the idea of how the wind has the human-like qualities to demolish the streets and physically come in contact with Lutie Johnson. Personification was her best used device as it was “noticeably evident throughout the entirety of the excerpt”, giving her exquisite examples to support her statement. Her use of imagery and diction were also beneficial as she pointed out the aggressiveness and visual actions of the wind, as well as the harassment of Lutie Johnson. Finding the evidence of the chosen literary devices helped Worrall in proving her statement, giving her an exceptional score in writing well supportive paragraphs.

Worrall's analysis proves that she has the ability to find and support her argument; but her universal idea was shown to be little broad. It was a little weak as far as structure and detail; however, she was able to support it by conveying that the wind “guided the main character of Lutie Johnson to a possible new home, an object clearly of her desires, possibly changing her life for the better or for the worse.” This is what makes her paragraphs exceptional as far as being able to support her point. If Worrall's universal idea was a little more specific and not as broad, she would earn a perfect score for her thesis statement as a whole. She has the ability to back up her claim using complementary examples as a support system.

As far as her usage of quotes, she shows the skill in her integration within her supporting paragraphs. “As the wind “touch[es] the back of her neck, explore[s] the sides of her head”, it is evident that Lutie is constantly in contact with the wind.” Worrall was able to analyze and annotate her use of the quote without explaining her choice as “This quote means...” or “This quote is being used because...”. The only weakness in using her quotes is that she doesn't provide enough affirmation to support her paragraphs. She does use a good amount of quotes; however, using “warmly”, “swirled” and “twisting” may not be enough in some cases for the proof of her argument. She is excellent in providing support in her own words, but conveying the support in quotes may require a little improvement.

Overall, Catherine Worrall's analysis as a whole turned out to be very exemplary. Her analysis proves that she does have the capability of supporting her claim. It's only her quotations that may need to be improved to make a stronger integration. Her literary devices were very strong as far as her superior adjectives to describe them. She also provoked with a well thought out shift to begin her thesis statement. As a result, I would grade Catherine's analysis a seven out of nine; beyond improving in the universal idea and choice of quotations, this analysis of “The Street” was commendable, admirable, and very well done.

susan said...

Susan Meyer's Analysis of Joe Cavanaugh's Analysis

Cavanaugh establishes his three main focuses to comment on Petry’s short story “The Street”, however, while establishing these focuses, he could improve his writing by bringing up the topic of the upcoming paragraph at the end of his previous paragraph, alluding to what is up next. The last sentence of Cavanaugh’s analysis says, “From all the years of rain and snow, it composed dark red stain like blood over the years the weather conditions nibbled away at the paint”, though this does contribute to his analysis of “The Street”, Cavanaugh could improve his writing simply by adding on a closing sentence to wrap up his paragraph and introduce his upcoming focus. By repeating this process at the end of each paragraph, Cavanaugh could improve his writing significantly. Cavanaugh’s analysis overall, explained exactly what needed to be explained, in doing so, he was very successful. The strong quote integration and sophisticated diction contributed gratefully in his analysis, though the overall flow of his analysis was slightly choppy. For this reason, Cavanaugh would most likely receive a 7 on the AP rubric, which is a good score, overall! To strengthen his analysis, in order to receive a 9, Cavanaugh should elaborate on the quotes that he successfully uses as well as smoothly transition his paragraphs, throughout his work. Cavanaugh successfully fulfilled the requirements of the rubric to earn a good grade on the rubric.

susan said...

Susan Meyer's Analysis of Joe Cavanaugh's Analysis

Cavanaugh establishes his three main focuses to comment on Petry’s short story “The Street”, however, while establishing these focuses, he could improve his writing by bringing up the topic of the upcoming paragraph at the end of his previous paragraph, alluding to what is up next. The last sentence of Cavanaugh’s analysis says, “From all the years of rain and snow, it composed dark red stain like blood over the years the weather conditions nibbled away at the paint”, though this does contribute to his analysis of “The Street”, Cavanaugh could improve his writing simply by adding on a closing sentence to wrap up his paragraph and introduce his upcoming focus. By repeating this process at the end of each paragraph, Cavanaugh could improve his writing significantly. Cavanaugh’s analysis overall, explained exactly what needed to be explained, in doing so, he was very successful. The strong quote integration and sophisticated diction contributed gratefully in his analysis, though the overall flow of his analysis was slightly choppy. For this reason, Cavanaugh would most likely receive a 7 on the AP rubric, which is a good score, overall! To strengthen his analysis, in order to receive a 9, Cavanaugh should elaborate on the quotes that he successfully uses as well as smoothly transition his paragraphs, throughout his work. Cavanaugh successfully fulfilled the requirements of the rubric to earn a good grade on the rubric.

Melanie Huynh said...

Analysis of CHRIS ROBINSON'S Analysis

Combining sophisticated diction and good transitions with a weak selection of quotes in his analysis of Ann Petry’s excerpt from The Street, Chris Robinson wrote a superb essay but fails to answer the exact prompt in his thesis, leading him to receive a 7 on the Advanced Placement Response Rubric.

Chris begins his essay with a uniquely structured thesis statement, putting his universal idea, “even in the hardest of times, one should continue to push forward”, in the middle instead of at the end. Chris uses words and phrases that are not exactly common. He claims that Petry “induces” reader’s recognition to the wind. He recognizes that the wind was given a “mind and body.” In search for their “sanctuaries”, Chris correctly identifies the character’s struggle to escape from the “chaotic atmosphere.” Furthering his good choice of vocabulary, Chris does a great job transitioning from paragraph to paragraph.

Making an essay flow, a task that is often found difficult by writers, Chris achieves magnificently. He does a great job connecting each device to the next, “personification can be further reflected upon through another crucial tool: imagery.” He then expounds upon his claim that Petry “continues to support her claim” at the beginning of the proceeding paragraph. Continuity and fluidity are crucial to a piece of writing. Despite his pleasing diction and transitions, Chris unfortunately chooses unrelated quotes for to support his devices.

Quotes are an important part of an analysis and though Chris uses many of them, most are irrelevant to the particular device he was addressing in a given paragraph. In the first paragraph, he quotes “chicken bones and pork chop bones” but should have instead focused on the wind “finding” those items in the street. In his second paragraph, Chris provides a vivid description of the setting for the excerpt but does not employ appropriate quotes. Instead he quotes “the violent assault” of the wind, which does contribute to the setting but does not exactly pertain to imagery. He put in a valiant effort to incorporate quotes in his writing but unfortunately had a poor selection of them.

Anonymous said...

Chris Robinson
English A

Chris Robinson’s Analysis of Peter Lee’s Analysis of The Street

Transition between “evolving personification” and the balancing of “violent imagery and palpable descriptions” throughout his analysis, Peter Lee emphasizes a strong use of vocabulary, and a hardy constitutional sentence structure, although he lacks a conclusion to his essay, but still earns an “8.5” as a grade. Lee displays a colorful vocabulary throughout his analysis, bolstering his supportive theme. Words such as “palpable” and “insistence” are portrayed in his thesis alone to further strengthen his major topics of imagery and descriptions, and personification. Lee further induces his audience to continue reading through his supporting paragraphs. He preaches his thoughts backed by the use of such words as “cognitive” and “deign” to relate how the wind “interacts with [humans]” in its surroundings. Lee’s creative ideas are braced by his choice of words, but that alone doesn’t fulfill his analysis. His ideas are further forged through another subtle key role of his essay: sentence structure.
Lee’s sentence, and overall, structure is unparalleled in terms of repetition, highlighting key points, and addressing different items of his subjects. Specifically in his first defending paragraph, Lee perfectly integrates his thoughts of the wind as “a dynamic force”, yet “a character in itself” without once repeating or stumbling over his writing. As he fortifies his claims, Lee develops his main points of “[characterizing]…the wind” through a “cognitive mind” and a “force”. He hits these points with haste and efficiency, especially since these are two different aspects of the same subject, and constantly talking of only the main subject without any definition grows to be a bore.
Though acquiring an excellent vocabulary and a robust structure, Lee lacks but one essential: a conclusion. His last paragraph is a mighty piece of work explaining the devoted “effort [in the] description” of Petry’s The Street. Lee compares the wind “with an imp or a minor demon”, and delivers the fact that the wind takes “pleasure in causing discomfort and pain”. Though a well-built foundation, Lee leaves the reader hanging. His concluding sentence to his final paragraph seems to lead to another reinforcing body. He reveals “the dark intentions that nature deigns to subject man to” as his closing, suggesting a new paragraph is to begin. Although this paragraph doesn’t exist, according to the essay, Lee still flexes his muscles in the final sentence of his final supporting body. Through varying and strengthening vocabulary, and a powerful base, although deprived of a concluding piece, Peter Lee artfully displays and proves his thesis statement in his analysis of The Street.

Anonymous said...

Steve Burrill's analysis of Christina Domaldo's analysis

In this essay, Christina Domaldo incorporates superior structural flow but fails to integrate diverse quotation use as well as support for her beliefs with an intuitive deeper meaning which results in a 7 for the essay.

Christina’s superb knowledge of the excerpt is clearly portrayed through her utilization of quote integration and intense vocabulary. Christina accurately uses prevalent personification to set up a wonderfully flowing first paragraph. Christina precisely portrays the wind as “Cold” and “violent” to prove that it is a dark force. Christina also shows that the wind has human capabilities by stating that the wind “found every scrap of paper along the street.” Words such as “fingering” and “pried” are also utilized to prove that the wind has human qualities. Christina is also able to take command of complex vocabulary words and correctly inserting them into her sentences. The rich vocabulary plotted throughout the essay instills a sense of a greater understanding of the subject. Ultimately, Christina’s superb structural command and advanced choice of wording allows her to deliver her thoughts perfectly.

Throughout the essay, Christina is able to insert quotes to make her sentences flow nicely, but unfortunately the redundant use of the same quotes in her essay takes away from the diversity of the sentences. This is a re-occurring problem that arises towards the end of the essay. Christina repeatedly uses the same quotes, such as “found every scrap of paper along the street” and “it did everything it could to discourage the people walking down the street.” Rather than using the quote “found every scrap of paper along the street” more than once it would have been a wiser choice to use a different quote to portray the wind such as: “the wind grabbed their hats” or “pushed them along the curb.” These quotes are diverse, but at the same time are able to adequately prove the same point. The superfluous use of the same quotes throughout Christina’ essay diminishes the potency of her essay, but this problem can ultimately be solved by finding some diverse quotes.

In order to further improve her essay Christina must develop a more sophisticated and insightful deeper meaning. The deeper meaning used in her thesis is weak and doesn’t really have any meaning at all. Rather than explaining the winds human characteristics in her thesis, Christina should attempt to develop a more worldly meaning. A good universal idea that could be developed is how the wind is utilized as a symbol to show that one may be presented with split second chances that they must capitalize on. Using a deeper meaning such as this would set the tone of the essay, a place where Christina’s sophisticated writing would be able to flourish. Another minor change that would improve the overall composition of Christina’s essay would be inserting the deeper meaning of each essay at the end of every paragraph. For example, the first paragraph talks about the use of personification to give the wind humanistic features. At the end of this paragraph, there should be a recap of this main idea, just worded in a different manner. Some of the opening statements of the paragraphs are also weak and could be strengthened by stating a stronger main idea.

Christina is able to integrate enhanced vocabulary to augment the structural flow of her essay but at the same time the lack of quote variation and an advanced deeper meaning take away from the appeal of the essay. By installing a solid deeper meaning Christina will be able to eliminate most of the problems occurring in her essay. The reiteration of this strong deeper meaning in her body paragraphs will surely develop her essay into a very excellent essay. If Christina is also able to find new quotes to insert throughout her essay she will find herself with a great essay that is well deserving of a 10.

Catherine Worrall said...

Catherine Worrall on Allie Zelinski


Shifting from a promising thesis to a weak analytical defense in her analysis of “The Street,” Allie Zelinski utilizes strong overarching ideas, but unfortunately creates many grammatical errors and employs overly simplistic language, earning her analysis a score of 6 on the Advanced Placement rubric.

With a universal idea of “a place can be a ‘violent assault’ on ‘the people on the street’”, Allie clearly shows her understanding of fluid quote integration and basic essay structure, and pairs them both with well thought out analysis. As the reader progresses through the analysis, Allie’s knowledge of structure and ability to find deeper meaning within the passage becomes evident. She states that the people of the street may be “somewhat frightened by the ‘rattled…tops of garbage cans’”, evidently showing her capability of deeper reading. Her natural ability to discover content and communicate it in an effective way shines throughout her analysis, but is unfortunately overshadowed by her grammatical mistakes and simplistic language.

Unfortunately, by making a noticeable error in the title of the passage (she writes: “’The Sreet’”), Allie’s analysis quickly makes a downfall. Her evident mistakes in spelling and grammar make the essay seem disorganized and written without care. These mistakes are mainly comprised of an excess use of commas, such as “The wind, then, starts to,” and “since the author is using such complex imagery mixed with some simple imagery, as well, it gives the wind a physical image.” Her ability to discover content cannot be shown to its full potential while it is masked by many and obvious careless mistakes, which not only distract from the content of the essay, but may put off an Advanced Placement reader.

Further lowering her score, her reliance upon common and comfortable, yet extremely simplistic language can make the analysis at times seem juvenile. Her potential is not pushed to its maximum, and the essay evidently shows her insecure reliance upon comfortable language. The content is relayed in a way that makes it seem extremely informal, rather than an Advanced Placement analysis. She straightforwardly states: “It is ironic that Petry portrays the wind as a physical thing because wind cannot be seen.” Though thought and analysis is unmistakable, Allie’s diction is rather simple; nothing special. Allie’s thoughts are valid; her analytical statements are well thought out, but her common and informal language makes the essay appear informal.

By allowing the reader to understand her complex thoughts and ideas easily, Allie shows that she is more than capable of performing well on an Advanced Placement analysis. But, her grammar and diction are things that will need to be improved upon, for the mistakes distract from the essay, and the language may make it virtually juvenile. Because of her clear understanding of the prompt, but varied mistakes throughout, Allie Zelinski’s analysis of “The Street”, earns a 6 on the Advanced Placement rubric.

Kristen Tenglin said...

Analysis of Amanda Schleicher’s Analysis of “The Street”

Portraying a deep understanding of the text in her analysis of “The Street”, Amanda Schleicher pervasively reiterates the universal idea and employs rich syntax including a multiplicity of quotations in order to override the trivial lack of transitional phrases between paragraphs and achieve a nine on the Advanced Placement rubric due to the “stylistic finesse” displayed throughout.
All encompassing within the analysis of “The Street” is the depiction of “the weather’s ‘violent assault’ and its power ‘to discourage’ one from acting as they normally would.” The universal idea is restated in a variety of ways and the analysis utilizes an array of approaches to ensure that the idea remains “fresh”. Amanda reaffirms the accuracy of the main idea in each supportive paragraph by saying it in a slightly different, but equally “sophisticated”, way. In the first supportive paragraph, Amanda convinces the reader that the depiction of the wind’s “violent assault” serves to personify the wind. The following paragraph emphasizes the “scenic images” and “careful selection of detail” which further the idea of the “power ‘to discourage’” that the wind possesses. This range of interpretations pinpoints the writers “insightful” nature and “cogent” ability to establish their point in a clear and forceful way, and these capabilities are further instated by Amanda’s “sound sentence variety.”
Instead of employing repetitive and simplistic sentence structures, Amanda skillfully utilizes “sound” syntax in order to construct a “pleasing” analysis of “The Street” which receives a nine on the Advanced Placement rubric. The “insightful” nature of the analysis is shaped by the masterful integration of quotations throughout the varied sentences: “She ‘felt suddenly naked and bald,’ displaying the weather’s way of welcoming someone into a new environment.” The “sophisticated” and “pleasing sentence variety” places this analysis “above the pack” by ensuring that the analysis is never bland, but always “fresh”. The analysis strays away from “sentence structure errors, generic and/or repetitive diction” by providing a multiplicity of sentence types. This careful syntactical selection throughout the analysis is somewhat countered by the lack of transitional phrases between subtopics.
“The Street” analysis does not provide sufficient shifts between paragraphs, which although noteworthy, is inconsequential in determining the numerical score of the work. Although there are no evident transitional sentences from one topic to the next, the shift from paragraphs is not choppy or “problematic”. The analysis is not “confounded” by the lack of “smooth transitions” because this meager shortcoming does not consume its entirety. Although the presence of “smooth transitions” is a piece of the puzzle that is required to receive a nine according to the rubric, its trivial absence is overridden by the overwhelming connections that Amanda makes between the three subtopics. She mentions the personification of the wind again in the paragraph concerning characterization, and this serves to connect the topics without “transitions”: “it is almost as if the weather is warning her against the house by ‘twisting the sign away from her’ so that she cannot read it.” Therefore, the lack of transitions does not thwart the “finesse” present throughout the analysis.
Apart from the absence of intermediary sentences, Amanda’s analysis of “The Street” receives a nine on the Advanced Placement scoring rubric due to the continually varying reiteration of the universal idea and the “pleasing sentence variety” and “structure.”

Matt Kelley's analysis of Kim Lynch's analysis said...

Transitioning from one strong thesis to a many great claims. Kim Lynch uses diverse adjectives, creative literary devices and strong examples to express that she believes the wind is how nature corresponds on how one lives and “‘[does] everything it [can] to discourage the people walking along the street.’”
Kim Lynch uses a good thesis to introduce her analysis. Kim used a good quote, which could have been integrated better. Kim had a good choice of literary devices that are strongly evident in the excerpt. The shift in the thesis is a great one but should be described as the point of view throughout the excerpt. The personification should be described as ‘deliberately violent personification’. Kim had a good selection of adjectives for the literary devices in her thesis.
Kim uses a good claim by suggesting that “the wind has a mind of its own”. Most of the one-worded quotes are integrated poorly. There was no need to change the tense of the quotes. Throughout the paragraph Kim makes very good claims and shows creativity; suggesting that “the wind has a mind of its own” and pointing out that it has “human-like actions”. Kim uses good examples and quotes to show that Petry uses “powerful personification”.
In the end I decided to give Kim a 7 as a final grade. The details were concrete and specific in referencing to the text. She effectively addressed the “what” and the “how” of her analysis. It was organized and logically ordered. It was well-written and had some good sentence structure and some varied diction. There were no errors in spelling or grammar.
To increase her grade I would suggest that Kim adds a few more things. Kim needs to increase her use of varied diction and use higher level vocabulary when portraying her thoughts in her analysis. Kim needs to make her thesis more effective by putting a deeper meaning behind it. To bring it to an 8 Kim needs to add “why” to her examples.

Anonymous said...

Erin Chancey's Analysis of Dan Kehoe's Analysis of The Street:

Shifting from informative personification, to analyzing the imagery, and finally to an in depth insight of ambiguity, in the analysis of the street by Ann Petry, Dan Kehoe uses good quote integration and refers back to the thesis often, but rephrases too much to successfully convey his thoughts on the devices used and also his insight on Petry's intentions on the main idea.

In his analysis, Dan successfully integrates his quotes in a meaningful and unique way. He doesn't just put random quotes in and then explain them, he keeps going with his thoughts and incorporates appropriate quotes when necessary for example when he says, "sole purpose is to drive 'most people off the street'". Instead of just using a quote, it is clear that Dan picked it for a specific reason and artfully utilizes it within his explanation. Dan also does an excellent job at analyzing the quotes he uses as well.

Along with good quote integration, Dan also does an excellent job referring back to his thesis. Throughout his entire analysis he explains how the wind, "directs them to a new path", "steers everyone away", and "changes it's approach". All of his explanations and quotes refer back to his main idea, and his entire analysis comes together nicely because of this. Dan repeatedly incorporates the thoughts of his thesis throughout the analysis, and he constantly proves his ideas and displays them in an easy to follow way for the reader.

Although Dan's analysis is very strong, he needs to work on displaying new and more unique thoughts. He too often clearly did not know what else to say so he simply rephrased what he had already said. For example, he mentioned that the winds intentions were to "push people away" this would have been a very intellectual thought but he then continued in the same paragraph that the wind "directs them to a new path", "points people in a different direction", and "one has to change direction." etc.

Overall, Dan wrote a very thoughtful analysis. It was very strong, and besides the rephrasing all of his thoughts problem it was good and well written. He also needs to think of different adjectives to describe his devices. He repeated a lot of the same ones/similar ones. Overall though it was very good, and I would give it an 8 or 9.

Anonymous said...

Danielle MacDermott
Analysis of the Analysis (Marco Orlando)
Part 1:
In Marco’s analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, he utilizes his strengths in explaining his thoughts in a clear, eloquent manner and uses supportive quotes that backup his stance yet the only criticism of this analysis would be the thesis restated exactly in the conclusion, but overall comes out strong in explaining the overall message that “dedication to an appropriate cause will result in a promising future.”
Marco clearly explains his ideas in an eloquent manner so the reader can understand them. He clearly states the main idea of the excerpt as “dedication to an appropriate cause will result in a promising future.” Also, he points out that Petry uses “raw and powerful imagery” to demonstrate the emotion of the wind and Lutie. Marco understands how “detail is most important” in Petry’s development of the imagery and personification to further characterize the Wind and Lutie. By stating “despite the women’s already difficult position, Petry takes it a step further and conflicts the ‘entity’ of the wind, against the woman with nothing to lose”, he straight up declares this as one of Petry’s strategies in this excerpt. He understands that the “wind” is more than just an element of nature; it is an opponent to Lutie to slow her endeavor.
Another commendation of Marco’s analysis would be his strategic use of quotes to back up his analysis of The Street. “The wind pushed it away from her” which backs up his support that Petry personifies the wind as the “friend or foe” of Lutie. The cold finger’s “touched the back of her neck”, which is another detailed example of the wind being personified as an opponent. Marco clearly stated personification as one of the techniques Petry uses but makes it apparent that imagery is just as important to the development of the story. The window shades were “sent flapping back against the window” and “rattled the tops of garbage cans”. These quotes in Marco’s analysis demonstrate imagery by setting up the scene of the cold, powerful wind outside on the streets.

Anonymous said...

Danielle MacDermott
Marco Orlando's Analysis
Part 2:
The only criticism I found in his analysis would be the thesis statement repeated again exactly in the last paragraph. Since the universal idea “no matter how unreal and horrific, dedication to an appropriate cause will result in a promising future” is repeated in the conclusion it stands out to the reader as being the exact same wording as in the introduction. This makes the reader catch it because it is at the end of the sentence therefore, making it more memorable to the reader as being the same. It could have been less noticeable if the universal idea was worded differently so the audience would not make this realization. This repetition could cause the audience to think that it was just done out of laziness but I understand that on a literary perspective it could have been done intentionally to make the reader remember the overall message of The Street.
In Marco’s analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, he utilizes his expertise in explaining his ideas in a direct, fluent manner and he fuses good quotes that support his solid thesis and yet the only criticism I made was the repetition of the thesis worded exactly the same in the introduction and conclusion, but in the end does an exemplary job in making the reader aware of the “promising future” that Lutie has ahead of her. Marco’s analysis uses great diction and syntax to explain the universal idea and uses effective quotes to back it up. In this analysis, there is not much to criticize because he does a praiseworthy job of analyzing Petry’s excerpt and backing up his ideas with strong support. The only thing that stood out was the thesis stated the same way again in the conclusion, which I felt could have been restated to perhaps make it more effective. The repetition of the same thesis does not take away whatsoever from the overall impact of his essay and might also add to it because it repeats the universal idea of Ann Petry’s The Street, therefore making it quite apparent to the reader that “dedication to an appropriate cause will result in a promising future.”

Anonymous said...

Christina Domaldo's analysis of Briana Barrows' analysis

Shifting from concrete ideas to less thought out ones in Briana Barrows’ analysis of “The Street”, she employs distinct examples from the excerpt, poor word choice, and an uninteresting layout to depict her thoughts and ideas of the passage.
Throughout the analysis Briana incorporates meaningful quotes; this adds a deeper meaning to each sentence. She skillfully adds quotes to appropriate sentence structures, allowing the reader to understand where she is coming from. Using quotes in a sentence, such as this one “When the wind was “twisting the sign away from her,” she noticed “the metal had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood”’, allows for easy transition throughout Briana’s paper. Her best asset throughout the essay is her quote integration, she clearly thought out each quote and where to place it. Briana may have thoroughly added quotes to her paper; but she did not choose the best words.
An essay is formed by many words strung together; to create a good essay one must have a good word choice. Briana had few good word choices, but she did not display that she thought out what she was saying throughout the whole essay. She did not do her best to edit her paper, there were several spelling errors, like “and initate”, along with poor choice and placing of words. Briana did not consistently keep her word choice flowing; she needed to plan her paper more meticulously. Continuously through her essay I had to stop and re read to understand what she was trying to convey, she did not use her best judgment or thesaurus when writing this essay.
Briana could have gone in so many different directions when writing this paper, but her layout was flat and uninteresting. She choose a very conventional way to convey her thoughts in this essay, it was a paper that anyone could have written. I was not impressed by her tedious layout; it came across as unplanned and confusing. Briana needed more flow throughout this essay, she was lacking excitement. She is very capable of writing a well organized essay, but she needs to plan out what she wants to say to make her paper more successful. Briana may have had been more triumphant when writing this paper if she thought more about the idea she was trying to convey rather than just putting all her thoughts down on paper.
Briana cleverly inserted quotes into her essay, although she did not use her best judgment when organizing her paper, but it was still successful in getting the point across. She could have written her paper more skillfully, but I do not believe this paper is a complete lost cause. With some editing and better word choices this could be a very well written essay.

poetryofsongmichellec said...

Michelle Carignan's Analysis of Gabbie Healey's Analysis of the The Street:
In Gabbie’s analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, she succeeds in identifying the main literary elements of the excerpt but struggles with using appropriate vocabulary and is lacking crucial concluding sentences, thus contributing to the incomplete aspect of her analysis.
The main literary elements that are prevalent throughout the excerpt are clearly identified by Gabbie, resulting in a successful structure of her analysis. The imagery, personification, and foreshadowing that Petry employs is shown through Gabbie’s statement of these devices as well as the example she provides in quotations. The recognition of “destructive imagery” is shown through her choice to quote “the exposed surface to its violent assault” from the wind. The next paragraph is well organized because she dedicated it to a different literary device, personification, which is identified through the “wind that grabbed their hats” and “pried their scarves from around their necks”. She further acknowledged another literary device, Petry’s use of foreshadow, in the third supportive paragraph of her analysis. With strong support to show Petry’s use of literary devices, Gabbie reveals her ability to identify these literary devices which leads to an excellent structure for her analysis.
While the paragraphs contain good content, they also lack in concluding sentences. A concluding sentence is crucial to a paragraph because it shows a thorough analysis, and also the correlation between a device and the universal meaning of the excerpt. Gabbie tended to end paragraphs with a quote, “blew their coats away from their necks”, which suggests that she was unable to fully develop her ideas. While this was most probably not the case, leaving a quote without an explanation leads a reader to believe that the writer could not properly execute the analysis, or leaves the reader confused because it is not clearly related to the universal idea. Without this connection to the universal idea, the reader gets the sense that the analysis is underdeveloped.
Throughout the analysis, there is a noticeable amount of advanced vocabulary that gives off an artificial vibe. However, she should be commended for trying to expand her vocabulary as a student. Unfortunately, words such as “lamentable” to describe Petry’s use of foreshadow feels slightly forced because she previously uses “unfortunate” and “inauspicious” in the prior sentences. While these words are all similar in meaning, they all have subtleties that give each word a different connotation. Although, this is praise-worthy because she attempted to vary her diction, which is shown by Petry’s use of imagery through stating that the “potent wind” is used to describe the streets’ “harsh conditions”. Even though these adjectives are more commonly used, her thoughts are more clearly understood. It is the overuse of synonyms that are above most people’s common knowledge that lead to confusion in the understanding of the analysis.
The potential for a more developed analysis is obvious. Gabbie showed this through her identification of literary elements and appropriate quotations, that she clearly understood the exerpt. Although, the shortage of concluding sentences in conjunction with unsuitable vocabulary, leads to the feeling of an incomplete and slightly underdeveloped analysis, yet glimmers of a solid analysis shine through with the concrete literary elements.

poetryofsongmichellec said...

Michelle Carignan's Analysis of Gabbie Healey's Analysis of The Street:
In Gabbie’s analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, she succeeds in identifying the main literary elements of the excerpt but struggles with using appropriate vocabulary and is lacking crucial concluding sentences, thus contributing to the incomplete aspect of her analysis.
The main literary elements that are prevalent throughout the excerpt are clearly identified by Gabbie, resulting in a successful structure of her analysis. The imagery, personification, and foreshadowing that Petry employs is shown through Gabbie’s statement of these devices as well as the example she provides in quotations. The recognition of “destructive imagery” is shown through her choice to quote “the exposed surface to its violent assault” from the wind. The next paragraph is well organized because she dedicated it to a different literary device, personification, which is identified through the “wind that grabbed their hats” and “pried their scarves from around their necks”. She further acknowledged another literary device, Petry’s use of foreshadow, in the third supportive paragraph of her analysis. With strong support to show Petry’s use of literary devices, Gabbie reveals her ability to identify these literary devices which leads to an excellent structure for her analysis.
While the paragraphs contain good content, they also lack in concluding sentences. A concluding sentence is crucial to a paragraph because it shows a thorough analysis, and also the correlation between a device and the universal meaning of the excerpt. Gabbie tended to end paragraphs with a quote, “blew their coats away from their necks”, which suggests that she was unable to fully develop her ideas. While this was most probably not the case, leaving a quote without an explanation leads a reader to believe that the writer could not properly execute the analysis, or leaves the reader confused because it is not clearly related to the universal idea. Without this connection to the universal idea, the reader gets the sense that the analysis is underdeveloped.
Throughout the analysis, there is a noticeable amount of advanced vocabulary that gives off an artificial vibe. However, she should be commended for trying to expand her vocabulary as a student. Unfortunately, words such as “lamentable” to describe Petry’s use of foreshadow feels slightly forced because she previously uses “unfortunate” and “inauspicious” in the prior sentences. While these words are all similar in meaning, they all have subtleties that give each word a different connotation. Although, this is praise-worthy because she attempted to vary her diction, which is shown by Petry’s use of imagery through stating that the “potent wind” is used to describe the streets’ “harsh conditions”. Even though these adjectives are more commonly used, her thoughts are more clearly understood. It is the overuse of synonyms that are above most people’s common knowledge that lead to confusion in the understanding of the analysis.
The potential for a more developed analysis is obvious. Gabbie showed this through her identification of literary elements and appropriate quotations, that she clearly understood the exerpt. Although, the shortage of concluding sentences in conjunction with unsuitable vocabulary, leads to the feeling of an incomplete and slightly underdeveloped analysis, yet glimmers of a solid analysis shine through with the concrete literary elements.

Anonymous said...

Stacie Linfield
11-30-11
Analysis of an Analysis - - Hannah Lavendier

While successfully establishing "nature's physical presence" and the "doomful foreshadowing" in her analysis of Petry's "The Street", Hannah Lavendier thoroughly proves her idea of nature's ability "'to discourage' Lutie Johnson from having a positive relationship with the environment" with use of foreshadowing, imagery, and personification, but should perhaps reconsider pairing quotes that differ from the original text to serve another purpose.
Lavendier utilizes the "intentional personification" of the excerpt to show how life is given to the unwelcoming wind. She integrates multiple quotes to show the intimidating presence the wind carries, and incorporates the "urban imagery" to show how this presence is looming over not only Lutie, but the pedestrians in the street, too. Lavendier does an excellent job analyzing the wind's intentions towards Lutie and gives strong evidence proving the contempt it has for her relationship with the environment.
The "doomful foreshadowing" gave a lot of depth to Lavendier's essay. Her thoughts on the "'coat of white paint'" were very engaging and provoked a lot of interest in what she had to say. The way she interpreted this was very original, and gave the reader good insight to her unique ideas. She also had excellent sentence structure in this paragraph that really drew the reader into her paper. In her sentence "it alludes to Lutie Johnson's uncertain future in the urban environment", I felt that it gave an open-ended feeling to what she was discussing, sparking curiosity about Lutie's future. It makes the reader wonder more about where she is going and what the future has in store for her.
A very minor issue that was noticed with this paper was pairing quotes that differ from the original text to serve another purpose. This is only a minor issue because it could occasionally confuse the reader if they noticed that they were taken out of the original context, however, I feel that it still works for this paper. When Lavendier quotes "it did everything it could to discourage", the original connotation of this quote was directed towards the pedestrians. Although the wind does not single out Lutie, she is still among the discouraged in the street. When the population is discouraged, among them is still Lutie, so the quote still provides its purpose to her point. When using quotes out of their original meaning perhaps she should explain how it relates to what she is trying to get across to the reader in the future.
Overall, Hannah Lavendier's essay was a thought provoking interpretation of Petry's "The Street". Her devices suited their intended purpose, and her sentence structure enticed the reader to keep on reading. Her analysis as a whole very successfully proved her original idea in her thesis.

Anonymous said...

Emily Christy
Analysis of Analysis on Caisey Calabro's The Street

Shifting from the expectations provided in the standard thesis and more detailed body paragraphs in her analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street”, Caisey Calabro employs good quote integration and varied sentence structure, but fails to check some grammatical errors.

The advanced and experienced use of quote integration gave the sense that Caisey knew exactly where she wanted to put her quotes. Whether it’s putting it at the end of a sentence, “touching her with its ‘cold fingers.’” or in the middle, “The wind seems to be physical because it is ‘grabbing,’ ‘fingering,’ and ‘wrapping’ the people and other elements on the street.” Caisey’s use of integrating her quotes gives a non-repetitive effect. Allowing the reader to ease into the multiple quotes per paragraph; this shows a deeper meaning of knowledge. Caisey does not throw in a quote just for the sake of having one; she has them because it gives further understanding to the reader.

The assorted use of sentence structure gives Caisey Calabro’s analysis meaning. It shows she spent time to make sure it was not repetitive, and original. Ending each body paragraph with another ending such as “‘By shifting characterization Petry starts to develop the affect the wind has on just one person, Lutie Johnson.’ or ‘She further emphasizes the effects of the wind through the use of sensual imagery.’” Even throwing quotes at different points gives her structure an altered arrangement.

After the experienced use of quote integration and assorted sentence structure, Caisey failed to check her grammatical errors. In the body paragraph of one, there are the errors of “toughing” (touching I assume) and a common mistake of “affects” (change to effects). And in the second body paragraph, “permeance” should be permanence. And to take out a comma in her thesis “sensual imagery,”. These are little mistakes and won’t destroy the scoring of Caisey’s essay.

Caisey Calabro provides clear evidence that on the Advanced Placement Rubric will earn her a score of an “8”. She made few mistakes, and asserted herself throughout the whole essay on Ann Petry’s “The Street”. Her quotes and structure gave her the points earned needed. But she did have to lose some do to the grammatical errors. This stopped her from earing a “9” on the rubric. But it also proved that Caisey Calabro is fully capable of earning a “9” and is well on the way.

Panos N said...

Describing the relationship between the characters in setting in “The Street”, Harnedy employs an appropriate selection of quotes, yet weak quote usage and repetitious sentence structures in her analysis of the excerpt.
Throughout the entire analysis, Harnedy utilizes strong and appropriate quotes to support her claims. When describing the “naturalistic personification” in the story, Harnedy uses a line from the excerpt to describe how the wind “ ‘rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows…” In her explanation of the author’s use of “urban imagery”, Harnedy integrates quotes to describe the utilization of imagery, assimilating how the sidewalks on the street comprised of “ ‘ theater throwaways… thinner waxed paper…’”All of Harnedy’s quotes are appropriate and relate to the topic that was being discussed. However, Harnedy’s selection of quotes proved to be her strongest part of her writing in the essay.
While Harnedy’s selection of quotes corresponded with respective topic that was being discussed, her use of quote usage left more to be desired. There was a blatant problem with the lengths of quotes. Both the third and fourth paragraphs mainly consisted quotes rather than analysis. Both the third and fourth paragraphs only contain four original sentences. These sentences did not necessarily contain analysis either as Harnedy used these sentences to describe what the quote is saying. For the most part, these original sentences were just indicating of what subject was currently being discussed. Furthermore, Harnedy’s quote integration was also lacking. Harnedy only once integrated a quote into a analytic sentence, using the word “‘discourage’”. However, the remaining quotes were poorly integrated, as they seemed to have been essentially “slapped” on. She did not once indicate that she was moving onto a quote (no colon or comma was used to indicate a long quote). Coupling weak quote integration with long quotes, the area of quote usage proved to be a weak point.
Harnedy’s repetitious sentence structures also proved to be an issue. While not a huge problem, it is something that stands out. Harnedy uses the word “by” to begin her second and third paragraphs. The phrases “by using” were used in back to back occurrences. The issue is certainly small, but it is something that derails the essay. The more sentence variety increases, the more intriguing the essay becomes. If the number of sentences that started with the word “by” were lowered, the overall feeling of the essay would be enhanced.
The appropriate selection of quotes was derailed by weak quote usage and repetitious sentence structures in Harnedy’s analysis on the excerpt of “The Street”. Analysis had potential but was not meticulously carried out. Thus, based on the AP essay-scoring rubric, this essay receives a five.

Panos Nikolos

Panos N said...

Describing the relationship between the characters in setting in “The Street”, Harnedy employs an appropriate selection of quotes, yet weak quote usage and repetitious sentence structures in her analysis of the excerpt.
Throughout the entire analysis, Harnedy utilizes strong and appropriate quotes to support her claims. When describing the “naturalistic personification” in the story, Harnedy uses a line from the excerpt to describe how the wind “ ‘rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows…” In her explanation of the author’s use of “urban imagery”, Harnedy integrates quotes to describe the utilization of imagery, assimilating how the sidewalks on the street comprised of “ ‘ theater throwaways… thinner waxed paper…’”All of Harnedy’s quotes are appropriate and relate to the topic that was being discussed. However, Harnedy’s selection of quotes proved to be her strongest part of her writing in the essay.
While Harnedy’s selection of quotes corresponded with respective topic that was being discussed, her use of quote usage left more to be desired. There was a blatant problem with the lengths of quotes. Both the third and fourth paragraphs mainly consisted quotes rather than analysis. Both the third and fourth paragraphs only contain four original sentences. These sentences did not necessarily contain analysis either as Harnedy used these sentences to describe what the quote is saying. For the most part, these original sentences were just indicating of what subject was currently being discussed. Furthermore, Harnedy’s quote integration was also lacking. Harnedy only once integrated a quote into a analytic sentence, using the word “‘discourage’”. However, the remaining quotes were poorly integrated, as they seemed to have been essentially “slapped” on. She did not once indicate that she was moving onto a quote (no colon or comma was used to indicate a long quote). Coupling weak quote integration with long quotes, the area of quote usage proved to be a weak point.
Harnedy’s repetitious sentence structures also proved to be an issue. While not a huge problem, it is something that stands out. Harnedy uses the word “by” to begin her second and third paragraphs. The phrases “by using” were used in back to back occurrences. The issue is certainly small, but it is something that derails the essay. The more sentence variety increases, the more intriguing the essay becomes. If the number of sentences that started with the word “by” were lowered, the overall feeling of the essay would be enhanced.
The appropriate selection of quotes was derailed by weak quote usage and repetitious sentence structures in Harnedy’s analysis on the excerpt of “The Street”. Analysis had potential but was not meticulously carried out. Thus, based on the AP essay-scoring rubric, this essay receives a five.

Panos Nikolos

Anonymous said...

Marc Daitch's analysis of Taryn Kitchens Analysis

In the analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, Taryn Kitchen utilizes strong topic sentences and a powerful thesis, but fails integrate the quotes as well as they could have, earning herself a grade of 7 on the advances grading rubric.
The first thing in the essay is the thesis statement, which Taryn does an excellent job with. The thesis “Focusing in from the effects of the wind on the whole city to its effects on one specific individual in the opening of The Street, Ann Petry combines harsh personification, calculated urban imagery, and a subtle foreshadowing to characterize Lutie Johnson’s sentiments towards her urban atmosphere as critical and flawed, yet decidedly ‘reasonable’” is very well written. The adjectives for her devices are extremely accurate. The thing about the thesis that does not make it a 9 is the quote at the end. I believe that she could have been able to find a better quote than “‘reasonable’” to describe the universal idea of her essay.
Taryn begins each of her paragraphs with strong topic sentences that support her ideas. The topic sentence “Johnson’s environment is riddled with litter and urban decay, furthering her animosity towards it” does a very good job of showing what her paragraph is going to be about. Rich vocabulary like “riddled” and “litter” enhance the sentence a great deal. Also, her final topic sentence of “While not blatantly stated, Petry suggests a lot in her opening paragraphs of events to come” does a very good job of showing how Petry foreshadows and is too obvious about it. Without her topic sentences, the essay as a whole would be a well written.
Although the essay as a whole is very good, one thing Taryn could work on is her quote integration. The quotes feel like the have just been put into the essay. They do not flow as well as they could. When she says It ‘“lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked and bald,’” exposing her to the harsh urban environment.” could be integrated a little better. It does not seem as though it flows as well as it could. When it is read, it seems as if it was just put into the essay and does not go with it as well as it could. It is a very good quote for her to use though. It is just not integrated too well.

Taryn said...

Taryn Kitchen's analysis of Ian Mallor's analysis
Failing to complete a full essay, Ian Mallor’s analysis lacks a surplus of examples yet institutes creatively effective diction and natural quote integration to “augment” his analysis.
Mallor displays a “high-level” of command over the English language throughout his sentences. Right from the start, Mallor selects accurate adjectives to describe Petry’s analysis. Rather than choosing “vivid” to describe imagery, he identifies the imagery as “stark”. Throughout the essay, he shows a strong vocabulary, utilizing words such as “blustery”, “metropolis” and “imparting”, without awkwardly throwing in extravagant words. Mallor additionally includes creative phrases to add interest to his writing, describing how Johnson’s world “explodes to life”.
Mallor augments his own writing with direct quotes from Petry’s writing. Although he only includes a single example for each device, the quotes are integrated smoothly into his writing. Saying that “the blustery scene is set with ‘window shades [sucked] out through the tops of opened windows’”, Mallor’s sentences flows seamlessly into Petry’s. He later chooses two specific quotes to display how the wind is physically personified. However, Mallor does not include any examples for his third device.
With a severely deficient amount of examples, Mallor misses the opportunity to support and prove his assertions. By only providing one example of each device, he limits his ability to make his argument very “thoughtful and convincing”. Mallor says Petry uses “vivid imagery” to “create a bleak mood”, but only provides one example. He should have included more of the several descriptions of the neglected street and apartment sign. In his personification paragraph, Mallor does not distinguish between the distinctly different types used in Petry’s excerpt. Mallor could have specified the differences between the physical and mental personification of the wind or its effects on the city compared to its effects on Lutie Johnson. Mallor then completely neglects to include any evidence of Petry’s “elegant figurative language”.
Although his essay lacks sufficient proof and examples, what has been written was well on its way to a good score. The writing includes qualities of a high scoring essay, such as “precise and fresh diction”, “thoughtful” analysis and has “virtually no errors in conventions”. However, the essay was severely defective with a minimal amount of writing. It could not be “cogent” without several “specific concrete details” nor does it display “careful development”, as it shows little development at all. While it could have been a successful essay if fully developed, the analysis does not merit a high score.

Anonymous said...

Stephen Hynes
The Street Analysis


Shifting between the humanity of the wind to the meager characterization of Lutie Johnson in “The Street,” Ann Petry uses overbearing personification, “cold” imagery, and unwelcoming tone in order to convey how the “exposed surface” of the “still” city has discomforted Lutie, leaving her “suddenly naked” and bare.
Petry doesn’t just personify the wind, she gives it its own persona of a creeping, “fingering,” “entangling” being that has a sinister attitude towards the people of the streets. The wind “did everything it could to discourage the people” in a peevish way. Where the wind is personified to be sinister toward the people by “entangling them,” and stinging them, and driving “the people off the street,” the wind is just annoying. It more annoys the people by deterring them rather than discouraging them. Even Lutie Johnson is driven to get a room to be rid of the peevish wind. Not only is this wind extremely personified, the actions of the wind are also strongly shown with imagery.
Ann Petry couples the personification of the wind with strong, “cold” imagery of the wind’s actions. The description of the wind “[finding] chicken bones and pork-chop bones and [pushing] them along the curb” does not only evoke strong images, it gives off a cold feeling. The overall tone of the imagery produced is cold and unwelcoming. Even “as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck” has the description of cold, personifying the wind to be cold and temperature and spirit while also the familiar feeling of cold wind arises the image of the event happening. This pairing of imagery and personification would not be complete without the intended tone.
As Petry personifies the wind, she makes it come alive with cold images that give off a cold, unwelcoming tone. The wind “[discourages] the people” and does not give off a friendly vibe. “The wind pushed” everyone and everything away from it, making it clear they are unwanted. The feeling of not being wanted pushes everyone to go inside, not feeling welcomed to be out in the night air.
In “The Street,” Ann Petry creates an unwelcoming tone through the pairing of “cold” imagery and overbearing personification of the wind. Through this she brings about the struggles Lutie is faced with as she finds a place to stay, trying to escape the “violent assault” of the wind, maybe to never fully be free of it, always facing obstacles when trying to accomplish goals.

Anonymous said...

Stephen Hynes

Shifting between the humanity of the wind to the meager characterization of Lutie Johnson in “The Street,” Ann Petry uses overbearing personification, “cold” imagery, and unwelcoming tone in order to convey how the “exposed surface” of the “still” city has discomforted Lutie, leaving her “suddenly naked” and bare.
Petry doesn’t just personify the wind, she gives it its own persona of a creeping, “fingering,” “entangling” being that has a sinister attitude towards the people of the streets. The wind “did everything it could to discourage the people” in a peevish way. Where the wind is personified to be sinister toward the people by “entangling them,” and stinging them, and driving “the people off the street,” the wind is just annoying. It more annoys the people by deterring them rather than discouraging them. Even Lutie Johnson is driven to get a room to be rid of the peevish wind. Not only is this wind extremely personified, the actions of the wind are also strongly shown with imagery.
Ann Petry couples the personification of the wind with strong, “cold” imagery of the wind’s actions. The description of the wind “[finding] chicken bones and pork-chop bones and [pushing] them along the curb” does not only evoke strong images, it gives off a cold feeling. The overall tone of the imagery produced is cold and unwelcoming. Even “as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck” has the description of cold, personifying the wind to be cold and temperature and spirit while also the familiar feeling of cold wind arises the image of the event happening. This pairing of imagery and personification would not be complete without the intended tone.
As Petry personifies the wind, she makes it come alive with cold images that give off a cold, unwelcoming tone. The wind “[discourages] the people” and does not give off a friendly vibe. “The wind pushed” everyone and everything away from it, making it clear they are unwanted. The feeling of not being wanted pushes everyone to go inside, not feeling welcomed to be out in the night air.
In “The Street,” Ann Petry creates an unwelcoming tone through the pairing of “cold” imagery and overbearing personification of the wind. Through this she brings about the struggles Lutie is faced with as she finds a place to stay, trying to escape the “violent assault” of the wind, maybe to never fully be free of it, always facing obstacles when trying to accomplish goals.

Amanda Sullivan said...

Amanda Sullivan
Analysis of Emily Christy's Analysis

Contrasting between a substantial breakdown of the excerpt and a poor structure in her analysis of “The Street”, Emily Christy successfully employs strong and relevant quote integration, but could utilize distinctive adjectives and a more detailed and profound universal idea, resulting in an analysis that receives a grade of a 6.5 on the Advanced Placement Rubric.
By Christy’s heavy incorporation of quotes, her analysis becomes stronger and more elaborate. Whether she quotes one word or a whole phrase from the passage, Emily places the quotes nicely in her writing. She uses quotes such as “’lifted’, ‘dancing’, and ‘grabbed’” to explain how the wind develops a body, and in doing so, she certainly strengthens this point. In addition to integrating one word quotes, she also manipulates longer quotes, which is as equally effective as shorter ones. Christy is describing Lutie Johnson and her responsibilities, and she quotes “’If it was three, why, she would go in and ask to see it, but if it said two – why, there wasn’t any point’”. Her argument is enhanced by applying this quote to her work. Emily Christy is quite successful in regards to using quotes in her analysis.
Although Christy is successful in her quote integration, she needs to work on using a variation in her adjectives. In her thesis, Emily describes her devices with the adjectives of “swaying”, “grim”, and “hasty”, but fails to change these adjectives in her body paragraphs, making her work repetitive. Instead of continuously describing the personification as “swaying”, Emily could use the words “fluctuating” or “changing” in place of it. For “grim imagery”, she could use “bleak” or “morose”, and for “hasty characterization”, she could change the adjective to “brief” or “prompt”. By using different adjectives, Christy’s analysis will become completely altered for the better. Other than that, Emily has a good range of vocabulary that she uses throughout the rest of her writing.
In Emily Christy’s thesis, she begins with an appropriate shift and commendable devices, but follows with a weak universal idea. Emily writes about how “’the “wind” is working against everything else’”. Her concept is on the right track, but could definitely be strengthened upon. To enhance her thesis, she could change it to something like “to express how the “wind” has a tendency to be bothersome and an enemy to most people it encounters”. Emily simply needs to make her universal idea stronger and sound more intelligent. If Emily feels that she wants to take a different approach to her universal idea, she could also change it by saying “to illustrate how the “wind” is in an endless battle with its inhabitants and is essentially winning at all times”. By making some sort of change to her universal idea, Christy’s overall thesis will become better and more intellectual.
Emily Christy receives a 6.5 on the Advanced Placement Rubric due to her noteworthy incorporation of quotes, but lack of differing adjectives and feeble universal idea. Christy makes many great points in her analysis, but still needs some work to reach the goal of a 9. If she heeds the advice given in the analysis of the analysis, she will certainly be on her way to obtaining a 9 on her future analyses.

Anonymous said...

Stephen Hynes
Analysis of Danielle's analysis


Through the use of strong quotations of the excerpt from Ann Petry’s “The Street,” although poorly integrated and with weak transitions, Danielle MacDermott did in fact answer the question being asked, achieving a score of a 6 on the Advanced Placement Response Rubric.
With an analysis, it is impeccable that one is able to utilize quotes to accurately corroborate their claims, and must be able to seamlessly integrate and explain the quotes. Unfortunately, MacDermott was unsuccessful in the explanation and integration of the quotes used. Multiple times after a quote, MacDermott followed with “this shows” which is an unsuccessful strategy of showing how the quote ties in to the explanation, because if a quote has to be explained that is being used to help explain a claim, then the quote is not a good choice. If the quote is incorporated correctly, it can have a much more powerful effect, along with smooth transitioning.
When switching between claims by starting a new paragraph, a transition between the paragraphs is needed in order to establish fluidity and style. Danielle seemingly made no attempt to try to connect the paragraphs through a transitional phrase to tie everything together. She ends one paragraph with reference to the “insightful but small amount of imagery” and then starts the next with Ann Petry’s utilization of “foreshadowing, personification, and imagery” as a whole in Petry’s excerpt “The Street.” There is no smooth transition connecting the two paragraphs in the same essay. The ordering of the paragraphs does not matter here because the lack of transition allows the paragraphs to change order without disrupting the desired effect of the essay. As she failed to make smooth transitions, she did not fail in finding useful quotes.
The quotes used to help enrich her claims were not poorly chosen. They were quality quotes that strengthened her claims. When she analyzed the usage of imagery, she quoted that “The wind ‘blew their coats away from their bodies,’” perfectly giving an example of imagery. The only problem with the quotation was, again, the outright explanation of the quote by following with the phrase “which gives the image” that is not necessary because when talking about imagery, it is obvious that the author is giving an image for the reader to interpret. While the integration and explanation of the quotes was poor, and the transition between paragraphs was weak, MacDermott still answered the question being asked and did have a solid selection of quotes.

Anonymous said...

Matt Remick
Analysis of Evan DaSilva's Analysis


Delivering a string of weak descriptive adjectives and devices in his analysis of Ann Petry’s “The Street”, Evan DaSilva sabotages his analysis with banal, shambling diction, and awkward quote integration; yet DaSilva’s insightful, arcing characterization of Lutie Johnson brought out through the “troubled urban setting” makes for a poignant overall theme to the work.
Continuously throughout his analysis, DaSilva employs a resoundingly stale and convoluted choice of diction that severely undermines what would otherwise be genuine ideas. For each of his supporting paragraphs DaSilva starts with such redundant sentences as “[i]magery is used throughout” and “[d]iction is used throughout”. Such examples leave the reader underwhelmed, and less likely to truly appreciate the main idea buried beneath. DaSilva’s shift is also lacking as he compares the “depictions of of human like winds” to the “emotional” Lutie Johnson; the personification of the wind is already covered in detail, and there is no further evidence given that Lutie Johnson is in any emotional state. DaSilva states that the personified wind emphasizes the “image of the wind throwing different objects”; such redundant passages also cloud DaSilva’s overall theme.
Further, DaSilva’s analysis is incredibly hindered by not only his integration of quotes, but also his follow-up explanations of them. A variation of “Petry states” or “the narrator says” marks the beginning of each quote. DaSilva makes little use of including quick quotations into his arguments, rather his analysis is filled with space wasting quotations. Dasilva’s analysis is hindered by large quotations that often dwarf his arguments. In his explanations of the quotes, again a pattern emerges with the use of the phrase “this shows”. DaSilva does not adequately connect these quotations to his main idea, rather a large portion of his analysis hinges on the quotes making the arguments for him. DaSilva also muddles his argument with references to the length of the passage, as in “[a]s the text progresses”, and “[a]s the excerpt concludes”. Devoid of structure, DaSilva’s ideas suffer.
Keenly, DaSilva juxtaposes how the wind is a metaphor for the harsh, “troubled” environment that Lutie Johnson finds herself. DaSilva suggest that the wind harbors everything “dismal” about the city; while Lutie Johnson is just the opposite. Even though the wind has broken down everybody else in the city, it is implied by DaSilvia that Lutie Johnson is the only one that stands against the wind. DaSilva uses a stark use of foreshadowing as he compares the bleakness of the “reasonable” tenant house to Lutie Johnson’s future in the city.
DaSilva’s deas are sadly lost in translation. Although his initial ideas showed spark, they were ultimately doomed by his poor choice of sentence structure, and word variety. DaSilva would receive, at most, a 5 on the AP exam. I believe that if the proper attention was given to the structure of his writing, DaSilva could potentially receive a much higher score.

Merry said...

Meredith Davern
Analysis of an analysis (Peter Le)
In Peter Le’s analysis of “The Street”, by Ann Perty he utilizes descriptive adjective, insightful connection, but needs to create more boundaries and flow in order to become a greater writer.
Starting with a strong thesis Peter takes advantage of adjective in order to prove “the influence of nature over an individual even at the individual’s insistence of control”. He uses “diabolical”, “aggressive”, and “mischievous”, which perfectly describe the wind in “The Street”. By using such descriptive adjectives he reiterates the author’s idea that the wind is a character. The choice of quotes also contains very appropriate descriptions, which describe the wind’s “violent assault” on Lutie. The story is played out through quotes and adjective, and not a plot summary, and even without reading “The Street” anyone could understand the basic idea of the piece and the intentions of the wind by reading Peter Le’s analysis.
Utilizing personal knowledge the author creates phenomenal connections by reading in between the lines. “It can be noted the authority of the wind over her” Peter proves that the wind is controlling Lutie. The sign in “The Street” is just blown around in the wind, but the wind is controlling when and if Lutie sees it. By quoting “finding all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk” and then going on to say how the wind is pushing all this grime towards those trying to walk the street shows how the wind takes control. Nature has the power to overcome anyone. Explaining the wind’s dominance Peter goes on to compare the wind to “an imp or minor demon”. The wind portrays “violent” behavior, but is “mischievous”. The connection of control also reinforces the demon side of the wind.
The ideas brought up in the analysis are all valid, but it seems as though there was more thought to be put down. The connections are both very well written, but more examples would have brought the ideas full circle. It seems as though there was more thought than was presented.
Overall the analysis deserves a nine out of nine. The use of adjective perfectly describes the story and characters. Elegant vocabulary was displayed, but not overdone and the original piece seems well understood.

Anonymous said...

Caisey Calabro’s analysis of Amanda Schleicher’s Analysis

Shifting from depicting the wind to depicting Lutie Johnson in her analysis of “The Street,” Amanda Schleicher does an excellent job of balancing intriguing vocabulary with excellent quote integration but has a downfall when its comes to slight grammatical mistakes, thus earning her an eight out of nine.
Amanda Schleicher makes use of an appealing vocabulary throughout her analysis. She chooses words such as “overt” and “exemplifies” in order attract the readers eye and keep them interested. These words help to show her clear understanding of the reading and how she is comfortable writing about it. She reinforces this thought later by introducing the narrative as being “fluid.” This shows the importance that the structure plays on this reading and how she can apply her own wide range of vocabulary to convey its importance.
Amanda is able to correctly integrate quotes throughout her analysis of “The Street.” She choose quotes that fit perfectly into each of her supporting paragraphs. She refrains from setting up the quote by avoiding the use of fragments such as “ Petry says that” or “the sign says.” Instead she smoothly includes her quotes, for example Amanda says, “ The for-sale sign ‘was streaked with rust’.” The quote flows very nicely with her statement, and it is obvious that Amanda has control over her quotes especially when she says, “ Lutie tries to read a for-sale sign, but ‘the wind pushed it away...’.” She is not trying to force the use of the quote.
The only aspect worth critiquing in Amanda’s analysis is her few, but important, grammatical errors. Whenever one is writing a thesis, one must always make sure to parenthesize the title of the piece they are writing about. In Amanda’s thesis she only says “The Street,” but she should have parentheses around it. When Amanda introduces her second quote in the first paragraph, she should have a semi colon where it reads, “...one character in particular, Lutie Johnson. ‘The cold fingers...” A quote should never be alone by itself and be its own sentence. She also makes a spelling error of “diable” instead of “disable” towards the end of her first paragraph.
Overall I would say this essay should be worthy of a grade of a nine, without the few grammatical errors made. Amanda does a great job of integrating quotes and showing her clear understanding of the reading. She remains true to her universal idea throughout the analysis as well. I think Amanda is an excellent writer and it is shown throughout her analysis of “The Street.”

Cassie H. said...

Mine was too long to post. I emailed it. I hope that's alright.

Peter L. said...

Peter L. Analysis of Stephen Burrill's Analysis

In permeating the analysis with strong insights to the author’s intent, Stephen Burrill lacks variance in his sentence structure and employs unorthodox, awkward diction, yet consistently and profoundly expands upon his universal idea.

Burrill is predisposed to adhere to the common sentence structure of leading with the subject and following with a verb. While this allows his to convey his thoughts, it does so in a manner that is halting or lacking in fluidity. This is true especially in the first paragraph when Burrill utilizes the subjects “Petry”, “The wind” and “The personification”, multiple, consecutive times. His dependence on introducing his sentences with the word “the” does not subtract from his ability to adequately submit his thoughts, yet it tends to lend an air of monotony and makes it difficult to distinguish one thought from another. Perhaps if he had inverted the sentence structuring or led with an adjective, it would greatly improve the rhythm of his piece. Furthermore, if he would utilize congruent structures with new points, this would give the reader subtle hints at these breaks in thoughts.

At certain times during the analysis, the reader is forced to notice peculiar details, as when the adjective “commanding” is used to describe “personification”. Without the context of the excerpt, this pair is perfectly reasonable. However, in context, it is difficult to discern how the adjective is used. It may either be a reference to Petry’s strength in using personification or it may suggest the commanding nature of wind; the ambiguity of this word detracts from the flow of the analysis. Contrastingly, when Burrill states that Petry “uses… the wind to evoke that the wrath of the real world has the ability to ruin split second chances”, there is a distinct stop in the reading. The word “evoke” is used to introduce a noun, yet in this passage, it is not. The work would be better replaced with “suggest”. The option to use “uses… the wind to evoke the message that…” also exists.

Burrill’s greatest strength lies in his focus on the central subject of his piece, his universal idea. He consistently alludes to and expands upon it, never allowing the reader to lose sight of the purpose. In the first paragraph, Burrill connects the use of “strong personification” to the “uncertainty [that] leads to the loss of opportunities”. Immediately thereafter, Burrill again reminds his readers “that things are always lingering in your life waiting to take away the opportunities you receive”. By augmenting the universal idea, Burrill strengthens his position throughout the analysis as a whole.

Although reliant on conventional sentence structuring and awkward diction, Burrill’s analysis is supported by his constant allusions to his universal idea, as well as original and well-stated insight into Petry’s intent. Thus he receives a seven as according to the AP analysis rubric.

Anonymous said...

Brittany Anteski-analysis on Dalton Ware


Shifting from an old device to a new paragraph, Dalton Ware utilized compelling vocabulary, immaculate sentence structure and perfected quote integration in order to depict the universal meaning in “The Street” by Ann Petry, whom was trying to convey a negative effect and “discourage the people”.

In his analysis, Dalton uses extensive vocabulary to get his perspective across. At anytime using vocabulary, it is hard not to sound over baring. Dalton, aside for lines 11-12 ‘ The repeating of well distributed imagery reiterates the macabre feeling, being complete with a sign with years of age and weather”, successfully transitioned from simple to complex vocabulary. The use of complex words did not lead the point astray, it created unity. He was consistent with the use of vocabulary throughout the entire analysis, once again making it less choppy.

The structure of his sentences were impressive and displayed a verity. Most people would say sentences with more than two commas would be considered a run-on sentence but in lines 9-11 one sentence that could be broken up into two due to the difficulty of creating an comprehendible statement was so elegantly pleasant it was almost impossible to tell that it wasn’t separated. The sentences were full and plentiful. Throughout the analysis, the structure created a sense of imagery in a whole unique way, making the paragraphs short and to the point.

Intergrading quotes is never easy, and sometimes can be a hassle, but Dalton did in such a way, making the quotes slide into the phrase. In line 5, ‘through 116th street’ was in no way choppy and helped describe the setting in a whole new level. Instead of typically describing the scene, a simple descriptive phrase was appropriate. Every quote throughout the analysis was explained in a reasonable and understandable fashion making the paper easy to follow along with. Thus stating, Dalton was fully able to not only add sensible quotes but also make them as natural as can be.

The combination of useful vocabulary, elaborate quote integration and sentence structure, Dalton was successful in displaying certain characteristics Ann Petry utilizes throughout “The Street”. Giving the story justice and systematically analyzing the universal idea and the specific device tools used to do so. Proving an elaborate understanding and development of formal operational skills among English literature.


Grade: 8.5

Jamie Tyree said...

Jamie Tyrees analysis of Merry Daverns Analysis

Shifting between the wind’s violence and Lutie’s long for success, in her analysis of “The Street”, Merry Davern utilizes descriptive details of the characterization of the wind but fails with proper quote integration and the separation of imagery and detail along, weakening the transition between her second and third body paragraph.

Davern’s descriptive explanations of the wind’s movements greatly help to characterize the wind, linking it more closely to her universal idea of discouraging Lutie from ‘remaining on “The Street”’. She pinpoints it’s character by showing how, ‘Describing such exact details like feeling “naked” alludes to an uncomfortable feeling out on “The Street”.’ Davern’s analysis of the wind, ‘“Fingering its way” through buildings and being physically violent’, shows her in-depth descriptions of the wind’s character. These descriptive implications throughout her analysis later prove how her paragraphs on imagery and detail are not correctly separated.

In Davern’s second body paragraph on detail she describes how ‘“The wind lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck…’. Although this is a very accurate quote for detail, but also strongly falls into the place of imagery. In body paragraph three on imagery, she implies how the wind ‘“rattles the tops of trashcans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows and set them back against the windows.”’ The details of this could easily link to body paragraph number two due to her analysis of the sounds being seen, which makes this fall more under detail. Although Davern’s descriptions of detail and imagery may, in fact correctly fit into their current paragraphs, the examples easily can link together in both the second and third paragraph.

Davern’s quotes do not all comfortably fall into place throughout her analysis. In body paragraph number two, she says, ‘The exact time of year and street “November wind blowing through 116th street” helps the reader to feel the “rush” of the cold fall wind.’ Although she comfortably fits in the use of “rush” the sentence structure could have been worded better to properly fit in “November wind blowing through 116th street”. In the third paragraph, describing scraps of paper, the sentence becomes repetitive when she says, ‘The image of leaves and scraps of paper “heavy waxed paper that loaves of bread had been wrapped in, the thinner waxed paper that had enclosed sandwiches, old envelopes, newspapers’. Although the quote is a great example of imagery, the repetition of Davern’s writing and the writing from the excerpt makes the sentence have a more uncomfortable feel to it.

Davern’s analysis overall links to the prompt and has a very advanced use of detail and description. Although Davern perfects those aspects, she lacks the comfortable separation of her body paragraph and proper quote integration, which further brings her to a 6 out of 9 on the Advanced Placement Rubric.

Anonymous said...

Ryan Consentino’s analysis of Sarah Nordstrom’s analysis
Beginning with a thesis lacking a final device but still finishing strongly, Sarah Nordstrom utilizes exceptional quote integration, a small amount of strong analysis, and some complex syntax, earning her a grade of a 6 on the AP scoring rubric due to the “sound organization” despite the “few errors”.
Throughout the analysis, Nordstrom very effectively integrates quotes in such a way that strengthens each point that is being made. When speaking about the personification in the excerpt, Nordstrom very seamlessly integrates all quotes that she has taken from “The Street”. A prime example of the quote integration is when she writes, “The wind, however, gives Lutie her own chance to make her own choice when it ‘held it still for an instant in from of her’” showing how the wind is affecting Lutie in order to strengthen her point of how the wind affects individuals. The quotes in her analysis are always “well-chosen” and they are sprinkled along with smooth transitions between the quotes and her analysis. The logical use of each quote in appropriate places was of great benefit to Nordstrom’s analysis.
Though Nordstrom effectively identifies the “what” and the “how” in her analysis, some of the power of her claims is taken away by missing the “why”. While in the analysis she states that “the city appears much more desolate and the people much more alone” which is true, she does not analyze this further to tell the reader why this is happening or what purpose it serves being this way. While the universal idea of her analysis is strong, she does not fully prove to the reader that it is correct and that Petry meant for that to be the theme of her excerpt. Some of the sentences Nordstrom uses such as, “Lutie wanders along a vacant street and the wind sweeps along as if it were an old friend” make good points but do not serve the full purpose of defending her main idea. Overall, the analysis was “less insightful” than it could have been but it was still “intelligent”.
The sentence structure of Nordstrom’s passage was very varied and added to the style of the analysis as a whole. She was very successful in using excellent prose and conveying her ideas in a sophisticated way. She makes strong metaphors such as the wind being an “out of control prankster”. She does not use a consistent sentence structure throughout which shows that she has “control” over her passage. She also has a very “good use of transitions” which makes the analysis flow in such a way that the reader does not have to figure out what they are reading about. The distinction between the “humane and genuine” forms of the wind is seen in the sentences in that paragraph. She also analyzes the “ghostly imagery” well by making points such as “an image full of hard times and dilapidation”. The analysis was helped by the flow of the claims and the variety of writing.
For improvement, I recommend that Nordstrom uses more in depth analysis that answers the question of why the author did that and for what specific reason. Also, she should relate the points she makes in supporting paragraphs to the universal idea of the excerpt in order to prove that it is correct. If she uses a “more developed analysis” and an “effective thesis” she will be able to move up on the AP scoring rubric.

Anonymous said...

Jenna Aries' analysis of Eric Forman

Shifting from the expectations provided by a strong thesis to over-powering use of vocabulary in his analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, Eric Forman utilizes rich analysis detail and strong quote integration but in some ways looses the reader with his grandiloquent vocabulary earning him a “9” on the Advanced Placement Rubric. In Forman’s analysis of The Street, he applies rich analysis detail to prove his thesis. He gives great examples from the text to supply the reader with knowledge from the passage. He also incorporates strong quote integration in the right places to make the analysis flow.
The quote integration plays a big role in Forman’s writing. He uses the quotes to make his analysis flow. One example of how he did this was simply in his opening sentence.. “Smoothly shifting focus from a menacing “November wind” to the seemingly foremost character in “The Street”, Ann Petry unleashes personifying imagery, a deliberate use of climax, and an overreaching selection of detail to dramatize the mind-blowing sensation one has upon visiting an ominous city and calling it home”. He does a very nice job of fitting the quotes into the sentence. Sometimes quotes can sound “awkward” or out of place if there at the beginning of a sentence or just stuck in the middle of one. Eric really forms his sentences and places his quotes very nicely. The structure of his sentences and quote integration exemplify the analysis.
One suggestion I have to Eric is to tone down the vocabulary. Sometimes the use of big vocab words can loose the reader. I don’t think using big words is a bad thing because you are smart and you do sound smart! The only thing I would change is just to tone down some of the extreme vocabulary and work on getting to the main point with less strenuous words.

Anonymous said...

Jenna Aries' analysis of Eric Forman

Shifting from the expectations provided by a strong thesis to over-powering use of vocabulary in his analysis of Ann Petry’s The Street, Eric Forman utilizes rich analysis detail and strong quote integration but in some ways looses the reader with his grandiloquent vocabulary earning him a “9” on the Advanced Placement Rubric. In Forman’s analysis of The Street, he applies rich analysis detail to prove his thesis. He gives great examples from the text to supply the reader with knowledge from the passage. He also incorporates strong quote integration in the right places to make the analysis flow.
The quote integration plays a big role in Forman’s writing. He uses the quotes to make his analysis flow. One example of how he did this was simply in his opening sentence.. “Smoothly shifting focus from a menacing “November wind” to the seemingly foremost character in “The Street”, Ann Petry unleashes personifying imagery, a deliberate use of climax, and an overreaching selection of detail to dramatize the mind-blowing sensation one has upon visiting an ominous city and calling it home”. He does a very nice job of fitting the quotes into the sentence. Sometimes quotes can sound “awkward” or out of place if there at the beginning of a sentence or just stuck in the middle of one. Eric really forms his sentences and places his quotes very nicely. The structure of his sentences and quote integration exemplify the analysis.
One suggestion I have to Eric is to tone down the vocabulary. Sometimes the use of big vocab words can loose the reader. I don’t think using big words is a bad thing because you are smart and you do sound smart! The only thing I would change is just to tone down some of the extreme vocabulary and work on getting to the main point with less strenuous words.

Anonymous said...

Ian Mallor's Analysis of Erin Chancey's Analysis

While Erin Chancey's analysis of The Street showed time and thought had been invested in its creation, several factors contribute to it being a sub-par essay. The biggest problem is that her thesis statement seems to lack that “punch” that thesis statements should have; her devices are valid, but the deeper meaning she elected seems to stray from the core ideas of the passage. Her paragraph on personification was well-done, with good quote integration and eloquent support of her ideas; “the reason behind personifying the wind is to make it appear almost human with its own unique intentions for disrupting and delaying everyone on the street.” At this point Ms. Chancey begins to slip up; there is an unexplained lack of a paragraph about “dark imagery”, even though this example was in the center of the thesis statement, therefore making it a logical choice for a middle paragraph and therefore inexplicable that she would have skipped it. She clearly began to lose interest while writing her paragraph addressing the passage's ambiguity, and falls into the trap of summarizing the passage. Her decision to use the device of “subtle ambiguity” seems very weak and difficult to support – if Erin were to select one device to skip in her essay, it should've been that instead of imagery. All in all, in its current state, this essay rightfully deserves a 5, but with practice and refinement Erin Chancey could become one of the great literary geniuses to be studied for all time.

Anonymous said...

Cameron Hale
Mr. Kefor
Period D

Barely transitioning between the understanding of personification and imagery, Sara Pishadadian's analysis of "The Street" by Ann Petry provides for a greatly detailed explanation of the prompt with her incorporation of vivid imagery and personification, yet lacks the proper device differentiation, a far stretched and slightly under explained universal idea and less than adequate selection of quote integration.
It is clear throughout the analysis that Pishadadian has a firm grasp on the concept of the excerpt. Yet the constant bombardment of advanced, or flashy, vocabulary takes away from analyzing what exactly the prompt is. This may only be apparent due to the incredible similarities between her two literary devices, "startling imagery" and "vivid personification." Both devices explain the "sinister" and "forceful" actions which the wind uses however fail to differentiate enough that the body of her analysis becomes repetitive. Rather than drawing only upon the "malicious"(Paragraph 2) and "cruel"(Paragraph 3) "intentions" of the wind, Pishdadian could perhaps limit one paragraph to the characterized personification of the analysis and the other solely to the impact of the "startling imagery" rather than again acknowledging that the "imagery creates a force in the wind" which the reader has understood from the second paragraph.
Pishdadian's understanding of the prompt is again clear enough that it comes through within the first sentence. Several times throughout the analysis the "forceful", "malicious", "cruel", and "determined" characterizations of the wind are acknowledged. With this, her quote integration was appropriate but the analysis in tie with the universal idea was lacking. The "chicken bones and pork-chop bones" "positioned" "along the curb" were used but followed up with the declaration of the winds important presence in people's lives. While in this example the integration is very smooth and natural the analysis of the quote, or slight explanation, is very unrelated and presents a obscure universal idea. Rather than addressing quotes such as "found every scrap of paper" to repetitively explain the "malicious intentions" of the wind, Pishdadian could have addressed its actions on Lutie Johnson or the sign in order to depict her oncoming universal idea.
Despite the bare differentiation and quote analysis Pishdadian is very succinct and impressive with her syntax and diction. The topic sentence of the body paragraph explains the "sinister force that is adamant on achieving its goal of removing pedestrians." Right away the main sentence to the opening body paragraph portrays a clear-cut and sophisticated analysis of what she'll be addressing later in the paper. Pishdadian consistently produces non-repetitive synonyms for the "cruel" "intentions" of the wind, making utilization of "malicious", "sinister", "forceful", "determined", and "crude". Not only does this avoid the possibility of becoming 'boringly' repetitive but it depicts a great vocabulary results in specialized diction.
It is the thorough understanding of the prompt and the tremendous utilization of syntax and diction which allows Pishdadian's analysis to successfully develop. Despite this Pishdadian must work on her differentiation of literary devices, the proper selection and analysis of quote integration and a succinct and clearly defined universal idea.

Sarah N said...

analysis of chengqis analysis!
Progressing from a strong thesis to humdrum vocabulary in his analysis of The Street, Chengqi promotes unique quote integration and sublime concluding sentences to further clarify the symbiotic relationship between the wind and the building that is crucial to Lutie Johnson’s decision making.
Chengqi clearly demonstrates his knowledge of the excerpt when he establishes the unconventional relationship between the building and the wind. Connecting the building and the wind to each other through Lutie, he awakens the personality of the wind and gives more character to the setting. However, the vocabulary lacks diversity and does not contribute to the insight offered within the depths of the analysis, within the analysis there is so much focus on universal idea and quote integration that the focus on word choice seems to have been left out.
At the end of each supportive paragraph there is a sentence that stands out and gives further insight into the excerpt. Chengqi further exemplifies the relationship between the setting and Lutie by an awesome concluding sentence, “Lutie is able to read the sign anyway, and embraces the building, while trying to hold the wind back”. By stating that Lutie holds the wind back he gives the wind a humanlike personality that is able to be held back, he also connects the building and the wind by characterizing the wind as what is trying to hold Lutie back from embracing the building.
The use of unique and skillful quote integration adds to the insight of the analysis by demonstrating a deeper understanding of Petry’s excerpt. By using quotes such as “grabs”, “pries”, and “blows” Chengqi gives the relationship between Lutie and the wind humanistic trait, he also demonstrates that the wind has a negative personality using quotes such as how the wind lifted the hair off of the back of her neck making her feel suddelny “naked and bald”. The quotes used in the analysis show that the wind is trying to defer Lutie from getting into the building; by utilizing “violent assault”, “discouraging”, and “found all the dirt and dust” adds to the negative connotation that chengqi assigns to the personality of the wind.
Chengqis analysis gave tremendous insight into The Street, it connected the wind, Lutie, and the building. Quote integration, concluding sentences were the strong points of the analysis that made the analysis very insightful, although lacking in vocabulary I would give this analysis an 8 on the rubric.

Kristen Tenglin said...

Blog Reflection
Reflecting upon Amanda’s analysis of my analysis, I believe the feedback that I received was reasonable and deserved. Amanda mentioned that I should consider selecting quotes that could not have “easily have been taken from any text” in order to ensure the AP reader that I understood and can utilize the material in my analysis. In the future, I will attempt to incorporate “more unique quotes” which “serve to enhance [my] argument”, but I will continue to sprinkle in some single word quotes to prove that I can use both methods. I appreciated Amanda’s compliments regarding my “accurate depiction” of the universal idea and “exquisite dissection of the most crucial literary devices.” Both the compliments and the critique were useful in shaping the way I plan to approach writing the next analysis, and I intend to take Amanda’s advice in order to raise my grade in the future.

Anonymous said...

Brittany Harnedy
Analysis of Amanda Sullivan’s Analysis
Successfully understanding the universal idea of Ann Petry’s “The Street”, Amanda Sullivan effectively analyzes the excerpt with a variety of sentence structures and proper quote integrations, which both merge to utterly divert the reader’s attention away from her summarization of the plot, earning herself the score of a “7.5” according to the Advanced Placement Rubric.
Varying the structure of her sentences makes Sullivan’s analysis sound interesting and elegant. Sullivan starts off each of her paragraphs with a different structure and wording. Each paragraph begins with a different subject. The second one’s subject is “Ann Petry”; the third one’s is “the passage”; and the fourth one’s is “the most important and significant device”. Beginning each new topic in a different manner appeals to the reader and sways them to continue reading. Sullivan does not overuse the simple structure of a noun followed by a verb followed by an adverb. Sullivan switches the organization around, putting the verb “settling” first. She also uses descriptive adjectives that fit the topic almost perfectly to liven up her analysis.
Sullivan smoothly incorporates the selected quotations into her analysis without interrupting the fluid ambiance of her writing. Instead of integrating the entire sentence, she only uses the important words and includes some of her own as well, for example “The wind begins by ‘rattling’ the garbage cans.” By putting some of the quote into her own words it is still stated and understood but in a much more concise way. To describe the personification of the wind, first she analyzes then she supports it in the same sentence by saying “because”, followed by the single actions the wind made. She used short quotes, including “’rattled’”, “’sucked’”, and “’drove’” in order to get a single point across with three supportive examples.
Although Sullivan’s essay was flawless structurally, the content of her writing needs some improvement. While writing her analysis, it seems as if Sullivan assumed that the reader had never read the excerpt and knew nothing about it. Instead of analyzing, she mostly summarized what she had read. She makes the reader informed about “Lutie Johnson, a woman searching for an apartment, but having a hard time because of the violent wind”, but continues to do so by summarizing her problems of “trying to read a sign giving information about an apartment” and being “unable to clarify if the apartment has two or three rooms”.
If ignoring the few summarizations throughout the analysis, Amanda Sullivan would have qualified for a nine. The way in which she words what she wants to say makes the content even better and distracts you from small mistakes. If she had analyzed the deeper meaning more and left out some of the storyline her analysis would have been outstanding.

Anonymous said...

Erin Chancey-Analysis of The Street
Shifting from actions of the wind to a harsh realization in "The Street", Ann Petry utilizes clever personification, dark imagery, and subtle ambiguity to convey the influences nature can have on people's decisions and lives.

Throughout "The Street", Ann Petry cleverly incorporates a vast amount of personification, saying that it "rattled", "sucked", and "drove" among others. The reason behind personifying the wind is to make it appear almost human with its own unique intentions for disrupting and delaying everyone on the street. Because the wind is given human qualities, it appears as though it has its own plan and that nature always has its own agenda for everyone despite people's own wishes.

"The Street" becomes quite ambiguous for several reasons. The wind seems to be portrayed as an evil being. At the beginning it is disrupting everyone on the street preventing them from getting where they need to go and doing whatever it is they need to do. Some may interpret this as being a dilliberant act by the wind attempting to stop everyone's plans. However, at the end, Lutie eventually reads the sign she has been trying to see and decides she will move into the apartment for rent. Because of this, the wind may not have had anything to do with everyone being late and disrupting everyone. The interpretation of the wind's actions is almost entirely up to the reader.

Anonymous said...

Danielle MacDermott
Analysis of the Analysis Reflection(Stevie Hynes)

I will use some of Stevie's critiques to help me the next time I go to write an essay because I do believe that I can improve on transitions and my quote intergrations. I do not believe that explaining my quotes was bad because I think it is important to make sure people understand what it is you are saying. Also, I felt Stevie contradicted himself by saying my quotes "were not poorly chosen" but prior says that "the quote is not a good choice" if it has to be explained. Therefore, making it confusing for me to understand what it was about my quotes that I did right and wrong. I felt like Stevie was harsh in his analysis because he used words like "failed" and even manage to say what it was that I did wrong for the majority of the paragraph that was suppose to be about the one thing I did right. Finally, I respect what Stevie has to say about my analysis because everyone is entitled to their own opinion but I do believe that my writing, while it does still need improvement, was not as bad as Stevie makes it out to be.

Anonymous said...

Caisey Calabro
Analysis Reflection of Emily Christy's analysis of my analysis

I think that Emily’s analysis of my analysis was very helpful and informative. One of the things I do not feel comfortable with is quote integration. To have her praise it in this analysis, it gives me more confidence for when I go to write another essay. Emily also mentioned how I have to check my grammatical errors. I will make sure from now on to do a better job of going over my entire essay and making sure I do not have silly mistakes in them. Her critiquing of my essay has definitely opened up my eyes to let me see what I can do better to improve and score a grade of a “9”.

Cassie H. said...

Cassie Hynes' Analysis of Emily Christy's Analysis

Pairing puzzling structure with novice quote integration, Emily Christy’s analysis of Ann Petry’s excerpt from “The Street” receives a grade of a “4” on the rubric by “expressing” somewhat efficiently how the author establishes the wind so thoroughly through combining a unique approach with poor word choice and “underdeveloped” concepts.
Though the analysis “fails to adequately address the question”, the approach taken by the paper is one that “allows the reader to view the wind” as a chaotic force working against all things. The wind is viewed, in the analysis, as a hindrance to those “who are searching for sanctuary”. The characterization present within “The Street” is examined in Christy’s analysis; the characterization, deemed “hasty”, is considered encouragement for the wind as “a challenge to an everyday person”. According to the paper, the intent of the author is to highlight the hope of sanctuary through the antithesis of the brutal wind. Petry’s use of personification is also studied within the analysis in order to illuminate how frequently the wind can be seen “bullying the people” and “victimizing objects”. Attention is drawn to the fact that the wind is personified both physically and intellectually by referencing the author’s use of verbs “’fingering its way along the curb’…it…’lifted’…and ‘grabbed’”. The paper is dedicated to its topic, and does an interesting job in discussing and exploring the wind.
“Weak” and “repetitive diction” are both prominent within the analysis of Petry’s “The Street”. The paper’s first body paragraph opens: “Forceful and sinister, the wind ‘rattled’ the swaying personification”. It is mentioned twice verbatim but there is no explanation given as to what “swaying personification” truly is. The analysis goes on to mention that Petry “states, ‘slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood.’ But she uses it to prompt the fact that the wind is victimizing objects on ‘the Street’.” The sentences are choppy and fragmented, indicating “weak control over conventions”. Rather than blatantly pointing out what is written, the sentence could have claimed that Petry alludes to the violent forces of nature through the dramatic imagery. The following sentence attempts to interpret the quotation, but does so with lack luster prose and is “misguided”, as wind has no influence on rust. As the paper goes on to discuss the “emboldened” and “hasty” use of characterization in the excerpt, Christy notes that “throughout the beginning Petry uses the wind as the person, and then she develops into a real person”. One may be confused by the wording of the sentence, though what is meant is that there is a shift of focus from the personified wind to an actual character, not that the wind develops into a person or otherwise; clarification is needed here. In the closing, “many great ideas such as personification, imagery and characterization” are briefly regarded. The amateurish prose make a bad impression, especially for the end paragraph. The sentence could be improved by referring to the “great ideas” as tools or devices, even explaining what they did would better the conclusion significantly.

Cassie H. said...

Analysis of Emily Christy's Analysis Cont'd
Although there is an overall dedication to the theme, there is no follow-through or deep thinking in the analysis. While the wind is the topic of the paper, there is a failure to address why Petry focuses on the wind so thoroughly. The incomplete thought process comes across to the reader as crude construction. In the second body paragraph, that of imagery, it is said that “The wind is forcing people to be ‘hurried’ but there is no strong, or even pertinent, evidence. The following sentence reiterates the same idea, also with no aid. The imagery, supposedly, “leads to the emboldened use of characterization”. Had the body paragraph been constructed and analyzed more completely, the two devices may be linked, however, because it is not, the characterization and the “grim imagery” seem distant from one another. When transitioning to characterization, it is stated that the wind is depicted as a “challenge to an everyday person” through the use of “hasty characterization”. Though, before supporting that idea with evidence from the text, or explaining why that might be so, the focus switches over to the “unique bond” shared by the wind and Lutie Johnson, and again to the responsibility Lutie is faced with. There is little to no elaboration on the points before moving on to the next ones. Again and again Christy’s train of thought seemed to be derailed. Much of the body strays from the original thesis, and the closing, in its entirety, is a “weak conclusion”. By saying that “Petry gives her readers exactly what they need to read at the beginning of a book” without providing any support on which to base it, the closeing is rather generic. The last sentence claims that that what one searches for may not really be what they seek, a good premise but somewhat unclear. People only search for what they seek, though not necessarily for what they need. If rephrased, the sentence could provide a potential dynamic end to the paper.
Overall, Emily Christy’s analysis “contains some supportive evidence”, and “conveys the writers ideas, but is underdeveloped”. The grade most representative of the analysis, according to the scale, is a 4. The paper has its faults, but that is not to say that it does not represent unique ideas, an independent point of view, and dedication to the topic. The work seemed rushed, and had more time been spent writing, or editing it, the analysis may have scored significantly better. Though, because the response “fails to adequately address the question”, little can be determined.

Anonymous said...

Marco Orlando


Despite a voluminous amount of grammatical and structural errors and flaws, Kim Lynch constructs her analysis of ‘The Street’ by presenting a heavy use of quotations, emphasizing Petry’s use of personification, and reflecting upon the ‘tedious’ mood in which the story delivers with the intent to not only showcase Petry’s literal complexity, but to vaguely summarize the overall message and reasoning behind ‘The Street’.
As portrayed from the start, Kim clearly appreciates the use of quotations in her analysis in order to support her ideas with concrete evidence from the excerpt. If she mentions a specific ideal or touches upon one of many of Petry’s literal techniques and talents, there is most likely a direct quotation to soon follow in which concludes the message she was driven to persuade. Though many of the quotations may not appear as appropriate evidence, and overwhelm the analysis, there is no denying that her idea to persuade the reader through a heavy use of quotations does not go unnoticed, and is actually more beneficial than negative with her essay. Aside from what was just stated, it would not be ethical to finalize the paragraph without briefly touching upon her use of brackets within a quotation that serve to indicate the specific key words within a quotation that stress the use of personification and reflect upon the winds humanistic characteristics. Though her use of quotations and brackets may require a little more thought and arrangement, her overall ideas behind it prove to be both persuasive and appropriate; respectable thinking.
If there is one idea that Kim seeks to prove most dominant above all else, it is Petry’s use of personification in order to project a ‘tedious’ and discouraging mood. “Throughout the excerpt, Petry uses personification to indicate how the wind has a mind of its own. The wind [grabs], [lifts], [fingers] and [sucks] as if its actions are human-like actions”. As the quote compares both mental and physical attributes of human qualities obtained by the wind, Kim recognizes in deep thought, that the wind, “with a mind of its own” and physical representation of human anatomy is not just a force of nature, but a tremendous burden; a burden masked with the image of a beast that obtains the power to think, make decisions and conduct it’s destructive acts reflecting upon its human structures; from “fingers” to the “mind”. With the intentional depiction of the wind’s representation of a monster-like character, the ‘tedious’ mood that Kim had mentioned blends perfectly with Petry’s use of personification. What other moods would a monster/beast apply varying from anything other than distress, discouragement, fear or destructive harm. “The reader can see how the wind is affecting them by discouraging the people”. The entire mood revolves around the wind’s power and intellect, all of which conclude the severity of personification Kim not only recognizes the effect of the wind’s human qualities, and the depressing, “tedious” mood the excerpt provides, but includes both within her analysis that may be grouped together, with one supporting the other in an almost perfect manner. The “tedious” mood and use of personification go hand in hand; “finger” in “finger”.
Though Kim’s analysis contains many obvious flaws and confusing structural/grammatical aspects, it is quite clear that Miss Lynch recognizes the most underlying and dominant literal techniques and presentations of Petry’s complex style in which gave way to extensive analytic review. Kim’s use of numerous quotes, emphasis on personification, and revealing the excerpt’s “tedious” mood, only deems her analysis as well-thought out and persuasive, despite the many issues that require extensive attention. Well done.

Anonymous said...

Matt Remick
Analysis Analysis

Sara Pishdadian’s analysis of my prompt has given me a large amount of insight into what I can do to better myself in terms of my writing. Reflecting back to Pishdadian’s argument, she mentions my “confusing structure” which undermines my analysis. Adding the cluttered nature of my analysis was also a clear “lack of flow” which leads to the analysis to read choppy and confusing. The fact that I had put the paragraphs in a different order than what was outlined in the thesis was less of a stylistic choice, but more of a wanton oversight. Although my structure was lacking, my thesis was “overall superb”, and my support for it was also “logical”; thus I can focus entirely on the Achilles heel of my analysis which is structure. Structure can be remedied easily by simple proofreading, which is a tool I am hesitant to use more often than not.

mike adler said...

Mike Adler
Shifting from the physical characteristics of nature to the important impact it has on ones mood in the "The Street”, Ann Petrey exploits dismal imagery, menacing personification and an aggressive tone in order to express the idea that something as simple as “the wind” is enough to produce a “violent assault” against those who do not feel welcome.
Under certain circumstances the wind is enough to devastate one’s confidence. Petrey explains how a harsh wind can make someone feel “suddenly naked and bald.” This “rush of coldness” is capable of making even the strongest person feel weak. Not only does this “discourage the people walking along the street” but also it attacks the newcomers with a feeling of despair that is impossible to escape.
Petrey forces these ideas on the reader through violent personification. The wind constantly works to disrupt the innocent citizens. It “fingers its way along the curb” and lifts the dirt off the street, throwing it into the faces of helpless bystanders “making it difficult to breathe” and “blinding them”. There is no defense against the uninvited “assault”.
Petrey’s attacking tone makes it clear just how helpless the weather can make someone feel. The more people tried to hide the more the wind would “grab their hats, pry their scarves from around their necks and stick its fingers inside their coat collars”. These chilling descriptions give the reader a sense of just how ferocious an uninviting wind can be.
Through her detailed figurative language Petrey allows the reader to get a feel for what the protagonist, Lutie Johnson is going through. Being alone in a city is not easy but when even the weather appears to be pushing one away, happiness becomes just about impossible.

Anonymous said...

Brian Loud
12/11/10
Class: A


Brian L. Analysis of David A. Analysis


David clearly identifies the shift in the setting of The Street. He then details each phase of the direction, feelings and atmosphere. He clearly identifies the role the wind plays in the setting of “The Street.”
David takes liberty with the image of the street sign and predicts through foreshadowing the possible bleak future, David did a good job using the physical makeup of the sign and movement to describe the atmosphere, setting and possible future of Lutie Johnson.
David goes into great detail describing the literary devices use to describe the setting. He indicates that these devices are used to build up to the future of Lutie Johnson. He does not indicate in any of his analysis the imagery, personification as being used to describe the trials or hardships Lutie had endured or faced to get to this point in her life.

Peter L. said...

Peter L. Reflection on Chris R. and Chengqi G. Analyses of Analysis.

Both of my critics were very liberal in their compliments and I am flattered. According to them, my descriptions and insights are well articulated; I will strive to continue and better this practice in the future.
Chengqi states that I had deviated from my original universal idea and upon rereading my thesis, I agree with him wholeheartedly. Not only did I not expand upon my idea, I had moved completely from the original intent. It is very easy to be carried away with the writing. I shall put into immediate practice the rereading of my works more thoroughly with special attention to focus on original subject.
Chris’s critique draws parallels to Chengqi’s in the aspect of universal idea and an adequate follow through. Both he and Chengqi had stated that I was missing a closing paragraph. Although I am aware that a closing paragraph is not essential to a piece and the exclusion of one is not a detriment, I was also aware that, as Chris stated, my analysis lacked what I was supposed to make up for if I had done the one. Seeing as both of my critics note a lack of substance or a flaring out at the end of my piece, I shall begin to construct solid conclusions to all proceeding analyses to practice until I find reasonable comfort and reassurances that they will no longer be needed (not necessarily meaning that I will banish conclusions all together once I have achieved mastery). Both of their honorable opinions are deeply appreciated and their valuable insights will be taken to heart.

Anonymous said...

Kate ledbetter's analysis of Shayna Rahwan's analysis

Shifting from a well-thought thesis to disorganized supportive paragraphs in Shayna Rahwan's analysis of "The Street", she utilizes strong devices and good use of quotes but lacks organized structure.
Her choice of including "assaulting personification", "forceful imagery", and "abrupt characterization" as her devices proves she understood the excerpt and noticed the most used devices. She does an excellent job in using quotes to help define the use of each device in the excerpt. Utilizing quotes such as, "rattled the top of the garbage cans" to show personification, "every scrap of paper" to show imagery, and "naked and bald" to show characterization show her intelligence of knowing what devices mean what and how to match them with quotes.
Shayna only wrote four paragraphs which is okay but with this excerpt and the strong devices she gave, five paragraphs would have better sufficed. It also could have been better organized, each paragraph had sentences in it that just did not belong. In the last paragraph she also does too much summarizing of the excerpt which is not necessary. She was capable of better work because she had the correct tools for it but did not put them to use.
Shayna Rahwan's analysis of Petry's excerpt started off very good but needs a little help to get it where it can be. Her use of devices were very well put together but the way she organized her analysis could have been better. Making it five paragraphs instead of four also might have helped. With that said I would give this analysis a six.

Anonymous said...

Brian Loud
12/8/11
Class: A

Shifting from the focus of everyone on the street to one individual in “Question 2”, Ann Petry uses invading personification, obscure imagery, and chilling mood to show how the “violent” environment has an effect on an “exposed” person.
Throughout the opening of “Question 2”, Petry gives the wind human characteristics. The wind uses these human characteristics to prevent the people on “116th street” from accomplishing their aspiration. “Fingering its way along the curve the wind set the bits of paper to dancing high in the air” This gives the wind life by giving the wind the ability to walk around; creating havoc and confusion, “so that a barrage of paper swirled into the faces of the people on the street”. The wind is used to show the hardship of life and a human’s reaction in the midst of troubling or harried times.
Obscure imagery is used to describe the infringement of the wind into the personal space of Lutie Johnson. “The wind lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked and bald”. It showed Lutie’s fear established by her shivering because of the cold of the wind. The wind can be described as showing things that can occur to us by nature in life that will make us raw or naked and the need to find the strength to move on.
Ann Petry’s writing gives the reader a very somber and chilling mood. The feeling of death is given off by the use of “chicken bones and pork- chop bones” in Petry’s writing. The wind “wrapped newspapers around their feet entangling them until the people cursed deep in their throats”. This gives the reader’s mood a chilling vibe almost as like they wind will not let the people on “116th street” escape.

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