Friday, September 26, 2014

Interdisciplinary Arts: 9-26

1. Click here to view a drawing demonstration by David Kassan. On Kassan's YouTube site, watch at least 2 more- be sure that at least one clip is a time-lapse video. For each video, articulate a) the parallels to course instruction and b) the distinctions (what he does differently, or adds to the process).

2. Link to Mr. Kefor's Academic Writing (linked on the left). Read the Pestalozzi Essay and take notes, focusing on the parallels between the claims of the essay and the content of this course thus far.  You will be quizzed on this next week.

14 comments:

Carli Arcaro said...

One parallel that David Kassan's clip includes is how he did his block in to start but one thing that differs is that he uses a utensil shaped like an arrow to smudge and push the charcoal in a certain aspect for his design.

jake burgess said...

1
In the original time lapse that you prompted us to watch, he starts with a quick block in. He basically does the same process as us except he will go over some areas with a white pencil to bring out the values.
In the time lapse where he sketches an African American Kassan starts the process with a quick block in and then adds slight detail with a stroke of his pen. He does not add background to his sketch.
In the time lapse sketch where he draws a female. He starts with swift calculated swipes then progressively gets more detailed and you begin to question reality. For this is the quickest transition for block in to final print.

Anonymous said...

a) David Kassan does a block-in of the drawing, and then moves to the general shape of the items involved and then draws breaks it down into the complete block in of the figure.

b) Kassan adds onto the picture by adding paint and color, he also is doing a self portrait. He also uses charcoal in his drawings rather than pencils.

Anonymous said...

a) David Kassan does a block-in of the drawing, and then moves to the general shape of the items involved and then draws breaks it down into the complete block in of the figure.

b) Kassan adds onto the picture by adding paint and color, he also is doing a self portrait. He also uses charcoal in his drawings rather than pencils.
-Camden Cleathero

Laine Parker said...


1. In “General Pencil Factory Demo,” David Kassan uses a lot of edging accurately depict the shadows on the factory worker he’s drawing, like we did with the spheres.
He uses a white pencil to even further the contrast, while we did not / have not.

2. In “David Kassan - OS Artistas, Faro, Portugal, Time Lapse Drawing Demo,” David Kassan used a lot of edging, as we did with the spheres.
His block-in is expanded upon relatively quickly, instead of being adjusted and such, like we did with the Chinese take-out boxes.

3. In “Drawing the Eyes with David Kassan,” David Kassan, at first, draws the shape (the eye) without directly outlining and drawing it with wicked precision, which is similar to what we had to when drawing the block-in for the take-out boxes.
He has to take anatomy into consideration, which we haven’t had to when drawing spheres and boxes.

Brody Wilson said...

What Kassan does that is similar to what you have showed us was his blocking in of any drawing he does. i watched him draw quite a few people and each time he starts off with a very basic geometric shape that is just the beginning to what kassan is capable of. what he does differently is he films it, we have never once filmed ourselves drawing. but a real difference is that he uses charcoal primarily, which is wild because that stuff does not erase.

Anonymous said...

Brian Cronin
In the drawings David Kassan starts with a very simple block in. He only draws the basic shapes of what he is drawing. During his block ins he uses simple swipes with his pencil. He does not use any dark lines or put any pressure into his lines. Once he feels that his block in's proportions are correct he begins to add detail to the block in. David also uses both with and dark pencils. He does this to increase the drawing's value and contrast.

amanda pierce said...

When I first watched David Kassans video The General Pencil Factory Demo I noticed he started by blocking-in his drawing just like we have done in class. He begins with an envelope and then adds lines as he goes. I also noticed Kassan used binoculars to see smaller details while he was observing the man. In the video Painting a Life the video shows Kassan getting his materials ready such as his pencil and paper before he starts his block in. He starts with such a basic envelope and by the constant adding of lines he is able to achieve drawing the lady accurately on the paper. Also in Time lapse drawing with Pan Pastel Kassan uses a pastel on the end of a knife and he uses a tissue to blend his lines and shading.

Anonymous said...

In the first video; A drawing demonstration by David Kassan, there were many similarities between the video itself and what we learned in class. For example; the box in. A box in is the beginning shape of a drawing, when you first begin the piece. In a box in, you can almost tell what you're drawing, and the general edges are drawn and you are able to build off of it. With the box in you are more able to put details into the piece you are working on. Also, he used certain tools (some that I was unfamiliar with) to put the proper shading into the drawing depending on the light source. With this, he was able to make the drawing more accurate and bring it to life.
On the other hand, he also did many things that we do not do. For example, he used live models while we use casts or other inanimate objects. Also, he used binoculars. I assume he did so to get and be able to portray all of the small details and make it more realistic.

Sydney Brady said...

In the first video; A drawing demonstration by David Kassan, there were many similarities between the video itself and what we learned in class. For example; the box in. A box in is the beginning shape of a drawing, when you first begin the piece. In a box in, you can almost tell what you're drawing, and the general edges are drawn and you are able to build off of it. With the box in you are more able to put details into the piece you are working on. Also, he used certain tools (some that I was unfamiliar with) to put the proper shading into the drawing depending on the light source. With this, he was able to make the drawing more accurate and bring it to life.
On the other hand, he also did many things that we do not do. For example, he used live models while we use casts or other inanimate objects. Also, he used binoculars. I assume he did so to get and be able to portray all of the small details and make it more realistic.

Anonymous said...

1)General Pencil Factory Demo

a.In the General Pencil Factory Demo, David Kassan starts with the envelope portion of the block-in process, just like we do.
b.After the block-in process, David Kassan appears to shade the some major parts and add some shadows to his drawing. Rather than drawing most of the person/object and then shading, he shades first.

2)Timelapse Drawing with PanPastel

a.In the Timelapse Drawing with PanPastel video, after the block in process David Kassan begins to add the details like the eyes, nose, mouth, etc. He adds even smaller details after that like the pupils and wrinkles.
b.In the video, David starts with shading during the block-in-process. Instead of just drawing the outline and getting that done first, he appears to be shading as he’s creating the shapes in his block in process.

3)Artist Daily Presents Drawing the Eye with David Jon Kassan

a.In the Drawing the Eye tutorial, David Kassan creates a dark contrast around the edges of the eye. The eye is more of a light color and the edges around create a sharp contrast.
b.In this video, David’s drawing the eye, without really drawing the eye. He is drawing the edges and the areas around the eye which eventually lead to drawing the eye itself.

-Amy Patrone

Jared S said...

In the original linked video, David Kassan starts with a quick block-in to obtain the general image for the worker's face. Then, Kassan uses the cross-hatching technique to add detail and texture to his face. Unlike the teachings, Kassan uses a white pencil to add highlights to contrast against the shadows to accentuate the features of the man.

In the video "Timelapse Drawing with PanPastel," Kassan once again begins with an envelope for his face and eventually develops it into a proportional figure. What Kassan does differently is use a black and white pastel for the background/shadow. He also keeps the block-in shape for the figure's shoulders and shirt as an artsy addition in the final product.

Anonymous said...

After watching a few of David Kassan's videos, i noticed that the how he did his block in was extremely similar to how we set up ours in class. also when i watched all of his videos i noticed that when he works he tends to have dark detail as his foundation, then when he is finished with his work he has intense white lines and cross hatching to sharpen all of his details. Also he even though in all his work he starts with intense shades, he is able to get a wide range of values that become subtle and work as a whole.
-Arianna Heath

Anonymous said...

In the videos General Pencil Demo, Timelapse Drawing with PanPastel and Trailer for Kassan Drawing DVD, David Kassan shows several similarities and differences to the way we have been learning in class to draw. In each piece, he begins with a rough block in of the subject, much like how we have learned. After completing the block in, he begins rough shading of general areas before adding more accurate edging to begin to add details. A slight difference I saw was that he did not create a solid contour outline as Ruder suggested, but built edging through contrast, smudging the charcoal rather than using a solid line. He also made use of toned paper in order to use white for highlights as well as the dark for shadows. He also creates a high contrasting background in some pieces in order to create the focal point at the subject's face.

Eric Sanford