Wednesday, April 9, 2008

The Kite Runner Revisited


Seniors- after viewing The Kite Runner movie, consider and respond, with highly specific and well articulated analysis, to the following prompts:

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?
2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?
3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?
4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

Courtney Gallagher


1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

The fact that their were subscripts, many people do not have that kind of imagination to listen, read, and put two and two together. I personally enjoyed this factor.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

The character of Baba maintained his paradoxical nature in the movie by favoring Hassan, and having such resepct as he did in the book among others. A specific scene that showed his true nature pertaining to the novel was when he forgave Hassan for "stealing" Amir's watch that Baba had given him.


3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

The movie made Amir out to be more of a hero than the book did, by showing his adventure going to Afghanistan and rescuing Sohrab.This made him out to be something great ,and hero like.

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain

The most powerful scene in the movie that wasn't as powerful in the book was when Amir read the letter that Hassan had written him for when he came back to Afghanistan.

Glassman said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

The fact that the movie is about a culture of whom we are fighting against. Also, the book is relativly new, many people who have not read it might not be interested in it.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

When Baba talks to Amir about "never hitting him" and also saving the man's wife from being raped. Baba is a very stubborn and patriotic character in both the book and movie.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

The protagonist is not always liked by the audience, at first people see Amir as weak, but his intentions were still good. He never meant to hurt Hassan, and tried his best to make up for it in the end.

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.

Kite Running in general was emphisized since those scenes were kept in the movie from the book were much deeper in detail. For some scenes, they were kept out of the movie, but those were put in, and at a higher meaning.

Anonymous said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success? I belive the fight scences were more visual in the mind and detailed then the movie and it lacked alot of action between Assef and Amir towards the end.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why? The scene where he pushes the russian doctor off him when he is checking his health. This was a key scence because it still showed his hatred towards the Russians.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?
The movie shows Amir as a character who never stands up for himself or to fight for others like in the book. Yet in the book Amir actually fought back to Assef in the end insted it was sorab who stood up to Assef.

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.
I belive to get the full experience on the kite runner you need to read the book. There are things in the book which you will never get out of the movie. Such as their culture which is more in detail in the book then the movie.

Josh Spilewski

Anonymous said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

I think some things that factored into the film's lack of critical and popular success is the fact that it had subscripts and was in a different language. A lot of people do not enjoy that therefore it did not get as much success.


2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

Although i missed most of the film, Baba is a complex and paradoxical charcter, he is very respected and confident. He stands up for things he believes, he is someone you can rely on but he also has opposite qualities. After Amir thought all of these great things about his father, he later finds out that Baba had been lying to him his whole life, finding out that Hassan really is his brother.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

Amir is a controversial protagonist, usually people like the protagonists and think of them as some sort of hero. Throughout the whole film and book, Amir was a mean person and no one really liked him but towards the end the audience ends up liking him. At the end he sticks up for what he believes in and does the right things.


4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.

I believe everything throughout th book and the film stayed powerful and convincing. The plot always stayed the same and had the same ideas and problems going. The theme is the most essential part and that was the most powerful.

Jennifer O'Brien

Anonymous said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success? I personally think the there is a lack of critical and popular success for this film because there was not a lot of hype about the movie. Many people have read the book because it is new but most people who read books for pleasure don’t want to see a movie adaptation of the book they read because they think that the book will get destroyed. Plus the movie only opened in select cities and that doesn’t help get people to see it.


2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why? Baba remains complex and paradoxical in the film because he does the same things like he still tells Amir it is wrong to lie and then later on we find out that Hassan is his son. This scene happens in the movie like it happens in the book and the movie.


3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why? In the movie you see the character in a new way so you actually see his evil doings. I see more emotion from Amir in this movie and it gives me shivers.


4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain. The movies plot and theme still remains the same for me because it still seems powerful. I actually got more emotion from the movie from the rape scene, but the novels theme seemed more powerful.
Adam Hart

Anonymous said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

The lack of critical and popular success the film recieved, in my opinion obviously came from people who didn't read the book, so they didn't get to analyze or relate to Afghan culture and the story.


2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film?

Baba's character is a very traditional, brave, and stand up guy. He is a puzzle to me in a sense because he lies to Amir about Hassan being his brother. Baba preaches to Amir about lying.

Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

The scene when Amir's relative calls him to come and visit, to talk about Hassan's death and his son. This scene is relevant because it reveals Baba as a liar, and someone who kept a secret.


3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him?

The movie portrays Amir as a "whimp" in a way. Hassan always sticks up for Amir as if he knew Amir was his brother all along. At the end of the movie Amir breaks his whimpish characterization by rescuing Hassan's son.

Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

The audience feels empathetic for Amir because they can not relate to him.



CASEY PIPES

Anonymous said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

I think that the film lacked success because not many people have read The Kite Runner. After reading the book I became interested in watching the movie to see what it was like. People who havent read the novel wouldnt be as interested in this movie because they would know little about what was going on.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

When Amir was a child, Baba talked about lying and stealing and how he shouldnt be doing either of them. As Amir reaches adulthood and Baba is dead he finds out that his father lied to him and stole his right to a brother as Hassan died as well. These scenes were key to maintaining his paradoxical nature.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

The majority of the movie was about him becoming good again and his stay in Afghanistan. I thought Amir's reaction to what happend to Hassan was cut off a bit compared to the book. I would say the audience was apathetic towards Amir and his plight because the movie left out some key scenes involving Sohrab. The movie showed Sohrab not talk for a few days it seemed where in the book he didnt speak or show emotion for months. Along with Sohrabs near death experience not happening, I would say the audience would be apathetic towards him.

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain

The overall plot of the movie was strong but it left out to many scenes that happend in the book. I would say the book itself gives a better representation of the story than the movie as its much more detailed and you dont miss out on the key parts of the story. The only scene that remained powerful to me in the movie was the soccer stadium. What they showed and what was said in the novel was pretty much what I imagined when reading.


James Kellogg
Period E

Anonymous said...

1.What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

-I believe the film lacked success due to the fact that it took place in Afghanistan and made the country look bad. I don’t believe people (especially in the Middle East) want to view a movie that deals with the Taliban and the bad affects it has on a country. It could have also been the fact that The Kite Runner is a relatively new book and film so people aren’t familiar with it.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

-The main scenes where Baba remains complex and paradoxical are when he tries to keep Ali and Hassan from leaving, saving the women from being raped, and talking to the general for Amir to marry his daughter. These scenes show Baba’s true character and how he was in the novel. His complex and paradoxical nature are displayed more than ever in these scenes.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

- The film doesn’t do the best job portraying Amir as we now him from the beginning of the book, but towards the end of the film we see him in his true skin. The audience sees him in a sympathetic way due to how he redeems himself in the end of the film and novel.

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.

-The elements that still remain meaningful and convincing to me are the relationship Amir and Hassan had as kids, the effect that Assef had on the movie/novel, and Amir’s determination to bring Sohrab back to America. All of these plot points are very powerful and develop The Kite Runner as the great book/movie it has become.

By Eric Olson
Class E

Anonymous said...

1. This film was most-likely not very popular due to many Americans' general dislike for the Muslim culture. Many Americans probably are hesitant to learn and/or embrace the Muslim culture due to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
2. Baba remains complex and paradoxical by being so well respected and by constantly favoring Hassan. A scene that showed Baba's true nature was when he was drinking at Amir's party even though it is a well known fact that it is against their religion and morals to do such things.
3. The movie characterizes Amir as more of a weak person. He struggles to stand up for himself and tends to get beaten down in the movie. The audience could be empathetic towards Amir. Many people haven't been through what Amir has been through, but people can uderstand how it feels to make those weak decisions and constantly struggle.
4. What still remained powerful in the book and in the movie was the scene where Amir watches Hassan get helplessly raped. You feel angry at Amir for not intervening when you read both the book and the moviel. The scene where Amir goes back to Afghanistan to get Hassan's son is much more powerful in the movie than the book. The fighting definately appears to be more graphic and emotional. The fact that Amir went through all of this trouble and never just broke down and gave up was powerful in the both the movie and the story of The Kite Runner.
-Keith Kelleher

Anonymous said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

I think that the movie in general did not make sense to the viewer unless you have read the book. A lot of important parts were missing and because of this, scenes in the movie left the viewer questioning what really happened. Also, the subtitles direct the viewer to read instead of watching the film and enjoying it. At the same time they without the subtitles, or if it was just in English, the viewer would not have received the full experience of the story/culture.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

I was absent for this part of the film.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

The movie further characterizes Amir by making him a Hero and a peace maker in many situations. The book made him out to be scared of going back to Afghanistan and hesitant about rescuing Sohrab. In the movie there was no hesitation or any scared look upon his face when Rahim Khan called Amir to come back to Kabul.




4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.

The movie revisited the thought that family always comes first no matter what past times had presented. That was a powerful message when Amir dropped everything in his life to go and save Sohrab and then bring him back to America to live a better life; to be apart of his family.

Alyssa Ruta
English D

Anonymous said...

1. Before the film was released, there was a lot of negative news circulating about the young actors and the controversial rape scene. This definitely did not give the movie a positive image in the eyes of critics as well as general movie viewers. Also, the Afghans were not portrayed positively with the terrorist attacks on 9/11, and the Kite Runner is based in Afghanistan. Many people discriminate against the Afghani culture, and for this reason alone, may not have wanted to see a movie centered around the Afghan culture.
Question 1 of 4
John Cunniff

Anonymous said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?
I think the major reason why the movie may not have been as successful as predicted is because of the subtitles. I found it hard to focus on them at times because I wanted to see what was occurring in the movie and then I lost my place in the conversation.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why? Baba, a man of complex nature, displays paradoxical nature when he moves him and Amir to America. Baba constantly wished for Amir to stand up for himself and fight his problems instead of taking the easy way out and running away. Baba moving him and Amir to America was a way for him to escape the troubles in Afghanistan and his loss of Hassan and Ali. Although moving to America was a choice of safety, subconsciously Baba may have also done it as a way to forget his major loss of a son and best friend; thus, proving Baba’s outlook on fighting off problems instead of running a paradox.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why? I think Amir is still ultimately a faulted person in the movie. He made the same mistake of neglecting to help his most loyal friend in his time of need. Like in the novel Amir overcomes his flawed past and redeems himself as a person. The audience is overall empathetic towards Amir. Unless a person was involved in a similar situation it is hard to feel sympathetic towards him. However, one can picture themselves in a situation like Amir’s and therefore feel empathic towards him and his predicament.

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain. The scene in which Hassan gets raped by Assef is still by far the most disturbing yet powerful scene in both the movie and book. However, scenes such as Amir going back to Afghanistan to get Sohrab and the beating of the woman at the soccer tournament were much more pronounced in the novel. In fact, the scene where Sohrab attempts to commit suicide was completely left out of the movie and I found that to be a very moving and important moment in the novel. I felt like that scene helped tie the whole ending together in the novel and the movie neglected it and therefore didn’t have as strong of an ending.
- Jordan Penney

Anonymous said...

1. I really do not understand why the film did not gain popular success since I saw trailers and advertisements on the television numerous times prior to the release of the film. Maybe the fact that it only played in select theaters or the timing of the release of the film contributed to its ostracized critical response.
2. For myself, I view Baba to be paradoxical in his lifestyle in America. Baba retains much of the pride and honor that he held as an affluent and respectable Afghani man. In his new home, Baba is forced to work jobs that are beneath his old social status; working at the gas station and haggling at a flea market. Baba tries hard to assimilate into America while staying true to his old personal characteristics.
3. The movie portrays Amir as weak and jealous, making him more vulnerable than what the book originally created. I believe the audience becomes apathetic to his plight because physically seeing the actions of Amir are more powerful and disgraceful than simply reading about it.
4. Even after the time that has passed since we read The Kite Runner, the ending scenes between Amir and Sohrab are very powerful. Both the book and the movie show how the characters are ashamed of their pasts and develop a special bond that in the final scene leads Amir to say “for you a thousand times over.”

Lauren Southworth

Anonymous said...

1. I think that the film was not very popular because it deals with a culture that is often viewed negatively. I think that it didn't receive critical acclaim because the movie somewhat failed in expressing the same message as the book.

2. Baba remains complex and paradoxical in the film because he is still portrayed as an honest and respected man; however, it is revealed that Baba was a disrepctful liar. I personally believe that Baba is truly an upstanding man which can be seen as he protects the woman from being raped. His paradoxical nature can be seen when Amir is informed of his father's lifelong lie.

3. I believe that the film did a great job of showing that Amir is human and he isn't a despicable villian, which is a perception that many people received from reading the novel. Ultimately, I think the audience is more empathetic towards Amir and his situation as they can see all of the pain and suffering he has experienced.

4. I believe that the scene when Hassan is raped is still just as powerful as in the book if not more. On the other hand, as I watched the movie, I felt that the scene when Amir discovers that Hassan is his brother was very poorly done. It certainly was not as shocking nor as powerful as in the novel. Overall, I think that the book did a far better job in bringing about a wave of emotions that dealt with its important message whereas the movie failed to grasp these essential qualities.

Brianna Cote
Block D

Anonymous said...

1. To me there are a number of reasons the film may not have been a large success. First is the subtitles, believe it or not this can steer many people away from a film. Second, it seemed as though the critical scenes in the movie and turning points from the book were poorly done and had little or no emphasis. For instance the scene where Amir is notified of Hassan's death seemed very nonchalant. And finally, I personally saw little to no advertisement for this film.

2. Seeing as the film tries to stick close to the book Baba is obviously going to maintain his complex nature. Early on he preached to Amir about stealing being the cardinal sin. If you lie you steal the right to the truth and if you kill you steal the right to life. Meanwhile Baba's life is built upon lies. Daily he lies to Amir about Hassan and his mother. The audience sees scenes like this and then they see when he stands up for the woman to the soldier and it seems like he is a heroic flawless person. The way the audience perceives Baba is a roller coaster ride in itself.

3. In the beginning of the movie I still felt Amir was a coward and I loathed him for the decisions he made. But further into the film I feel like they started to portray him as too much of a good guy especially with all the time spent documenting his trip back to Afghanistan. Personally, I feel the audience is apathetic towards Amir due to the fact that he committed so very selfish acts in the beginning of the film.

4. The movie focused ultimately on the fact that Amir had a way "to be good again." I feel that too much of the film focused on him trying to rescue Sohrab and not enough on the other key elements of the story. For instance I think for emphasis should have been placed on the scene revealing Amir and Hassan's true relationship and when Amir was informed that Hassan died. Those were big turning points or surprises in the book but they seemed overlooked in the movie.

Ryan Kok
English D

Katrina said...

1) I believe that the film did not have much critical or popular success due to the high controversy between the US and the Middle East and also the internal conflicts in the Middle East regarding the two young boy actors, especially the one that played Hassan. Also, the fact that there were subscripts probably turned many movie-goers away from the film because many people do not like "reading" their movies.

2) Baba, in the book and the movie, was portrayed as a complex and paradoxical character. One of the most crucial scenes that was needed to maintain this characterization was when he is complaining to Rahim Khan about how Amir is not a "real" boy because everybody takes advantage of him; however, he contradicts himself when he is extremely proud of Amir when he wins the Kite Running Competition. Also, the scene when Baba stands up for the woman that he does not even know when they're on the bus, because he has to uphold his reputation as a strong and brave person; however, Amir feels that his Baba is only putting on an act because he feels as though Baba would never stand up for him.

3) Amir is definitely more likable in the film. In the book, Amir is portrayed as more cowardly in regards to the Hassan incident. In the video, he is shown as more innocent and it seems like the guilt had effected him more, making him more likable. Ultimately, the audience that viewed the film was probably more sympathetic than those who read the book.

4) The book, like the case is most of the time, was much more powerful than the film. The diction and powerful adjectives that Hosseini used in the novel made the scenes more powerful and, ultimately, better. Also, the video cut out many of the important scenes between Sohrab and Amir, which lessened Sohrab's importance in the story. I was definitely disappointed with the film, because the book was so good that there was no way the film could have measured up.

Rachael M. said...

1. What do you think contributed to the film's lack of critical and popular success?

This movie was not widely released in theatres, which is one reason why the majority of people did not see it. Another reason that it did not achieve popular success was because of the subtitles, which many Americans tend to shy away from.

2. How does the character of Baba remain complex and paradoxical in the film? Which particular scenes are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature? Why?

Baba remains complex and paradoxical in both the film and the book. An example would be that he treats Amir harshly when it comes to gaining his love, yet his other son, Hassan, is seen through Baba’s eyes as the perfect boy. Another example would be when he is ill. He sees a doctor, but then ignores the treatment that the doctor has suggested for him in order to remain healthy.

3. Amir is a controversial protagonist. How does the movie further characterize him? Ultimately, is the audience sympathetic, empathetic or apathetic to his plight? Why?

Amir is a controversial protagonist because he commits a moral crime against his best friend Hassan by not helping him in a terrible situation. The movie further characterizes him as such by leaving out crucial scenes of Amir attempting to adopt Sohrab and taking him out of the country. Ultimately, the audience is usually sympathetic towards Amir and his plight, because the audience feels bad for Amir and the people he has lost in his life. However, I feel more apathetic towards Amir, because he did a horrible thing to his friend, and what he did in the end does not justify his previous actions.

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.

When Hassan tells Amir “for you a thousand times over” and then Amir says this to Sohrab later on, the meaning and strength of these words remain. Also, Rahim Khan’s message to Amir that there is “a way to be good again” is repeated in the film, and the message of Amir redeeming himself is still powerful.

Anonymous said...

2. Throughout the film, Baba remains both complex and paradoxical. One way he does this is by never telling Amir that Hassan is his brother. He leads Amir to believe that Hassan is just his servant, and thus, he is lying. However, early in the film, Baba states that the only sin in the world is stealing (killing someone is theft of life, lying to someone is theft of the truth). By contradicting himself here, Baba is a indeed a complex and paradoxical character.
3. Throughout the movie, Amir is portrayed as a flawed character. Showing that Amir knew Hassan was going to get raped, then seeing him still not defend Hassan proved that Amir was flawed. However, Amir attempted to “be good again” when he rescued Hassan’s son, Sohrab. Because of this, I feel the audience ultimately feels empathetic towards Amir. Few people have been in a similar situation, so I don’t think the audience is sympathetic, and since Amir went through so much to save Sohrab, I don’t believe many people would feel apathetic to Amir’s plight.
4. The scene where Amir threw many pomegranates at Hassan remains powerful. Hassan never threw anything back at Amir, even when Amir screamed at him to do so. This scene remains very convincing in that Hassan would never do anything to hurt Amir even when Amir purposely hurts Hassan. The theme of guilt also remains very powerful. When Amir found out that his brother died, and he never fixed his childhood mistakes, he felt very guilty. He eventually saved Sohrab, but still, guilt remains in Amir’s life.

John Cunniff

Anonymous said...

1. I feel that this movie was filmed with meticulous detail and powerful insight. However, there were many things that were done by the director that I believe took away from the film's overall impact on us. For example, if a person who read this book saw the movie, I feel they would be utterly disappointed. The book goes into deeper detail than the movie could ever go into. I feel like the movie would make the viewer be in some ways angry at how the film took away from the original Kite Runner book.

2. Baba is a very good example of a paradoxical character. Baba always talks about how stealing is the worst sin a man can do. However, Baba stole the truth from Amir by never revealing to him that Hassan was in fact Amir's brother. Another scene that greatly shows this in Baba's character is when he always talks about how Amir was not a real boy for never standing up for himself and how Baba treated Hassan with courtesy and was easier on him. In my opinion, this is very paradoxical.

3. Watching the movie, I feel as though the character of Amir does not give you that same hatred that the original book did. The actor who played Amir did a good job, however, I feel that Amir was almost looked at in the film as needing pity and that we should feel bad for him. On the other hand, in the book, the author makes us want to kill Amir because we are able to go inside of Amir's head.

4. I was very disappointed when we were first introduced to Baba's character. I feel as though Baba should have been a bigger, rougher man. The scene that remains as powerful as the scene from the book is when Baba was begging his servants to stay. I feel the director did a great job at portraying this scene.


John Cummings

Anonymous said...

4. A considerable amount of time has passed since our completion of the novel. After revisiting the story via the movie, which elements (plot, motifs, themes, etc.) remain powerful, convincing and meaningful? Explain.

The part where Hassan got raped by the older kids remained powerful, because he wouldnt give up the kite that he was running for amir. Amir witnessed the whole thing and was too much of a whimp to help out his so called friend who got raped over his kite.

CASEY PIPES

Anonymous said...

1.I believe that there was a lack of critical and popular success because the movie was in Farsi and most people have trouble following subscripts. And another thing is if people didn’t read the book then they would not have been aware of the true brilliance of this story. It also was not as creative and good as the book so automatically there wasn’t going to be a huge popularity with the movie. The movie didn’t show enough action between Amir and Assef in the end of the movie and that was something, for me anyways, that took away from the movie.

2.Baba was such a complex and paradoxical character because he was seen as an overall great guy that could be counted on when needed, which I agree with; but Baba lead a life of lies because he lied to his son and lying to anyone “is stealing there right to know the truth.” Even though he kept Hassan a secret from Amir I still believe that he was a really stand up character because he even protected the women from getting raped.

3.Watching the movie made me personally like Amir a lot more. In the movie I really disdained him and thought he was a crappy excuse of a human being; but in the movie I really started to like him. I believe that overall the audience became empathetic to him. The movie made him out to be a hero when he went to go save Sohrab but in the book it seemed like he was doing it just to relieve his conscious. The audience is empathetic to him because he is made out to be a hero and not a horrible self-indulged person.

4.The most powerful scene for me in both the movie and the novel was the scene when Assef raped Amir. A powerful scene that was captured in the movie was the scene where Amir read the letter that Hassan wrote to him; this scene really impacted the movie where in the book didn’t stand out to much. A scene that was really important to the book was completely left out of the book. The scene where Sohrab tried to commit suicide. There was a lot left out of the movie but overall I believe the movie sent the same messages.

Alicia Scanlan
Period D

Stephanie Bryant said...

1.) What I think contributed to the film’s lack of critical and popular success would be a few various factors. One would be the fact that the film was very controversial as far as the rape scene goes with the two young boys. Another would be the fact that it dealt with a lot of racial issues that still exist today in Afghanistan such as with the Pashtuns and Hazaras. And lastly, I think the fact that the movie itself was almost entirely in the Afghani language and subtitled made it harder for the masses to follow along with and thus, get into the film causing it to have an overall lack in both critical and popular success.

2.) The character of Baba remains complex and paradoxical in the film because he still holds true to his motto that lying is the only sin, yet lies throughout the entire movie pretending that Hassan is not his son. Also, Baba appears to be this very strong, masculine character where in fact, he can be pinned as weak for not admitting to the truth that lies and walks before him day in and day out. And finally, Baba can also be called paradoxical seeing how he appears outwardly a very strict, and stern father, yet makes it a fact to buy Hassan a present for his birthday every single year, and is practically on the verge of tears when he gets news that Hassan and Ali will be leaving him. The scenes that are key to maintaining his paradoxical nature are as follows: The scene where the Russian soldier tried to rape the woman with the baby because although he stands up for the woman and does what’s right, he can’t stand up for his own son and admit that he’s his own. Another scene that proves this point is the scene where Hassan and Ali inform Baba that they’re quitting and moving away because they’ve brought Baba too much shame. This scene is key to maintaining Baba’s paradoxical nature because here Baba has to act like he’s unscathed by Ali’s news, where in actuality Baba wants nothing more than for Hassan and Ali to stay.

3.) Yes, I’d have to say that the movie does further characterize Amir. In addition to what Amir is like in the novel, the movie stresses the fact that Amir is weak, selfish, uncompassionate, a liar, and a bit of a backstabber as well. Ultimately, the audience seems to be empathetic towards Amir’s plight in that they can imagine what it might be like to be in Amir’s position, and think deeply upon what they would do if they were him. They also might be able to relate to what he’s going through, just not the exact same situation that he went through.

4.) After revisiting the story via the movie, the elements that remain powerful, convincing, and meaningful would be redemption, friendship, and loyalty. Redemption because it’s a good message for all who read and/or watch the film, in order to learn that “There is always a way to be good again” no matter what the case, as long as you honestly wish to right your wrongs. Friendship because it teaches people about the power a friendship can have and it’s intensity. How it can be easily broken, yet easily mended. And finally, loyalty. Loyalty because it shows us that if you’re loyal to someone through thick and thin people can tell, and will respect you for it, whether they admit that they do or not.