Tuesday, October 7, 2008

The Kite Runner: Online Discussion #2


Do you feel as though Amir has atoned for the sins of his past after his violent encounter with Assef? Do you think the author intends for you to accept this scene as atonement or question it? Who is the ultimate judge of whether or not he has repaid Hassan for his sins? How does Sohrab relate to Amir's ability or inability to redeem himself?

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't believe this completely atones the sin he's had in the past but it's bettering him as a person. I believe he wants to keep us wondering about Amir but at the same time show the developement and how he realizes all he's done wrong. I don't believe that can be clarified but if anyone it could be him and how much guilt he still feels. It helps him realize that he has done something good and it's something he's been waiting for all along because he knew he should've helped Hassan all along.

Anonymous said...

I think that it makes up for betraying Hassan because he is getting revenge for not sticking up for him that day, but it does'nt fully avenge him. Sohrab would also help make up for the betraying of Hassan if Amir will help and take care of him. The author wants us to question this seen. The ultimate judge would have to be Sohrab because he is taking the place of Hassan.

Joe A.

~Judy~ said...

1. I think that Amir can never atone himself for his sins of the past after his violent encounter from the past. It is something that he can never fix. Once you commit a mistake you can't fix it. Once it is in the past it is in the past, you can only look foreward.
2. I think that the author intends for me to accept this scene as atonement because it made him feel good that he was being beaten by Assef. It was somewhat seen as a redemption for what happened to Hassan.
3. Sohrab is trying to make things better. He helps Amir by ending the quarrel that Amir and Assef had. He defended Amir by using a slingshot and taking out Assef's eye.

Anonymous said...

Elizabeth Estremera

I feel that Amir needed to forgive himself for us to be able to see him as redeemed. I think that he has, in some way, felt that he has made up for a part of his sins. I believe the author intended for us to question it a little because there is still more to do for him to be completely redeemed. The ultimate judge of his atonement is Sohrab. Sohrab relates to his ability or inability to redeem himself because if Sohrab has a good life and is safe and happy I believe he has repaid Hassan for his sins.

Anonymous said...

I don't think he has atoned his sins of his past because I think that the author is doing this because of how he didn't help Hassan earlier in the book. I think the author does intend for you to accept it because of how he didn't help Hassan, I think the author is trying to make it seem like payback to Amir. I think Amir is the judge of if he has repayed Hassan because he tried to and had Hassan throw the fruits at him, then after that he kind of stopped trying to I think he figured that it was over and he was done repaying him. But, I also think that Hassan obviously is too a judge to see if Amir has repayed him for his sins.
-Jay!

Jessica Schneider!! (: said...

I dont feel Amir has compleatly made up for the sins of his past after his encounter with Assef, i dont think he will ever compleatly make up for those sins. The sins Amir commeted are too big of ones for him to ever come back from they, the only way he could have would have been through Hassan, but now he is dead. I Think Hosseini intends the readers to question the scene as atomenment as apposed to having the reader be like yes! i accept and agree that Amir has atoned his sins. I think Hassan is the only person who can ultimately be the judge of Amir atoning his sins, but like i said Hassan is dead and there is nothing more Amir can do. Sohrab does not relate to Amir's innability or ability to redeem himself because i honestly think there is no way to redeem himself, because deep down he commited big sins.

Nickopotomus said...

I feel Amir can feel more comfortable about the situation after hes been beaten. he feels as though he shouldve taken that beating a while ago. and although Sohrab like his father, saves Amir from Assef,relating to Amir's inability to redeem himself, He seems to feel he has somewhat redeemed himself. I feel before he completely be healed he must repay Sohrab. This is how Sohrab can also relate to Amir's ability to achieve redemption. The ultimate judge for deciding whether Amir has payed back Hassan can only be Amir. Who else is to judge? Sohrab has only heard good from his father about Amir, everyone else has passed away. Amir must decide himself whether he is truly healed.

-Nick J

Anonymous said...

I do think that, after his violent encounter with Assef, Amir has made up for the sins of his past. I think that the author intends for the reader to accept the scene as atonement, because when Assef is beating him Amir starts laughing because he finally feels at peace for his sins. I think Amir is the ultimate judge of whether or not he has repaid Hassan for his sins; because Hassan and Baba are dead, and Rahim Kahn left, so there’s no one left who knew what happened, and even if they did they wouldn’t understand it enough to decide if Amir repaid Hassan for his sins. Sohrab relates to Amir’s ability to redeem himself because he is the reason that Amir is redeeming himself.

-Rockwell

Anonymous said...

I feel that Amir has half-way atoned for the sins of his past after his violent encounter with Assef. It shows that he has grown up and sticks up for what he believes in. It’s good to see him actually do something after all these years, but I don’t think that he fully atoned his sins of his past. I think that the author intends for you to accept this scene as atonement but question it at the same time, because he finally stands up against Assef, but then again he hasn’t fully helped out Hassan’s son Sohrab yet. I think that the ultimate judge of whether or no he has repayed Hassan for his sins is Amir him-self. I think that when Amir believes that he has done the right thing then he will be redeemed of his sins. I believe that Hassan’s son Sohrab relates to Amir’s ability to redeem him-self because if he helps Sohrab out and brings him somewhere safe like America and takes care of him and raises him, then he will be redeemed of his sins.

-Nick S.

Anonymous said...

Matt

I do feel that Amir has atoned for his sins after his encounter with Assef. He saved Hassan’s child from a pretty crappy life of humiliation from Assef. I tend to believe that the author hasn’t let Amir fully off the hook. In the reality of the story Amir feels like he has paid for his past actions and can now live in peace. Amir is the judge of his actions and if he feels he has paid for them then he has paid for them. Sohrab relates to Amir’s inability to redeem himself because Sohrab ended the fight with his slingshot. Much like Hassan, Sohrab defended Amir when he fought Assef.

Anonymous said...

Matt

I do feel that Amir has atoned for his sins after his encounter with Assef. He saved Hassan’s child from a pretty crappy life of humiliation from Assef. I tend to believe that the author hasn’t let Amir fully off the hook. In the reality of the story Amir feels like he has paid for his past actions and can now live in peace. Amir is the judge of his actions and if he feels he has paid for them then he has paid for them. Sohrab relates to Amir’s inability to redeem himself because Sohrab ended the fight with his slingshot. much like Hassan, Sohrab defended Amir

Anonymous said...

I feel that Amir has not atoned for his sins, after his encounter with Assef. When Amir betrayed Hassan by putting the cash, and watch under Hassan’s mattress Ali decided to leave with Hassan. This ultimately led to his death when Rahim Khan asked Hassan to come live with him.

I believe Khaled Hosseini wanted us to question if Amir has paid for his sins.

Sohrab will be the one who gives the final decision if Amir has paid for his sin. As of now Sohrab isn’t really talking to Amir, and when Sohrab fully opens to Amir will be when Amir is fully forgiven. Sohrab relates to Amir because like Amir, he is quite and doesn’t talk much. He keeps everything to himself and doesn’t let Amir help him.

Sean H

Anonymous said...

I believe that Amir will never atone for his sins in his own eyes. I believe as bad of a person as his is he has tremendous expectations and thinks lowly of himself. I also believe that Sohrab bailed him out just like his father did, making the atonement obselete. This may seem terrible to say, but it is just like Amir's character to need someone to help him out in the clutch. The ultimate judge is Hassan but Hassan would have obviously forgiven him. This is due to his character and his ever-forgiving nature. I think that Sohrab fixed his situation for him and forbade him from being fully atoned for his sins.

Seamus Slattery

Chris Anderson said...

The Kite Runner: Online discussion #2

The encounter between Amir and Assef was a violent and painful one. I believe that this relieves the sins of Amir’s past, it does not fully atone it. At one point during the fight Amir started to laugh as he realized that he was getting what he deserved. In order for his sins to be atoned he must sacrifice himself for Hassan. As with most authors I believe that Hosseini left this passage open to the readers’ opinion. The author gives us a lot of detail such as Amir’s injuries. He has lacerations, a punctured lung, broken ribs, torn lip, ruptured appendix, and head trauma. To some people this description is atonement enough, but Hosseini keeps this open to the opinion of the reader. I believe that the ultimate judge of whether or not these sins are atoned is Amir. The reader is a great judge but does not live with Amir’s conscience. Hassan can not be a judge because he is long dead. Sohrab is too young and did not witness or experience the tragic event of the past. Amir, on the other hand, is the one who has to live himself for the rest of his life. He was also the only one to be present at both the rape and the fight. If he is satisfied and no longer in emotional distress then his sins have been atoned. If he still feels that emotional anguish then his sins have not been atoned. Amir is truly the only one who knows whether or not Hassan has been repaid. I believe that Amir’s ability to redeem himself is through Sohrab. Now that Hassan is dead Amirs can no longer make it up to him directly. If Amir adopts Sohrab and gives him a better life, he can redeem himself. Hassan would want for his son to have a decent life, Amir may be the only opportunity for this to happen. If Amir takes Sohrab it will be the only way to repay the debt that he owes to Hassan.

Anonymous said...

(1) I don’t think that Amir has cleared his past by just being beat up by Assef. His father made mistakes in his life and dedicated a lot of time and money to redeem himself from his sins. Amir never did anything himself to clear his sins; he still had someone else (Assef) try to do it for him, which isn’t really fixing the wrongs and regrets in his life.
(2) I think he wanted us to have our own opinion on the situation. The author does not try to really lead us to a specific opinion. He was filling us with in information and emotion, so that later on we will have enough evidence to make our decision about what we think of the man Amir really is.
(3) Amir has met many admirable people throughout his life that have taught him many things. I feel that all of this people are also Amir’s conscience; he has a strong feeling of what is acceptable to them. Until he feels at peace with himself, he will never have fully be forgiven for his sins. Ultimately, Amir is his own judge.
(4) Sohrab doesn’t fully understand what happened all those years ago. Even though Sohrab, in the end saved Amir, he stills sees Amir as a man that saved him from a terrible place. Sahrab related to Amir as his hero almost, despite that watched his father suffer.


Michelle Kilburn

Anonymous said...

I feel that Amir complete atoned his past sins. Not only is Amir atoned from his past sins he also becomes a man. I feel it is more a personal question and the author intends for the reader himself to deside weither or not Amir should be atoned for his sins or if it is just a small contrabution towards being atoned for his sins. The ultimate jude would have to be Amir and if Amir can now live with himself and his past. If Amir still has guilt and can not live with himself then he has not completley forgiven himself for his past. Sohrab gives Amir a chance to redeem himself for his past. Make it up to Hassan and take Sohrab and give him the life that Hassan would have given him and wanted him to have.

Katie Kolodziejczyk

Bri Cunningham said...

1. I feel like Amir has not atoned for the sins of his past, just because he got beat up doesn’t mean that all of his sins can go away. Early on, Baba tried hard to fix his sins by taking a lot of time in helping other people and making peace. Amir hasn’t attributed anything to fix his sins that he has caused.
2.I think that the author intends for us to question it in our heads on whether or not to accept it or leave it as is. He does not mention anything about Amir forgiving himself for the sins that he has made. The author just leads us with information from the past into the present about what happened, and the sins that Amir has committed.
3.I feel as if Baba looking down on Amir’s life is the judge on whether or not he has repaid his brother for his sins. Baba knows everything that Amir has done to Hassan and has the right to make the decision on when Amir has completely fulfilled the duty on repaying for them.
4.I think that the whole thing with Sohrab kind of helped him redeem himself in a different way. Yes, Amir took him to America and saved him from being killed in Afghanistan. But, another look at it is that Amir still hadn’t done anything real big to help him fix what he did throughout his life.

Rickie said...

1) I do not feel Amir has atoned for the sins of his past after his violent encounter with Assef because all he did was laugh when assef kicked him.
2) I think the author intended the fight scene to be atonement and not so much to question it.
3) I believe sorab in a way is the ultimate judge of whether or not he has repaid Hassan for his sins because he is trying to save sorab in order to redeem himself.
4) Sohrab relates to Amir's attempt to redeem himself because he is so simular to hassan.