Sunday, October 14, 2012

The Poetry of Song: COW work for Tuesday, 10-16



Complete the following work and submit responses as a comment here by the end of the block. 

Visit the 2 links below and read the album reviews. Then, find one of your own and answer the questions that follow. 

1. Fleet Foxes (great band, by the way)

2. Paul Simon 

3. Find one of your choice. 

As evidence of your perusal, post a comment response to the following questions:


1. List every adjective from the Fleet Foxes review.


2. For the review of your choice, select a passage ( to paste here and describe the literary and journalistic qualities that make it exemplary. 


3. Students tend to have difficulty integrating fluid quotations into their own writing. Copy and paste at least 3 excerpts from the 3 reviews that incorporate quoted song lyrics. After each sentence, create a grammatical map of the sentence structure. Example: David Fricke writes, "I wonder if I'll see/Any faces above me/Or just cracks in the ceiling," Pecknold sings in "Montezuma," imagining his deathbed.= Quote+Subject+Predicate+Preposition+Song Title+Participial Phrase. No, you can't use this one. 

4. Copy and paste Will Hermes' thesis statement here. Which of his sentences encapsulates his most profound analysis of the album? Where did you find it?

5. If you finish early, proofread your work. Use any remaining time to complete make up work or finish your homework for Thursday. 

See you all Thursday. Please be respectful of your substitute teacher as well as the computers. 

24 comments:

Moonwaves182 said...

Matthew Litchfield
1. List of adjectives in the Fleet Foxes review:
beauty
skin-deep
gleaming
acid-folk
warming
dazzling
trouble-songs
battered
impending
chirpy, disarming
period-perfect glow
stubborn
gorgeously
2. For the review of your choice, select a passage ( to paste here and describe the literary and journalistic qualities that make it exemplary.
The Mountain Goats
Transcendental Youth
Merge

By Jody Rosen
October 5, 2012
An album full of characters struggling against dead-end jobs, drug addiction and depression doesn't exactly sound inviting, but in the hands of John Darnielle, it's magic. Darnielle is a former psychiatric nurse; his catchy, gracefully appointed chamber-pop songs paint portraits of dread and paranoia with empathy and precision. "Harlem Roulette" – which jump-cuts from Frankie Lymon's final recording session, in 1968, to the 21st-century Pacific Northwest – is as close as a pop song gets to philosophy. The title track brings sumptuous horns and a glimpse of, yes, transcendence: "Clutch those broken headboards, ride the highest wave/Dusky diamonds shining in the far depths of the cave."

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/transcendental-youth-20121005#ixzz29TY0KY1o

This review is outstanding because it succinctly describes the sound and universal ideas of the album. The integration of quotes is efficient in conveying the ideas of the album. The author’s variety of syntax makes the review easy to read.

3. Copy and paste at least 3 excerpts from the 3 reviews that incorporate quoted song lyrics. After each sentence, create a grammatical map of the sentence structure.
"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song.
Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/helplessness-blues-20110428#ixzz29TZutrNl
Quote+ subject + prepositional phrase+ participial phrase

"It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.
Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/so-beautiful-or-so-what-20110405#ixzz29Tb2pXMS
Quote + subject + predicate + prepositional phrase

The title track brings sumptuous horns and a glimpse of, yes, transcendence: "Clutch those broken headboards, ride the highest wave/Dusky diamonds shining in the far depths of the cave."
Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/transcendental-youth-20121005#ixzz29Tbj9VyZ
Subject + predicate + appositive + quote

4. Copy and paste Will Hermes' thesis statement here. Which of his sentences encapsulates his most profound analysis of the album? Where did you find it?
Thesis:
Simon's first album in five years is full of heavy business: life's meaning, beauty, brutality and brevity.
Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/so-beautiful-or-so-what-20110405#ixzz29Tcz3Owt
Most profound analysis:
All Simon seems to know for sure is that there is love, and there is beauty — and that, afterlife or no, great songs live forever.
Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/so-beautiful-or-so-what-20110405#ixzz29TdaF48l
I found this quote at the end of the last paragraph of Hermes’ review. It is the broadest – but most unique – statement he makes (in that it sums up what he thinks of the album, which other listeners may or may not agree with).

Andrew Morse said...

Andrew Morse
1. Gleaming, acid-folk, harmonium, warming, choral, incredible, chirpy, young, perfect, stubborn, gorgeously.

2. Someone lit a fire under Band of Horses' porch. The quintet usually specialize in beard-y reverie, somewhere between Built to Spill's guitar majesty and Seventies AM folk of America. But the Horses rough things up on Mirage Rock, from the "Brown Sugar" bounce of "Electric Music" to the crackling "Knock Knock," where Ben Bridwell sings of "a ramshackle crew with something to prove." The excerpt contains a lot of quotes and song titles which offer support or a place of reference to prove what the author has said. Also there are interesting comparisons and adjectives to keep the writing fresh.

3. "If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song. Quote – pronoun-verb- phrase. But underneath the mischief are serious concerns. "It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs. Intro phrase-quote-subject-verb phrase. Even when Band of Horses go for broke, the South Carolina-bred Bridwell exudes the laidback gravity of a down-toearth Southerner: "Dumpster World" starts like a CSNY-style teach-the-children lament for a ruined planet, then shifts into teenage-anarchist fight-song punk. Intro phrase- subject-verb phrase-quote-simile-phrase.

4. On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides. The most profound views are in this sentence. This is the thesis and is the first sentence in the review.

Anonymous said...

1. Skin-deep, gleaming, acid-folk, warming, choral, hammered, dazzling, spaced-cowboy, Indo-Celtic, trouble, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, period-perfect, glow, stubborn, gorgeously.
2. This isn't to say that "The Landing" is stunning perfection. Like most Iron Savior albums, as great as the songs are, there is always one or two filler tracks that would qualify as mundane. "R.U. Ready" is rendered useless in light of the great "Heavy Metal Never Dies." The power ballad "Before The Pain" is a good and "mature" ballad, almost too inspiring when the remaining tracks bathe in the adolescent congruence of sci-fi and metal. Other than that, the album is the classic Iron Savior song writing as expected.
With that said, you'd be hard pressed to not be immediately coddled with such great songs like "The Savior," with its hulking riffs and intensifying chorus. Speedy numbers like "Starlight" and "Faster Than All" (with its spaghetti western influence) both seem to be gleefully dating circa 1990 Blind Guardian. The album's best tracks are the blood stained, metal soaked "Heavy Metal Never Dies" and "Hall Of Heroes," which get help with way more than a mere pinch of Manowar for inspiration. The choruses get no better than the gushing over the top "Moment In Time."
This review is well done because it does a thoroughly proficient job of representing the album in its description. It first begins with a statement humbling the album and proceeds to address its faults and achievements by talking about certain songs that were either horribly mundane or outstanding. Using brutal adjectives such as “hulking” and “blood-stained” the reviewer captures the overall tone of the music encapsulated in the new album. The review makes a point to relate Iron Savior to similar, more popular bands such as Manowar. It does a fair job of complimenting the work but also taking out its faults such as the mundane “R.U. Ready” which for those who have actually listened to it is one of the most generic rock melodies by the band. In the end it does a sufficient job of portraying what one gets with Iron Savior’s “The Landing”
3. Will Hermes writes, "It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.= quote+subject+verb+preposition+adjective+verb+preposition+participal phrase
Will Hermes writes, "Check out the radio/Pop-music station/That don't sound like my music to me." Yeah, yeah: Everyone's a critic.= Quote+preposition+statement
Met Underground writes, “You can't kill the metal, metal will live on!" The Iron Savior "lands" in the same spot.= quote+subject+quote+preposition+participal.




4. On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.

The line “Simon is pushing 70; it's appropriate that he's got mortality on his mind.” from the first section is very analytical in its process of applying the singer’s real life to the themes of the album.


S.Aaron Killingbeck

Connor Rouillard said...

Connor Rouillard
Oct 16, 1864
POS
COW work


1.) Beauty, acoustic, acid-folk, dazzling, battered, chirpy, disarming, young, stubborn, raw, gorgeously
2.) "He does it in a chirpy, disarming voice, like a young Graham Nash. Yet there is a fighter's spirit in there and in the period-perfect glow of the music: a stubborn faith in the peace and healing embodied by records like Déjá Vu."
This part of the review is particularly good because because he uses clear adjectives, allusion, and compares the album to a past record, showing knowledge of their history.
3.)"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song."
quote+subject+predicate+adverb+verb+"title song"
4.) “But underneath the mischief are serious concerns. ‘It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek,’”
Second sentence, or third if you count the parenthesis

Ashley said...

Ashley Boulos
October 16, 2012
Poetry of Song


1.Adjectives:

a. Gleaming
b. Acid folk
c. Warming
d. Dazzling
e. Space cowboy romance
f. Choral
g. Indo-celtic
h. Incredible
i. Trouble
j. Battered
k. Impending
l. Chirpy
m. Disarming
n. Young
o. Stubborn
p. Reduced

2.“Adele is a born Bond Theme Girl, with the voice, and the flair for melodrama, that the job demands. Written by Adele and her "Rolling in the Deep" collaborator Paul Epworth, "Skyfall" sounds like the product of a computer algorithm, designed to produce the Platonically-ideal Bond theme. It has a slow-boiling tempo; a grandly arcing melody line; strings and brass that shiver, gust, and swoop; and a bombastic, romantic lyric ("Let the sky fall/When it crumbles/We will stand tall/Face it all together"). Adele sings magnificently, but the thing feels a bit too worshipful, not quite goofy enough.”

The writer of this song review, Jodi Rosen, uses a large range of strong adjectives in order to enforce Adele’s talent. The review depicts Adele as being the perfect singer for the theme song of the new James Bond Movie, which is her newly released song Skyfall. Rosen does a good job explaining the structure of the song from tempo to melody, and also how Adele’s voice sounds in correspondence to the romantic lyrics.

3.“If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song.

Quote + Subject + Predicate + Preposition + Adjective + Song

It has a slow-boiling tempo; a grandly arcing melody line; strings and brass that shiver, gust, and swoop; and a bombastic, romantic lyric "Let the sky fall/When it crumbles/We will stand tall/Face it all together"

Subject + Preposition + Adjective + Quote

But underneath the mischief are serious concerns. "It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.

Quote + Subject+ Preposition + Adjective + 2nd Subject


4.Will Hermes Thesis Statement:

Thesis:
On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.

Sentence that encapsulates most profound analysis of the album:
“Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs. "The Afterlife" resolves darkness and light with a tossed-off charm — a specialty of New York poets from Frank O'Hara to Biggie Smalls, including Paul Simon.”

This sentence thoroughly explains Simon as a singer and the song main theme. I found this in paragraph one of the song analysis.

Beck Gerritsen said...

Beck Gerritsen
1. Skin-Deep, Gleaming, Acid-Folk, Warming, Dazzling, Hammered, Sunflower-era, Spaced-Cowboy, Indo-Celtic, Incredible, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, young, perfect, stubborn, raw, reduced, rendered, young, dear

2. “If only it were all as brilliant as "Calling Lightning With a Scythe", one of my favorite tracks of the year. The wheat-field dramaturgy begins with acoustic strums, twangy banjo, and suitably bummer lyrics: "On Sunday I found your rotting bones/ Oh, my old friend, it's so hard to let you go." Amid increased guitar doses, now electric, and some horns, the protagonist takes a train, ponders ghostly arms, legs, and graves (plus a "picture of you smiling when you were young"), and finds himself "laying around in the wreckage of this beautiful little world." It's a jasmine-scented "Sweet Home Alabama" until the banjo warps and the guitar swerves out of tune, producing a beautiful, noisome solo. Eventually, the guitar doubles, bleeding across channels to tear it up even more enormously. They don't try to mix the eruption lower or blend the ferocious tracks; as a result, the guts and scars remain after the song's ripped apart.”

This excerpt is from Brandon Stosuy’s review of Howlin’ Rain’s “Howlin Rain”.
It uses literary devices such imagery in lines like “wheat-field dramaturgy” and “jasmine-scented”. It also includes allusion to “Sweet Home Alabama” for a comparison. Journalistically, it uses quote integration to describe the song and give the reader a feel for the sound of the album.

3. Brandon Stosuy writes, “there's precipitation, a solitary man, and days that "slide away, like mud."”=preposition-noun-preposition-adjective-noun-noun-preposition-quote.
David Fricke writes, “"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song.”=quote-subject-verb-preposition-adjective-verb-noun
Will Hermes writes, “"It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.”
=quote-subject-verb-transition-adjective-adjective-noun-adjective-adjective-noun
4. On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.
This sentence encapsulates the most profound analysis of the album, and it is found at the beginning of the review.

Kayla G said...

1. Gleaming, acid-folk, warming, dazzling, trouble, battered, impending, chirpy, and disarming.
2. http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/babel-20120920
The word choice, such as adjectives, makes the review exemplary. Instead of being like “Babel is a really good album, go listen to it”, Hermes says “Babel steps up Mumford & Sons' game without changing it too much. It feels shinier, punchier, more arena-scale than the debut, with the band hollering, hooting, plucking and strumming like Olympian street buskers.”
3. I’m so confused by what to do, it isn’t even funny.
4. On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides. But underneath the mischief are serious concerns. "It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.
i. I found this in the first paragraph

Jamie Weaver said...

1) Gleaming, acid-folk, warming, dazzling, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, young, period-perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, reduced.
2) “Taylor Swift teamed with Swedish hit whisperers Max Martin and Shellback on her new single, and its hooks, plural, have a zing that's more Stockholm than Nashville. But it's unmistakably Taylor: a witty relationship postmortem, delivered in inimitable girlie-girl patois. And this bit – ". . . I'm just, I mean, this is exhausting. Like, we are never getting back together. Like, ever" – might be the most sublime spoken-word interlude in pop since Barry White died.”

The review of Taylor Swift’s “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” utilizes enticing adjectives to promote the song. Phrases such as “witty relationship” and “inimitable girlie-girl patois” draw the reader into the song and make it more appealing. The song is engaging to anyone who can relate to being in a bad relationship. Several lines “might be the most sublime spoken-word interlude in pop since Barry White died”, which adds to the likability of the song.

3) "If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song.
Quote+subject+predicate.

"It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.
Quote+subject+predicate.

And this bit – ". . . I'm just, I mean, this is exhausting. Like, we are never getting back together. Like, ever" – might be the most sublime spoken-word interlude in pop since Barry White died.
Subject+quote+predicate.
4) On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.
"The Afterlife" resolves darkness and light with a tossed-off charm — a specialty of New York poets from Frank O'Hara to Biggie Smalls, including Paul Simon.
-first paragraph, halfway through
Jamie Weaver

Nicole Miller said...

Nicole Miller PART 1
1.Skin-deep, second, gleaming, acoustic, acid-folk brush, harmonium, hammered, warming, choral, dazzling, early-seventies, spaced-cowboy, Indo-Celtic, trouble, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, young, fighter’s, period-perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, reduced, and true.
2.“Cage the Elephant” review of their album “Cage the Elephant” by contactmusic.com
The state of Kentucky in America may currently be known as the home of Fruit Of The Loom and Chevrolet Corvettes, but the quintet of Cage The Elephant may soon change that. This is their debut album, having promoted themselves with slots at SXSW and Lollapalooza.
In a time when record companies are looking to make a quick profit by discovering the latest band to join the newest fad, it's rare for an act to have a sound unique to that of their peers. That's the first thing to note about Cage The Elephant, whose funk-rap-rock is perhaps best likened to the sound of Red Hot Chili Peppers, but even that comparison is off the mark. Also far from the now defunct nu-metal movement, the bass-propelled groove of the likes of "In One Ear" begs to be bounced along to, while complementing guitar lines impress on top. Recent single "Ain't No Rest For The Wicked" reminisces Kid Rock's "Cowboy", while "Tiny Little Robots" has the kind of guitar playing that The Hives would appreciate. Best of all are "Soil To The Sun", which highlights the band's ear for a catchy chorus", and "James Brown", an infectious number which could have you dancing like it was a tune from the Godfather of Soul's catalogue. Whilst not accessible enough to start a new movement, Cage The Elephant display enough raw talent and passion to suggest they can outlast many of the trends currently popular.
This album review is particularly good because it compares the sound of Cage the Elephant’s songs to other bands while still maintaining their individual and unmatchable sound. The journalist compares their song to the Red Hot Chili Peppers, but also states that “even that comparison is off the mark.” Another instance of beneficial reporting is how the journalist states how the band is up and coming, and may soon redefine their hometown by their emergence into popularity. He also states how a lot of bands have been prematurely and undeservedly introduced into musical culture, but then reiterates how Cage the Elephant was not one of these bands. They were not thrown together and signed to make a quick buck, but deserve the popularity they are getting because of their unique sound.

Nicole Miller said...

Nicole Miller PART 1
1. Skin-deep, second, gleaming, acoustic, acid-folk brush, harmonium, hammered, warming, choral, dazzling, early-seventies, spaced-cowboy, Indo-Celtic, trouble, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, young, fighter’s, period-perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, reduced, and true.
2. “Cage the Elephant” review of their album “Cage the Elephant” by contactmusic.com
The state of Kentucky in America may currently be known as the home of Fruit Of The Loom and Chevrolet Corvettes, but the quintet of Cage The Elephant may soon change that. This is their debut album, having promoted themselves with slots at SXSW and Lollapalooza.
In a time when record companies are looking to make a quick profit by discovering the latest band to join the newest fad, it's rare for an act to have a sound unique to that of their peers. That's the first thing to note about Cage The Elephant, whose funk-rap-rock is perhaps best likened to the sound of Red Hot Chili Peppers, but even that comparison is off the mark. Also far from the now defunct nu-metal movement, the bass-propelled groove of the likes of "In One Ear" begs to be bounced along to, while complementing guitar lines impress on top. Recent single "Ain't No Rest For The Wicked" reminisces Kid Rock's "Cowboy", while "Tiny Little Robots" has the kind of guitar playing that The Hives would appreciate. Best of all are "Soil To The Sun", which highlights the band's ear for a catchy chorus", and "James Brown", an infectious number which could have you dancing like it was a tune from the Godfather of Soul's catalogue. Whilst not accessible enough to start a new movement, Cage The Elephant display enough raw talent and passion to suggest they can outlast many of the trends currently popular.
This album review is particularly good because it compares the sound of Cage the Elephant’s songs to other bands while still maintaining their individual and unmatchable sound. The journalist compares their song to the Red Hot Chili Peppers, but also states that “even that comparison is off the mark.” Another instance of beneficial reporting is how the journalist states how the band is up and coming, and may soon redefine their hometown by their emergence into popularity. He also states how a lot of bands have been prematurely and undeservedly introduced into musical culture, but then reiterates how Cage the Elephant was not one of these bands. They were not thrown together and signed to make a quick buck, but deserve the popularity they are getting because of their unique sound.

Natasha Merianos said...

Natasha Merianos
Gleaming, acid-folk, warming, dazzling, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, stubborn, gorgeously.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/channel-orange-20120713
Jody Rosen does an exquisite job writing the review for Frank Ocean’s recent album, Channel Orange. Rosen’s word choice is what sells the most. Rosen describes a few songs from Channel Orange and she also says that “there are echoes of soul forbears in Ocean’s music – Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Sly Stone, and Prince.” She also concludes that Frank Ocean “is a torch singer.”
On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.

Anonymous said...

Nicole Miller PART 2
Along with the journalistic properties that cause this review to be exemplary, its literary devices stand out and aid the article as well. It utilizes several colorful adjectives and comparisons, which allow the band and its sound to be better understood. The sound was likened to the Red Hot Chili Peppers, but then was stated that that comparison still did not hit the mark. Following suit, it was also compared to Kid Rock, and to the current bands that are now emerging. He stated how there are currently record companies who are signing virtually anyone to make a quick profit, but Cage the Elephant does not fall into this category. Along with these comparisons, the colorful adjectives that present themselves throughout the piece draw the audience’s attention into the review, and allows the journalist to explain to the reader what the band is like without actually playing them a song. They use “bass-propelled grooves” with “complimenting guitar lines” that would cause the listeners to dance “like it was a tune from the Godfather of Soul’s catalogue.” Through the use of colorful adjectives and popular comparisons, this journalist is able to give his readers a sneak peek into the band’s sound without actually playing them a song.
3. ‘It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.” Quote+Subject+Predicate+Preposition+Adjective+Adjective+Noun+Adjective+Noun.
“’If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song”
Quote+Subject+Predicate+Preposition+Adjective+Predicate+Noun
When he sings about a girl who holds “her dirty hands over the flame,” yeah, he’s singing about a lost love, but he’s also singing to himself
Quote+Subject+Predicate+Adjective+Preposition+Subject+Predicate+Subject
4. On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.
His sentence that most encapsulates his profound analysis of the song is: "The Afterlife" resolves darkness and light with a tossed-off charm — a specialty of New York poets from Frank O'Hara to Biggie Smalls, including Paul Simon.
This sentence is right in the middle of the paragraph of his analysis.

Stee said...

1. Adjectives in the review of "Helplessness Blues"
-skin deep
-gleaming
-warming
-choral harmonies
-harmnoium
-hammered dulcimer
-acid-folk
-dazzling

2. "Live From Harlem"- Tim Vocals

Tim Vocals, an R&B singer from Harlem, has emerged as an internet sensation with a novel shtick: crooning gritty, profane tales of thug life and drug-peddling in a lilting, feather-light soul man’s tenor. His debut mixtape collects a dozen of Vocals' "goon-mixes," with beats repurposed from hip-hop and R&B hits past and present. In the passage Jody Rosen uses many different adjectives to describe the artist and the album. She writes about the profane language that is used and how it displays the artists lifestyle.

3. "Live From Harlem"
"Every night I be livin' that trap life," he coos. Quote+subject+verb

"So Beautiful or So What"
"It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs. Quote+subject+verb+adjective+noun+adjective+noun







Anonymous said...

Zack Sicard
10/16/12
Mr. Kefor's POS Class

(1)List of adjectives in Fleet Foxes "Helplessness Blues".
* skin-deep
* gleaming
* acid-folk
* warming choral harmonies
* dazzling evocation
* harmonium, hammered dulcimer
* early-seventies rock
* sunflower-era
* spaced-cowboy romance
* Indo-Celtic exotica

(2)Passage from the Review of our choice

Tim Vocals, an R&B singer from Harlem, has emerged as an internet sensation with a novel shtick: crooning gritty, profane tales of thug life and drug-peddling in a lilting, feather-light soul man’s tenor. His debut mixtape collects a dozen of Vocals' "goon-mixes," with beats repurposed from hip-hop and R&B hits past and present. Thus Ne-Yo's "Sexy Love" becomes the blood-soaked "Bust My Guns" and Drake's noirish "Marvin’s Room" is transformed into "Bags of the Sour," a coke-dealer’s tale of paranoia and retribution.

*There is a multitude of thug-life and street adjectives that bring about this albums local color.

(3)
Tim Vocals
*"Every night I be livin' that trap life," he coos. The tune? Michael Jackson's "Human Nature."-Quote+Subject+Verb+question+statement

Lord Huron
*"Forget all your troubles," he sings on "Lullabye" – the prettiest track on an album fat with beauty – inviting the listener to "dream of laughter and old friends and lovers," and giving you the tools to do it.
Quote+explanation+support

*

Anthony Hallgren said...

Anthony Hallgren
Poetry of Song

1. Skin, second, Pacific Northwest, gleaming, acoustic, acid-folk, brush, warming, choral, dazzling, trouble, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, young, fighter’s, period-perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, reduced.


2. “When a song that was entrance music at the Olympics ("Survival") barely gets the bronze for Most Epic Thing on Your Record, that's a triumph that would make Freddie Mercury's mustache tingle.”

This passage is exemplary because it shows that a song that was made to be epic, isn’t the most epic on an album can help make one of the legends who influenced the song be in envy.

3. "It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs. Quote+Subject+Predicate+participial phrase

"Wake to see your true emancipation is a fantasy," Matthew Bellamy moans on "Supremacy," a jeremiad against the hubris of modern man that turns Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir" into a black-booted march. = Quote+Subject+Predicate+Song Title+ Participial phrase

"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song.= Quote+subject+predicate+participial phrase

4. On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.

This sentence shows the most profound analysis because it compares the album to a trip in traffic court.


jake hallgren said...

Jake Hallgren
Mr.Kefor
16 October, 2012
Poetry of Song Assignment

1.gleaming, acid-folk, warming, dazzling, stubborn, chirpy, gorgeously, battered, blown.
2. Not yet heavy metal's Homer Simpson, Ozzy Osbourne in 1980 was nonetheless an elder statesman. But on his solo debut, the locomotion of "Crazy Train" proved indelible; explorations of alcoholism ("Suicide Solution") and Satanism ("Mr. Crowley") courted controversy; and the porn- addict rehab "No Bone Movies" matched metal's proggier, punkier younger bands. This remaster (issued simultaneously with 1981's Diary of a Madman) highlights rhythm-section tracks, and stands as a tribute to fallen Randy Rhoads, whose guitar symphonics majestify both the proper album and three bonus live cuts. http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/blizzard-of-ozz-reissue-20110531#ixzz29TYWQPJC
The literary and journalistic qualities that make this review of the reissue good is the way the writer, Chuck Eddy, uses a lot of adjectives and describes the song in small and basic detail to the reader. The writer also tells the reader that this album was reissued as a tribute to the fallen Randy Rhodes, which is good to answer the question of why the album was reissued.
3. Underneath, you find trouble-songs loaded with blown chances, battered ideals and impending mortality. "I wonder if I'll see/Any faces above me/Or just cracks in the ceiling," Peck¬nold sings in "Montezuma," imagining his deathbed. =Description+ Quote+ Singer+ Song title+ phrase.
"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song. = Quote + pronoun+ adjective + phrase.

"It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs. = quote+ singers name+ adjective based description

4. On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides. –Thesis by Will Hermes I believe the most profound sentence in his analysis is the thesis sentence which is the very first sentence of his entire analysis.

Zachary Freedman said...

http://zfreedman.blogspot.com/2012/10/classwork.html - Link to my classword

melanie morris said...

1) Skin-deep, acoustic, acid-folk, warming, dazzling, trouble, blown, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, young, period-perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, reduced.
2) "Eyes on the prize/Reboot the mission," goes the first Wallflowers single in seven years. Reboot – not reinvent. Jakob Dylan's group has picked up where it left off: with sharp roots-rock songs full of sturdy hooks, deadpan jokes and pathos that sneaks up on you. The band charges through the boogie blues of "Hospital for Sinners," and brings an antic oompah thump to "It's a Dream." "Reboot the Mission" is a homage to Sandinista!-era Clash, with guest help from Mick Jones and lyrics that tip a fedora to the Clash's late leader while introducing the Wallflowers' latest lineup: "Welcome Jack, the new drummer/He jammed with the mighty Joe Strummer."
The article reviewing the new album Glad All Over by The Wallflowers uses allusions to the Clash to connect with the fact that Mick Jones provides guest help. The review also takes the title of the song “Reboot the Mission” and connects this with the coming back of the band after a significant hiatus or break. The Wallflowers are currently on tour, and played in Boston this September. By using strong adjectives and onomatopoeia, ”oompah” it aids in making the reader more intrigued and apt to listen to the album.
3) "Eyes on the prize/Reboot the mission," goes the first Wallflowers single in seven years. Quote+verb+article+adjective+Artist name+noun+predicate

"It seems like our fate/To suffer and wait for the knowledge we seek," Simon sings amid a sharply syncopated groove and heavenly electric riffs.
Quote+Artist+verb+preposition+adjective+noun+conjunction+adjective+noun.

"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song.
Quote+personal prounoun(artist)+verb+preposition+adjective+adjective+noun

bobby h said...

(I WASN’T IN CLASS ON TUESDAY SO I DID THIS AT MY HOUSE BUT POSTED IT TO MY BLOG ON ACCIDENT INSTEAD)

1. 1)The adjectives used in the Fleet Fox review were beauty, gleaming, warming, dazzling, incredible, Indo-Celtic exotica, mortality, chirpy, disarming voice, period-perfect glow, gorgeously, refuge, and inspiration.

2. 2)The Fleeting Foxes’ Helplessness Blues review is written in a very unique and soothing way. The writing is filled with a lot of adjectives and is written in a very descriptive way .The adjectives are adjectives that describe different feelings that you are expected to feel when listening to this music. The music is described as soothing, warming and inspiration. Only very special songs and lyricists have the power to evoke these emotions on you and that’s what this song does.

3. 3)Fleet Foxes
"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song. = Quote+Predicate + Subject +Participial Phrase

It's like Nash's "Our House," rewritten for an age of reduced expectation but rendered with a true seeker's gusto. = Subject + Quote + Predicate + Preposition + Participial Phrase


Paul Simon

On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.
= Quote + Subject + Predicate + Preposition +Participial Phrase


At other times, like in "The Ballad of Billy the Kid," the singer's bristling ego mocks his supposedly objective point of view. Song Title + Subject + Predicate + Participial Phrase
Dazzling Blue” feels just as organic, combining country-folk melodies with South Indian percussion in a love song about driving out to the beach on Long Island.= Quote + Subject +Predicate + Participial Phrase

On "Love Is Eternal Sacred Light," a roadhouse-blues jam that rides a ghostly techno pulse, a character who appears to be the Almighty (in one of a few album appearances) bitches while driving "a pre-owned '96 Ford" down the highway: "Check out the radio/Pop-music station/That don't sound like my music to me."= Quote + Subject+ Predicate= Participial Phrase +Quote + Quote

Billy Joel
"Somewhere Along the Line" holds the album's most concise observations, waxing philosophical without wallowing in pretentious drivel. = Quote + Subject + Predicate

"Captain Jack" chronicles the stolidly suburban lifestyle of a decadent middle-class hipster from Hicksville, U.S.A.= Song Title + Subject + Predicate + Participial Phrase

4. 4)“On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.” Is the sentence I would choose as the thesis statement because I feel as if encompasses a lot of what the album was about. I feel this way because it sums up how something that is supposed to be so beautiful and amazing can end up being so plain and ordinary. “But underneath the mischief are serious concerns” may be the most profound sentence in the whole review. Although the sentence is short is encompasses a grand idea. This sentence is saying how although something may seem so innocent and trivial there may be an underlying issue that is not directly apparent. This sentence was found about half way through the first paragraph and I believe it was the best sentence in the entire review to describe the overall theme of the album in such a concise manner.

bobby h said...

(I WASN’T IN CLASS ON TUESDAY SO I DID THIS AT MY HOUSE BUT POSTED IT TO MY BLOG ON ACCIDENT INSTEAD)

1. 1)The adjectives used in the Fleet Fox review were beauty, gleaming, warming, dazzling, incredible, Indo-Celtic exotica, mortality, chirpy, disarming voice, period-perfect glow, gorgeously, refuge, and inspiration.

2. 2)The Fleeting Foxes’ Helplessness Blues review is written in a very unique and soothing way. The writing is filled with a lot of adjectives and is written in a very descriptive way .The adjectives are adjectives that describe different feelings that you are expected to feel when listening to this music. The music is described as soothing, warming and inspiration. Only very special songs and lyricists have the power to evoke these emotions on you and that’s what this song does.

3. 3)Fleet Foxes
"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song. = Quote+Predicate + Subject +Participial Phrase

It's like Nash's "Our House," rewritten for an age of reduced expectation but rendered with a true seeker's gusto. = Subject + Quote + Predicate + Preposition + Participial Phrase


Paul Simon

On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.
= Quote + Subject + Predicate + Preposition +Participial Phrase


At other times, like in "The Ballad of Billy the Kid," the singer's bristling ego mocks his supposedly objective point of view. Song Title + Subject + Predicate + Participial Phrase
Dazzling Blue” feels just as organic, combining country-folk melodies with South Indian percussion in a love song about driving out to the beach on Long Island.= Quote + Subject +Predicate + Participial Phrase

On "Love Is Eternal Sacred Light," a roadhouse-blues jam that rides a ghostly techno pulse, a character who appears to be the Almighty (in one of a few album appearances) bitches while driving "a pre-owned '96 Ford" down the highway: "Check out the radio/Pop-music station/That don't sound like my music to me."= Quote + Subject+ Predicate= Participial Phrase +Quote + Quote

Billy Joel
"Somewhere Along the Line" holds the album's most concise observations, waxing philosophical without wallowing in pretentious drivel. = Quote + Subject + Predicate

"Captain Jack" chronicles the stolidly suburban lifestyle of a decadent middle-class hipster from Hicksville, U.S.A.= Song Title + Subject + Predicate + Participial Phrase

4. 4)“On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.” Is the sentence I would choose as the thesis statement because I feel as if encompasses a lot of what the album was about. I feel this way because it sums up how something that is supposed to be so beautiful and amazing can end up being so plain and ordinary. “But underneath the mischief are serious concerns” may be the most profound sentence in the whole review. Although the sentence is short is encompasses a grand idea. This sentence is saying how although something may seem so innocent and trivial there may be an underlying issue that is not directly apparent. This sentence was found about half way through the first paragraph and I believe it was the best sentence in the entire review to describe the overall theme of the album in such a concise manner.

bobby h said...

(I WASN’T IN CLASS ON TUESDAY SO I DID THIS AT MY HOUSE BUT POSTED IT TO MY BLOG ON ACCIDENT INSTEAD)


1. 1)The adjectives used in the Fleet Fox review were beauty, gleaming, warming, dazzling, incredible, Indo-Celtic exotica, mortality, chirpy, disarming voice, period-perfect glow, gorgeously, refuge, and inspiration.

2. 2)The Fleeting Foxes’ Helplessness Blues review is written in a very unique and soothing way. The writing is filled with a lot of adjectives and is written in a very descriptive way .The adjectives are adjectives that describe different feelings that you are expected to feel when listening to this music. The music is described as soothing, warming and inspiration. Only very special songs and lyricists have the power to evoke these emotions on you and that’s what this song does.

3. 3)Fleet Foxes
"If I had an orchard, I'd work till I'm raw . . . and you would wait tables and soon run the store," he sings in the gorgeously appointed title song. = Quote+Predicate + Subject +Participial Phrase

It's like Nash's "Our House," rewritten for an age of reduced expectation but rendered with a true seeker's gusto. = Subject + Quote + Predicate + Preposition + Participial Phrase


Paul Simon

On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.
= Quote + Subject + Predicate + Preposition +Participial Phrase


At other times, like in "The Ballad of Billy the Kid," the singer's bristling ego mocks his supposedly objective point of view. Song Title + Subject + Predicate + Participial Phrase
Dazzling Blue” feels just as organic, combining country-folk melodies with South Indian percussion in a love song about driving out to the beach on Long Island.= Quote + Subject +Predicate + Participial Phrase

On "Love Is Eternal Sacred Light," a roadhouse-blues jam that rides a ghostly techno pulse, a character who appears to be the Almighty (in one of a few album appearances) bitches while driving "a pre-owned '96 Ford" down the highway: "Check out the radio/Pop-music station/That don't sound like my music to me."= Quote + Subject+ Predicate= Participial Phrase +Quote + Quote

Billy Joel
"Somewhere Along the Line" holds the album's most concise observations, waxing philosophical without wallowing in pretentious drivel. = Quote + Subject + Predicate

"Captain Jack" chronicles the stolidly suburban lifestyle of a decadent middle-class hipster from Hicksville, U.S.A.= Song Title + Subject + Predicate + Participial Phrase

4. 4)“On "The Afterlife," an African-pop-flavored standout from his 12th solo album, Paul Simon describes the wait at the Pearly Gates like it's a trip to traffic court, all long lines, mumbled excuses and jokey asides.” Is the sentence I would choose as the thesis statement because I feel as if encompasses a lot of what the album was about. I feel this way because it sums up how something that is supposed to be so beautiful and amazing can end up being so plain and ordinary. “But underneath the mischief are serious concerns” may be the most profound sentence in the whole review. Although the sentence is short is encompasses a grand idea. This sentence is saying how although something may seem so innocent and trivial there may be an underlying issue that is not directly apparent. This sentence was found about half way through the first paragraph and I believe it was the best sentence in the entire review to describe the overall theme of the album in such a concise manner.

shinn furukawa said...

Fleet Foxes
1. Beauty, gleaming, warming, helpless, dazzling, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, young.


Meteora By Linkin Park

Rolling Stone Reviews.
By: Barry Walters
“Presenting the hardest-working men in showbiz: Linkin Park? It ain't easy making green, and the band wants us to know that following up the best-selling debut of the new millennium is no simple feat. Especially if you're as self-conscious as this sextet. As someone blurts during a seventeen-minute documentary on the making of Meteora's artwork — not to be confused with the thirty-three-minute documentary on the making of Meteora's music that comes in the album's special-edition bonus DVD — "The art is the making of the art.”

This review is good because it describes how this album was big, and how the band earned it. It also uses some good literary terms.


shinn furukawa said...

Fleet Foxes
1. Beauty, gleaming, warming, helpless, dazzling, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, young.


Meteora By Linkin Park

Rolling Stone Reviews.
By: Barry Walters
“Presenting the hardest-working men in showbiz: Linkin Park? It ain't easy making green, and the band wants us to know that following up the best-selling debut of the new millennium is no simple feat. Especially if you're as self-conscious as this sextet. As someone blurts during a seventeen-minute documentary on the making of Meteora's artwork — not to be confused with the thirty-three-minute documentary on the making of Meteora's music that comes in the album's special-edition bonus DVD — "The art is the making of the art.”

This review is good because it describes how this album was big, and how the band earned it. It also uses some good literary terms.


shinn furukawa said...

Fleet Foxes
1. Beauty, gleaming, warming, helpless, dazzling, battered, impending, chirpy, disarming, perfect, stubborn, gorgeously, young.


Meteora By Linkin Park

Rolling Stone Reviews.
By: Barry Walters
“Presenting the hardest-working men in showbiz: Linkin Park? It ain't easy making green, and the band wants us to know that following up the best-selling debut of the new millennium is no simple feat. Especially if you're as self-conscious as this sextet. As someone blurts during a seventeen-minute documentary on the making of Meteora's artwork — not to be confused with the thirty-three-minute documentary on the making of Meteora's music that comes in the album's special-edition bonus DVD — "The art is the making of the art.”

This review is good because it describes how this album was big, and how the band earned it. It also uses some good literary terms.