Thursday, May 9, 2013

AP Seniors: Friday's Class Work


What’s a dinner without dessert, right?

Please complete the following tasks before the end of the period via a post here.

1.View the Final Exam Project on Edline.

2. Please post an exam and course reflection here. Please take some time to think about this. This is not an opportunity to berate your teacher, nor is it an attempt on his part to fish for compliments. Please discuss course experiences that prepared you well and tasks that you felt/feel ill-equipped for. I will take a close look at this and use your feedback to strengthen my instruction.

3. In preparation for the third portion of your Final, select one of the studies posted to Edline (Howley, Hodson, Bellis, or Stephens). Read it and develop a review of: research questions/hypotheses; methodology and data; conclusions and findings; implications and suggestions for future research.

41 comments:

Jordan Ledwith said...

After taking the AP Exam, I realized that many of the things I did not particularly enjoy throughout the year were actually very helpful through the year. Many of the activities we did with the poems and the prose that we did in class helped us understand how to approach these questions. I think that, even though I am not very good at multiple choice to begin with, that we could have done more with understanding the different kinds of questions they ask and how to answer these questions. I think that the class should have consisted of less big classroom discussion because these kinds of discussions prevent some students from getting a lot out of the discussion. I think that small group discussions would have helped us go deeper into the books we were reading rather than only getting to talk about a small amount of topics within each book.

Nicole Miller said...

Nicole Miller
2. I felt as though I was fairly well prepared for the AP exam. I am glad that we reviewed as many poems as we did, as it really helped. I would recommend that in the future, more multiple choice practice is given, and are done together as a class, with other practices to be completed alone as well, and some with time constraints to mimic the multiple choice on the test. I feel as though I was well prepared for the essays, and that there was a sufficient and good amount of practice on each type of essay, my only suggestion would be to give more class-completed multiple choice and time limited multiple choice.

Anonymous said...

Rachel Anderson

Holistically, I think the AP exam went very well. All of the practice multiple choice sections prepared me well, and I thought the poems and prose on the test were very easy to analyze. We did enough practice in class throughout the year, so I was able to manage my time well. Question 1 went great, and I am very satisfied with the outcome of my essay. Our extensive practice of writing thesis statements payed off, for I was able to construct a thesis which served as a solid foundation for a great essay. I was slightly less confident in my Question 2 response, as I found the piece to have little substance. The prose excerpt was a cliched characterization of a woman living in a world dominated by men, and I found it difficult to look beyond the obvious implications. In my question 3 response, I definitely presented a unique analysis, but I may have lacked sufficient details to back it up. This problem is solely my fault, for we have done plenty in class to prepare for question 3s. I simply did not prepare for it by reviewing the story which I planned to write about. Overall, I think the exam went well. I am confident that I passed, for our jigsaws, discussion facilitations, and practice promts prepared me adequately.

Anonymous said...

2. To many teachers, the AP English literature exam is a reason to teach based around the exam itself. However,you did a great job of balancing your own curriculum and preparing us for the test. I felt that I was particularly prepared for the multiple choice. It came very easily to me. Initially, I was nervous about my ability to analyze poetry but I think that I held my own in that regard. I do, however, wish we had practiced all three essays a bit more. I felt that there was a large concentration on Question 3.

Dan Rafuse

Joe Carlin said...

The AP test wasn’t as bad as I was expecting. The multiple choice section of the test I found to be surprisingly easy which I am not sure how to take whether I did well or if I completely bombed it. However with that being said I have some confidence and found the pieces provided to be easily analyzed due to the overarching practice that we prepared for. Also using the round robin jigsaw practices in class also prepared me for the exam’s analytical aspect which seeing previous pieces on the exam and others with similar devices and structure. I also think the constant practice help a lot with preparation of the exam. I feel that we should try more practices involving the writing aspect or the test by doing “mock” exams again and again by analyzing a poem then prose then a question three so when we get to them on the exam we can get through them quickly and provide a lot of examples. I overall felt very prepared for the exam and I think my grade will reflect it.

Ashleigh Korona said...

Ashleigh Korona

I feel that I was for the most part well prepared for the AP test. I felt very confident with my open responses for the most part, but I do wish we had started being more thorough with essays in the beginning of the year, I feel that my writing would have developed further. The poetry that we did through out the year was very helpful and I was very confident in my answer for that question. Over all it was a great experience being in this class and that it will greatly help me in the future.

Colby Sears said...

After a long year of seemingly endless poem annotations and novel analyses, I must say that I felt extremely prepared for the AP test on Thursday. I first opened the test booklet, nervous of what was to come in the following three hours, but was immediately encouraged when I realized that we had actually already analyzed the first poem presented in the multiple choice section. Soothed by the classic sonnets and rhymes of Shakespeare, I was able to answer the questions effortlessly and moved through the rest of the section with ease. I feel like I was so prepared for the AP multiple choice solely because of the practice exams and questions we answered throughout the year; receiving a multiple choice test just a few weeks before the exam, although frustrating, proved more helpful than anything.
The group activities we participated in this year, like the jigsaw poem/prose groups, were also very helpful in approaching the essay prompts and learning how to approach the pieces with more than one perspective. By dividing into groups and focusing on one specific piece of writing, it allowed for an in-depth analysis that would not be possible to formulate alone. I felt as if the poem and the prose questions on the exam were not entirely difficult and I felt comfortable knowing that they were modern pieces. The Q3 prompt was also easy to approach (I used “The Kite Runner”) and although we did practice it multiple times during the course, even more practice would have been much appreciated.
Overall, the exam was not as awful as I had believed it would be; exhausting yes, but difficult to complete, certainly not. The AP English Literature course prepared me greatly for the exam, and I believe I will be satisfied with the score I receive in July.

Anonymous said...

Naomi Stuffers
5/10/13
Period B
AP Test Reflection

Considering all of the AP practice that we did over the past year, I think that this test could have been a lot worse. The multiple choice questions were relatively easy. Luckily, the poems and excerpts we had during the multiple choice were not overly difficult. Had there been some kind of really old poem, I think that I would not have done as well. I do not think that that is because we did not practice them enough, older poems are just harder to understand.

As for the essays, like the multiple choice, it was not extremely hard. The poem was okay and had enough information to write a solid essay. I also feel like the books we read over the year definitely prepared us for the prompt. We had a selection of books that we could have used for the Q3, and that was comforting.

As for the course in general, it was definitely an experience. At times it was a lot of fun, but there were times that weren't as fun. That's true for most classes though, so don't be sad Mr. Kefor! Still, I'm definitely happy that it is finally over. Thanks for teaching us this year!

Taylor Saltmarsh said...

2. The Multiple Choice questions on the AP exam i found sort of challenging. However, overall the free response questions I felt very prepared for. Everyting we did in class pepared me for the poerty. One thing I didn't like about the class was the classroom discussions, because it prevents everyone from getting involved. Overall however, the AP exam went well and I feel as though I got a good score on it.

Anonymous said...

Rachel Anderson

In Dying To Be Famous, Mark Bellis explores the correlation between fame and high premature mortality rates. He hypothesizes that mortality rates among stars will exceed those among the average human population, but he fails to quantify his hypothesis. Another fault in Bellis' hypothesis is that he omits the criteria he uses to qualify "fame." Without explanation of his strategy in choosing which stars to examine, his ethos are weakened. If he had no specific criteria in deciding which stars to examine, he could easily have manipulated the results. Bellis' procedure was commendable, and he included a plethora of statistics, observations, and findings, both quantitivative and qualitative. His investigation into the correlation between performer type and mortality rate showed readers that he did take into consideration other factors that may have affected mortality rate. Bellis also separated his research geographically, finding that American stars have higher mortality rates than European stars, suggesting that a cultural factor may have played a role. In further studies, sports stars, politicians, and famous CEOs should be investigated as well to determine whether the high mortality rate is only present in "Hollywood-type" stars or in famous communities in general. It would also be interesting to separate deaths by cause of death and investigate each case individually to determine whether a childhood factor, genetic disadvantage, or unrelated health issue may have been the cause. Another interesting aspect to consider would be age of peak stardom; one could question whether those who reach stardom before their frontal lobe has completely developed face a higher risk of premature death. A final factor I would like to see considered is whether stars who live with family have lower mortality rates than those who have left their families behind.

Ashleigh Korona said...

Ashleigh Korona

The research study on rock/pop stars and their mortality rate by Bellis is rather interesting. Their hypothesis of them having a high mortality rate is something that has always been a theory with all stars and has been a question for decades. The conclusions drawn by Bellis were pretty much what I had figured from the beginning, the research done seems somewhat in complete though because the specific stars are not analyzed before they are but under the strains of star-hood. The causes of the high mortality seems very obvious but what about the stars that make it to the end with out having been effected as deeply? What is different about them? Is the real root problem in their past? Over all the study was interesting, but I would like to see one that is more in depth.

Jennifer said...

2. The AP really wasn’t bad at all. I thought I was prepared for the test, but being my third test this week, I was just completely exhausted especially by the time I got to my Q3. I think we did a lot of ridiculous assignments in this class, some which did turn out to be helpful, as much as I hated them, since I am not that great at English so they were incredibly difficult for me, even though they did not seem that bad to you. I really liked doing the carousels, especially the poetry one, and the jigsaws because we could see a wide range of poems and prose which was very helpful to quickly read and understand for the multiple choice. I was especially prepared for the Q1 and Q2, as we did lots of practice with Q2s on characterization. As I said, my Q3 was bad, not because I wasn’t prepared from the class, but just because I did it last. It might have been beneficial to do Q3 first, since I am definitely stronger in Q1 and Q2.

Anonymous said...

1. Done

2. I felt fairly well equipped for the test. The multiple choice I felt comfortable with on the exam, we did enough practice in class with it in groups and assessments, but I did not like how sometimes we would make our own questions and complete them because they did not feel like official questions. I get though how it sets us in the mind sets of the makers, which I did appreciate. We did a lot more prose than question one, and the pieces we did in class were interesting and I suggest doing more boring ones as it will be more realistic to the exam. We had a lot of options for question three, but I feel too many of them were thematically similar with violence, foreign issues, and loss of innocence. Maybe switch up the selections for a more broad experience reading, the books that were too similar are as follows: “What is the What”, “A Thousand Splendid Suns” and “The Kite Runner”, of the three I would replace Dave Eger’s book. Overall, I enjoyed the class and how you would keep things light hearted with music, discussions, and group work in preparation for the exam.

3. Bellis investigated the relationship between rock and pop stars’ fame and death. He further investigated the cause of death, age, and adverse childhood experiences in relation to mortality in several pools of select individuals of specific characteristics in North America, Europe, and the United Kingdom. He crossed sources and developed a pool, placing people under certain categories, from here he made graphs and charts to visualize the trend of fame and mortality against mortality and the general population. From this it is concluded that those famous die younger, and so their deaths are publicized. They tend to die from taking risks, and this risky trait may correlate into their histories and childhood. From this alarming study fans are advised as not to participate in such risks as their idols, thus saving them a few years of life. I believe it would be interesting to examine a pool of fans and see how their idols choices and deaths affect that of their own.

Ash Carlson

Jordan Ledwith said...

The major question/hypothesis that was discussed in this paper was why pop and rock stars die at such young ages. The article discusses the activities that pop and rock stars lead contributes mainly to their untimely deaths. Some questions that I still have about the issue have to do mainly with the beginning of their lives and how this lifestyle begins. Does family life have anything to do with it? Why do pop stars lead this kind of lifestyle? Do they feel like they have to because everybody else does? Are there any that do not fit this mold? If so, what was different about their childhood than the ones who participate in these activities and end up dying prematurely?

Anonymous said...

Brent Condon
My major concern while taking the AP test was prose in the multiple choice and the question 2. I have a difficult time focusing while reading dull passages. A lesson about analyzing boring passages would help to improve the understanding of prose questions on the AP test. Another weakness of mine is finding adjectives for the poetic terms in the thesis. I use about three minutes trying to find an adjective to use. The class as a whole was well-balanced; however, more instruction on writing techniques would have helped. Prose passages about everyday life are difficult to analyze as they seem bland and meaningless. Students would benefit from studying passages that appear to have no meaning on the surface.

Kayla said...

The AP Exam was a daunting process throughout the year but I feel this class has been very beneficial. Before this class I knew I liked poetry but after this year I realize that I really like analysing poems. I think this class has a very nice set up and I never feel overwhelmed in comparison to other AP courses. The material is difficult for me but the laid back atmosphere has been really helpful. I would have liked more multiple choice breakdown and more essay discussions rather than novel discussions. I think that the class review of possible essay directions would be much more beneficial for the exam. Thank you for such a great year and I hope that future classes are just as fun as this one has been.

-Kayla Murphy

Anonymous said...

• Is there a correlation between extreme amounts of fame and mortality?
• How do researchers overcome the limitations set by studying “unreachable” individuals?
• Charts are very helpful in depicting acquired analysis.
• There is, in fact, a correlation between mortality rates and success.
• American pop stars seem to have a greater issue with staying alive and being successful compared to European ones.
• I could take a deeper look into why European pop stars are better off than American pop stars.

Danny Rafuse

LCerullo said...

I had a great time this year with this class just to start off. You got quirks Mr. Kefor, from your over exaggerated warm greetings complimented by your creepy smile to start off every class, to your lectures where you wander off to fantasy worlds which could rival Carroll to explain a point or idea. But that’s just you, so you roll with it and I respect that as well as find it very entertaining. In regards to the test, I thought we were extremely prepared for the poetry prompt having done numerous examples, practices, and walkthroughs throughout the year. I felt nearly the same way with prose but maybe slightly less so. Prose is more difficult to effectively teach but I thought we did many thorough breakdowns this year and practice prompts which helped out tremendously. Question 3’s have always been my personal weak area but that’s only because of my own personal inability to recall books I’ve read at a proficient level. I do however think we had a strong reading list this year from What is the What to the 1984 to the Kite Runner, and with the Power Read thrown in there too. FINALLY READ HAMLET and it wasn’t too bad.
On a personal note I have really enjoyed your teaching style the past 2 years; you’ve always had a bright enthusiasm to start every class. While the Bob Dylan fanaticism is a bit much, your integration of music into the class is awesome. It makes all the dreary timed prompts a little bit less painful, and all our regular activities feel much more relaxed and easy-going. I think you’re a talented and passionate teacher and I’m glad to have taken AP Lit.

Colby Sears said...

The research study discussing rock and pop entertainers and their respective mortality rates by Mark A Bellis comes to the conclusion that “despite often considerable wealth, rock and pop stars suffer higher levels of mortality than demographically matched individuals in the general population”. The theory that musicians and popular entertainers die sooner than those of the average population is one that is clearly supported by the study’s results involving 1489 rock and pop stars reaching fame between 1956 and 2006. The study does state that because of having a profession as glamorous and admired as one in the entertainment industry, it is more likely that rock/pop stars are more exposed to risk behaviors like substance abuse; the research does take this into consideration, but also claims it possible that some issues are more complex, deeper-rooted problems. Future research could still be completed, perhaps regarding the mortalities of rap/hip-hop and R&B stars, and contrasting their health issues against those of the mainstream rock/pop performers. After analyzing the data of these rock/pop stars and reading Bellis’ in-depth research, it is evident that the study is, in fact, correct; people are “dying to be famous”, and entertainers – individuals from all demographics, nationalities, and other characteristics – have statistically higher death rates than those that stay off the stage.

LPK said...

I feel as though the time spent doing various essays, as well as working on essay strategies, was time well spent. I felt much more prepared for the first and second questions than I would have otherwise, given the amount of practice and mental preparation. Question 3 was challenging, but given its unpredictability, there was only so much we could do to prepare.
I felt prepared for the multiple choice section, but quite honestly that particular section is much more dependent on reasoning and logic than than the others, and as such necessitates less preparation. I personally feel that as long as one has the ability to think on their feet, they shouldn’t have too much trouble.

Jillian Allard said...

1. Checked Edline
2. Despite my general resistance to learning useful information through this course, I found myself well prepared for the AP English Literature exam. Being a person who likes structure and predictability in relation to school work, I liked how we practiced formatting a thesis for the first month of school. Looking for specific literary elements that all helped culminate into one main concept clearly outlined the ensuing paragraphs. In addition, the exposure to a copious amount of poems through jigsaws or carousels helped develop my analytical skills for the AP test. The multiple choice and essay practice we did in class thoroughly prepared me for the actual test. Holistically, I found both to be easy in comparison to my expectations. I would recommend practicing relating the universal idea to the specifications of the prompt. For example, if the poem was about a tree (perhaps a black walnut tree) and the prompt was about family relationships, I would practice constructing an overarching theme around family relationships.
3. “Dying to be famous: retrospective cohort study of rock and pop star mortality and its association with adverse childhood experiences” was a study conducted by Bellis, Hughes, Sharples, Hennell and Hardcastle. The research question posed was if the shortened life expectancy of rock and pop stars was due to the individual characteristics of the performer or experiences that predated their fame. A formal hypothesis is never stated making this study seem like a general research project designed to generate information for others to analyze, not a carefully designed case study. The nationality, gender, age, music genre and type of performer are aspects Bellis took into consideration. Also, Bellis was so extremely thorough that he defined fame in respect to this study as someone with 200, 000 fans for at least five years. The methodology was a comparison of 1,489 celebrities’ post-fame mortality to the general population; correlations between adverse childhood experiences, risk factors and protective factors were explored, too. The data revealed that lengthier careers decreased the performers’ survival rate and that North America stars were more prone to early mortality. If the artist experienced an adverse childhood experience, they are more likely to perish from risk- related behaviors that are abundant to wealth, recognizable people. Bellis concludes that adverse childhood experiences are likely to induce risk behavior in all citizens, but rock and pop stars have more opportunities to engage in such dangerous activities. Bellis consents that there was wide variation amongst the participants, but an interesting correlation did emerge amongst some of the celebrities. This study implicates that further studies could be conducted to understand why risky behavior is rampant amongst artists; if this behavior could be controlled, the stars would stop negatively influencing youth culture with their deplorable behavior.

Anonymous said...

Gordon Hudson begins analysis of the correlation between prejudice and conservative idealisms parallel to general intelligence levels. The process taken was that of a general survey through cognitive testing directed at abstract forms of thinking on various adult groups in both the U.S. and the U.K.. These tests yielded results that did in fact correlate conservatism and unintelligence. It would seem that children less able to understand points of view and empathy lean more toward ideologies that rely on keeping things the same for the sake of order and stability. The possibilities for the future are that if less conservative idealism and greater educational programming are introduced into the lives of the youth than prejudice can be eradicated.
Seth Killingbeck

Christine Lattouf said...

1. Done.

2. All of the essays (poetry, prose, and question three) we wrote in class help prepare for the AP test. We should have practiced writing essay questions more frequently. Less group work would have been better overall. I believe that we should have had more multiple choice practice in class. The multiple choice practice should be timed and the first couple of multiple choice practice tests should not be graded. We should have started multiple choice practice earlier in the year. The voice thread project helped me understand all aspects of “The Road.” You could try using the voice thread for other books such as “The Kite Runner” so the students can produce details from all aspects of the book. The voice thread could be used as the class discussion, instead of spending class time discussing the book. If we do not spend time in class discussing the book, we will have more time to do AP essay and AP multiple choice questions.

Christine Lattouf said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Christine Lattouf said...

1. Done.

2. All of the essays (poetry, prose, and question three) we wrote in class help prepare for the AP test. We should have practiced writing essay questions more frequently. Less group work would have been better overall. I believe that we should have had more multiple choice practice in class. The multiple choice practice should be timed and the first couple of multiple choice practice tests should not be graded. We should have started multiple choice practice earlier in the year. The voice thread project helped me understand all aspects of “The Road.” You could try using the voice thread for other books such as “The Kite Runner” so the students can produce details from all aspects of the book. The voice thread could be used as the class discussion, instead of spending class time discussing the book. If we do not spend time in class discussing the book, we will have more time to do AP essay and AP multiple choice questions.

Christine Lattouf said...

1. Done.

2. All of the essays (poetry, prose, and question three) we wrote in class help prepare for the AP test. We should have practiced writing essay questions more frequently. Less group work would have been better overall. I believe that we should have had more multiple choice practice in class. The multiple choice practice should be timed and the first couple of multiple choice practice tests should not be graded. We should have started multiple choice practice earlier in the year. The voice thread project helped me understand all aspects of “The Road.” You could try using the voice thread for other books such as “The Kite Runner” so the students can produce details from all aspects of the book. The voice thread could be used as the class discussion, instead of spending class time discussing the book. If we do not spend time in class discussing the book, we will have more time to do AP essay and AP multiple choice questions.

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Anonymous said...

Naomi Stuffers
5/10/13
Period B
Stephens Experiment

Why did they “choose” to stay?

In this experiment, researchers attempted to understand why certain people in New Orleans chose to stay in their homes during Hurricane Katrina. They hypothesized that the “leavers’” firsthand accounts would emphasize choice, independence, and control, whereas the “stayers” were not passive but rather “agentic,” meaning acting in ways that were appropriate for their context. By interviewing these different types of people, the researchers could find out how people in different situations make sense of the same event.
In order to get their answer, the researchers set up two studies. The first study consisted of questioning outsiders as to how they perceived the leavers and the stayers. The researchers inferred that they would follow along the guidelines of the “disjoint model,” where the survivors would have influenced their surroundings and made their way out of New Orleans based on “good” actions. The second study consisted of questioning the leavers and the stayers about their experiences. The researchers noticed that the two groups of survivors differed greatly in sociocultural background: the leavers consisting of White, middle-class families and the stayers consisting generally of Black working-class families. The researchers hypothesized that the leavers would associate more with the disjoint model, while the stayers would follow the “conjoint model” which states that “good” actions are based on obligations of family and environment, and promote interdependency.
Through study 1, the researchers manufactured a table that laid out certain types of personality-driven attributes including: good luck vs. bad luck, smart vs. stupid, and unprepared vs. prepared. Through an online survey, the observers generally picked out the positive attributes for the leavers and the negative attributes for the stayers. However, in study 2, the results were not as straightforward. The stayers and leavers had several different ways of making meaning to Hurricane Katrina, however, they still followed a loose version of their expected model. The stayers focused on adjusting to the world and maintaining interdependence, while the leavers focused on independence and control.
From this experiment, the researchers learned that the observers assumed that the disjoint model of acting independently and taking control of the situation is the only “right” way to act, even if the resources available did not allow that. The experiment demonstrated that the “survivors’ agency was powerfully shaped by the resource structure of their environments.” Sometimes, being “stupid” and “unprepared” is different from lacking the resources needed to successfully evacuate an area.
The researchers went on to explain that future experiments should examine the models of agency that shape how people make sense of others’ behavior outside of White, middle-class contexts.

Taylor Saltmarsh said...

Why Did They "Choose" To Stay offered an interesting perspective to those who did not evacuate New Orleans before Hurricane Katrina hit. The results of this experiment offered more insight to the other reasons and factors that played into this fate. Middle class and lower class struggles, high priced hotels, limited resources, and even faith in God. The methodology to this study was also rather interesting because it used numerous samples and people to reach a majority conclusion, and
shed light on the fact that it was not a decision that they made to stay.

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Anonymous said...

The study entitled, in part, “Dying to be Famous” set out to examine the statistical links between stardom in recent history, adverse childhood experiences, and premature deaths. In order to accomplish this study massive amount of biographical data was selected for a carefully defined group of stars. The stars in this study were individuals born in the latter half of the twentieth century in either North America or England, who had reached their point of fame within the past twenty years or so. The genres of music, and therefore the avenues for fame, specified in this study were restricted to the most mainstream pop/rock music.
This study suggests that the correlation between fame in the late twentieth century and death a number of years after the height of fame is fairly strong. According to the article, stars are most likely to perish of an untimely death not at the height of their fame, but rather decades afterward. While the precise leading causes of deaths remain unclear, largely thanks to the variety in bibliographical sources, the implication of risky associated with stardom behavior are implicit.
While many of the parameters of the study were very closely defined (time of fame, types of ACEs, time of death, etc.), many were rolled together into single categories. This bundling suggests the ability for further research into each of the subcategories of destruction categorized here. For example, the potential for examination of solely verbal abuse of a star as a child could be examined. That is, provided enough data was available. Additionally, the study brings to light the possibility for examination of the backgrounds of other troubled figures including visual artists or vocal artists of other genres. Conversely, the correlation between adverse childhood events and the frequency of irresponsible life decisions in individuals who have never been famous is a related avenue waiting to be explored by like-minded researchers.

Bry D

Christine Lattouf said...

Great Freshmen Advice:

Savor every moment and use it to strengthen your abilities and knowledge. Make the best of each moment for “one day it may be otherwise.” Set goals and surpass them. Knowledge is the one of the only things that cannot be taken away from you… It’s priceless.

~ Christine Lattouf

Christine Lattouf said...

Great Freshmen Advice:

Savor every moment and use it to strengthen your abilities and knowledge. Make the best of each moment for “one day it may be otherwise.” Set goals and surpass them. Knowledge is the one of the only things that cannot be taken away from you… It’s priceless.

~ Christine Lattouf

Christine Lattouf said...

Great Freshmen Advice:

Savor every moment and use it to strengthen your abilities and knowledge. Make the best of each moment for “one day it may be otherwise.” Set goals and surpass them. Knowledge is the one of the only things that cannot be taken away from you… It’s priceless.

Christine Lattouf said...

Great Freshmen Advice:

Savor every moment and use it to strengthen your abilities and knowledge. Make the best of each moment for “one day it may be otherwise.” Set goals and surpass them. Knowledge is the one of the only things that cannot be taken away from you… It’s priceless.

Anonymous said...

Brent Condon
Stephens attempts to understand the reaction of American citizens after they realized the survivors of hurricane Katrina were warned of the hurricane. The author argues that race was a contributing factor in deciding who evacuated from the hurricane. Those in poverty were less likely to escape while most educated and wealthy people left. The study utilized relief helpers in order to identify the circumstances that caused someone to stay during the hurricane. People who stayed were often given negative descriptions by the relief helpers when the helpers reported the interaction. Leavers were usually white, wealthy, and educated whereas survivors were usually poor and uneducated.

Anonymous said...

Message to Freshmen -

Right now is the perfect time to take a moment to see where you are going. Stop for a second and think about what you have accomplished this year. Are there things that you could have done better? What were you really good at? Take a moment and make a plan for your next three years now. Don't just ride along and take whatever classes you are dropped into. Decide what you like and what your strongsuits are and then find a way to do more of that. School actually can be enjoyable, you just need to make it play to what you like doing. Be proactive.

Bry Dague

Christine Lattouf said...

3. Psychological Science

In the experiment titled “Psychological Science” they hypothesized and tested medication models indicates that cognitive ability predicts greater prejudice. They found that a lower intelligence (g) in childhood would predict greater racism in adulthood.
It is said that cognitive abilities have important implications for both interpersonal behaviors and relations. Studies show that individuals with lower levels of general intelligence (g) are less trusting of other people, less sensitive to interpersonal cues, and less accurate in deciphering other people’s behaviors and intentions. Recent studies have reported that there is a negative correlation between scores on intelligence subscales and racism and between abstract reasoning and prejudice toward homosexuals. This study proposes that right-wing ideologies, which are socially conservative and authoritarian, represent a mechanism through which cognitive ability is linked with prejudice.
Research has revealed that individuals who more strongly endorse social conservatism have greater cognitive rigidity, less cognitive flexibility and lower integrative complexity.
There is a relevant finding that states that less intelligent children come to endorse more socially conservative ideologies as adults. As compared with liberal, individuals who endorse right-wing ideologies are more fearful and anxious that out-groups will cause the disintegration of societal moral standards and traditions. It is confirmed that there are strong positive correlations between right-wing ideologies and prejudice.
Individuals with lower cognitive ability may be more attracted to right-wing ideologies that promote coherence and order, and because such ideologies emphasize the maintenance of the status quo, they may foster greater out-group prejudice.
This experiment used AMOS software to test hypothesized mediation model separately for men and women in each data set, using correlation matrices reported by Deary at al and Schoon at al. The tests results shows that abstract reasoning negatively predicted prejudice, but this effect was significantly reduced when the experimenters included the mediators in the model. Lower levels of abstract reasoning also predicted greater right-wing authoritarianism, which in turn predicted elevated prejudice against homosexuals. The analysis of the U.S. sample showed the relationship between intelligence and prejudice, which is the intergroup contact.
In the end, this study represented that cognitive ability is a reliable predicator of prejudice. Understanding the causes of intergroup bias is the first step toward addressing social inequalities and negatively toward out-groups. Exposing right-wing conservative ideology and intergroup contact, where personal intelligence may influence prejudice represents a fundamental advance in developing such an understanding.

Christine Lattouf said...

3. Psychological Science

In the experiment titled “Psychological Science” they hypothesized and tested medication models indicates that cognitive ability predicts greater prejudice. They found that a lower intelligence (g) in childhood would predict greater racism in adulthood.
It is said that cognitive abilities have important implications for both interpersonal behaviors and relations. Studies show that individuals with lower levels of general intelligence (g) are less trusting of other people, less sensitive to interpersonal cues, and less accurate in deciphering other people’s behaviors and intentions. Recent studies have reported that there is a negative correlation between scores on intelligence subscales and racism and between abstract reasoning and prejudice toward homosexuals. This study proposes that right-wing ideologies, which are socially conservative and authoritarian, represent a mechanism through which cognitive ability is linked with prejudice.
Research has revealed that individuals who more strongly endorse social conservatism have greater cognitive rigidity, less cognitive flexibility and lower integrative complexity.
There is a relevant finding that states that less intelligent children come to endorse more socially conservative ideologies as adults. As compared with liberal, individuals who endorse right-wing ideologies are more fearful and anxious that out-groups will cause the disintegration of societal moral standards and traditions. It is confirmed that there are strong positive correlations between right-wing ideologies and prejudice.
Individuals with lower cognitive ability may be more attracted to right-wing ideologies that promote coherence and order, and because such ideologies emphasize the maintenance of the status quo, they may foster greater out-group prejudice.
This experiment used AMOS software to test hypothesized mediation model separately for men and women in each data set, using correlation matrices reported by Deary at al and Schoon at al. The tests results shows that abstract reasoning negatively predicted prejudice, but this effect was significantly reduced when the experimenters included the mediators in the model. Lower levels of abstract reasoning also predicted greater right-wing authoritarianism, which in turn predicted elevated prejudice against homosexuals. The analysis of the U.S. sample showed the relationship between intelligence and prejudice, which is the intergroup contact.
In the end, this study represented that cognitive ability is a reliable predicator of prejudice. Understanding the causes of intergroup bias is the first step toward addressing social inequalities and negatively toward out-groups. Exposing right-wing conservative ideology and intergroup contact, where personal intelligence may influence prejudice represents a fundamental advance in developing such an understanding.

Moonwaves182 said...

Matt Litchfield
2. The AP exam was, overall, a positive experience for me. I felt like the multiple choice was really easy, and I think doing more open response questions in class helped me to look at passages from a more accessible angle. Ironically, I thought the open response was much harder. I think my main problem was more of a mental block during the exam. The prose was particularly difficult though, and more practice throughout the year might have helped. I feel like we mostly approached our novels from the perspective of question 3, not so much 2. Starting with poetry at the beginning of the year gave me a really strong basis for analysing it too, so I felt confident in that. Finally, I really liked the selection of class books this year: I felt exposed to a lot of different cultures and worldviews that I otherwise would have never known. Nevertheless, it would have been nice to read one or two more "classic" novels to prepare for older prose passages.