Wednesday, May 14, 2014

5-15 Substitute Plans: English I:H D

1. Choose 3 devices that Golding employs, with success, in Lord of the Flies thus far. One device must be linguistic (diction, syntax, etc.). As a comment here, offer a concise (short paragraph) analysis of each. Include specific examples, and discuss how Golding’s handling of each device is representative of his authorial voice and style.

2. Propose 3 potential scenarios for your RAFT by commenting here. Use the acronym to frame your scenario.

3. For the last half of class, read, annotate, develop, and post a response to the AP poem prompt. This will be graded with the AP rubric as a quiz.

18 comments:

Alex McFaun said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jen Petrilli said...

Jen Petrilli

Personification is vital to the theme of destruction in Lord Of The Flies. After the plane had crashed into the land, it becomes the cause of the deterioration of natural life in the area, the damaged zone being referred to as “the scar” The use of personification in this instance is portraying the island as a living creature who is damaged by the crash, and later by the boys’ brash and inconsiderate actions. This device is also used when referring to the copious amount of creepers found on this island. When Piggy sets fire to the forest, the vines surged to life as they “rose for a moment into view, agonized, and went down again.” The creepers seemed to awake with the heat from the flames to show the island being tortured as a result of the boys’ actions.

Dialect is a common element in this story due to the boys’ home country of England. Their foreign vocabulary is unique and seemingly more eloquent than a typical American repertoire. The dialogue of the boys informs us of this in many instances of conversation. When the choir boys’ robes are referred to as “togs” and “cloaks” their native tongue is prevalent. Not only are their descriptive words unfamiliar, but also their action words. This can be seen when Jack says that they “shan’t see round this corner” The dialect of the boys’ is a reminder of where they hailed from and could eventually show their loss of civilization.

Throughout the chapters of this story, imagery is displayed across the island, vibrant and grand. The scenery of the land is ironic in a sense. While the island is beautiful and flourishing, its conditions are slowly wearing away the boys. The children are so worried about their state of absence that they give no thought to enjoying the simplistic beauty of the island’s wildlife. Ralph and the others take no time to relax and view locations like “the shimmering water” “tiny, glittering fish” or waters “with the efflorescence of tropical weed and coral.” The imagery of these scenes appears lovely and peaceful. This emphasizes the chaos just beyond the beauty of the land.

jack veglas said...

The use of devices in the book Lord of The Flies helps strengthen the story about the hardships of creating a society in Lord of The Flies, Golding utilizes luminous syntax, consistent personification,and appealing symbolism to convey the difficulties of creating a society

Golding implements the use of personification throughout the novel Lord of The Flies. Nearly every time the forest is described, clear examples of personification show up in this text, “the jungle has a life and will of its own”, he’s saying that the jungle has a life of its own life and will which a jungle is not able to leading to a great example of personification. Such as this other quote about the jungle "the creepers in the forest had woven a great mat that hung at the side of an open space in the jungle," and also "and a rapid climber flaunted red and yellow sprays right to the top”. As we know creepers(vines) cannot weave or flaunt showing how Golding Personifies items in the forest .As you can see Golding loves to personify the forest showing that the forest is a big part of the novel with some kind of force or symbol to the kids and their society.
Golding includes various items that either the reader views as symbols to the society of the kid’s society or items that symbolize the island itself. A great example that I used in the last paragraph is the jungle plays a big part in the book creating some force towards the kids. Golding personifies and describes the jungle in many ways almost alluding that the jungle is alive. The jungle itself is probably the big symbol of the island pretty much making it complete and adding more of a mysterious view on the island. As well as the jungle symbolizes the island you could say that the conch symbolizes the society that the kids created. The conch became a great power in the society it became a powerful symbol of the society as well as it kept order. The shell itself governed the boys and kept order in the meeting, because only the person holding the conch was able to talk. As well as the conch being a symbol it also became a figure in their democratic government and in their democratic power. Even though the power and the influences on the boys decreased as the society fell and turned into more barbaric and savagery.
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Alex McFaun said...

Golding's three well used devices in Lord of the Flies are vivid diction, illustrative imagery and descriptive personification. The main character Ralph's diction is assertive. When Ralph says things like '"This is our island. It's a good island. Until the grownups come to fetch us we'll have fun. (35)"' It's very clear that he is the leader of the group and in control of whatever situation is currently going on. Another one of the main characters Piggy has very intelligent diction, it is very clear that Piggy is the smartest one in the group and knows what he's talking about. '"I've been thinking,"..." about a clock. We could make a sundial. (64)"' Piggy's knowledge of survival techniques is well documented.
To go along with diction Golding's imagery is another device that used within the story. The first few paragraphs of each chapter always include some type of setting description. "The first rhythm they became used to was the slow swing from dawn to a quick dusk. They accepted the pleasures of morning, the bright sun, the whelming sea and sweet air, (narrator 58)." However, he also does a good job of describing other things such as the fires the kids make on the island" Ralph stood next to the ashes of the signal fire, hands full of meat, saying nothing (narrator 74)." The imagery is very clear in those two instances because you can’t actually see what is going on but the situation is very clear.
Golding's diction and imagery can very easily be accompanied by his use of personification. Personification is a device Golding uses very well and in many places. For instance when one of the "littleuns" Phil, describes his nightmare the night before the narrator says" The vivid horror of this, so possible and so nakedly terrifying held them all silent (Narrator 85)." Talking about the horror of the dream "holding" all the kids silent is very good personification of the events within the dream. Also personified is the setting a lot to show how calm or harsh the weather on the island is. "The glittering sea rose up, moved apart in planes on blatant possibility (narrator 58). Golding personifies the ocean to give a better description of what it is actually doing.
Golding’s vivid diction is shown through Ralph and Piggy. His Illustrative imagery is shown through his setting and situational occurrences such as fire. Lastly, his descriptive personification is shown through his characters emotions as well as the setting. Those three things together are how Golding made Lord of the Flies as popular a book as it is today.

Kathryn Ward said...

Kathryn Ward
1. Demonstrating examples of literary devices throughout Lord of the Flies, Golding utilizes characterizing diction, metaphorical devices, and descriptive imagery.
By the use of diction between his characters Golding creates and vivid characters. When the boys are sitting by the water Ralph yells to Maurice to, “Belly Flop!” which develops the immaturity found in the boys on the island by their screaming and desire to play around. (65) At the assembly in chapter five, Ralph declares, he knows, “what we need. An assembly to put things straight. And first of all, I’m speaking.” (79) By using a direct and clear tone, Ralph’s diction distinguishes him as the leader. The decisiveness in his voice is what the boys look up too. Golding’s utilization of diction among his characters creates a deeper sense of who these characters are and influences his detailed style.
Metaphors and other comparative language are found throughout Lord of the Flies, and imply the symbolic and descriptive style Golding uses in the novel. While Simon was secluded from the group in the rock shelter he had found, he was described as, “secure in the middle he was in a little cabin screened off from open space by a few leaves.”(57) Instead of simply saying Simon was secure Golding clarifies that he was comfortable by indirectly comparing the rock shelter to a cabin. When the boys were building a fire it states: “Life became a race with the fire and the boys scattered through the upper forest.” Golding uses a metaphor to compare creating a fire to race by the rushed importance of it, which creates a hurried and excited mood in the reader. The symbolic language in Lord of the Flies employed by Golding is common throughout his writing.
Most of Golding’s writing is detailed imagery with a very illustrative style. Ralph’s voice was described that “his ordinary voice sounded like a whisper after the harsh note of the conch,” from blowing the conch so much. More commonly in Lord of the Flies is when Golding creates descriptive scenery. The beach is described as a “glittering sea rose up , moved apart in planes of blatant impossibility; the coral reef and a few stunted palms that clung to the more elevated parts would float up into the sky, would quiver, be plucked apart, run like raindrops on a wire or be repeated as in odd succession of mirrors.” (58) By using illustrative verbs and adjectives Golding paints a picture of the scenery in his writing. The imagery used in the novel is frequent in Golding’s writing.

kambrynn bowman said...

In his novel, The Lord of the Flies, Golding employs dominant symbolism, contrasting characters, and deliberate allegory to further express the plot of the book.
One of the first events that occurs in the novel is the discovery of the conch shell. The shell is used to signal the other castaways on the island. The shell unites the boys during a time when they felt distant and lost. The boys elect a leader, and with the help of the law and order represented by the conch, Ralph is chosen. Ralph sets rules for the island involving the conch: “I’ll give the conch to the next person to speak. He can hold it when he’s speaking” (33). The power of the conch is sacred to Ralph, and he does not want it to fade away, which is why he doesn’t blow the conch when the boys flee the meeting prematurely. Ralph states, “If I blow the conch and they don’t come back; then we’ve had it. We shan’t keep the fire going. We’ll be like animals. We’ll never be rescued” (92). For Ralph, the conch is their key to getting off the island.
The characteristics of Jack and Ralph foil one another. Ralph is genuinely concerned for the wellbeing of the castaways. He tries countless times to establish rules for the community to follow. Ralph becomes upset when the group does not follow his simple regulations because in his eyes, they will not get rescued without the principle of law and order. Ralph is sensible, he chose to build shelters as the group’s task. Jack, one the other hand thought the duty to take priority was hunting. This says much about Jack’s personality of violence and eager for power. Jack’s followers, the other choir members, are Jack’s hunting members. Jack forced this decision upon them, and often pressures members of the groups to agree with him due to his sinister ways. Jack being a power hungry monster often finds himself in disputes with members of the group, Ralph more than anyone. A big war of words occurs when Jack allows the fire to go out, preventing a ship from seeing the smoke signal. Ralph, a normally calm boy snaps at Jack, “’There was a ship. Out there. You said you’d keep the fire going and you let it out!’ He took a step toward Jack” (70). Jack made Ralph become defensive and enraged, qualities that can only be brought out onto the surface by a distasteful person.
Piggy is without a doubt the most intellectual on the island. However, his opinion and voice of reason go unseen because of his large appearance and glasses. Piggy’s physical qualities are constantly used against him. The boys tell him to shut up and call him fat whenever he tries to possess the conch. Piggy represents intellect which is often ignored in society. Intelligence is the key to human survival, yet society calls it unimportant. If the group listened to Piggy, their life on the island may be smoother. However, due to the group’s ignorance, life remains a colossal mess.

Justin Johnson said...

Employing devices to reinforce the defects of human nature and society in Lord of the Flies William Golding utilizes repetitive personification, lucid syntax and compelling symbolism to tell the story of wrecked boys.
To begin with Golding consistently refers to the island as more of a life form rather than an uninhabited stretch of land. In the beginning of the book the island is depicted as just a piece of land that has left the boys’ miles upon miles from civilization. As the story and characters develop the island starts to shape the boys’ personalities and behavior. When the boys plummeted on to the island from their plane, before the ocean swallowed the plane, it dug across the island. This is referred to as the “scar” by the young boys and is a trace of their existence on the island. On top of that the boys are always entangled in the “creepers” that symbolize the island’s growth and life. The creepers pull at the boys almost as though the island is trying to grab them, the creepers are usually referred to in a negative way. “He must have had a nightmare. Stumbling amongst all those creepers,” this quote shows the negative connotation of the vines and the way Golding uses them to show the island’s way to interact with the boys. Golding also employs sentence structure that helps captivate the reader’s attention.
Additionally the elaborate ways Golding manipulates the sentences in each chapter are dependent upon the situations. At times the syntax can change from being simple to poetic to even barbaric, the boys’ behavior are represented by the sentences and dialogue. In the novel when

DID NOT FINISH

Justin Johnson said...

Employing devices to reinforce the defects of human nature and society in Lord of the Flies William Golding utilizes repetitive personification, lucid syntax and compelling symbolism to tell the story of wrecked boys.
To begin with Golding consistently refers to the island as more of a life form rather than an uninhabited stretch of land. In the beginning of the book the island is depicted as just a piece of land that has left the boys’ miles upon miles from civilization. As the story and characters develop the island starts to shape the boys’ personalities and behavior. When the boys plummeted on to the island from their plane, before the ocean swallowed the plane, it dug across the island. This is referred to as the “scar” by the young boys and is a trace of their existence on the island. On top of that the boys are always entangled in the “creepers” that symbolize the island’s growth and life. The creepers pull at the boys almost as though the island is trying to grab them, the creepers are usually referred to in a negative way. “He must have had a nightmare. Stumbling amongst all those creepers,” this quote shows the negative connotation of the vines and the way Golding uses them to show the island’s way to interact with the boys. Golding also employs sentence structure that helps captivate the reader’s attention.
Additionally the elaborate ways Golding manipulates the sentences in each chapter are dependent upon the situations. At times the syntax can change from being simple to poetic to even barbaric, the boys’ behavior are represented by the sentences and dialogue. In the novel when

DID NOT FINISH

Justin Johnson said...

Employing devices to reinforce the defects of human nature and society in Lord of the Flies William Golding utilizes repetitive personification, lucid syntax and compelling symbolism to tell the story of wrecked boys.
To begin with Golding consistently refers to the island as more of a life form rather than an uninhabited stretch of land. In the beginning of the book the island is depicted as just a piece of land that has left the boys’ miles upon miles from civilization. As the story and characters develop the island starts to shape the boys’ personalities and behavior. When the boys plummeted on to the island from their plane, before the ocean swallowed the plane, it dug across the island. This is referred to as the “scar” by the young boys and is a trace of their existence on the island. On top of that the boys are always entangled in the “creepers” that symbolize the island’s growth and life. The creepers pull at the boys almost as though the island is trying to grab them, the creepers are usually referred to in a negative way. “He must have had a nightmare. Stumbling amongst all those creepers,” this quote shows the negative connotation of the vines and the way Golding uses them to show the island’s way to interact with the boys. Golding also employs sentence structure that helps captivate the reader’s attention.
Additionally the elaborate ways Golding manipulates the sentences in each chapter are dependent upon the situations. At times the syntax can change from being simple to poetic to even barbaric, the boys’ behavior are represented by the sentences and dialogue. In the novel when

DID NOT FINISH

Justin Johnson said...

Employing devices to reinforce the defects of human nature and society in Lord of the Flies William Golding utilizes repetitive personification, lucid syntax and compelling symbolism to tell the story of wrecked boys.
To begin with Golding consistently refers to the island as more of a life form rather than an uninhabited stretch of land. In the beginning of the book the island is depicted as just a piece of land that has left the boys’ miles upon miles from civilization. As the story and characters develop the island starts to shape the boys’ personalities and behavior. When the boys plummeted on to the island from their plane, before the ocean swallowed the plane, it dug across the island. This is referred to as the “scar” by the young boys and is a trace of their existence on the island. On top of that the boys are always entangled in the “creepers” that symbolize the island’s growth and life. The creepers pull at the boys almost as though the island is trying to grab them, the creepers are usually referred to in a negative way. “He must have had a nightmare. Stumbling amongst all those creepers,” this quote shows the negative connotation of the vines and the way Golding uses them to show the island’s way to interact with the boys. Golding also employs sentence structure that helps captivate the reader’s attention.
Additionally the elaborate ways Golding manipulates the sentences in each chapter are dependent upon the situations. At times the syntax can change from being simple to poetic to even barbaric, the boys’ behavior are represented by the sentences and dialogue. In the novel when

DID NOT FINISH

Justin Johnson said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
shaeleen hughes said...

Unfinished:

Procreating alluring syntax, consequential allegory, and captivating symbolism, in Lord of the Flies, Golding is able to draft a magnificent story of internal struggle and the idea that at any given point a human being has the potential to turn back to barbaric ways.
Directly, one is able to conclude that Golding’s syntax is essential in keeping the reader engaged in Lord of the Flies. The way in which Golding choses to portray the story is actually quite beautiful in the sense that he drifted apart from normality with writers from his time. “The beach between the palm terrace and the water was a thin stick, endless apparently, for to Ralph’s left the perspectives of and beach and water drew to a point at infinity: and always, almost visible, was the heat.” “He turned over, holding his nose, and a golden light danced and shattered just over his face.”

Renee Sanord said...

In the Lord of the Flies, William Golding employs literary devices such as characterization, diction, and symbolism. Golding characterizes each of the boys to show their roles on the island. A vote is made to nominate a chief. Jack nominates himself and boy nominates “’him with the shell”’, meaning Ralph. Ralph wins the chief because he was the one who blew the conch shell. Jack is left in charge of the choir boys and they will fill the role of the hunters. Piggy is the smart one, but no one listens to him. He understands what they need to do in order to survive. However, Ralph and Jack have the power and overrule Piggy’s ideas and talk over him.
The diction of the boys shows their level of maturity even in difficult times. Ralph speaks with confidence, adding to his leadership qualities. He reassures the boys that, “’sooner or later, [they] shall be rescued.”’ He talks about his plans, making the boys feel safer. Piggy is very smart, but whines a lot. When the boys all run up to make a fire Piggy complains about how “The first thing we ought to have made was shelters down there by the beach. It wasn’t half as cold down there in the night. But the first time Ralph says ‘fire’ you goes howling and screaming up this here mountain. Like a pack of kids!”’ The way Piggy speaks shows that he is smart, but he whines, making it hard for anyone to take him seriously. This can be problematic because Ralph is more convincing when he speaks, but Piggy has better ideas that nobody will listen to, even if he is holding the conch shell.
The conch shell is a symbol of leadership. Ralph was nominated as the chief of the island since he was the one who originally blew the conch. During meetings, whoever holds the conch gets to speak, representing control. The boys created the “scar” that is left on the island. It represents their time on the island, and the impact they have made. Nobody has ever been on the island before them, and they are starting to create their own civilization. Being the first humans to live there will drastically change the previously deserted island.

Shianne Taylor said...

In The Lord of the Flies, Golding employs literary devices into his writing helping to display his underlying meaning in the book. Using linguistics he portrays the time period in which the book is set and ages as well as nationalities that the children are. Golding uses “specs” and “creepers”, which are commonly used in British literature referring to glasses and undergrowth. This helps us analyze the diction by saying that the kids are more than likely from Britain or a British speaking area. Also throughout the book there is a reference to world war two. Golding gives us a time period in which this story is taking place by referencing the atomic bomb because there had been two used during the war. Reading about the atom bomb, you can now assume they are in the 1950’s-1960’s era. When the kids say things like “littlluns” or “biguns” it helps us distinguish them as being of ages 7-14 because of their type of slang pronunciations. They do not speak like adults or refer to things the way older children would. Golding uses these types of linguistical phrases or speech patterns to his advantage in giving the reader clues into the back story of the kids which assists you in seeing the changes made by each from being stuck on the island.
Depicting the children and how they may have acted or been treated in society before the crash is also done by Golding’s descriptive imagery shown throughout the chapter. He describes how the kids are dressed and how their hair length changes, which directly translates to how the civilized aspect of their way of life slowly slips away into their newly barbarianized ways of living. The most drastic of changes was underwent by Jack himself. In the text it talks of “His sandy hair,” becoming “considerably longer than it had been when they dropped in…” The island is taking effect on Jack and the description of his now long and shaggy hair as well as his sunburnt and peeling skin show how far he is from what he used to be. Slowly, but surely, he will become completely unrecognizable from when he was first dropped onto the island, because the toll of staying on this island for him is his sanity and well-being. He will adapt to these changes by striving for excellence in his hunting ability and this will cause his possible downfall. The imagery depicting the kids is not just helpful to see or have a picture set in your head of them but is very useful in characterizing them. Golding’s imagery helps foreshadow possible scenarios in the near future as well as who the island will change the most whether for better or worse. Not only does the imagery help us define the characters more easily but it also helps us understand the general makeup of the island and how that assists the idea of the story. A common landmark in the story is the “scar” which we assume is where the plane crashed and had damaged the earth. Similarly the hill is referred to in the book being that it is the highest point on the island where they make their fire in hopes to alert possible ships that pass by. The imagery throughout the story does more than just set up the scene, it also gives dimension into the underlying concept of the story and how accidents can change people in different ways.

NOT DONE

Shianne Taylor said...

In The Lord of the Flies, Golding employs literary devices into his writing helping to display his underlying meaning in the book. Using linguistics he portrays the time period in which the book is set and ages as well as nationalities that the children are. Golding uses “specs” and “creepers”, which are commonly used in British literature referring to glasses and undergrowth. This helps us analyze the diction by saying that the kids are more than likely from Britain or a British speaking area. Also throughout the book there is a reference to world war two. Golding gives us a time period in which this story is taking place by referencing the atomic bomb because there had been two used during the war. Reading about the atom bomb, you can now assume they are in the 1950’s-1960’s era. When the kids say things like “littlluns” or “biguns” it helps us distinguish them as being of ages 7-14 because of their type of slang pronunciations. They do not speak like adults or refer to things the way older children would. Golding uses these types of linguistical phrases or speech patterns to his advantage in giving the reader clues into the back story of the kids which assists you in seeing the changes made by each from being stuck on the island.
Depicting the children and how they may have acted or been treated in society before the crash is also done by Golding’s descriptive imagery shown throughout the chapter. He describes how the kids are dressed and how their hair length changes, which directly translates to how the civilized aspect of their way of life slowly slips away into their newly barbarianized ways of living. The most drastic of changes was underwent by Jack himself. In the text it talks of “His sandy hair,” becoming “considerably longer than it had been when they dropped in…” The island is taking effect on Jack and the description of his now long and shaggy hair as well as his sunburnt and peeling skin show how far he is from what he used to be. Slowly, but surely, he will become completely unrecognizable from when he was first dropped onto the island, because the toll of staying on this island for him is his sanity and well-being. He will adapt to these changes by striving for excellence in his hunting ability and this will cause his possible downfall. The imagery depicting the kids is not just helpful to see or have a picture set in your head of them but is very useful in characterizing them. Golding’s imagery helps foreshadow possible scenarios in the near future as well as who the island will change the most whether for better or worse. Not only does the imagery help us define the characters more easily but it also helps us understand the general makeup of the island and how that assists the idea of the story. A common landmark in the story is the “scar” which we assume is where the plane crashed and had damaged the earth. Similarly the hill is referred to in the book being that it is the highest point on the island where they make their fire in hopes to alert possible ships that pass by. The imagery throughout the story does more than just set up the scene, it also gives dimension into the underlying concept of the story and how accidents can change people in different ways.

Shianne Taylor said...

In The Lord of the Flies, Golding employs literary devices into his writing helping to display his underlying meaning in the book. Using linguistics he portrays the time period in which the book is set and ages as well as nationalities that the children are. Golding uses “specs” and “creepers”, which are commonly used in British literature referring to glasses and undergrowth. This helps us analyze the diction by saying that the kids are more than likely from Britain or a British speaking area. Also throughout the book there is a reference to world war two. Golding gives us a time period in which this story is taking place by referencing the atomic bomb because there had been two used during the war. Reading about the atom bomb, you can now assume they are in the 1950’s-1960’s era. When the kids say things like “littlluns” or “biguns” it helps us distinguish them as being of ages 7-14 because of their type of slang pronunciations. They do not speak like adults or refer to things the way older children would. Golding uses these types of linguistical phrases or speech patterns to his advantage in giving the reader clues into the back story of the kids which assists you in seeing the changes made by each from being stuck on the island.
Depicting the children and how they may have acted or been treated in society before the crash is also done by Golding’s descriptive imagery shown throughout the chapter. He describes how the kids are dressed and how their hair length changes, which directly translates to how the civilized aspect of their way of life slowly slips away into their newly barbarianized ways of living. The most drastic of changes was underwent by Jack himself. In the text it talks of “His sandy hair,” becoming “considerably longer than it had been when they dropped in…” The island is taking effect on Jack and the description of his now long and shaggy hair as well as his sunburnt and peeling skin show how far he is from what he used to be. Slowly, but surely, he will become completely unrecognizable from when he was first dropped onto the island, because the toll of staying on this island for him is his sanity and well-being. He will adapt to these changes by striving for excellence in his hunting ability and this will cause his possible downfall. The imagery depicting the kids is not just helpful to see or have a picture set in your head of them but is very useful in characterizing them. Golding’s imagery helps foreshadow possible scenarios in the near future as well as who the island will change the most whether for better or worse. Not only does the imagery help us define the characters more easily but it also helps us understand the general makeup of the island and how that assists the idea of the story. A common landmark in the story is the “scar” which we assume is where the plane crashed and had damaged the earth. Similarly the hill is referred to in the book being that it is the highest point on the island where they make their fire in hopes to alert possible ships that pass by. The imagery throughout the story does more than just set up the scene, it also gives dimension into the underlying concept of the story and how accidents can change people in different ways.

NOT DONE

Kambrynn Bowman said...

In his novel, The Lord of the Flies, Golding employs dominant symbolism, thoughtful diction, and deliberate allegory to further express the plot of the book.
One of the first events that occur in the novel is the discovery of the conch shell. The shell is used to signal the other castaways on the island. The shell unites the boys during a time when they felt distant and lost. The boys elect a leader, and with the help of the law and order represented by the conch, Ralph is chosen. Ralph sets rules for the island involving the conch: “I’ll give the conch to the next person to speak. He can hold it when he’s speaking” (33). The power of the conch is sacred to Ralph, and he does not want it to fade away, which is why he doesn’t blow the conch when the boys flee the meeting prematurely. Ralph states, “If I blow the conch and they don’t come back; then we’ve had it. We shan’t keep the fire going. We’ll be like animals. We’ll never be rescued” (92). For Ralph, the conch is their key to getting off the island.
Golding’s diction is not the most challenging. However, his choices of words are powerful. Most sentences are succinct, but the point that Golding was trying to emphasize is clear. The components of the story represent something larger. The connotation in Golding’s writing allows his symbols and allegories to appear in his story flawlessly. The word choice depends on the subject. When talking about Ralph, positive words such as those that relate to authority and peace. In contrast, hateful and violent words would be enforced when Jack or a negative event is the subject. The words chose when describing setting is vital to the imagery of the novel. The longest passages in the Golding’s novel are those in which he describes the environment. Diction is very important when describing the setting because it tackles all the senses so the reader can relate to the story. Colors help establish a picture of the setting. Golding uses a variety of colors to paint a picture of his island. Light colors represent the beautiful daytime, but the scary nighttime utilizes dark and mysterious colors and words. Diction is the backbone of all elements in Golding’s novel.
Piggy is without a doubt the most intellectual on the island. However, his opinion and voice of reason go unseen because of his large appearance and glasses. Piggy’s physical qualities are constantly used against him. The boys tell him to shut up and call him fat whenever he tries to possess the conch. Piggy represents intellect which is often ignored in society. Intelligence is the key to human survival, yet society calls it unimportant. Without intelligence, there would be no progress in human civilization. With Piggy, Golding is trying to express the point that if there is no knowledge, there is no way for people to grow. If the group listened to Piggy, their life on the island may be smoother. However, due to the group’s ignorance, life remains a colossal mess.

Patrick Robles said...

In Lord of the Flies, Golding uses old English diction to portray where the characters are from. Golding has the characters use words like specs and creepers instead of using the words glasses and a dense growth of plants. Using these this diction that is more common in Great Britain. This shows that the characters are from the Great Britain area.