Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Seniors: Orwellian Parallels


Part A: To supplement our reading of 1984, I am asking you to consider the qualities of both utopian and dystopian societies. Visit the two links below (of course, these are not put forth as actual utopias, but undeniably represent facets of idealistic societies). Offer a brief synopsis of each. Then, discuss the qualities that you identify as synonymous with utopias and dystopias.




Part B: Click here. View the document. Construct a thesis statement connecting the content of this article to 1984.


Part C: Click the links below to explore the images of North Korea on "The Big Picture". Peruse the photographs and read all of the captions. After viewing a number of images from multiple links, choose 3 that you feel echo- or, perhaps, represent distinctions when compared with- 1984. Construct 3 separate theses that identify and articulate between image and text.


Part D: Study the following songs. Analyze the lyrics, and compose a paragraph that pinpoints the relationship between the songs and the novel. Though all of the songs are allusive, their contextualization and universal ideas may differ from Orwell's. To enhance your understanding, you may wish to view the videos while reading/following the lyrics in a separate window.

"Testify" by Rage Against the Machine: audio/video
"Big Brother" by Stevie Wonder: audio/video
"2+2=5" by Radiohead: audio/video

Part E: Search the web for a video clip that makes an allusion to 1984 or George Orwell. Discuss how and why the speaker includes such an allusion, and how the allusion supplements his or her point or argument.

Part F: View this video from RSA Animate. Compose a paragraph that examines the relationship between the lecturer's overview of linguistic nuance and what we've learned about Newspeak and doublethink. 

80 comments:

Katie Folan said...

For number 6, I had originally picked C. The correct answer is letter A because "manners" is not referring to politeness or accepted rules, it is referring to the fact that the house is not distinguished with its typical boxy structure and comfortable feel.

For number 9, I had originally picked E. The answer is D because it refers to elaborate data with "figures all in rows..." and not necessarily research. That data answer is better.

For number 14, I picked C, however the correct answer is D because the bees are not actually tired as I originally thought. The bees are happy about the amount of honey they have produced, "summer has o'er brimmed their clammy cells."

Anonymous said...

Doug McKeen

A)
The video describes The World Islands as a paradise like no other. It was designed by the most ingenious humans all for your comfort and ease. Everything about it is ideal.

Denmark is nice because its inhabitants all make similar salaries, but have their education and health care paid for. They can choose to be whatever they want and won’t be judged by their choice.

Both of these places have qualities of utopias; Denmark has the happiest inhabitants and The World Islands are shown advertised like heaven itself. However the commercial for the islands is reminiscent of propaganda, which is an element of many dystopian settings.

Melissa Potvin said...

A) The reason why they say Denmark is the “happiest place on earth is because they live in a mindset of simplicity. The comparison between the doctor and trash man is that the trash man is more happy because he works five hours in the morning then the rest of the time he is at home with his family and enjoying his life. In this article it says:” You might expect that place would be a tropical paradise with warm sand and soft breezes. Or a Mediterranean village with sun-kissed vineyards. Or the United States -- land of the free and home of the brave. But if you use social science techniques, you'll find some surprises. A paradise like Fiji comes in more than 50 spots below Iceland in happiness rankings. For all its style and cuisine, France and Italy rank well below Canada. And while the United States may be the richest and most powerful country, when it comes to happiness, it is only No. 23”.


B) The factoring point in this article is that when something comes to the human brain the thought is never in just one part of the mind it is in several different places. Your brain has certain parts of it and each part has its own job, for example the screwdriver in the article it is stated: Screwdriver isn't one place in the brain. It's many places in the brain. When you think of a screwdriver, you think about how you hold it, how you twist it, what it looks like, what you use it for," This ties into the novel 1984 because the thinking and logic of the characters were never in just one place they were all over the place and never just had one solid idea or conclusion.

C) I picked the mountain, the soldier walking and the lake picture because they all have 3 similarities such as the scenic views. One of the great similarities in North Korea and 1984 is that they both have extremely controlled governments and rulers and these photographs say so such as the one on the blog of all the soldiers sitting in rows and they seem as though they are taking an order to a leader or higher stature.

D) The lyrics in all 3 of these songs tie into the novel 1984 because they all have to do with the character big brother and how the governments logic in the way they run things. The song “big brother” is really one that is quite powerful in a sense it all makes sense and mentions a lot of things that 1984 refers to. Testify is mainly about taking a risk against what others believe and societies beliefs in things.

E) The speaker uses allusion in his speech or video because it gives you a broader picture of the depth of the situation. It supports the argument because it makes his theory stronger and more appointed.

F) The lectures overview is basically his opinion but backed up with facts but in a sense he still have his own look on it and strongly believes in it.

- Melissa Potvin

Melissa Potvin said...

A) The reason why they say Denmark is the “happiest place on earth is because they live in a mindset of simplicity. The comparison between the doctor and trash man is that the trash man is more happy because he works five hours in the morning then the rest of the time he is at home with his family and enjoying his life. In this article it says:” You might expect that place would be a tropical paradise with warm sand and soft breezes. Or a Mediterranean village with sun-kissed vineyards. Or the United States -- land of the free and home of the brave. But if you use social science techniques, you'll find some surprises. A paradise like Fiji comes in more than 50 spots below Iceland in happiness rankings. For all its style and cuisine, France and Italy rank well below Canada. And while the United States may be the richest and most powerful country, when it comes to happiness, it is only No. 23”.


B) The factoring point in this article is that when something comes to the human brain the thought is never in just one part of the mind it is in several different places. Your brain has certain parts of it and each part has its own job, for example the screwdriver in the article it is stated: Screwdriver isn't one place in the brain. It's many places in the brain. When you think of a screwdriver, you think about how you hold it, how you twist it, what it looks like, what you use it for," This ties into the novel 1984 because the thinking and logic of the characters were never in just one place they were all over the place and never just had one solid idea or conclusion.

C) I picked the mountain, the soldier walking and the lake picture because they all have 3 similarities such as the scenic views. One of the great similarities in North Korea and 1984 is that they both have extremely controlled governments and rulers and these photographs say so such as the one on the blog of all the soldiers sitting in rows and they seem as though they are taking an order to a leader or higher stature.

D) The lyrics in all 3 of these songs tie into the novel 1984 because they all have to do with the character big brother and how the governments logic in the way they run things. The song “big brother” is really one that is quite powerful in a sense it all makes sense and mentions a lot of things that 1984 refers to. Testify is mainly about taking a risk against what others believe and societies beliefs in things.

E) The speaker uses allusion in his speech or video because it gives you a broader picture of the depth of the situation. It supports the argument because it makes his theory stronger and more appointed.

F) The lectures overview is basically his opinion but backed up with facts but in a sense he still have his own look on it and strongly believes in it.

alexyis dyckman said...

PART A
In The World: Dubai, they explain the making of a “perfect world” They were making a plan of putting islands off the coast of Dubai in the shape of the world. Dubai is a modern city with great weather and incredible views, but does that make it a utopia? Although this place was created to be perfect, there comes a lot of problems with making it. There is no automobiles, because the islands are all beaches and canals. All of the houses are very close together and are very expensive to live in. Being close to your neighbors and not being able to afford it can make this place really not seem as utopian.
Denmark doesn’t have the best weather, and their taxes may be high, but their people are still happy. Jonte-lov says “You're no better then anybody else” I like this quote because it shows how you can have any job and still be happy. An example in the article was that there was a trash man who was just as happy as anybody else. Because the taxes are so high everyone takes home the same amount of money. This puts everyone at an equal standard, and you can do anything and you will still make money, and have a good life.

PART B
Though the article talks about a new way to read the brain, in 1984 there are not actual scanners reading the minds of the characters. If your thoughts are spoken like Winston's, when he shouted he hated big brother they now know your thoughts. The article tells how our Fifth Amendment states we do not have to incriminate ourselves, so using this machine to see our thoughts could be incriminating ourselves, though in 1984 they do have thought crimes, which will incriminate them based on their thoughts.

PART C
Through the three photos on the pages Tensions in the Korea's, it shows the type of dystopia Korea can be. There is a lot of fighting and kind of grey area with a lot of smoke from the tensions between the Korea's.

Anonymous said...

Part A:
There are many qualities that you can identify as synonymous with utopian and dystopian societies with Denmark. Denmark thought as themselves as utopian. They had health and education and most people rated themselves as an 8 for happiness. People who lived in Denmark didn’t have a lot to complain about. They thought their lives where so easy and simple that it couldn’t get any better. Their where many dystopian things in Denmark though. Stoic locals wear sensible shoes and snack on herring sandwiches. They also pay between 50 – 70% of their incomes in taxes. Living in Denmark everyone is isolated with no cars and you live close to your neighbors.
Part B:
In 1984 people didn’t have the technology like MRI’s like we do today that was talked about in the reading. In 1984 people would have loved to read minds but didn’t have the materials like today that you needed to do that.

Part C:
1. There are many things that are the same between 1984 and North Korea and how they both only show the world what they want them to see as in the example of “Prosper the Motherland.”
2. In the picture number 3 of peering into North Korea, it shows how the living in their country was like living in the victory mansions in 1984.
3. Both North Korea and 1984 always had wars going on, and would be bombed like Yeonpyeong Island and how it was hit by North Korea.

Part D:
There are many similarities with all these songs in 1984. The first song “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine compares to how they were trying to get Winston to testify and lose his sense of self. The next song “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder is comparing Big Brother in 1984 as a tyrant, and the song like Big Brother is described as a president type of leader. The last song “2+2=5” by Radiohead is just like The Party and how they don’t want anyone questioning its authority.

Part E:
A video clip that made an allusion to 1984 was billboard eyes from “The Great Gatsby”. How those eyes watch over that city and the people just like Big Brother did in 1984.
Part F:
There are many similarities in the lecture’s overview of linguistic nuance and about Newspeak and doublethink in 1984. They both say one thing but do another. “War is Peace” is an example of the veiled communication that Steven Pinker writes of.

-Madison Duross

Anonymous said...

Douglas McKeen
B)
Informing readers on a subject reminiscent of 1984, the author speaks of how advanced brain scanning capable of reading thoughts is only several years away and how companies want to use them for intelligence on consumers.

Anonymous said...

Cassandra Goyette
Orwellian Parallels

A) The World: Dubai is portrayed as a wondrous, perfect paradise were everyone should live and will be happy no matter what. The World is a man-made formation of islands, surrounded by sparkling azure water, and has high temperature weather year round. It is basically a large scale vacation resort constructed into a city or a civilization, to fit what some people would consider their utopia. Also the islands constructed for this civilization are made to resemble the continents; if you were to look at a flattened map of the world, and compare it to a bird’s eye view of “The World” you would be able to see resemblance.
Denmark: The happiest place on earth is an article that gives us insight on how Denmark is run as a country. People in Denmark face some of the highest taxes in the world but are still rather happy because the government pays for the majority of you needs like education and healthcare. They are a content bunch of citizens who don’t expect a lot so they are never disappointed, but everyone is paid the same and can make as much money as anyone.
B) Through evidence and testimonies the author Shari Finkelstein uses technological parallels, comparable principles and neurological practices to inform us of the upcoming scientific advances which allow an invasion into the mind.
C) Recent scenes from North Korea shows several parallels to the book 1984 by George Orwell by using authoritative influence, mass intimidation and conformity in order to form a bigger picture.
A North Korean anniversary and debut shows parallels to the book 1984 written by George Orwell by displaying a fortuitous military presence, a party that controls the country and a strong authoritarian presence that shows us the consequences of allowing a group total control over us.
Tension in the Koreas displays a few connections to the book 1984 written by George Orwell by revealing neighboring warfare between North Korea and South Korea, the inducement of hysteria among citizens and mass intimidation to convey the tensions between North and South Korea.
(Part 1)

Anonymous said...

Cassandra Goyette
Orwellian Parallels
(Part 2)
D) The song Testify by Rage against the Machine alludes to the book 1984 by George Orwell, the song it’s self is rebellious and its message is to not let the government rule us or dictate our decisions. “And it’s right outside your door.” A lyric in the song that could be taken as the government is right outside always there, always watching just like the posters of Big Brother are everywhere in Oceania, captioned “Big Brother is watching you.” A direct reference to the book 1984 by George Orwell is found “Who controls the past now controls the future
who controls the present now controls the past.” Is actually found in the book as a party slogan and featured in the song. Big Brother by Stevie Wonder also features parallels to the book 1984 by George Orwell. First off the name of the song itself is a connection to the book 1984. “Your name is Big Brother, you say that you're watching me on the tele.” Big brother is referenced and how he is always watching you, and the tele represents the telescreens in everyone’s apartments watching you. The next song is 2+2=5 by radio head, yet another quote from the book is found. “2+2=5” is a reoccurring motif in the book 1984.
E) The following link will take you to 1984 Apple’s first Macintosh Commercial. The commercial features a large monitor watching you, much like the telescreens in 1984. Also there is an authoritative presence on the screen, made to look intimidating and speak forcefully. Along with a large group of people, all wearing the same outfits, following orders like mindless zombies, not questioning what is happening like the Proles. The military force seen running after a rebellious woman in orange shorts and a white tank top, could be a way of depicting the thought police. Or if you want to take it a different way the video can be seen are the two minutes of hate, where everyone is forced to watch a video and some people even throw objects like the sledge hammer symbolizes. The effects this commercial has on tis audience tells them that Apple will be different and not control you or take advantage of your conformist nature. The advertisement supports that because it shows the screen shattering releasing everyone, and a new presence causing disturbance. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYecfV3ubP8
F) The lecturer believes language is an important part of discerning what people mean or what they do. Depending on the words you choose the other person may not know that you know that you know what they know. So that without mutual understanding or mutual knowledge and to get mutual knowledge you can use explicit language. His view on language is that it’s important to make other people understand what you intend when speaking. So instead of using innuendos that create individual knowledge, use direct speech for mutual knowledge. Newspeak is the dictionary in the book 1984 by George Orwell. Newspeak essentially cut down the English language to as few words as possible, it got rid of all the words with similar meanings and simply made it so one word fits the entire definition. To reduce the language to an adolescent form of what it once was. If the lecturer was to live in the book 1984 he would have a heart attack because of the chicken scratch language created, and how no one would have mutual understands of one another you could only take an educated guess as to what they meant. Nineteen eighty-four is essential a world of innuendos.

Catherine Rafuse said...

Part A:
Both Dubai and Denmark are places of retreatment. They off an oasis and are beautiful places. Dubai is paradise for most people. You never don’t have a view of the sparkling, blue ocean and you are constantly feeling the sand. The only way to travel is to walk or use a boat. There would be no chaos and happiness and contentment is right outside your door. As for Denmark, that has been rated the happiest country. Everyone that lives there loves their jobs and loves their country. There are very little complaints about the world they live in and the trust is one of the biggest aspects of living there. “Mothers leave babies unattended in strollers outside cafés.” Very few places are able to give you that trust that you could leave your child unattended without worrying.
The definition of a utopia is an ideal place or state. Ideal to most people would mean somewhere happy without worry. What is more ideal than a remote vacation island with constant, beautiful views of the ocean? Dubai shows numerous characteristics of a utopia as well as Denmark. A survey was done and most Danes rated Denmark an eight or above on a ten point scale for how happy they were. An eight is an extremely high number meaning that most people there feel as though they are living in a utopia. Neither of these places shows characteristics of a dystopia.
Part B:
Though both this passage and 1984 display characteristics of being able to read people’s minds, in 1984 the party cant physically read your mind, they just get you to tell them what you’re thinking, while in this passage they are actually able to read inside your mind using technology.
Part C:
1. Though this picture and 1984 both show how people in the country are watched by their leaders, in 1984 they are watched and monitored through telescreens while in this picture they are watched closer up using binoculars.
2. Though this picture and 1984 both display the fact that children are brought up to love their leader, in 1984 they are brought up as spies while in North Korea they are brought up to bow down to their leader, Kim Jong Un.
3. Though this picture and 1984 both show how the people involved with the government are very secretive, in 1984 those involved in the inner party know everything that’s going on while in North Korea some soldiers don’t even know the full story.

Catherine Rafuse said...

Part D:
“Testify” by Rage Against the Machine is extremely allusive to George Orwell’s 1984. The line, “To numb me and purge me know” is referencing Julia. Winston uses Julia to forget about the pain that his life brings. By being involved with her he is numbing the aching that has become his life. A direct allusion is also displayed in the song, “Who controls the past now controls the future, who controls the present now controls the past.” In 1984 the party has complete control over what happens and they get rid of the past by erasing it. “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder also displays allusions to 1984. “Your name is big brother, you say that you’re watching me on the tele.” This is a direct allusion to the party and Big Brother watching people’s every move on the telescreens. Stevie Wonder also makes an allusion to the fact that the party has complete control over the way people think and feel when he says “the President of your soul.” The title of “2+2=5” by Radiohead is a direct allusion to 1984. O’Brien tries to get Winston to believe that 2+2=5 and by doing so he proves the party’s control. After being held captive, Winston realizes “there is no way out, you can scream and you can shout, it is too late now.” After the party got him he wouldn’t be able to turn back. As much as he struggled and fought back, they had control of him.
Part E:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o66FUc61MvU
This clip has so many references to George Orwell’s 1984. The rapper is trying to make a point that the internet can now be monitored and people can see what we’re doing. Towards the end he makes references to the Thought Police and how people who committed crimes like the thought police are considered heroes. Laws are constantly being put into place about the internet which is like laws being made in Oceania. By using the entire concept of 1984, the rapper is able to display the similarities between Orwell’s messed up world of 1984 and how the internet is in today’s society.
Part F:
The English language and Newspeak are completely different. In English there are so many ways to say things. There are a numerous amount of words that mean the same thing as the word “good”. In Newspeak there is one word that means something and no other word means the same thing. There is no such thing as synonyms and thesauruses don’t exist. The newspeak language is very bland so people are unable to think as abstractly.

Elliot Ariola said...

Part A: The World is a dream idea coming true. It resembles the continents of the Earth but as real state and beach front property. It is still in construction but will be the only utopia of its kind. Denmark does not seem like the happiest place on Earth, but it was researched as it. The taxes people pay are from 50 to 70 percent of their income. In return the country pays for child education and all health care costs. This along with everyone’s general happiness level resulted in the researcher’s results.
The World is completely isolated from the rest of the world. The only mode of transportation is walking on your island and the boat travel between the islands. You are extremely close with all your neighbors, they are next door and would know them on a first name basis. This would result in a utopian society that could be potentially problematic if there were shortages of food or a tsunami. Denmark’s government is the center of the population’s happiness. They pay for the education of children and health care costs. This in turn makes their population happy. All of these characteristics of both places relate to utopias. Everyone is happy and loving of each other. I do not think there is any dystopian qualities in either of these places.
Part B: Though this passage and 1984 both find out what you are thinking of, in this passage they use fMRI’s to react the brain’s patterns to find out what you are thing of, while in 1984 Big Brother uses torture to bring out your thoughts without your discretion.
Part C: Though this picture and 1984 both show ways that the government gets children involved in their nation early in life, in this passage the young Koreans held up colored cards for their Mass Games which come together as a whole to portray their leaders, while in 1984 Big Brother gets children to join the spies to turn in any adult who does not follow the Party’s orders.
Though this picture and 1984 both display their government spying on individuals, in this passage people are showed looking at you with binoculars, while in 1948 people are monitored through telescreens positioned everywhere in homes.
Though this passage and 1984 both display villages and towns as run down and dry, in this passage there is farmland with cattle and a running stream, while in 1984 there is almost no life with everyone living day to day off of rations disguised as treats.
Part D: In “Testify”, by Rise Against the Machine, the lyrics, “Who controls the past now controls he future” is a direct comparison to 1984. The Party had complete control of the past utilizing their Ministry of Truth. They rewrote the past so they could control the future.
In “Big Brother”, by Stevie Wonder, there are many parallels including the title itself. “watching me on the tele”, “My name is secluded”, and “We live in a house the size of a matchbox” all relate to 1984. The Party watches everyone through their telescreens, the proles are all secluded from the government and its ideas, and the proles all live in houses and apartments that are in a very bad shape.
In “2+2=5”, by Radiohead, the lyrics “I try to sing along but the music’s all wrong” and “Don’t question my authority or put me in the box” relate to 1984. The Party dictates what they say is true but some people know that it is wrong. The writer does not want to be secluded in his box from the truth of the world.
Part E: The trailer for the movie “The Giver” depicts a dystopian society where leaders have complete control over their society. The movie was created to show that the society can happen but will not stay in control in the long run. Orwell had the same idea but his world did not regain its free will.

Elliot Ariola (part 2) said...

Part F: Doublethink relates best to the RSA Animate video. In the video the speaker compares what people say to what people think. Sometimes what people say, is not actually what they mean. This requires the term doublethink to actually understand what they are talking about. Newspeak limits what people say buy continuously decreasing the amount of words at their disposal. Some words imply other meanings than just the obvious. It can leave open to question about their real meaning, or the opposite, actually give too much information without their intent. With newspeak these faults are possible easily disrupting daily conversations.

Johnmichael lee said...

Part A: I don’t think there is an actual utopian place in our world right now. There is always going to be something that you might not like or someone annoying you. In 1984 Big Brother is trying to create a utopian world but in reality the people that live there think it is dystopian. To have a perfect utopian world I imagine a place with the perfect temperature weather all year long, never rains during the day, and no one has to pay taxes. This is almost highly impossible to happen sense most of those things are out of our control which might make it a dystopian world.
The world of Dubai that is in the making looks like it will be the perfect utopian world, with beautiful sun year round, and getting to choose which island you want to build on. The place that was ranked the happiest place on earth is somewhere people would never want to live, Denmark. The weather isn’t great, it usually rains every couple days and people aren’t relaxing on a beach all day. This is a perfect example of how people don’t need much to be happy. The personalities of the people that live in Denmark is what makes it a utopian world for them.

Part B: 1984 and this article have similar concept of thought crime both displaying ways higher officials can use this to solve a crime, however in 1984 doesn’t have the science needed to complete this.

Part C: One of the pictures that really stood out to me was a picture of two boats that are talking to each other and a man watching over them from a distance using binoculars. I think is represents 1984 and the theme of “Big brother is watching you.”
The other picture that stood out to me was the huge group of North Koreans all lined up wearing the same thing. This stood out to me because everyone in 1984 whore blue overalls and would imagine they looked the same.
The third photo that related to 1984 was a picture of a bunch of people doing exercises in a row all lined up. When I saw this photo it reminded me of when Winston was woken up to do exercises and then was yelled at because he wasn’t doing them right.

Part D: The song "Testify" by Rage Against the Machine relates to 1984 because they are singing about testifying and in 1984 both Julia and Winston are both tried to testify against the government. One line in the song that stood out was “Who controls the past now controls the future, who controls the present now controls the past, who controls the past now controls the future, who controls the present now?”
The song that relates the most to 1984 was “Big Brother by Stevie Wonder” In the song he makes clear connections to 1984 by talking about Big Brother. One line that really relate to 1984 is “ The president of your soul” this is a perfect example of how Big Brother controls the people in his government taking away their say. I believe the line “You say that you’re tired of me protesting” relates to the people having hate week and protesting against Big Brother.
2+2=5 by Radiohead really pinpoints the saying 2+2=5 the famous saying Big Brother makes you believe is true. “two and two always makes a five It's the devil's way now” is a great example of how the devil is compared to Big Brother which is a negative look. I also think “There is no way out You can scream and you can shout It is too late now.” Relates to Winston being in the ministry of love getting tortured to learn “2+2=5”

Johnmichael lee said...

Part E: The video clip I found was one of apples first commercials, the video starts out with all of these people in a dark ere setting all wearing the same thing. They all proceed to an auditorium where they watch a telescreen with a man talking to them, while they all listen closely. All while a women is running towards the screen with a sledgehammer and guards casing her. This would be Julia rebelling against Big Brother and the though police casing her. At the very end of the commercial it says “you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like 1984” referring to the world George Orwell created.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R706isyDrqI


Part F: The RSA lecture and the newspeak in 1984 have very similar concepts, to get right to the point. The newspeak words become bolder and sharper cutting down the definition and getting right to the point. With changing a couple of words in a sentence can eliminate any confusion their might have been. A great example in the video was when he shows two people having a conversation and both of them thinking two different thing but all while saying something else.

Anonymous said...

Alejandro Torres

PART A:

THE WORLD-DUBAI: the shows a type of easy world when the economic issues,transportation problems,and delinquency are no more it is like a paradise for humankind ,howerver, the video never mention what is the time of government or power that rule that world

Denmark The happiest place on earth: this article presents to the reader some surveys and questionaries made by universities to see what is the happiest place on earth. They also show that this place is Denmark describing the way to work and live but they don’t speak about government neither about government or the authoritarian person or people who has the power

1984: On the other hand in 1984 george orwell describes an oppressed world ruled by a dictatorship,fear and suffer. where Big Brother and the party are the only beneficiaries without caring about people feelings

PART B:

Suspenseful imagery scary symbolism and clear personification are just three of the multiple devices the editor uses to describe the future in technology in the passage from “60 minutes” and how this technology would help to the good of humankind. Similar to 1984 george orwell uses these and more devices to explain his idea of the future. We can compare this revolutionary machine from 60 minutes passage with the telescreens and the thought police.

PART D:
Testify: analyzing the lyrics of the video we can conclude that the author,in his way to sing this song, is trying to infuse us the rage against political corruption and the sickness of people being betrayed by their own government but they can not do anything against them. We can compare this with 1984 when even there are people against the party and big brother there are not just the minority but they are oppressed by the power.
Big Brother: in this song the author uses quite sarcasm to show his anger against the government or the president by referring to them as “big brother” and by called himself “nobody”.similar to 1984 i can say that although there is few people against the party they know they can not do anything against them,however, unconsciously they do not want to be oppressed .
2+2=5: in this video the representation of control power and oppression is showed to us by drawings these drawings expressed better these points .in 1984 in i found a parallel with the “proles" that even they know there are more an enough tu crush the party they are intimidated by the the power. Just as O’brien said the humankind has to be lead, they have to decide between freedom or happiness
Part E:
VIDEO: apples 1984 commercial.
the video has a length of 1minute and 2 seconds it just talk about the modernization in apple devices so people won't be controlled for an external power

PART F:
the video explains multiple facts of communication,understanding and misunderstanding between people. The speaker mentions a type of sentences called “sentences between the lines” which are the ones that we use unconsciously or consciously depending what we want to the other person to understand. But,in the other hand, in 1984 talking about “doublethink” and “newspeak” is completely different. In the reading or wells shows us just one way to speak without many synonyms or antonyms or metaphorical sentences.

Anonymous said...

Alejandro Torres
PART A:

THE WORLD-DUBAI: the shows a type of easy world when the economic issues,transportation problems,and delinquency are no more it is like a paradise for humankind ,howerver, the video never mention what is the time of government or power that rule that world

Denmark The happiest place on earth: this article presents to the reader some surveys and questionaries made by universities to see what is the happiest place on earth. They also show that this place is Denmark describing the way to work and live but they don’t speak about government neither about government or the authoritarian person or people who has the power

1984: On the other hand in 1984 george orwell describes an oppressed world ruled by a dictatorship,fear and suffer. where Big Brother and the party are the only beneficiaries without caring about people feelings

PART B:

Suspenseful imagery scary symbolism and clear personification are just three of the multiple devices the editor uses to describe the future in technology in the passage from “60 minutes” and how this technology would help to the good of humankind. Similar to 1984 george orwell uses these and more devices to explain his idea of the future. We can compare this revolutionary machine from 60 minutes passage with the telescreens and the thought police.

PART D:
Testify: analyzing the lyrics of the video we can conclude that the author,in his way to sing this song, is trying to infuse us the rage against political corruption and the sickness of people being betrayed by their own government but they can not do anything against them. We can compare this with 1984 when even there are people against the party and big brother there are not just the minority but they are oppressed by the power.
Big Brother: in this song the author uses quite sarcasm to show his anger against the government or the president by referring to them as “big brother” and by called himself “nobody”.similar to 1984 i can say that although there is few people against the party they know they can not do anything against them,however, unconsciously they do not want to be oppressed .
2+2=5: in this video the representation of control power and oppression is showed to us by drawings these drawings expressed better these points .in 1984 in i found a parallel with the “proles" that even they know there are more an enough tu crush the party they are intimidated by the the power. Just as O’brien said the humankind has to be lead, they have to decide between freedom or happiness
Part E:
VIDEO: apples 1984 commercial.
the video has a length of 1minute and 2 seconds it just talk about the modernization in apple devices so people won't be controlled for an external power

PART F:
the video explains multiple facts of communication,understanding and misunderstanding between people. The speaker mentions a type of sentences called “sentences between the lines” which are the ones that we use unconsciously or consciously depending what we want to the other person to understand. But,in the other hand, in 1984 talking about “doublethink” and “newspeak” is completely different. In the reading or wells shows us just one way to speak without many synonyms or antonyms or metaphorical sentences.

Laura said...

Part A:
In Dubai, “The World” has been given its name for an obvious reason; the islands form the shape of the continents of the world. The video parallels “The World” with perfection. This place is described as “an island of paradise where unprecedented opportunities can be found.” This idea stands true with the straight forward characteristics of Utopias. A Utopia is an ideal place or state where there is political or social perfection. These islands that form the outline of the world are described as the perfect paradise; “An ideal mix of sand, sea, and sky… with private beaches and marinas.” The video describes the islands as not only a desirable get away spot, but as working efficiently with the adjacent islands, in such a way that nothing there can be any less than the best. This concept is at the core of Utopian societies – there can only be perfection because everything operates under ideal circumstances. In conjunction with perfection another value of Utopian Societies that support “The World” is that you are not limited to anything. In a part of the video, the narrator discusses the effect of shaping islands into sanctuaries to allow hoteliers to create their own idea of perfection.
In the article, the author discusses how Denmark is considered to be “the happiest place in the world.” When Bill Weir traveled to Denmark and asked many Danes to rank their happiness out of a ten point scale, everyone gave results of at least an eight. The article discusses how the Danes pay upwards of 70% of their incomes in taxes, but in return receives free health care and education, as well as the leisure of knowing children and elderlies are being helped out by the government to which they pay the taxes. In Denmark, it does not matter what job one chooses, in fact everyone receives about the same pay, despite what job field they have chosen, which allows people to choose jobs they really love doing verses the jobs that will pay well. The article describes how a garbage man can live a middle class life and not feel the stress or burden he might in other countries. People here are considered to be so happy because they are very social and trusting of one another as well as the government, which demonstrates a functional, coherent society. Denmark through this article is described as an ideal place, a Utopia because people are described with living a stress free life and with having a job that they love, which isn’t really a job at all. I would consider both of these examples described above as utopias verses dystopias because of their ideal functioning and little perfections. Characteristics I consider synonymous with dystopias would include a society characterized by human misery, restricted information, oppression, distrust, disease, and overcrowding.

Laura said...

Part B:
The emerging technologies of fMRI brain scanning today is making the “science fiction” in George Orwell’s 1984 novel of incriminating those guilty of thoughtcrime a possible reality in the near future.
Part C:
• In the image of the North Korean Highway, the caption describes how the only cars one may see are military or the brand new Mercedes cars belonging to the North Korean officials passing by at very high speeds.
o North Korean officials are similar to the inner party members in 1984, in the sense that they are the only ones in their society that receive luxuries, such as new Mercedes cars or real food verses the synthetic Victory products, respectively.
• In the image depicting the two North Korean soldiers observing the south side, one is peering out a window with binoculars.
o The close attention North Korean soldiers pay to their surroundings resembles Big Brother in 1984, in the aspect that he is everywhere and no secret can be kept from him.
• A North Korean soldier plays a guitar on the banks of the Yalu River near the town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese city of Dandong on April 15, 2009.
o Unlike the North Koreans who are allowed to experience and articulate their emotions, members of Oceania, in 1984 are unable to because the party is more stringent on repressing all forms of thought.

Laura said...

Part D:
In the song “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine, there is a reference to George Orwell’s 1984 novel when they say “Who controls the past now controls the future. Who controls the present now controls the past. Who controls the past now controls the future. Who controls the present now?” This reference to the Party’s slogan describes how the party controls everything, even how society thinks and acts. The last line being asked as a question makes the listener question their satisfaction with who is in charge, just as Winston questions Big Brother because his job leads him astray. The lyrics create an interpretation and comparison to how the modern world of Hollywood, TV, and media are able to fill people’s minds with false perceptions of what reality is. In 1984, the party orders the rewriting of history so they are always right. They are able to do this because they have incorporated the idea of doublethink into society so well. As these lyrics suggest, people are brain washed into thinking anything they hear in the media, which almost always leads to misinterpretation of world events. The lyrics "We found your weakness and it's right outside your door, now testify” could possibly be referring to people in general, that if they were to gather together they could take down who is in charge. In 1984, the only weakness of the party would be if all the thought criminals and Goldstein’s followers were to come together and fight back against the party. We know this to be true when reading the novel by the careful attention they pay to catching these criminals and their devotion to “healing” them because they cannot risk their state of power with any outlier against the party that might try to rebel.
There are multiple references to 1984, in the song “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder. The title itself reflects the character George Orwell describes in his novel as an all-knowing, all-powerful, and all-great leader. In the second line, the lyrics are making a reference to the telescreens used in 1984 by Big Brother and the inner party to watch and regulate society. The lyrics “You say that you got me all in your notebook/ you’re writing it down every day,” supports the idea of Big Brother taking notice of everything and that there is no hiding your secrets from him; just as Winston got caught, it is just as likely others will get caught within time as well. The lyrics suggesting a change if one lets him lead your soul, reflects the same concepts O’Brien demands of Winston while he is in the Ministry of Love. It is not only loving Big Brother, but accepting all his values and beliefs without question or hesitation, such as doublethink. The reason Big Brother needs his people to do this are so he can maintain power and control over everything and everyone. The line “you killed all our leaders” could tie in with 1984, for the fact that at the ministry of Love, the party captures, reconfigures, and then kills all outliers who wish to rebel against the Party. The point of view from this song is reflective of the point of view of Winston, or any other thought criminal that wishes to unite with the brotherhood and shares the hope that one day the Party will cease to exist.

Laura said...

The song “2+2=5” by Radiohead makes allusions to George Orwell’s 1984 novel. The title comes from the part of the novel where O’Brien is trying to teach Winston through torture to listen to the Party and accept what it tells him to be the truth, even though it will often vary from past and present. However, the song’s lyrics start out with having already accepted the change the Party continually calls forth through doublethink. It is as if the narrator of the song is trying to repress what the party is trying to do, but he is helpless because by the facts they state in the beginning that “January has April showers” proves the Party’s power in converting even the most rebellious thought criminals. As the song progresses the solid idea of one thing will change to another. For instance, in the last lines “Oh go up to the king, and the sky is falling in/But it’s not/But it's not/Maybe not/Maybe not” the idea of absolute “not” is changed to a possible “not.” This parallels with the way O’Brien was able to transform Winston in the Ministry Of Love; after repetition one will start to change their original opinion until they are convinced by what they are told. The overall message that is portrayed similarly in 1984 as it is in this song is that no matter how much you try to seclude yourself from the Party and its brainwashing effects, you cannot hide from the inevitable “truth” the Party places in your mind. This idea supports how in the novel, even Winston was unable to keep the real truth we wanted to remember.
Part E: http://www.matttrailer.com/thx_1138_1971
This clip is a movie trailer to “THX 1138.” It encompasses several ideas from 1984, including how emotions are forbidden. Love is unacceptable in any form, in which in 1984, we see this to be true with Winston never loving his wife; it was their duty to the party. Any form of emotion, and in the case of 1984 thought was against what was allowed, in which anyone who disobeys this will be scrutinized and hunt down. The government controls and monitors its people through cameras, which is how the Party in 1984 watches over its people. They both share the same concept that you are always being watched, and that no act against the stringent code will go unpunished. Another interesting connection is how in the movie clip, names do not exist - only numbers. In George Orwell’s novel, Winston was called by his last name, followed by some numbers while in the Ministry of Love. These similar ideas seem to supplement the foreshadowing warning people of the future should have on technology.

Laura said...

Part F:
The lecturer discusses indirect speech, in which one can veil their intentions while still expecting their listener to read between the lines. The video describes how subtle differences in choice of words can create a slightly different meaning. By veiling ones intentions, one cannot get in trouble or risk harming a relationship. This idea supports the same thought processing of doublethink. Doublethink is the acceptance of two contradictory ideas or beliefs at the same time. By veiling one’s intentions through diction, someone has the choice of interpreting the comment as either literal or figurative. In the video a good example of this was with the pet store and how the owner received a veiled threat “Nice store you got there…it would be a shame if anything happened to it.” The owner understands that the statement could be taken literal, but more than likely means he is being threatened. The knowledge of knowing what the criminals know and what they are trying to convey cleverly is like accepting two ideas at once. In general the concept of Newspeak supports fewer words to be available to express your speech because this way there can only be one interpretation. By limiting the words one has to choose from, Newspeak automatically disallows you to veil your true intentions, which is exactly what the party wants. You are given words and phrases that lack depth in meaning, so there can be no metaphorical meaning behind your language. The Party in 1984 has adopted Newspeak as a way of eliminating the comfort of veiled intentions because they want to control their people and understand at all times what they mean in their speech to be able to detect thought crime.

Jensen Bramwell said...

Part A: In The World- Dubai, a very intelligent idea was shown of a system of islands that seem impossible to resist; 300 small islands divided into estates, private homes, resorts, and community islands. They have optimal travel time and travel control that can accommodate large and small ships, and access to commercial retail places making them a logical place to choose. These islands can be planned to have certain densities which in turn creates “self contained commercial offerings” that cover all needs of the residents. The article on Denmark highlights the unexpected happiness found in a place like Denmark. A survey was given and it showed that despite their jobs and humble ways of life, the people of Denmark were happiest. Almost everyone participates in a social group and use bikes instead of cars. The only drawback is the exceptionally high taxes, but the people really don’t mind. Within these two examples, there is many examples of a utopian lifestyle. The fact that everything is easy to access and within a short boat ride in The World, and the happiness found in Denmark easily relates to the utopia. However, the fact that the densities of an island are dictated in The World may be closer to a dystopia. Another dystopia is the intense taxes paid in Denmark. The two examples are clearly more utopian despite the few dystopian points.
Part B: “Though identification” and the fMRI directly relate to George Orwell’s 1984 and the use of the Party and telescreens to show us what people are really thinking.
Part C: In the first section, pictures 18 and 20 display the similarities between North Korea’s Kim Jung-Un and 1984’s Big Brother due to images of a glorified leader that are distributed and seen everywhere.
Picture 27 in the third section shows a young boy in uniform which is comparable to the Parson children in 1984 and their naivety in the actions they being to carry out.
In section 4, image 25 depicts a rally against North Korea and posters against their leader which is comparable to the hatred towards the Party in 1984.

Jensen Bramwell said...

Part D: In Testify by Rage against the Machine, the lyrics clearly show how propaganda is constantly fed to us through movies, news, and magazines and how the media can control what we get to know just like in Orwell’s 1984. The song directly quotes 1984 when saying “Who controls the past now controls the future, who controls the present now controls the past.” The next song, Big Brother by Stevie Wonder, starts off by stating “Your name is big brother, you say that you’re watching me on the tele” which can easily be related to the telescreens and Big Brother in 1984. The song further goes on about election time which is slightly different than 1984 because in the book, Big Brother is always there regardless of voting. The final song is 2+2=5 by Radiohead and, like the others, it directly references 1984. The books explanation of 2+2=5 is that you can make people believe anything even if it’s clearly untrue. Leaders can be so powerful that they brainwash your former way of thinking and can be molded into anything.
Part E: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q23touF8g4Q This video shows an interview with Ken Auletta who wrote “Googled” and he talks about everybody’s fear of losing privacy. They bring up 1984 and compare the times today to the society created in the book.
Part F: George Orwell’s 1984 uses Newspeak and Doublethink which relate to the linguistic nuances seen in the lecture. Newspeak, as seen in the novel, is an extremely shortened version of a language with fewer words. Newspeak doesn’t allow you to hide your intentions, and when compared to the video it relates to how the lecturer talked about people and their knowledge of what you are saying. Many people can easily decode an innuendo and it limits what you can say to others without them knowing too much. Doublespeak is when an individual can simultaneously think two contradicting thoughts at once. This again can be related to the idea of innuendos. When you say something, it can have multiple meanings and be an innuendo, it is up to the listener to decode it as literal or not. Therefore, 1984 can be related to the linguistic nuances discussed in the video.

Anonymous said...

Arina Bruno
A.) A utopian society is the polar opposite of a dystopian society. Utopias are designed to be the perfect community where everyone has something in common. An example of a utopia could be a religious group. Now a day when people envision a utopia it is in reference to a get-away or a vacation of some type. When comparing The World in Dubai it seems plausible that it is a tropical getaway. Only accessible by boat and prime real estate, the world at Dubai is meant for honeymoons, vacations and even year round inhabitance. It seems that the world is self-sufficient in that it has its own retail shopping and restaurants and small markets in the midst of the groupings of islands. Depending on how the islands are grouped there can be small communities within them, complete with private beaches and marinas. While the world seems like a perfect hide out or home the paradise of tropical land and sea seems only feasible if financially equipped at the moment. Denmark being a small European country wouldn’t seem like a utopia until we consider the staggering statistics. While Denmark isn’t tropical or warm all year round it is known to have the happiest people compared to all other countries. The happiness buds off of the fact that everyone is equal no matter what status or job you hold and that there is free health care and education. While the taxes are an extremely high rate it doesn’t matter because of all the benefits provided by the government. Materialism isn’t as important when it comes to social events; the citizens of Denmark have social gatherings and groups and enjoy friends and family more than anything else. The relatively cleaner environment due to people riding bikes everywhere results in more energized and desirable place to live. The happier the people the better the place. A dystopia usually has qualities that are oppressive and cruel in terms of a government or a society. The ruling power will usually have total control and forces very strict rules upon its people. The quality of living and entertainment pass times will often be very poor and undesirable. More times than not the dystopia will be forced upon its people rather than joined willingly.
B.) Much like the mysterious thought police and corrupt inner party of George Orwell’s 1984, brain imaging technology can be used to “read” people’s minds, the advancement of this technology for purposes like criminal justice, retail marketing and research sparks the debate of what is ethical and may result in people having to censor their thoughts in the near future.
C.) Much like the inner party of Oceania in George Orwell’s 1984 the government of North Korea in an attempt to be correct in all political statements had a counter attack against what the South Korean government had to say about the recent attacks so that North Korea seemed more superior and not at fault but in reality it is the exact opposite, the manipulating of facts and truth echoes the tactics used by the Party.
Compared to the Party of George Orwell’s 1984 the technique of brainwashing children to be loyal subjects of the government is also utilized by North Korea, representing the dictator by artwork is similar to the scouts of 1984 that learned to worship the party through propaganda.
In contrast to the Party of George Orwell’s 1984 the government of North Korea provides photo evidence of the dictator and the heir of the country while in 1984 it is unknown whether Big Brother is real or not because he is never pictured or present, he is more of an abstract idea, this concept is opposite than what Orwell presents the reader.

Anonymous said...

Ariana Bruno
D.) Many Orwellian subliminal messages exist throughout the media, in songs such as 2+2=5, Testify and Big Brother references to 1984 include themes that relate directly to the novel and more abstract references like comparing our government to that of the Party. Steve Wonder’s song “Big Brother” directly references the “tele” and the “notebook”, these direct messages are describing the constant surveillance of the telescreen and Winston’s diary that he wrote in. Lines such as “ Children dying every day, My name is nobody” may be a more abstract reference to the massacre of enemy women and children and the harsh environment of the Prole life, the second line may refer to the lack of individualism and the focus on communalism. Radiohead’s “2+2=5” contains more abstract references, the title itself holds symbolism to the 1984 text and concept of double think but the remainder of the song is a little farfetched. “Are you such a dreamer,To put the world to rights” may suggest Winston’s longing for the truth and what a different form of government might bring the country. Rage against the machine’s “Testify” can be related to the type of government the United States has, it makes the president appear corrupt and hypocritical. “I’m empty please fill me, Mister anchor assure me” this line can represent the robotic mindlessness of the party members that are waiting to be filled with what the party has to offer. The anchor assuring can be either the messages that the party feeds the people of the country or can be a parallel of the media that fuels Americans. The media plays a huge role in what Americans believe even if it is not entirely true. The lines of this song in particular can allude to the parallels of the corruption of Oceania and the United States ruling bodies.
E.)
Is our secret safe tonight? And are we out of sight
Or will our world come tumbling down?
Will they find our hiding place
Is this our last embrace
Or will the walls start caving in?
(It could be wrong, could be wrong) But it should have been right
(It could be wrong, could be wrong) To let our hearts ignite
(It could be wrong, could be wrong) Are we digging a hole?
(It could be wrong, could be wrong) This is out of control
(It could be wrong, could be wrong) It could never last
(It could be wrong, could be wrong) Must erase it fast
(It could be wrong, could be wrong) But it could have been right
(It could be wrong, could be...)
Love is our resistance
They'll keep us apart and they won't stop breaking us down
Hold me
Our lips must always be sealed
The song “Resistance” by Muse holds several 1984 references about Winston and Julia. The first few lines may mean the secret room in Mr. Charrington’s house where they used to hide out free from being watched. The constant risk that they would be caught was imminent and neither Winston nor Julia ever knew when the last time they would meet would be. If the party were anything like a normal government it should have been allowed for their love affair but due to militaristic laws they were not allowed to love or have affairs. The only successful rebellion they were able to accomplish was their time together and that it was going against the party. The last three lines may refer to when Winston and Julia were caught, they were tortured and kept apart from each other but their only hope would be to not turn against each other. “Our lips are sealed” holds ambiguous meanings, either that they must keep quiet about their love in order to prolong it, or their secret wanting for the abolishment of the party or lastly to hold true to each other and not denounce each other if imprisoned or tortured.

Anonymous said...

Ariana Bruno
F.) The RSA animate lecture of linguistic nuance can be applied to George Orwell’s 1984 concept of newspeak and doublethink because of the mutual knowledge factor in which it is used. New speak being the practice of shortening words and language so that there are no multiple meanings refines the language as a whole which in turn leads to simple sentences. The simplicity implies that no one can express themselves or how they are feeling if the word for what they want to say doesn’t exist. This basic language makes every relationship and conversation very obvious so that both participants know exactly what is going on, an example could be when Winston and Syme are discussing the reducing of the English language. Doublethink is the concept of thinking one thing but believing another simultaneously, this concept is very hard to accept because it is clashing. Many party members have to abide by double think when it comes to reality and facts, Winston being the main character. Doublethink could possibly have been a uniting factor in a rebellion but it lacked mutual knowledge between the party members, if all members knew that each other knew that doublethink wasn’t correct then they could have stood up for what they believed in. Because the lack of mutual knowledge is an impossible factor to add in the Party of Oceania it would make any type of complex thinking and speaking hard to accomplish without great danger.

Kylie Barrows said...

Kylie Barrows

A: A utopian society is a perfect place or world that people live in. Denmark and Dubai are two perfect examples of a utopian society. In Denmark they live much happier and simplicity is their motto. They are socialist and would rather be happy then rich. They live the dreamed life of living on an island where it's warm all year. The one thing I could never bring myself to do which they do is pay 50%-70% of their incomes on taxes. Dubai is what you would picture to be a perfect society, the island life with warm weather all year long. They say you can't envision the amount of opportunity that is available. Investors can expand their places, configurations by density focal point for visitors ideal mix sand sea sky estate plot. This island is very exclusive. It meets all residents needs with a full time place boat ride from Genva island into sanctuary. This creates perfect retail revenues. They have year round sunshine and endless places to explore. Both Denmark and Dubai are an example of a utopian society.

B: In this article they focus on the brain and how different parts of the the brain function. When the human brain is thinking it's never thinking in just one place but several different places. The brain has certain parts that have a very specific jobs to do
in the article they bring attention to comparing the brain to a screwdriver, "Screwdriver isn't one place in the brain. It's many places in the brain. When you think of a screwdriver, you think about how you hold it, how you twist it, what it looks like, what you use it for" which is saying a screwdriver only has one job but to complete one job it takes multiple steps and actions to complete the job. This connects to 1984 because the characters where never aloud to finish the job of thinking on their own without it being a though crime.

C: Though in North Korea they are controlled the government they are controlled by a actual human and not a made up person in a poster like in 1984. They both share the same lifestyles and are controlled by someone higher above.

Though in North Korea and 1984 they both are talked up to be nice places to live because of the ones controlling your life and controlling the government and everything that happens. For a place cracked up to be perfect the both are very imperfect gross places.

Kylie Barrows said...

Though in North Korea people are rebelling and acting out and harming others. In 1984 there is the thought police who control everyone and everyones thinking and are being watched at all times but no one actually acted out in 1984 like they did in 1984.

D: In all the songs they all talk about someone trying to brainwash them into believing what they are saying is true. In each song they have references to 1984 clearly in them. In the first song they say to go against the government and the usual to follow your heart and believe in what you believe. He also says to "testify" meaning even though you are being told one thing doesn't mean that you have to abide by it you can stray away from the set rules and protest. They all say don't be brainwashed by those who try to control you have your own thought on things and think the way you want to think don't let others control what you think. Stevie Wonder talks about people sticking out and not caring about what the consequences were to do it anyways. Also said we are all nobody to Big Brother meaning Big Brother doesn't care who you are or what your name was you were just another brain to control. They all talk about how "he" can always see you. The last one he says you only visit around election time meaning they only come around when they need you number to count for something. They all said mostly the same thing about being controlled by someone higher and how to rebel against their words.

E: They use allusion to 1984 to support their argument and defend their beliefs. It benefits the argument and provides a strong real life example of the effect of total control. It also is an eye opener to those who believe everything are told and don't think with their own minds.

F: I have learned that both Newspeak and linguistic nuance are way to confusing for me to even wrap my brain around. They both make no sense to me and make my head hurt. They both make everything much more complicated than it has to be. Every thing they say in a complex way can be translated into smaller more comprehendible to students. Both ways of speaking share the same qualities and complex ideas.

Anonymous said...

Christopher LaPalme
Part A Back ground information the definition of Utopia an imaginary island described in Sir Thomas More's Utopia (1516) as enjoying perfection in law, politics, etc. 2. (Usually lowercase) an ideal place or state. 3. (Usually lowercase) any visionary system of political or social perfection.
Dystopias a society characterized by human misery, as squalor, oppression, disease, and overcrowding.
Dubai is supposed to be the greatest place to live everything on the island is used to help the citizens that live there. Almost all of the island are same huge houses that people can live in. The engineers that made the houses can be transformed in to different living spaces. This is a place that everyone wants to live in, it’s the place that every nation should be trying to get there
The Dystopias in supposed to a location that has no hope, no life and its torn down, the one thing that people don’t understand when society falls apart is at one time it was a Utopia and its leaders made decisions of lack of decisions that made the society fall apart. Leaders make decisions that will best interests themselves, it’s up to the people to make sure that the decisions are in the best interests for their society.

Part B In Tech that reads your mind written by CBS Interactive staff the technology that can be used to get the information from our brains and can be used to see what we are thinking about. In 1984 the party is trying to think of way to see what people are going to say and change what people think by using disfuntal mind sent, precise medical know age, and how people will act, the science that is being used can be helpful but it must be tested for a couple of years to make sure that it will work completely, most likely it might be used in about ten years from now.

Part C
In North Korea the dictator government hides its problems by having a strong show of a military present in rural parts of the county the problem that exist in North Korea also exist in 1984, forceful interrogation of dictatorial beliefs and a sense of national pride. In North Korea there government rules by fear, to show fear the governments send troopers with weapons across the county just to strike fear, in 1984 big brother has daily propaganda to strike fear in its citizens.
In A North Korean Anniversary and Debut the leader of North Korea shows himself as an untouchable figure that is a god nothing can destroy him, controlling characterization and powerful symbolism. The characterization is in the leader of North Korea is that he thinks that he can take on the world and destroy the United States of America. The symbolism is that to show the world that they are a powerful country and are the greatest people in the world, which is wrong.
In Tensions In North Korea the images that are shown show North Korea is on a path to war fighting an enemy for no reason other than to show that it is more powerful then South Korea, North Korea produces false propaganda to put its citizens in a state of entrust against all counties other than North Korea and use powerful means to keep its citizens from knowing the truth, a quote from 1984 “Ignorance is strength.”


Anonymous said...

Christopher Lapalme part 2
Part D The tree different song are Testify" by Rage Against the Machine "Big Brother" by Stevie Wonder"2+2=5" by Radiohead
In Testify by Rage against the Machine the song is about an overpowered government that is going to war just for oil, the song is about American government just finding ways to get money. In 1984 is about a society that has lost its way by losing hope, the government or “party” now controls everything nothing is done against the party, everything is for the party. The video about testify is more about President Bush then Big Brother because apparently Bush is more dangerous than Big Brother.
In Big Brother by Stevie Wonder the song is about a world that the government does not fear its own citizens the song is a warning that what happened in 1984 is happing now, the citizens of the United States should listen to this song and read 1984, some of the facts that are presented make perfect sense and a person who knows 1984 can pick up on some of the phases in the song. Like “Writing it down every day” that is about Winston writing in his journal and breaking a law which is a crime punishable by years in jail.
In 2 plus 2 equals 5 by radio head to show has many quotes that do not make sense to any thinking person but we as readers must look pass those quotes to see the second meaning to them, January has April showers And two and two always makes a five, for the record January almost never gets rain because is freezing almost every day and 2 plus 2 equals 4, but it’s a double think, because you start to second guess your own knowledge about basic math. The song is supposed to show that not all facts are true and if something is wrong or unjust then we must rise up and stop it.

PART E The allusion from 1984 is a video game created in 2004 twenty years after “1984” and it was called Half Life two. The video is Half Life 2 plus 1984 created by DarkLancee. In the games some of the parells that are presented is that when leaving a train in to the big city a flying camera takes the charterers’ picture to show that they are watching you at all times. The people of city 17 have to wear blue jumpsuits, like the blue overalls. One of the locations that someone has to go to is called victory Square like the victory products that are found in the book 1984. Value corporations uses the 1984 book when making the game because in the game the world was at war and the only way to win was to get rid of basic rights and free will. One of the so called Easter eggs, thinks that are put in the game is a picture of oranges and lemons, a huge point in the book to show that Half Life is the game for Big brother.

PART F Words have two meaning the real detention of the word and what is meant, when double think is presented then the thinking must decide on witch definition has to be used, the main important basic of innuendos is that saying that the person is thinking can and will be dangerous to Winston’s health so he say things that can be easily taken as a simple words but it is used to show an idea to someone that they may be a brotherhood member if they exist, I believe that they do but they were killed off years ago. New speck is now being used to get rid of ideas that are harmful to big brother and the best way to bring citizens to their knees is to make so many laws that they can be thrown in jail for the rest of there lies by breaking laws.

Katie Folan said...

Part A: A utopia is an ideal place or state that has a system of political and social perfection. A dystopia is the opposite; it is a society characterized by human misery, overcrowding, disease, and oppression. The video “The World: Dubai” features an artificial archipelago composed of various small islands that form the shape of the world map. The World is composed of 300 private islands that people can invest in through private homes, estate homes, community islands, or dream resorts. The World is like a utopia because it is an ideal getaway spot that provides privacy and exclusivity. The World exemplifies a perfect society with its idyllic residential developments that include private beaches and any commercial offerings needed. Hoteliers are given the chance to create their own perfect resorts. The homes and resorts have ideal modern designs, and there are plenty of boutiques, restaurants, and cafés. The World features beautiful scenery with the “ideal mix of sea, sand, and sky.” Residents and visitors can enjoy year-round sunshine and activities such as snorkeling in the clear, blue oceans and swimming with the sea life. Traveling around The World is made simple with four major transportation hubs. Each hub is connected by a series of waterways that provide access everywhere and control traffic. The World is an idyllic sanctuary that exemplifies a utopia. In the article, “Denmark: The Happiest Place on Earth,” the authors discuss where in the world people are the happiest. Social scientists and pollsters have searched for the happiest place on earth. They have found that the people who are the happiest are those living in Denmark. Denmark can be compared to a utopia because of several ideal aspects of life in the country. In terms of economy, although Danish people have high taxes (between 50 and 70% of their incomes), the government provides them with free health care and education, and spends “more on children and the elderly than any country in the world per capita.” Another positive effect of high taxes is that, because a banker could end up with the same amount of money as an artist, people tend not to choose careers based on income or status. Therefore they are typically happier in their career choices, and also there is a saying in Denmark, 'Jante-lov,' meaning you are no better than anyone else; a garbage man can live amongst the middle-class and not be judged by anyone. Denmark has also achieved a sort of social perfection. Ninety-two percent of Danes belong to some kind of social club that the government pays for. Danes spend a lot of time with friends and family as well; they even have a word for gatherings called “hygge.” Also, Denmark is a post-consumerist society, meaning people have nice things but shopping and consuming is not a top priority. Danes have a strong sense of trust in each other and their government. Bicycles are often left unlocked and stands run on the honor system. The Danes place less stock in money and material things; they care more about hard work and spending time with people than they do about cars and shopping. Because of this, Denmark has achieved a level of happiness that is not found in most places around the world, lending to a society of near political, economic, and social perfection.
Part B: In the 60 Minutes video “Tech That Reads Your Mind,” the concept of the Thought Police employed in the novel 1984 is shown to come to life through the use of MRI scanning to identify people’s thoughts, an advancement in technology “that is transforming what once was science fiction into just plain science.”

Katie Folan said...

Part C: In George Orwell’s novel 1984, the lack of knowledge the people of Oceania have about the nations of Eurasia and Eastasia parallels the relationship between secluded North Korea and China, as seen in the picture of the “Broken Bridge.”
In George Orwell’s novel 1984, the nation of Oceania is plagued by food shortages due to limited rations and a corrupt government, a situation that is similar to the starvation facing North Korea as explained in the photograph of three young girls.
Comparing the nation of Oceania in the novel 1984 to North Korea, the willingness of the brainwashed devotees to the repressive government of Oceania is seen through the words “If (our) party decides, we will do it!” featured in the picture of a North Korean field.
Part D: The song “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine draws several parallels to the book 1984. The song is about how the media misrepresents what is going on around the world. The news that we receive is propaganda fed to us by the government to cover up what is really going on, in the Middle East for example. In 1984 the Party covers up news and events based on the interests of the government at the time. For example, when the war shifts from alliance with one nation to the other, the government has the Records Department destroy any documents saying that they were ever at war with the nation they are now allied with. The Party controls the mind so the people of Oceania listen and alter their own memories to align with what the government says. Also, the people of Oceania are kept from any real knowledge of life in Eurasia or Eastasia. The song alludes to our reliance on oil, “the car is our wheelchair.” It talks about how the men and women fighting in the Middle East go to “mass graves for the pump,” meaning they die for Americans to have oil. In the novel, Oceania is constantly at war with either Eurasia or Eastasia; this continuous war provides the government with some resources but primarily serves to keep the class structure in order. The song takes a quote from 1984, “who controls the past now controls the future, who controls the present now controls the past.” This quote means that the people who control the future are those in control of the past and the ones that control the past are those who now control the present, so the people of present are in control of all. In the book, the Party has the power over the people of Oceania to alter the past according to the current interests of the government. The song is saying that those currently in charge are the type of people that have always, and will always be in charge. This draws a parallel to 1984, with Big Brother, who will remain as the eternal leader of the government.

Katie Folan said...

There are several parallels between Radiohead’s song “2 +2 = 5” and George Orwell’s novel 1984. The song is about how people can be brainwashed to believe anything even when the truth is obvious. In 1984, the majority of the population of Oceania is under the control of the government. The title of the song “2 + 2= 5” is a direct allusion from the book. When Winston Smith is being tortured by Party member O’Brien in order to fix him, O’Brien tells him that two plus two equals five because the Party says so. O’Brien tells Winston that the Party controls every aspect of the lives of the citizens of Oceania; they have gained the power to do this through fear, hatred and pain. The Party has torn apart the minds of the people and put them back together in ways of their choosing. The ability to persuade a group of people to believe extreme or clearly false ideals is historically like the totalitarian regime in Nazi Germany under Hitler’s control. The idea that people can be brainwashed to believe something, despite the truth being right in front of them also calls into mind the idea of doublethink; doublethink is the ability to hold two contradictory ideas simultaneously while accepting both to be true. The lyrics “are you such a dreamer to put the world to rights, I stay home forever where two and two always makes five,” show how someone who is brainwashed may not question what they are told to believe, as with many of the characters, such as Parsons, in 1984. In beginning of the book, Winston starts to really question the government and rebel against them, but he fails in the end because the government is too powerful. This parallels the lyrics, “It’s the devils way now, there is no way out, you can scream and shout,” because Winston is caught by the Thought Police and he is tortured and humiliated so he can be fixed. The final lyrics, “Oh go up to the king, and the sky is falling in…but it’s not…maybe not,” shows how a person has been brainwashed to believe in the impossible and question this belief for a second but ultimately reverts back to their mindless trust and belief in the government.
In Stevie Wonder’s song, “Big Brother,” there are similarities drawn to the novel 1984. The song references Big Brother, who is the watcher over all. Big Brother is the term used in the book for the leader of the Party of Oceania. In the novel, Big Brother sees all through the Thought Police and the telescreen, resembling the song lyrics “you say that you’re watching me on the tele.” The song is about the rich politicians who run the country but do not cater to the needs of the whole, especially the lower class. The lyrics “seeing me go nowhere…we live in a house the size of a matchbox,” refer to the poor conditions and limited opportunities available to the poor. This parallels the proles in 1984, a group of people making up the lower class of Oceania. The proles live in rundown areas of the country, many facing starvation due to the lack of supplies and limited rations handed out. The proles receive little or no attention from the government; they are uneducated and kept in semi-comfortable conditions so as to keep them from revolting against the Party. Those who are deemed dangerous and capable of uprising are eliminated, but otherwise, the group is viewed as helpless and irrelevant. The protagonist of the novel, Winston Smith, sees the corruptness of the Party and calls them out for destroying the old world and all of its leaders; this supports the song lyrics, “you’ve killed all our leaders,” which could be referring to the deaths of Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, and other famous leaders. Winston also says that because a civilization cannot be founded on hatred and cruelty, the Party will eventually fail; the song echoes a similar sentiment “I don’t even have to do nothin’ to you, you’ll cause you own country to fall,” alluding to corrupt or mediocre government officials running a country into the ground.

Katie Folan said...

Part E: In a clip from an episode of Spongebob Squarepants, Spongebob and Patrick find themselves in an alternate Bikini Bottom that is now called Man-Ray-Opolis after villain Man-Ray took over the city. Man-Ray-Opolis is darker than Bikini Bottom and makes allusions to 1984. This is done through posters featuring Man-Ray’s face with the line “I am watching you” featured on it; this is an allusion to the posters in the novel that read “Big Brother is watching you.” As in 1984, there are citizens who are clearly devoted to their leader; some are seen putting up propaganda posters and saying “Man-Ray is great.” Also, there is a “citizen” with a camera face that represents the telescreen that is always watching and the Thought Police who are always listening, both from the book. These allusions to 1984 are included in this part of the episode to emphasize the power Man-Ray has gained in this alternate reality and the control he has been able to exert over his citizens. The allusion strengthens the scene because the novel is so well-known for its dystopian world and corrupt government that controls the minds of its inhabitants.

Katie Folan said...

Part F: Newspeak is a language created in George Orwell’s novel 1984. The language follows many of the grammatical rules of English but has a very limited vocabulary, having eradicated most synonyms and antonyms. The purpose of the language is to prevent the people of Oceania from having the freedom of thought, a concept that poses a threat to the totalitarian government. Doublethink is a Newspeak word; it is “the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them.” Newspeak and doublethink act as language that allows you to see into human nature in Oceania. Newspeak is used to keep the power of thought at bay, so as to prevent the people from understanding the corruptness of the government and revolt against it. However, the use Newspeak by lower Party members who are unaware of its function and implications serves to show the nature of their minds and how they blindly follow the government because Newspeak has served its purpose. Doublethink also serves to show this idea of brainwashing; people can deliberately tell lies, while as the same time, truly believing in them. It is in the nature of these people to remain knowingly blind to contradictions, as workers in the Records Department do when they themselves rewrite history and then believe every word of it. Doublethink allows the Party to create reality; the inhabitants of Oceania are not in control of their lives or their minds. The concepts of Newspeak and doublethink employed in the novel can be compared to the RSA Animate video. This video is about how language is a window into human nature, similarly as to how doublethink and Newspeak help determine human nature in Oceania. The video talks about the indirect speech act, a case in which humans do not say what they mean in so many words but instead veil their intentions in innuendo. The reason for this is because they hope that they don’t have to bluntly say what they mean, but that the listener will be able to read between the lines and infer what they mean. This shows how humans tend to use underlying meaning to avoid bluntness if, for example, discussing an uncomfortable or vulgar subject. The video also talks about relationship types and how we have formed rules as humans in order to keep these clearly defined relationships from crossing boundaries or becoming awkward. The three types are dominance, communality, and reciprocity. A reciprocity relationship is likely a formal business relationship. In a communality relationship, like one with a family member, it is acceptable to hug or use informal language, while it would be inappropriate to do these things with someone in a reciprocity relationship. On the other hand, you shouldn’t get into a business exchange with someone in a communality relationship because it could put a strain on the bond. These rules we have created show how humans use language to dictate how we interact with people, and judge what is appropriate and what isn’t in certain relationships. (sorry for the comment about multiple choice)

Kayla Sicard said...

Part A: The World: Dubai is groupings of islands made to look like all the continents. It should be paradise with the perfect weather, beaches and beautiful scenery all around. In Denmark: The Happiest Place on Earth, everyone there has to pay a very high amount of taxes and live in a socialistic society in order to be happy. Utopias and dystopias seem to be perfect in their own ways, which is living a certain way with certain standards. The only difference is that dystopias have one or a few things that have gone wrong to make it not as desirable or bad for the people living in it.
Part B: In 1984, Orwell uses the Thought Police to find those who were thinking against Big Brother and the Party, much like how scientist now have figured out how to read our minds using MRI’s.
Part C:First link second picture: Although 1948 and this picture both show outsiders that everything looks great, in 1984 they hide all the past and in this picture shows outsiders that north Korea looks like a peaceful place.
Last link first picture: Although 1984 and this picture both show bombing happening, in 1984 has the bombings taking place on themselves and the picture shows North Korea bombing South Korea.
First link first picture: Although 1984 and this picture both display a found love in their leaders, in 1984 the Party doesn’t really show you who Big Brother is but in North Korea they show you who is the leader.

Kayla Sicard said...

Part D: “Big Brother”- The song title is the first thing that makes a connection to the novel. It reads, “You say that youre watching me on the tele.” This is making a reference to the telescreens. When it says, “You say that you got me all in your notebook,” this is talking about how Winston would write things in his notebook. Stevie Wonder alludes to 1984: “The president of your soul.” This is saying that Big Brother is the President to your soul and mind: that you are comprised of only Big Brother.
“Testify”- The song tiles is what people are forced to do when they are caught by the thought police. They testify of their wrong doings and blame other people. They go through what Winston had to go through. The song says’ “We found your weakness And its right outside your door.” This is talking about room 101. In room 101 they torture you with your weakness or greatest fear. The second to last stanza is a huge allusion to the book 1984. This talks about the past, present, and future. The ministries job was to change the past, control the present and write the future.
“2+2=5”- The song title describes what the Party made Winston believe and engraved into his mind. The song says, “January has April showers.” You have to just believe what the party tells you even though you know it doesn’t make sense. It reads, “It’s the Devils way now There is no way out.” The Devil, meaning the party; the party has all control and there is no going back. Radiohead alludes to 1984; “Oh hail the thief.” In 1984 everyone is praising the one guy that has taken away a lot of their freedoms.
Part E: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlFu8QGy1LM (5:10-6:55) He makes the allusion by having signs of Man Ray saying “I am watching you”; there is a sign that talked about Man Ray dollars which is like Victory Products. Also, when Spongebob and Patrick went into the Krusty Crab there was a telescreen telling someone to eat their food faster. There was a person standing there but it was really a security camera. The speaker includes this allusion to show the severity of what life in Bikini Bottom would be if Man Ray was the leader of the sea. Well in 1984 people were being watched at any moment and you wouldn’t know when, just like in Spongebob. Spongebob and Patrick were easily tricked into the ways of Man Ray; they didn’t even notice the signs. They didn’t even notice the new police officers, the just noticed the new uniforms.
Part F: The RSA video explains how there are three types of relationships that you can have. With each relationship you have certain boundaries you have to follow unless you want awkwardness. The three types of relationships are dominance, communality, and reciprocity. With newspeak the language is so sort that you speak the same way to everybody. In the English language we read in between the lines when people speak and in 1984, people just accept what is being said to them even thought it doesn’t make sense and this is called doublethink. The English language can also be indirect where as newspeak is straight to the point with only a few words.

Kayla Sicard said...

Part D: “Big Brother”- The song title is the first thing that makes a connection to the novel. It reads, “You say that youre watching me on the tele.” This is making a reference to the telescreens. When it says, “You say that you got me all in your notebook,” this is talking about how Winston would write things in his notebook. Stevie Wonder alludes to 1984: “The president of your soul.” This is saying that Big Brother is the President to your soul and mind: that you are comprised of only Big Brother.
“Testify”- The song tiles is what people are forced to do when they are caught by the thought police. They testify of their wrong doings and blame other people. They go through what Winston had to go through. The song says’ “We found your weakness And its right outside your door.” This is talking about room 101. In room 101 they torture you with your weakness or greatest fear. The second to last stanza is a huge allusion to the book 1984. This talks about the past, present, and future. The ministries job was to change the past, control the present and write the future.
“2+2=5”- The song title describes what the Party made Winston believe and engraved into his mind. The song says, “January has April showers.” You have to just believe what the party tells you even though you know it doesn’t make sense. It reads, “It’s the Devils way now There is no way out.” The Devil, meaning the party; the party has all control and there is no going back. Radiohead alludes to 1984; “Oh hail the thief.” In 1984 everyone is praising the one guy that has taken away a lot of their freedoms.
Part E: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlFu8QGy1LM (5:10-6:55) He makes the allusion by having signs of Man Ray saying “I am watching you”; there is a sign that talked about Man Ray dollars which is like Victory Products. Also, when Spongebob and Patrick went into the Krusty Crab there was a telescreen telling someone to eat their food faster. There was a person standing there but it was really a security camera. The speaker includes this allusion to show the severity of what life in Bikini Bottom would be if Man Ray was the leader of the sea. Well in 1984 people were being watched at any moment and you wouldn’t know when, just like in Spongebob. Spongebob and Patrick were easily tricked into the ways of Man Ray; they didn’t even notice the signs. They didn’t even notice the new police officers, the just noticed the new uniforms.
Part F: The RSA video explains how there are three types of relationships that you can have. With each relationship you have certain boundaries you have to follow unless you want awkwardness. The three types of relationships are dominance, communality, and reciprocity. With newspeak the language is so sort that you speak the same way to everybody. In the English language we read in between the lines when people speak and in 1984, people just accept what is being said to them even thought it doesn’t make sense and this is called doublethink. The English language can also be indirect where as newspeak is straight to the point with only a few words.

Ahnya Dague said...

A) The World: Dubai-
This brief video explains the development and ambition for the ultimate location in real estate. It depicts a development of individual islands all systematically arranged and joined through waterways as to provide, theoretically, the perfect mix of anything you could want- low density areas to commercial venues. The entire thing has been completely engineering and manufactured so that every detail is meticulously planned and controlled.
Denmark-
This article explains how despite all the odds in favor of the idealistic paradise locations around the world, the happiest people reside in Demark. The article doesn’t go into extreme detail about the lives of the individual person but rather gives a possible explanation as to what may be causing such happiness- their government is uniquely set up. They pay between 50 and 70% of their income to taxes but the government uses this money to cover health care and education. Also, people don’t base their careers based on income or status- they all so what they want to be doing.
Dubai is utopian in respect to the physical aspect of it- the setting itself is engineered so heavily to be perfect. For Denmark, there was no extreme engineering to design it to be perfect. It’s utopian in a more abstract way- the feelings of the people that live there are what makes it paradise like. Although their setting is not picturesque, they are the happiest people on earth. In regards to dystopias, there are aspects of that in each of these examples. For Dubai, the fact that the whole complex in completely managed and planned and unnatural. There was way too much control over every aspect of this development that it seems almost dangerous. The same idea can be said about Denmark- with so much control and money in the government’s hands, there is enormous potential for something to go seriously wrong in the future.
B)
In the article “Tech that reads your mind”, the subject in focus parallels the Orwellian ideals behind 1984 in specific comparison with both the Thought Police and the Telescreens that are ever-present throughout the novel.
C) In regards to the 18th picture down on the first link:
In comparison with 1984 by George Orwell, this image parallels and symbolizes the figure of Big Brother in the omnipotent, controlling manner of which Big Brother stands for.
In regards to the 3rd picture down on the second link:
In comparison with 1984 by George Orwell, this image parallels and symbolizes the intentions and ideals behind the Thought Police, of which Orwell uses to control the population under control of the Party.
In regards to the 18th picture down on the third link:
In comparison with 1984 by George Orwell, this image parallels and symbolizes the complete power and control had by the Inner Party members, in regards to the subordinate members of the Oceania population.

Ahnya Dague said...

D) For the first video, there are several points that parallel 1984. One blatant one is when the lead singer says “Who controls the present controls the past” which can be tied to how the Party has people like Winston that go back and alter history because they’re in control now. Also, through the combination of video clips and lyrics, the listener gets the impression that the speaker is unhappy with government and who it’s controlling things right now- he repeatedly tells us to “testify” and that its “right outside your door”. This is the same as 1984 because the issues were right in front of Winston and when he ‘testified’, it was under forced conditions. For the second video, every line ties into 1984. There are allusion to telescreens, to Big Brother directly, to the speaker being called “nobody” and living in tiny houses, to the numerous deaths of children and adults, to Big Brother causing his own country to fall, and more. Every aspect of this song by Stevie Wonder directly parallels the ideals throughout the novel 1984. And for the last link, there is a blatant connection between “2+2=5”, which is used in 1984 to symbolize how the party has complete control over every aspect of their population, including their own brains. Also, there is a connection between Winston’s capture and the lyrics “It’s the devil’s way now/there is no way out/you can scream and shout/it is too late now”. This connected to the helplessness of Winston when he was being interrogated by the party officials. Lastly, the visual aspects that go along with depicts violent whippings and hangings, which are used in 1984 to instill fear into and control the population.
E) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ODdhNH0n8U
This video, in the very beginning, shows a crowd of people in front of a big screen which can be paralleled to the telescreens in 1984. Also, all the people are walking in a giant formation without knowing exactly what’s going on which symbolizes how the party brainwashes and controls the entire population so that they are at the mercy of the Party Officials. In the end, it takes and explosion from the giant, controlling screen for people to snap out of their trance and have their own individual thoughts again.
F) Between these two forces, there is a distinct connection. For both the video and 1984, there are aspects where was is said both contradicts and supports indirectly what is being done simultaneously. There are subtle modifications in language that would normally go unnoticed, but in context with the situation, play a big role in the course of the conversation. Doublethink can be tied to the first example of the video where the kidnapper gets pulled over by a cop. By showing the cop the $50 bill, he is both one step ahead/being proactive and going against the law in bribing the cop. Also, there is the aspect that he is being very cordial toward the cop while he is committing a severe crime. Also, there are loads of extended metaphors in 1984 that conceal what is actually being communicated- for example the book and interactions between Winston and O’Brien. Lastly, the idea of Newspeak- in it that language is heavily managed and altered to depict a certain idea- is used throughout the video. Depending on the situation, language can be manipulated, refined, and engineered to accomplish a specific purpose or intent subtly.

Shinnosuke furukawa said...

Shinnosuke Furukawa

A) Utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. It is essentially the perfect place to live. The world in Dubai, is considered a “utopia” because it is a luxurious beach resort where everything is nice, the weather is beautiful, the people are nice because everyone is happy with where they are, and the things there are really nice. On the other hand Denmark is also considered a “utopian” place because even though the place itself isn’t considered so great (because it’s cold and dreary), the people there are very friendly and very happy with their lives. The people there have jobs that can afford cars, but ride bicycles because it’s better for the environment. They also give 70% of their taxes to the government, and the government covers many necessities such as education.

B) Thesis: As our world advances further into technology, some technology such as the fMRI will be able to read our minds and invade our privacy.

C) 1) One picture shows a woman in a soldiers uniform, and in the caption it says they in the countryside there are many people in uniforms like her, indicating that there are many soldiers and that they’re everywhere.

2) There is a picture of the newly elected members of the central leadership, and above them is a picture of what looks to be an important man, however his name was not mentioned.
3) There is a picture of a man standing guard at a stadium with a machinegun.

D) The song 2+2=5 by Radiohead is referring to the book because in the book it talks about the concept of 2+2=5. The song also talks about how people can be just brainwashed to think a certain way even though it isn’t correct.

Shinnosuke furukawa said...

Shinnosuke Furukawa

A) Utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. It is essentially the perfect place to live. The world in Dubai, is considered a “utopia” because it is a luxurious beach resort where everything is nice, the weather is beautiful, the people are nice because everyone is happy with where they are, and the things there are really nice. On the other hand Denmark is also considered a “utopian” place because even though the place itself isn’t considered so great (because it’s cold and dreary), the people there are very friendly and very happy with their lives. The people there have jobs that can afford cars, but ride bicycles because it’s better for the environment. They also give 70% of their taxes to the government, and the government covers many necessities such as education.

B) Thesis: As our world advances further into technology, some technology such as the fMRI will be able to read our minds and invade our privacy.

C) 1) One picture shows a woman in a soldiers uniform, and in the caption it says they in the countryside there are many people in uniforms like her, indicating that there are many soldiers and that they’re everywhere.

2) There is a picture of the newly elected members of the central leadership, and above them is a picture of what looks to be an important man, however his name was not mentioned.
3) There is a picture of a man standing guard at a stadium with a machinegun.

D) The song 2+2=5 by Radiohead is referring to the book because in the book it talks about the concept of 2+2=5. The song also talks about how people can be just brainwashed to think a certain way even though it isn’t correct.

Shinnosuke furukawa said...

Shinnosuke Furukawa

A) Utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. It is essentially the perfect place to live. The world in Dubai, is considered a “utopia” because it is a luxurious beach resort where everything is nice, the weather is beautiful, the people are nice because everyone is happy with where they are, and the things there are really nice. On the other hand Denmark is also considered a “utopian” place because even though the place itself isn’t considered so great (because it’s cold and dreary), the people there are very friendly and very happy with their lives. The people there have jobs that can afford cars, but ride bicycles because it’s better for the environment. They also give 70% of their taxes to the government, and the government covers many necessities such as education.

B) Thesis: As our world advances further into technology, some technology such as the fMRI will be able to read our minds and invade our privacy.

C) 1) One picture shows a woman in a soldiers uniform, and in the caption it says they in the countryside there are many people in uniforms like her, indicating that there are many soldiers and that they’re everywhere.

2) There is a picture of the newly elected members of the central leadership, and above them is a picture of what looks to be an important man, however his name was not mentioned.
3) There is a picture of a man standing guard at a stadium with a machinegun.

D) The song 2+2=5 by Radiohead is referring to the book because in the book it talks about the concept of 2+2=5. The song also talks about how people can be just brainwashed to think a certain way even though it isn’t correct.

John Munger said...

Part A:

The World is a place of wonder, amazement, and opportunity. It is an island paradise made up of 4 separate hubs. These hubs are broke up into estates, resorts, and high and medium density areas. These are reachable by boat through waterways. I believe that The World is a Utopia becuae presents owners, investors, and real estate agents with many great opportunities. It’s location is beautiful and is great for paradise vacations. It is a place that is not hugely populated, so it allows for people to become friendly with each other and decide on the best way for it to be ruled, which is the main reason that it should be conisdered a Utopia.

Denmark is definitely a great place and has qualities that make it a Utopia. The high taxes are a small barrier that comes to people who live there, but they don’t mind as much because of their National Healthcare Program. This is the main reason it should be considered a Utopia because the government is good to the people of the country. There isn’t constant fighting and all the people are happy work as a cohesive team to make their country better than it already is. This is why I feel that Denmark has the qualities that make it a Utopia

Part B:

In, “ Tech That Reads Your Mind”, by the CBS Interactive Staff, the reader is shown the parallels between the article and in 1984 by George Orwell, with the use of innovative technology and the laws brought up with use of the technology.

Part C:

In the images of, The Big Picture, we see the parallels to 1984 and North Korea when North Korean soldiers are seen walking the outside of the Chinese border guarding people from entering or escaping.

In the images of, The Big Picture, we see the parallels to 1984 and North Korea when soldiers are seen guarding the border from potential escapers and from people entering the country.

In the images of, The Big Picture, we see the parallels to 1984 and North Korea when you see the similar Big Brother propaganda picture of Kim-Jung Il with the rest of his party members.

John Munger said...

Part D:

To begin with, the titles of all the songs are very similar to topics and ideas that are motifs throughout 1984. In the song, “ 2+2=5”, by Radiohead the idea of 2+2 equling 5 is present in 1984. This is a way of showin that populants of Oceania are brianwashed and love Big Brother. It is a way to show that they stop believing in what they know and just believe in Big Brother. The video for Testiy has allusions to 1984 as well. It shows that George Bush is like Big Brother and people should rise up or testify in order to bring him down. In Big Brother by Stevie Wonder, wee see yet another allusion to 1984. Besides the name of the song, he mentions that, “ you are watching me on the tele”. This is exactly what happens in 1984. This is how the Thought Police catch Thought criminals, by watchin them on the telescreens. These are just a few of the many allusions to 1984.

Part E:

In the song, YOLO, by The Lonely Island, there references to 1984 throughout the song. The song is about being safe in the world and preventing death. Other than mentioning 1984 and George Orwell, they talk about not trusting anyone because it could result in your death, but in 1984 they don’t trust anyone because they could be meber of the Thought Police. Also, they talk about using a chastity belt in order to prtoect themselves from sexually transmitted diseases. In 1984, Julia wears a chastity belt to show she is part of the Junior anti-sex league. These are the references to 1984 in YOLO by Lonely Island.

Part F:

There are many parallels to 1984 in Language as a window into Human Nature. One example is veiling our intentions. That is what Newspeak does. The complicated language is based of intentions that are not blurted out there, but it is velied in order for the reader to figure out the true intent of what is being said. Doublethink is also alluded to in this video. It comes with mutual knowldege. People know something, but they do not particularly know if the other person knows. This relates to doublethink in a way. A person wants to do one thing, but not ure if it will be caught so they decide to do something which they know will not get them in trouble. These are the parallels to 1984.

Emily Brogan said...

Part A: Both The World and Denmark represent utopias, which are idealistic societies. They are both presented as fantastic places to live with ideal circumstances for all involved members of society. The World presents a new way of living, with the ability to easily create islands adaptable for residential properties or commercial use. Denmark, on the other hand, depicts how an entire country has revolutionized both their ways of thinking and living to create a perfect society. People are more trusting, not locking their bikes or over-protecting their children. Status in society is entirely antiquated, as most people ride bicycles rather than cars. Even those in government, the Bourbons, do not flaunt their status; they opt to remain humble.

On the other hand, a dystopia is a utopian society that has gone wrong, which is apparent in 1984. The Party was created to offer unity, and Big Brother is meant to be symbolic of a loving leader; however, this entire idea went awry. The World and Denmark have the potential to become dystopias, although it is not a possibility for the near future. If things keep progressing and people are not as thrilled about it as the people making these changes, a dystopian society could be in order.

Part B: By combining the invasive technologies and idealisms of 1984 with the current technology making it possible to use fMRIs in order to read minds, the idea of “thoughtcrime” can be revolutionized; speculation will no longer be used by the Thought Police to make arrests but rather there will be solid evidence of thinking against the party.

Part C: Paralleling the Two Minutes Hate and Hate Week depicted in George Orwell’s dystopian 1984, North Korea’s Mass Games serve to foster commitment towards the one party of the government and to emphasize the importance of the Motherland “over individual prowess”.

Showing a scene of police surveillance against the backdrop of a decrepit city in a country that boasts of its affluence and prosperity, both Orwell’s Thought Police and the North Korean border guards represent the oppressive control system imposed upon a repressed people who know no other way of life.

North Korea’s bombing of South Korean ships in the disputed Yellow Sea entirely parallels the war-crazed, accusatory ideals of Oceania; these blatant displays of aggression against innocent forces represent the backwards values of dystopian societies where “war is peace”.

Emily Brogan said...

Part D: Though some of the central ideas between the songs and George Orwell’s 1984 may vary slightly, “Testify”, “Big Brother”, and “2+2=5” all work together to form a relationship with the novel. By using the quote “who controls the past now controls the future, who controls the present now controls the past”, the song “Testify” draws upon the idea that people are forced to submit to an oppressive government. Even the word “testify” implies a coercive relationship between the repressed people and the controlling government, similar to how life is in 1984. Stevie Wonder’s “Big Brother” relies on the idea that people are constantly being watched, and if they are not up to the government’s standards, then they will be an enemy of the state. This directly parallels 1984 in that the thought police and telescreens are constantly monitoring people; if they are not up to par or commit “thoughtcrime” or even “facecrime”, that is proof enough to jail and even execute. 2+2=5 does not much parallel the central themes of 1984 besides using one of the Party’s paradoxical slogans - “2+2=5” to show how people can be brainwashed enough into believing anything that is force-fed to them by someone who claims to be more intelligent.

Part E: The entire album Resistance by Muse, and especially the title track (found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPE9uSFFxrI) is an extended metaphor for 1984. Lead singer Matthew Bellamy has commented in several interviews that the album is inspired by Orwell’s dystopian novel. The song “Resistance” in particular is inspired by the illicit relationship between Winston and Julia. Parallelling the hiding in apartment with “will they find our hiding place?” and the imminent dangers of thoughtcrime with “our lips must always be sealed” and “you’ll wake the thought police”, Muse’s song portrays the dangerous impact constant surveillance has on people.

Part F: This video from RSAnimate offers both parallels and distinctions between modern linguistic nuances and Orwell’s Newspeak and Doublethink. By providing examples of how the meanings of phrases can differ when viewed in certain circumstances, the video proves Orwell’s idea of Doublethink, that you can accept several differing ideas at once. With the idea that it is possible to understand things that ordinarily would not make sense due to the increasing understanding of language, both the video and Orwell’s 1984 pinpoint the flexiility of the English language and how it can adapt and change to people’s needs over time.

Jasmine Graslie said...

Part A:
The World- Dubai:
The World Islands would have been composed of 300 man-made islands that resemble nothing short of a paradise. There would’ve been plenty of houses, resorts, pools, retail, and community to go around. There would be private beaches, blue ocean, blue sky and anything that anyone could dream of for a vacation. This project would have resembled a perfect world, or a utopia.
Denmark: The happiest place on Earth:
Demark may have high taxes, but the citizens that reside there are generally considered the happiest people on Earth. Their government covers all of the health-care an education prices while all of the residents get, pretty much, equal pay. Everyone makes enough money to support themselves. The people of Denmark aren’t obsessed with owning the best things or buying anything fancy. Most citizens chose to ride bikes even when most of them can afford a car.
Utopias and Dystopias don’t have very many similar qualities; however, there are a few elements that remain throughout both extremes. In both cases there is some form of government control. In Denmark, for example, they may be the happiest people alive but they pay 50-70% of their income in taxes. Whether a utopia or a dystopia, there’s also a uniform love for the government and the country the citizens live in.

Part B:
Moving from a world where your private thoughts were considered a human right to a world where machines are created to know what you’re thinking, in Tech tech that reads your mind, 60 Minutes covered a story on new MRI scans that identify the patterns of the brain and relate those patterns to thoughts so that within the next five years no thought will be private.

Jasmine Graslie said...

Part C:
Propaganda can be seen as a way to enforce government support in citizens by implanting the thought, “If our party decides, we will do it,” which is a phrase that can be seen pictured by Reinhard Krause in North Korea; the idea of government worship enforced by propaganda can also be seen written by George Orwell throughout the novel 1984.
Whether a prole from Oceana, written by George Orwell in 1984, or a lower class citizen from North Korea, pictured by David Grey in “The Big Picture,” one thing remains the same, the lower class of a dystopian society is the least susceptible to government watch while also playing their part by conforming to the rest of society.
While the dystopian society written about by George Orwell in 1984 can be related to North Korea, George Orwell painted a picture where there were no pastimes other than government events where on the other hand, even North Korean soldiers can be seen enjoying thing such as music, pictured by Stringer in “The Big Picture.”
Part D:
George Orwell uses his book, 1984, to convey a sense of desperation and false hope in a society where the government has full and complete control. His main character, Winston, attempts to spark rebellion within himself, however it is too late. The Radiohead song 2+2=5, of course alludes to the scene in the novel where Winston is being forced to accept the society he lives in through torture. This song correlates pretty directly with the text by stating that, “It’s the devil’s way now/There is no way out.” Radiohead is trying to portray the idea of taking charge of a situation and “paying attention,” before it’s too late, but then again, “maybe not.” Stevie Wonder also makes a reference to 1984 in his song Big Brother. Stevie Wonder is making the point that the government, or president, is just watching, “on the tele,” and they make promises that things will change if their elected, but people still, “live in the ghetto.” Stevie Wonder also has a spin on the outlook on Big Brother, while Orwell ‘s idea was that there’s a point where things have gone too far, Stevie Wonder sings, “you’ll cause your own country to fall,” which is like the hope that Winston once had. Rage Against the Machine states that, “Who controls the past now controls the future/Who controls the present now controls the past,” which is a common theme throughout 1984 where no one really knows the past and therefore the future is controlled by the one who erased the past. Then the lyrics are, “testify,” or fight for what you believe in before it’s too late.

Jasmine Graslie said...

Part E:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTZ0A5qXNUU
One of my favorite bands, Incubus, alludes to 1984 in their song “Talk Shows on Mute”. The lead singer Brandon wrote the song about being controlled and transfixed by technology, specifically a talk show. He references 1984 when he sings, “come one, come all/Into 1984,” while embodying the idea that technology, “electric sheep,” is going to make or break our future. We’re all getting closer to being controlled and taken over by this technology; therefore we need to learn how to live with the, “sound turned off.”


Part F:
Language around the world today is constantly growing as new words are created to convey new ideas. As humans the way we communicate with each other is often more indirect, especially when we want to ask something that may result in a negative answer. The RSAnimate video explained how commands, bribes, threats and requests are usually veiled with indirect phrases that don't state exactly what the speaker means. Using ambiguous language we can get what we want and need while preventing the situation from ruining relationships and growing awkward. In novel 1984, the concept of doublethink echoes the way that people request and demand things. Doublethink is the idea that you know one thing, but believe in another thing simultaneously. This could be applied in a situation where, like in RSAnimate, a person could hint at something, “Would you like to see my etchings?” and even though it means one thing, someone could know what the double meaning is. The language of Newspeak created by Orwell is one in which ambiguity would be ruled out completely. No longer would any request need to be veiled, because the point of the language is to narrow down the vocabulary into as little amount of words as possible. In the case of Newspeak, you only need as many words as to get the point across, and no more. In words of Newspeak, everything would be relayed directly. There would be no doublethink because there wouldn’t be enough words to convey the idea.

Kaitlin M said...

Part A- (The World: Dubai) Manmade islands are shaped into the continents of the world. Located just off the coast of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, it is made to be the ultimate paradise. It will contain private homes, estate homes, dream resorts, and community islands. There will be exquisite restaurants by the sea, and private beaches; the ultimate getaway. This almost seems the propaganda in 1984 saying how it is a perfect world.
(Denmark: The Happiest Place On Earth) When looking at the world happiness map, Denmark is the happiest compared to other places such as the US ranking 23rd place. Although the taxes are extremely high (between 50 percent and 70 percent of their incomes) the government pays for their health care and education. More money is spent on children and the elderly than any country in the world. People are allowed to choose whatever job they want not based on income, but on what they really want to do. There is basic trust in the government and the people around them. In 1984, the people have trust in Big Brother and in the government.
Part B- (60 Minutes' video: Tech that reads your mind) Parallel to the novel 1984 by George Orwell, the new technology shown in 60 Minutes' video: Tech that reads your mind, our world can potentially become a world with no privacy.
Part C- (A shell fired from North Korea is seen on Yeonpyeong Island November 24, 2010) In the novel 1984 by George Orwell, the shell fired from North Korea looked to that of the missile in the Proles neighborhood.
(A border area of North Korea’s west coast, dotted with artillery bunkers and a sign reading “Long live Great Kim II-Sung and his revolutionary ideology!, as seen from South Korea’s Yeonpyeong Island in the disputed waters of the Yellow Sea on January 28, 2010) The slogans from the novel 1984 by George Orwell are very similar to that of North Korea, and show the eerily similar ideology of love for the government.
(Young Koreans hold up colored display cards to form a background image for a performance of North Korea's Mass Games on September 12, 2008. The Mass Games are designed to entertain or celebrate holidays, and place emphasis on group dynamics rather than individual prowess. This particular show's name is "Prosper the Motherland!”, dedicated to the 60th Anniversary of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, celebrated on September 9th) The love and celebration of Big Brother in the novel 1984 by George Orwell, is similar to that of North Korea’s celebration for its leader.
Part D- The three songs that were shown closely relate to the novel 1984. In the novel Orwell creates the theme of control by the government. In the song Big Brother by Stevie Wonder, its theme is that the governments control will eventually be its own downfall. In George Orwell’s novel, the downfall to the government is said to be human nature.
Part E- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1BQPV-iCkU This clip shows a human dystopia like in the novel 1984 particularly at 1:43. This part of the clip shows the education of the young children. They are being taught about their “home sweet home”, and how great it is. This type of brainwashing is shown in the novel, and helps display this idea of brainwashing.
Part F- The power of language is shown in 1984 by George Orwell and in the video RSA Animate - Language as a Window into Human Nature. The Newspeak language limits the vocabulary and understanding of others. How can the people star a revolution if there is no word for it? The video shows that without this universal understanding of knowing that others feel the same way you do, it is pointless.

Emily D said...

Emily Durst

Part A: The World: Dubai is a real estate project in which a large group of islands are turned into houses and resorts. They are grouped into what looks like continents, hence the name The World, and are grouped into estates, mid density, and high density regions. Some islands are also used for resorts and commercial use. This is supposed to be an island paradise, whether it is used for permanent living, vacations, or business.

The World is most like a utopia because it is seen as a paradise with crystal clear oceans and skies. It is meant to be a destination for relaxation, whether it is a vacation home or permanent home. There is nowhere else like it in the world and it is everything anyone could ever want. The only dystopian quality I see is the possible negative impact on the marine life around the islands due to construction and the presence of humans.

This article features Denmark as the happiest country on earth according to studies done by the University of Leiscester and the Erasmus University Rotterdam. This article includes interviews with Danes on their happiness and their way of life. Despite high taxes, Danes are generally very happy and most rate 8-10 in happiness based on a scale of 1-10. Everyone earns around the same income despite their profession, so people pursue careers based on their interests rather than money. Also, over 90 percent of Danes belong to some sort of club, which is paid for by the government. This creates a strong sense of community and trust.

Denmark is most like a utopia because of the level of trust the people have in each other and their government. According to the article, the people feel “‘tryghed’-- the Danish word for ‘tucked in’—like a snug child”. The government also pays for the clubs and activities the people participate in. In Denmark, people have equal opportunities due to having the same income. A garbage man can live in the same neighborhood and have the same pride as a lawyer or banker. This is utopian because people are genuinely happy without having excess luxuries. The only dystopian part of Denmark would be the high taxes, with 50 to 70 of their incomes being taken out in taxes.

Part B: By utilizing advanced technology, modern science mimics the intrusiveness of mind reading and the invasion of privacy that is synonymous with the strict control expressed by the Party in George Orwell’s 1984.

Part C:
For picture 9 from “Peering into North Korea”- Struck by severe poverty, the houses of Hyesan depicted in the photograph have a similar neglected appearance like the homes of the Proletarians in George Orwell’s 1984 and both scenarios express the negative consequences of a totalitarian regime on its people.

For picture 20 from “Peering into North Korea”- Watching over his people with constant vigilance, the portrait of Kim Il-sung depicted in the photograph is eerily similar to the portrait of Big Brother in 1984 in that they are both symbols of the strict control of their respective Parties.

For picture 34 from “Peering into North Korea”- Reading “If our party decides, we will do it!”, the sign depicted in the photograph creates a sense of forced allegiance, much like the Party in 1984 influences people with the slogans “WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH” and the forced loyalty to Big Brother and the Party.

Emily D said...

Emily Durst

Part D: In the song “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine, lyrics at the beginning and the end of the song can be linked to 1984. In the first verse, the lines “To numb me and purge me now/Of thoughts of blaming you” can be compared to the control the Party has over its citizens. The people of Oceania are not free thinkers; the government numbs them with propaganda and slogans swearing loyalty to the Party. The Party also purges thoughts and memories of their citizens, through the use of the memory hole, where papers as well as memories are burned and forgotten forever. Near the end of the song there is a verse that reads “Who controls the past now controls the future/Who controls the present now controls the past/Who controls the past now controls the future/Who controls the present now?” In 1984 when Winston is being interrogated, O’Brien reveals that the Party has the power to change history and by changing history, they can change the way the world works. The Party controls the past, the present, and the future.

In the song “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder, allusions to 1984 are scattered all though out the song. The lines “Your name is big brother /You say that you're watching me on the tele” is similar to the telescreens used by the Party in the novel. In the line “The President of your soul”, Big Brother from the novel can be seen as the President of citizen’s souls because of the undying love and loyalty they must swear to him and to the government. They do not need souls of their own when they have Big Brother. “We live in a house the size of a matchbox, /Roaches live with us wall to wall” is similar to what the Proles must live in despite their undying loyalty to the government. Finally the song ends with “You'll cause your own country to fall” which is similar to what Winston said to O’Brien during his interrogation. Winston believed that eventually the Party would cause its own downfall and the people of Oceania will rise up.

With a title like “2+2=5”, the song by Radiohead already links to the interrogation scene where O’Brien tries to convince Winston that 2+2=5. The idea is that if the Party says that something is true, it is true regardless to what was believed before. The lines “I try to sing along/But the music's all wrong” can be connected to Winston’s inability to completely devote himself to the Party.

Part E: This video compares the world of the video game Half Life 2 to the world of 1984. The person plays through the game and annotates what connections can be made between characters and settings from both the game and the book. There are obvious similarities to 1984 in the game; such as Dr. Breen paralleling Big Brother, the telescreens everywhere, Dr. Kleiner paralleling Goldstein, and The Combine paralleling the Thought Police. While the game is not completely spot on with the book, the creator of the video, DarkLancee, points out some very obvious symbolism and allusions to 1984 in Half Life 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4p6FGjMNW0

Emily D said...

Emily Durst

Part F: In the video about linguistic nuance, the speaker explains that there are multiple ways of speaking that can come to the same conclusion. For example, someone can use a pick up line about etchings that implies that they want sex or they can flat out ask for sex. In Newspeak, all synonyms and antonyms are eliminated and words are only given one meaning. Therefore, there is only one direct way to come to a conclusion and it allows the Party to decrease the amount of thinking someone does, thus allowing more government control. Moving back to linguistic nuance, the speaker in the video explained how one person will not rise up against a ruler unless the ruler is loathed by other people. By learning that other people hate a ruler, everyone’s knowledge is expanded and they are another step closer to revolution. Doublethink does the opposite by decreasing knowledge; it allows two contradicting beliefs to be accepted as truth. For example, the three slogans of the Party are “WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH.” These are all contradictory but are accepted as fact, and the Party utilizes doublethink to control its civilians. If people widely accept these ideas and nothing else, then there will less likely be a revolt.

Anonymous said...

A)These two places obviously have utopian aspects that have made there citizens undoubtedly happy, unlike 1984 which is a dystopia they had no freedom only fear. These places seem to be almost exact opposites for dubai they have tropical islands man made with beautiful beaches and as much solace as you want. then for denmark it shows that people here are truly happy, they are content with the way there life is and is going and are happy about there government also completely opposite of 1984.

B)In this article the writer uses bias point of views and the progress of science to convince readers that mind control is coming and that it is a good thing, although some people may disagree.

C) number one from the first link immediately stood out to me because it seems like it is trying to imprint in everyones mind kim jung is a god like figure.
Number 3 on the second link made me think of 1984 because of the huge military presence and the fact that they are always being watched

D)testify- this relates to 1984 because he is talking about how no matter if they say there telling the truth or even call them self the board of truth there lying
Big brother- this is a direct song made because of 1984 from the name to the notebook
2+2=5 is pertaining to the brainwashing in 1984 and how it relates to us today

Kenzie stewart

Anonymous said...

A)These two places obviously have utopian aspects that have made there citizens undoubtedly happy, unlike 1984 which is a dystopia they had no freedom only fear. These places seem to be almost exact opposites for dubai they have tropical islands man made with beautiful beaches and as much solace as you want. then for denmark it shows that people here are truly happy, they are content with the way there life is and is going and are happy about there government also completely opposite of 1984.

B)In this article the writer uses bias point of views and the progress of science to convince readers that mind control is coming and that it is a good thing, although some people may disagree.

C) number one from the first link immediately stood out to me because it seems like it is trying to imprint in everyones mind kim jung is a god like figure.
Number 3 on the second link made me think of 1984 because of the huge military presence and the fact that they are always being watched

D)testify- this relates to 1984 because he is talking about how no matter if they say there telling the truth or even call them self the board of truth there lying
Big brother- this is a direct song made because of 1984 from the name to the notebook
2+2=5 is pertaining to the brainwashing in 1984 and how it relates to us today

Kenzie stewart

John Cormier said...

Part A.
The World Islands are a collection of man-made islands shaped into the continents of the world, located off the coast of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. It will consist of over 300 small private artificial islands that are divided into four categories private homes, estate homes, dream resorts, and community islands. It’s not one island paradise but a bunch of islands paradises all put together.

Denmark=the Happiest Place on Earth. Overall the Danes: Trust their Government, feel Comfortable, Safe, have a Strong Economy, More Women’s Equality. All have lifelong, citizens National/Universal HealthCare that comes out of tax dollars. They also choose their job based on what they like not what pays the best.
Part B
Shifting from sci-fi technology that Orwell’s Thought Police could only dream of having into to reality new thought predicating brain scans have been developed.
Part C
Picture 25, in Tension in the Koreas page reminds me of the two minute hate and hate week from 1984.
Picture 4, in Recent Scenes from North Korea page reminds me of Julia walking in the golden country to go meet Wilson.
Picture 27, on the A North Korean Anniversary and Debut page reminds me of the young spies from 1984.
Part D
Each of these songs goes about their 1984 allusions slightly differently. First we’ll start with the alternative rock song “2+2=5” by Radiohead. Which beside the obvious references to the quote from 1984 that “2+2=5”, it also reverences to how in Orwell’s society that “It is too late now” for rebellion “Because you're [the in this case you refers to the lower and middle class] not there Payin' attention”. This is similar to how Wilson and Julia both rebel “quietly” because any organized or loud rebellions are doomed to fail as the party has made far too many counter measures against such actions. This contrasts the song "Big Brother" by Stevie Wonder which refers more to the constant vigilance and economic neglect of Orwell’s 1984 with lines like “You say that you're watching me on the tele, Seeing me go nowhere”. Stevie Wonder then relates the neglect of the Orwellian universe to modern America with lines like “I'll change if you vote me in as the pres…You just come to visit me 'round election time”. Finally there is "Testify" by Rage Against The Machine which only quotes 1984’s party’s slogan “Who controls the past now controls the future. Who controls the present now controls the past. Who controls the past now controls the future.”

John Cormier said...

Part E
The Orwellian Secrets of Smartphones -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyqALy-idm0
Mark Dice is a media analyst, political activist, and author who ties to get people to question our celebrity obsessed culture, and the role the mainstream media and elite secret societies play in shaping our lives. In this case by explaining how the camera in your smartphone can remotely be used to generate a 3D map of the inside of your house, the microphone can listen to you even when the phone is powered down, the photos you take all have your location encoded into them, and every conversation you have is recorded and data-mined for keywords and other information. He chooses to compare this to Orwellian dystopias because it is the closest thing he has to explain how and in what way people are being watched and listened to. He says this to “welcome people to the new Orwellian order”.
Part F
Orwell’s language of Newspeak and philosophe of Doublethink prevent certain actions such as Indirect Speech acts. That way the citizens of Oceania are force to abandon innuendo and simply blurt out their intentions in front of the tele-screens. Newspeak is designed to take away the ability to convey rebellious ideas and content while also inadvertently eliminating the need for language to negotiate a relationship. Since Newspeak doesn’t acknowledge any relationships. This is also because Newspeak relies solely on Overt language that cannot be taken back. While Doublethink addresses the ideas of mutual and individual knowledge. As doublethink allows you to willing deny yourself mutual knowledge thus proving the ignorance is bliss statement true. That way the people’s views lack the collective power that the video says is necessary to bring down a regime or old views.

I don't know if I should have posted this but I did anyway. I'll bring a hard copy to class

Eric Sanford said...

Orwellian Parallels - 1

Part A

The World: Dubai is a project currently in works to create an area of small man-made islands made to resemble a map of the Earth. These islands are intended to be mainly self sufficient, providing areas for not only resort-like vacationing, but also permanent housing in various amounts of density depending on the island, as well as corporate areas to oversee trade and business. The islands are separated by shallow canals, ideal for transportation of both people and goods from one to another, and to and from the mainland.

Denmark is notable for being considered the “happiest place on Earth” compared to other nations. This title is based upon several studies and polls, which show that the average Dane is more content in life than any other nationality. This contentedness is supposedly found from a generally close-knit society, where everyone is more or less equal, and trust is commonplace.

Utopias require many qualities in order to function correctly, which has proven to be the main issue historically with creating one. The main issue being that those in power will have to use that power to create the utopia, but then must relinquish that control to an extent in order to maintain the utopian effect, allowing the people to make guided decisions, rather than keeping control. Despite the near impossibility of a utopian society forming, the qualities normally associated with utopias are equality, justice, personal freedoms, and peace. However, it is far too easy for a utopia, once established, to fall, to either attack or revolution. A change in power, or even just continued power of a utopias founders, could result in the beginning of a dystopian society, in which the majority of the people are equal, but in being equal, are held far below those in power. Freedoms could be stripped away by a powerful government, turning what had begun as an idealistic movement towards a utopia into a violent dictatorship or totalitarian state.

Part B

The “thought identification” technology presented by “60 Minutes” would suit George Orwell’s Big Brother from the novel 1984, allowing the fictional totalitarian government to use this technological advance in order to monitor brain activity of its citizens and recognize any signs of rebellious thought “within minutes.”

Part C
http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/nkorea_10_11/n08_25427881.jpg

Showing parallels to the loss of individuality of citizens of Oceania in George Orwell’s 1984, the people of North Korea are shown to wear uniforms, which, while more evoking of military style than the blue overalls of Orwell’s Party, serve a purpose much like those in the novel, intending to make the wearers nearly identical to each other, regardless of gender or rank.

http://inapcache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/nkorea_04_24/n25_18563365.jpg

Paralleling the atrociously impoverished dwellings of “proles” in George Orwell’s novel, 1984, the living conditions faced by many North Koreans appear to be dilapidated and unimpressive, without even electricity for heating, as shown by the omnipresent smoke from hundreds of chimneys.

http://cache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/nkorea_09_17/nkorea26.jpg

Contrasting the small conveniences held by Inner Party members in George Orwell’s 1984, North Korea’s Dictators, Kim-Jong Il and Kim-Jong Un live in a bubble of luxury and excess, which is displayed prominently by this extravagant ceremony, with tens of thousands of people forced to perform for the entertainment of their totalitarian leaders.

Eric Sanford said...

Orwellian Parallels - 2

Part D

Criticizing the United States government during the Bush Administration for the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars, “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine includes several aspects, which have parallels to George Orwell’s novel 1984, despite the strong political overtones of the song. The notion of media control is explored, which parallels the Party’s manipulation of historical documents and propaganda from the novel. This connection is strengthened by the lyrics “Who controls the past now controls the future/ Who controls the present now controls the past,” which is extremely reminiscent of the Party’s manipulation of the truth, which is what leads to the main character Winston’s personal rebellion against the Party. In addition, the song references the cleansing of minds of those opposed to the Party with the lyrics “To numb me and purge me now/ Of thoughts of blaming you,” which refers to how the Party mind washes all of its citizens, even those who are sentenced to death, in order to create a universal love of Big Brother.

Denouncing the United States government’s relation to those living in poverty, “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder makes several allusions to the fictional Party and Big Brother from George Orwell’s 1984. The most obvious references are the use of “Big Brother” to refer to the president, and the lyrics “You say you’re watching me on the tele,” which alludes to the two-way telescreens used to monitor all of the Party’s members. Wonder also sings “My name is nobody,” creating an allusion to the loss of individuality in the novel, and the lyrics “you just come to visit me ‘round election time,” specifically criticize the presidential campaigns as having false pretenses, but also refer to the Party’s apathy towards the impoverished “proles.” In addition, the song references the self-destructive nature of the Party in the lyrics “You’ve killed all our leaders… You’ll cause your own country to fall,” showing how the Party cannot sustain itself as it vaporizes its own members just to maintain fear and paranoia in the remaining members.

Articulating the notion of imposing untrue ideologies over logical truth, “2+2=5” by Radiohead alludes to the core beliefs of the Party from Orwell’s 1984. The concept of “doublethink” requires an individual to put aside their own grasp on reality and logic to allow the ideologies and propaganda of the Party to become their “truth.” The specific idea that “Two and two always makes up five,” is taken directly from the novel, as the main character Winston’s grasp on his own reality is based on the truth that 2+2+4, but that is destroyed as his mind is cleansed through seemingly endless torture in the Ministry of Love, he is forced to learn that 2 plus 2 equals whatever the Party wants it to equal, which is more often than not very different from four. It is also shown how the people of Oceania allow the Party to oppress them as they “Lay down the tracks,” and “Have not been/ Payin’ attention.” This song perfectly captures the essence of how Party forces its members to ignore the contradictions it constantly creates.

Eric Sanford said...

Orwellian Parallels - 3

Part E

In the Futurama episode “How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back,” the center of the organization that the character Hermes, a bureaucrat, works for is revealed, its overall appearance alluding to the Party’s Ministries from 1984. This “Central Bureaucracy” is a massive windowless cube, similar to Orwell’s windowless pyramids. In addition, another character, Professor Farnsworth, says, "You can't just waltz into the Central Bureaucracy! It's a tangled web of red tape and regulations. I've never been, but a friend of mine went completely mad trying to find the washroom there." Alluding to how many Party members in 1984 had not seen the insides of other ministries apart from the ones in which they worked, as well as making specific reference to Orwell’s Ministry of Love, where the character Winston finds himself at the novel’s climax, in which he is tortured into losing his individuality, or as Farnsworth suggests “went completely mad.”

(I couldn’t find a video from the episode online, probably due to the show’s copyright, so here’s an image from the episode: http://theinfosphere.org/images/e/e4/Central_Bureaucracy.jpg )

Part F

Comparing the concept of linguistic nuance to those of Newspeak and doublethink from George Orwell’s 1984, the idea that language can affect how people interact with one another and the society around them relates to the novel, because of how strictly the fictional Party controls the language used, constantly editing and refining it to be more efficient and less expressive. The goal of this reformation of English into Newspeak is intended to remove the ability of individuals to express any sort of rebellious ideas. The concept of mutual knowledge as opposed to individual knowledge shows that a single person may harbor resentment towards the Party, and many others may share that sentiment, but none of those individuals will be able to know that they share feelings until one or more of them express those feelings. This also relates to the concept of doublethink, in which an individual must replace their own grasp on reality and what they hold to be true with what the Party deems to be the truth. If the knowledge of the truth is kept at a level of individual knowledge rather than expanding to mutual knowledge, it will be impossible to regain those truths that have been replaced by propaganda fueled lies. However, the fear that others do not share the knowledge of the truth, and have been completely cleansed and brainwashed, keeps any one individual from expressing the truth, allowing the Party to remain in control. This is enforced when any individuals that are deemed to be at risk of breaking the truth from individual to mutual knowledge of the public, such as Winston, are systematically “vaporized”-erased from existence.

Hogan Bridges said...

Hogan Bridges
A.) The World: Dubai - The World created in this utopian society is a water based, miniature scale of the world. The roadways are made of water, being that it would be pleasurable to travel, yet still controllable. Every section of the "world" had a purpose, some being high class, and others being low class. While it may not seem that this parallels to 1984 in the conventional way, being that its strictly governed, and oppressing, it very much is completely controllable, and someone could be as easily removed and replaced from this utopia as they could from the Orwellian dystopia created in 1984.
Denmark: The Happiest Place on Earth - In this so-called utopia, the world defined is Denmark, or "Danes". It is said that everyone there, or at least the majority, are very content with their lives, unlike in 1984. However, in 1984 it is portrayed that everyone is happy with their lifestyle, although we know as the readers that there is much discontent.
B.) Similarly to 1984's all knowing government, the concept of reading someone's thoughts introduced by the article takes Orwell's idea of the Thought Police to the next level.
C.) Image 4 from "Recent Scenes from North Korea" compares to 1984 in that the uniformed soldiers are seen everywhere, where similarly in 1984, the party members all dressed the same and you rarely had a moment of solitude.
Image 3 from "Peering Into North Korea" relates to 1984 that there are border guards to keep people from leaving just like in 1984 where they similarly had to avoid cameras, microphones and people in order to get into the woods where they could have a moment.
Image 1 from "A North Korean Anniversary and Debut" relates to 1984 in that both have a supreme dictator type ruler, yet in 1984 this figure is never really seen (Big Brother).
D.)
E.) I could not find any clip after about 30 minutes of searching. I remember hearing a quote in a movie I watched recently that said something about "Big Brother's Big Brother" but I cannot recall the movie.
F.) The idea's portrayed in the lecturer's overview come to the idea that language must be used to do more than just state a message. It must convey that message through a particular use of words. For example there are 3 types of language: Dominance, Communality, and Reciprocity. Each of these we use in the appropriate scenario, depending on the relation we have with the person we are speaking with. In 1984, Newspeak aims to create words that limit the vocabulary of the user, and Doublethink is the idea that one can accept and believe 2 contrasting or opposing ideas at the same time. While Newspeak really isn't to relatable to the lecture, the speaker does talk about the idea of conveying a message with a veil. For example, the veiled threat "Nice store you have here; it'd be a shame if something were to happen to it" where the person proposing the threat isn't coming out and directly saying it, yet both parties understand what is going on. Doublethink allows for people to accept one thing, yet at the same time believe in another. For example Winston accepts that he is not to write yet he does anyway, believing that his thought should be written down, all the while telling himself that he shouldn't be doing so.

M.Eisnor said...

A: "Denmark: The happiest place on earth" displays a very non-America and more utopia like way of living where they have a saying of "Jante-lov" which says "You're no better then anybody else,'". The article follows a garbage man who lives a comfortable-middle class life style and has no shame in his job.
"The World Dubai" discusses a more social class system when buying real estate in the island system with areas of "high density population" down to "low density population" and also areas of resorts, community islands, and private islands.
Both places mirror qualities of the utopia-dystopia like Oceana in "1984". Oceana combines the social system of Denmark and uses a more communistic feeling with it, having all the citizens be treated the same no matter what job they do or role they play in society. However, the class system of Dubai is also used in Oceana with the inner/outer parties and the proles.
B:Shari Finkelstein's "Tech that reads your mind" and George Orwell's "1984" both connect the gap between science and truth through the idea of manipulating the brain to "read your mind" and find out "what [you're] really thinking".
C: "A female soldier walks on a road in the countryside" clearly shows the militaristic views and goals of North Korea, much like the militarism seen in George Orwells "1984" where Oceana is "always at war with East Asia".
"North Korean border guards pause.." is an accurate example of the sameness seen through out society in George Orwell's "1984" where much like in the photo the idea is to have unification and sameness through out all people of the society to ensure no freedom of thought and expression is exposed to the people.
"North Korea's leader Kim Jong Il (center, seated), poses with.." establishes the idea much like in George Orwell's "1984" that one single entity can and should control the people with the comparison of Kim Jong II and Big Brother.
D: All three songs reference 1984 either directly or indirectly. Radiohead's "2+2=5" is written with direct reference to 1984, as the idea of "2+2=5" is an important passage of the book which proves that Big Brother and the party can control everything, including logic. Stevie Wonder's "Big Brother" also has direct references to 1984 all through out to song talking about "big brother...watching me on the tele" and Winston's "notebook". Stevie also says "You'll cause your own country to fall." which is directly related to the control of Oceana that is poisonous to its people. Rage Against The Machine's "Testify" does not directly reference to 1984 but does relate to it by saying things like "
Who controls the past now controls the future. Who controls the present now controls the past. Who controls the past now controls the future. Who controls the present now?" which relates to the fact that the inner party is so extreme that they use their dictatorship to even rewrite history to make them seems all knowing and always correct, maintaining their power past, present, and future through false information.

M.Eisnor said...


E:Radiohead's "Karma Police" makes correlations to 1984 through their song which is really about the thought police, stating in their song things like "Karma police, arrest this man. He talks in maths" and "Karma police, arrest this girl. Her Hitler hairdo is. Making me feel ill" this is supposed to be the thought police who arrest people who commit "thought crimes" which are fake accusations and just people thinking differently from the party.
F: The lectures idea of linguistic miscommunications and annoyances relates to Orwells ideas of newspeak and doublethink. Newspeak is created to limit the human thought by simply taking away the words that someone could use to describe an idea. The lecturer talks about how phases can be used to veil things like bribes or come ons, newspeak could need these veils due to the lack of words but the need to get a point across. Also these veils could be needed to avoid becoming thought-criminals in 1984.

Elliott Johnson said...

Elliott HC Johnson
Part A
What is a Utopia? A utopia is a “perfect” world or society. A place where there is low crime, no problems but a perfect way of living. A place where everything is free health, dental, and all the important things in life is guaranteed from birth to death. A dystopian society is often a planned structured society in which the conditions of life are deliberately made miserable, characterized by poverty, oppression, violence, disease, scarcity, and/or pollution for the benefit of a select minority or some unnatural societal goal. Denmark The small country has managed to provide universal health care, extensive parental leave, and generous vacation and unemployment benefits. The result: happiness, equality, and social mobility. Denmark’s success has been noted before: The Economist recently hailed the Nordic model as an expansive and thick social safety net beside vibrant capitalism as the next “supermodel.” The evidence is strong: the four Nordic countries rank at the top for entrepreneurship, education, happiness, health indicators, equality and social mobility. The utopian character of Dubai, it must be emphasized, is no mirage. Even more than Singapore or Texas, the city-state really is an apotheosis of neo-liberal values. On the one hand, it provides investors with a comfortable, Western-style, property-rights regime, including freehold ownership, that is unique in the region. Included with the package is a broad tolerance of booze, recreational drugs, halter tops, and other foreign vices formally proscribed by Islamic Law.
Part B
Technology is taking a turn into a new and improved generation, a place where we can only be safe in our thoughts or that’s what you think. Computers hooked to your neuroscience in your brain giving out information to tell what one is thinking in their thoughts, a passage from 60 min explains it all. “As correspondent Lesley Stahl reports, neuroscience research into how we think and what we're thinking is advancing at a stunning rate, making it possible for the first time in human history to peer directly into the brain to read out the physical make-up of our thoughts, some would say to read our minds”. I can see these invention going terribly wrong, or awesomely right.
Part C
North Korea has a bunch of similarities shared with a close relation from 1984, North Korea and Oceania, aka 1984; Are both run by the military or dictatorship from Big Brother and Kim Jong Un. Both countries scare their citizen’s with military tactics they can stay in control. Menacing posters in 1984 are used to strike fear, and North Korea does the same thing. North Korea and 1984 both have what they call “parties” groups that pretty much enforce the laws and what goes on in and out of the 1984, and North Korea. In one picture of North Korea, you see rows of almost identical soldiers walking with great authoritarian to their commanders. This correlates

Elliott Johnson said...

to 1984 because it shows the sternness and strictness the government is during the story line of 1984, another picture that depicts
Part D
The songs share a certain similarity that go towards the government and how somebody is always watching you. The video to radio head shared a trait with 1984 on how the government controls what you watch. Said in radio head “Karma” police is a reference to the Thought just like in 1984. All these songs have a similar meaning on how everything is messed up.
Part E
I found a video clip that explains the purpose of the war, the Meir fact that the war is not meant to be won but how the war is not really a war at all just a way to keep its citizens scared so the government can stay in control. The Speaker in this video makes the allusion to both North Korea and 1984, a comparison between the two places that had the same tactic to rule over all the weak and the old, even the young and the strong, innocent people dying and truly believing all that is happening is because of a “war.” A “war” that’s not supposed to have a victory.
Part F
1. In the lecture the man explains how we word things differently to mean the same thing but gives you more of a “comfort” using secrete innuendos, for example when a man asks a woman if she would like to go see his etchings this is a code word for sex. But not actually coming out and saying, Hey want to come up stairs and have sex? If the person is turned down about looking at his “etchings” things wouldn’t be so socially awkward between the two so their friendship can carry on. Another example is when the man speaks about the movie Fargo when the cop pulls the car over. The driver shows a 50 dollar bill and says maybe we could take care of this right here. What he is talking about is saying he wants to bribe the cop into letting them go but not fully saying hey I will give you this money to let us go free, which is illegal by the way. Now going back to 1984 people had gotten innuendos from basically everything they seen or touched, Newspeak the paper had tones of innuendos to keep the people “happy”. Their government used a trick called, Doublethink the acceptance of or mental capacity to accept contrary opinions or beliefs at the same time, especially as a result of political indoctrination.

Elliott Johnson said...

Sorry Mr Kefor, my file locker came up as corrupted and it wouldn't let me open my file!

Mike Travers said...

Mike Travers
English IV F Block
1984 Paradox

A, To many people,Dubai is seen as a paradise. There are waterfront homes. They have nice beaches. Each island has public docks. The hotels are nice. There are no enemies. It is a land with a comfortable climate. Denmark is considered the happiest place on Earth. People do not care about how much money they make. Health Care is paid off by taxpayers. Most Danish people belong to some kind of a club. Shopping on consuming is not a priority. Most Danes can afford to buy cars but they choose to bike. In Denmark, you can leave your cars unlocked. People do not steal in Denmark because they have everything they want. Both of them are paradises. In 1984, it was a terrible place. Winston was starving. He had a terrible job working at the Ministry of Truth. It was illegal to think differently than the the party. Even if you did not speak out, you could still get caught. Parsons got caught when he was sleeping and spoke out against Big Brother.

B, Both this article and 1984 both display repetition, imagery and alliteration to convey us the similarities between thoughtcrime and thought identification.

C, Both this photo and 1984 both display imagery, allusion and foreshadowing to convey us that Big Brother and the North Korean Soldiers are watching us.Both this this photo and 1984 both display imagery, allusion and foreshadowing to convey us that the police and the thought police are closer than you think. Both this photo and 1984 both display imagery, allusion and foreshadowing to convey us that the military is the only one who drives on the highways and that anyone could be an undercover police officer.

D, In “ Testify” by Rage Against the Machine, they have so many many allusions to 1984. “ I need you my witness” means to watch it happen. “ The jury’s sleepless” means that they not have a say. “ Now testify” means to speak out. “ It’s right outside your door” means that it is right there. “My witness I’m hungry” refers to 1984 because people did not get to eat enough. “ We found your weakness” means that we found out where you struggle. “ Who controls the past now controls the future. Who controls the present now controls the future. Who controls the present now?” They referred to Big Brother. Big Brother was in the controls since the sixties. Big Brother is in control and he controls the future. Big Brother controls the present now.

Mike Travers said...

In “ Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder, there are allusions to 1984. “ Big Brother” is the dictator. “ Watching me means seeing me.” Big Brother is watching.us. “ Tired of protesting” means tired of not granted rights. Winston got tired of protesting the party because he would not get released from the ministry of love until he stopped and accepted the party. “ My name is nobody” means I do not have a say. “ You say that you got me all in your notebook,” refers to Winston’s diary. “ I live in the ghetto” represents the bad living situation in Oceania. “You’ve killed all or leadors” refers to Big Brother who did that during the revolution. “ You’ll cause your own own country to fall” refers to Big Brother being a bad dictator.

There are allusions to “2+2=5.” by Radiohead. I’ll stay home forever refers to being secret. “ Where two and two always make five” refers to it in Oceania. “ And two and two always makes five” refers to the party choosing what it makes. “It is too late now” refers to toke book because Big Brother is the dictator. “Because you’re not there” refers to not being there when Big Brother took power. “ Do not question my authority or put me in the box” refers to Winston in his diary. “ Oh go up the king, and the sky is falling refers to Oceania becoming worse as Big Brother takes power.

Part E, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LT6dvh1aQw4
I watched a video from youtube which had clips from Fairly Odd Parents that alludes to 1984. Wonda talked in Newspeak. She eliminated the word “ Uranus.” Mr Turner represented the Party when he said, “ Your not suppose to be on those kinds of websites.” When Timmy was young, he could walk an old lady across the street. Now he can’t because time’s have changed. Vicky represented the “Thought Police” when she knocked Timmy Down and turned him into the police.

Part F, Newspeak is slang. It shortens the number of words that we use. In real life, we can not eliminate words but we can purposely avoid saying certain words. Doublethink means to give up your belief for the Party. In Real Life, you will have to doublethink if your live in a certain area at a certain time. Try not to say awkward sentences. You cannot undo words you said. But you can get stuff if you say it in a certain manner. If you say it wrong, it could cost your a friendship or a relationship.

Anonymous said...

3Part A
Denmark is known of all its people being really happy they have sensible shoes and they snack on herring sandwiches an angry Dane even said she was content and there was a very little to complain about though they have the highest taxes in the world in exchange of that the government cover your health care and education and example is a garbage man is content with picking up garbage for a living.  

Part B
This is connected to 1984 because in 1984 they  did not  have the technology to read peoples minds like they do today but I think they would have liked to have it in 1984 instead of torturing the truth out of people.                                                                                                             

Part C
1.This picture relates to 1984 because its to women and they look really powerful because they have there chins held up high and I feel like that is showing that they have power. 
2.This pictures with the Koran soldiers that are making serious and silly faces this would relate to 1984 because this is showing how all the party members aren’t serious all the time and how may not be so loyal to there government as people think. 
3.The picture of the one girl solider reminded me of what people thought Julia was a very serious member of the party loved big brother and did not want to rebel.                                                                                                                                         
The song testify by rage against the machine relates to 1984 because in the song they used a party slogan” who controls the past now controls the future who controls the present controls the past.” In the song Big Brother by Stevie Wonder it relates to 1984 for many reasons one the song is called big brother and the first line of the song is “your name is big brother you say that your watching me on the tele”
The song 2+2=5 refers to 1984 because of how the video it was dark and the there was things being taunted like Winston was when he was captured .                              

Part D
This created an allusion because he used party slogans and he made the video look dark and deep and showed a lot of soldiers. 
Marlena Sage

Keenan Coffey said...



KEENAN COFFEY
Part A – The world in Dubai, and the happiest place on Earth (Denmark) contain utopian dynamics that set up a perfect world for their inhabitants. The world in Dubai contains a chain of islands branching to make the silhouette of the world. Inland Dubai is only 5-10 minutes from each island, so good and materials can be accessed that aren’t available on the islands. The expected crime rate will be very low, and the people living there will feel happy with their isolation from everyone. The happiest place on Earth is in Denmark based on surveys and information from every nation. The utopian dynamic in Denmark directly correlates to their idea of taxes. People in Denmark pay 50-70% of their entire income. Everyone in the nation feels as if the government has their back, and they have a great relationship. There are no real dystopian values with these two places, and they are ultimately the closest to a utopia as it gets.



Part B - Connecting the science fiction values of the thought police in George Orwell's 1984 to actual thought scanning technology like that of an fMRI portray the reality of advancing technology reading the minds of their patrons.

Keenan Coffey said...

Part C -

1) Isolating the nation of Oceania in George Orwell's 1984 is a lot similar to the virtues of North Korea in the new millennia, although the vanishing of many bridges in North Korea provide a more serious approach.

2) Evaluating the poor living conditions in George Orwell's 1984 is no where near the harsh conditions of North Korea, in regard to the photo of a poor man extracting water from the Yalu River.

3) Containing reasonably inadequate policing and fire systems in George Orwell's 1984 compares slightly to the severity of not having proper fire officials in North Korea in regard to a man extinguishing a house fire by his lonesome.



Part D -

1) Testify by Rage Against the Machine makes distinct allusions to George Orwell's novel 1984. More importantly, the tune makes allusions to the world we live in today. For example, Rage Against the Machine alludes to our dependence on foreign oil. They sang, " Oily silence mocks the legless boys". This pinpoints the middle eastern tragedies that are occurring in regard to the oil crisis. Boys are getting killed, along with innocent women and children, and this dynamic is a lot like 1984.



2) Big Brother by Stevie Wonder makes connections to the text of George Orwell's 1984. Certain lyrics of this song contain direct examples from the book. For example, "You say that you're watching me on the tele". The telescreen in 1984 was a reoccurring theme, and showed that the government was watching over their people. Stevie Wonder alludes to the similarity with our government today, and how it is in 1984. Also, there were modern allusions in the lyrics. An example of this includes; "I live in the ghetto, you just come to visit me 'round election time." This demonstrates how politicians speak to the poor class during election time.



3) 2+2=5 by Radiohead demonstrates the theme of a dystopian setting in both our world today, and in George Orwell's 1984. The song portrays the theme of a math equation "going wrong". This is directly related to how our government works today, and the corruption it beholds. The world in 1984 is similar because of the Ministry of Truth, and the changing of history. This connection to the text is related to this famous Radiohead song.

Keenan Coffey said...

KEENANCOFFEY

Part E-

A song that connects to the text of 1984 is spies by Coldplay. The theme of never being able to express yourself and that everyone is always watching is evident in both of these pieces. The argument displayed is that you are never truly alone.



Part F-

The correlation between linguistic nuances and newspeak and doublethink is very clear. We make distinct inferences when we speak, and interact with other people. Many different words have different meanings, and this is also clear in newspeak. This idea in 1984 is a lot like what we are doing to the English language. Pretty soon, we will be abbreviating words more than was ever though of. This is a large problem, and 1984 makes clear warnings of this.

Keenan Coffey said...

KEENANCOFFEY

Part C -

1) Isolating the nation of Oceania in George Orwell's 1984 is a lot similar to the virtues of North Korea in the new millennia, although the vanishing of many bridges in North Korea provide a more serious approach.

2) Evaluating the poor living conditions in George Orwell's 1984 is no where near the harsh conditions of North Korea, in regard to the photo of a poor man extracting water from the Yalu River.

3) Containing reasonably inadequate policing and fire systems in George Orwell's 1984 compares slightly to the severity of not having proper fire officials in North Korea in regard to a man extinguishing a house fire by his lonesome.



Part D -

1) Testify by Rage Against the Machine makes distinct allusions to George Orwell's novel 1984. More importantly, the tune makes allusions to the world we live in today. For example, Rage Against the Machine alludes to our dependence on foreign oil. They sang, " Oily silence mocks the legless boys". This pinpoints the middle eastern tragedies that are occurring in regard to the oil crisis. Boys are getting killed, along with innocent women and children, and this dynamic is a lot like 1984.



2) Big Brother by Stevie Wonder makes connections to the text of George Orwell's 1984. Certain lyrics of this song contain direct examples from the book. For example, "You say that you're watching me on the tele". The telescreen in 1984 was a reoccurring theme, and showed that the government was watching over their people. Stevie Wonder alludes to the similarity with our government today, and how it is in 1984. Also, there were modern allusions in the lyrics. An example of this includes; "I live in the ghetto, you just come to visit me 'round election time." This demonstrates how politicians speak to the poor class during election time.



3) 2+2=5 by Radiohead demonstrates the theme of a dystopian setting in both our world today, and in George Orwell's 1984. The song portrays the theme of a math equation "going wrong". This is directly related to how our government works today, and the corruption it beholds. The world in 1984 is similar because of the Ministry of Truth, and the changing of history. This connection to the text is related to this famous Radiohead song.

Connor McKenney said...

Connor McKenney

Part A: Denmark: The Happiest Place on Earth – I would not expect that the most pleasant and happiest place to live in the world would be the cold, dreary, not so spectacular Denmark. The ABC News anchor Bill Weir traveled to the country to find out and asked random Danes to rate themselves in relation of happiness, on a scale of one to 10 many people rated themselves with at least an eight although there were several nines and tens. That is a high rate of happiness and paying some of the highest taxes in the world the people don’t have a lot to complain about because of the support and care of their government, between fifty percent and seventy percent of peoples incomes go to paying taxes. However, the government ensures that the Danes are backed up and covered by covering all health care and education. The government spends more on children and the elderly than any other major country in the world which shows that they care and take care of the future and past generations until they no longer need support. The synonyms with a utopia are very close to how the country of Denmark operates, health, financial stability, trust, and friendship are all traits that can be described for the country and it is shown that their system is efficient and working quite well, “people feel “tryghed” – the Danish word for “tucked in” – like a snug child.”

The World: Dubai: Discover a world to explore to simply get away, modern design, timeless in appeal and a destination that captures the imagination and does not let go. The World Islands are a collection of man-made islands that have shaped into the continents of the world, thus giving it the iconic name that draws the world to of the coast of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. These islands would make up of private homes, estates, dream resorts that include private beaches and community islands to bring friends and family to relax and get away from the stress and daily issues that life throws at you. The synonyms with a utopia are almost identical to how The World will operate, you are literally away from all the problems and issues that surround the everyday individual just off the coast of Dubai and it allows people to feel that paradise does exist and having the island being divided into four islands, West Hub, North Hub, South Hub, and East Hub make up other islands that are all connected and made simple to travel around the world.

Connor McKenney said...

Connor McKenney

Part B: Is it in our human nature to be given the ability to reach into someones brain and uncover not only what they're thinking but be shown your previous environments. The idea of having other people know what your thinking isn't just an uncomfortable feeling because your one place of complete secrecy is now intruded by other humans..that is a completely other story. The parallels between the article "60 Minutes video: Tech that reads your mind" and George Orwell's 1984 draws out the main subject about how the breakthroughs researchers have made in identifying peoples thought's just by conducting what is simple science, the specialized use of MRI scanning called "functional MRI, " or just fMRI for short. The possibilities range from crime-ridden streets of people who are victims of thought identification may be the solution to maintaining order throughout the nation of both Oceania and United States.

Connor McKenney said...

Connor McKenney

Part C:

The Distinctions between this picture of the mighty military of North Korean Army marching in the center of the capital Pyongyang can draw from the power and control by fear of George Orwell's 1984. In this picture you see every single soldier marching with each methodical step that almost looks to perfect to be real, being able to demonstrate your power is what satisfies and feeds the fuel to the party In both countries. Which method they decide to display their strength and dominance is done by forcing your citizens to learn, understand, and accept their place in this dictatorial empire by whatever they deem necessary.

In what appears to be a strong powerful government of leaders that holds out as the last Stalinist state in the world, although they seem well of in this picture it is not so pleasant in the heart of North Korean society. The strength and amount of members in the central leadership of the Workers Party of Korea has distinctions between George Orwell's 1984 through the eyes of each party of both countries. The difference of the two is that in North Korea there are only certain Koreans that are deemed trustworthy and important enough to be apart of the Workers Party, as in Orwell's 1984 the Party of Oceania is a known wide and significant position but there are defectors inside the Party who work for the enemy the Brotherhood to really turn in to the party and be resurrected.

The emotionless picture of the tyrant Kim Jong-II inside the home of newly moved in artist on the bank of the river Taedong in the Capital Pyongyang show the relationship the government has with its citizens and how they personally visit your home to establish you are a follower of the Party. The distinctions of the picture and George Orwell's 1984 are very similar in the manner of how it is portrayed. North Koreans leader has the identity as a tele-screen in 1984, watching with a stern and serious look to make sure they are successive to the ideals and beliefs of the party.

Connor McKenney said...

Connor McKenney

Part D: The first song "Testify" by Rage Against the Machine has a gratifying relationship with George Orwells 1984, the song quoted a particular symbolic quote that involves into imagery for the viewer to understand and make the connection to the book, also the band seemed to reference the government of America electing a President to power to how the country of Oceania operates in the set Dictatorial, thought crime world. This is the illustration that seemed to draw inside my mind once I listened to it, "Of thoughts of blaming you" line 12 of "Testify" references directly how people get caught and punished, you follow what the Inner Party(government) is putting out for you or you will soon enough, is the personification I received from comparing the two. Although the main universal idea of the song is that they are unsure who has control of the present in todays society by again making an extensive remark to the book 1984, "Who controls the past now controls the future, who controls the present now controls the past, who controls the past now controls the future."

In the song “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder the relationship is almost directly referencing George Orwell’s 1984 by including many lyrics that have symbolic and metaphorically meanings. “Your name is big brother, you say that you’re watching me on the tele” this quote is directed toward the prosaic and ideological image of Big Brother and his regulated Inner Party, the “tele” is the tele screen in Orwell’s world that has the capability of identifying people through television and security cameras to maintain order and power throughout the nation of Oceania. The known parallels that are brought out in the song and the book are the lyrics “I live in the ghetto, someday I will move on my feet to the other side, my name is secluded” these lines have a unique meaning because I made the inference that Stevie Wonder is telling that he understands the people who are struggling with obtaining work, thus not having enough money to live and are in complete poverty, compared to the proles of 1984 who are the lowest social class in the country yet have more opportunities to make money because they are allowed within the Inner Party's means but have more freedoms than those of higher class because of the method of their treatment is taken less seriously and not cared for by the party, creating the embodiment of real freedom being brought out from the proles in Orwell's portrayal to our own U.S Government in Stevie's "Big Brother" song.

This unpaired and intricate song "2+2=5" by Radiohead has a complex relationship with George Orwell's 1984 dystopian novel. The concept that the Inner Party has is beyond doubt that it is the source of their power, having set principles that are being given to you by an authority as irrefutable as them can be related to today's society in which the two Party's the Republicans an the Democrats vote for power over each other. I believe some parallels of the two are in the lyrics of Radiohead, the feeling of having control over physical reality takes a hold of you and you realize that your ideology cannot be discarded or forced to believe lies. In reality this may seem inconceivable to ever likely happen but maybe Radiohead is foreshadowing our fate. I also received the impression that Radiohead included these lyrics "Don't question my authority or put me in the box" Stating basically that if you attempt to disband from Big Brother (Government) then you will be faced consequences to reform your way of life.

Connor McKenney said...

Connor McKenney

Part E: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UZV7PDt8Lw, In this link contains a Apple Macintosh Ad that aired during the Superbowl year 1984. The beginning of the video starts out with a bunch of minion like individuals simultaneously marching down a path with almost little to no expression of emotions. This is pointed towards the members of the Outer party who follow and live the ideologies and system that the Inner Party presents to you, the screens on the walls of the hall seem to be tele-screen related which signify the Power of the Inner Party. However the biggest indication to 1984 is when the woman wielding the strength of a sledge hammer running towards the "Big Brother" representing the freedom of those still immune to the propaganda being bestowed upon by the Party to force these people on their Ideologies and what they want you believe has me envisioning a foreshadow of Winston building up the courage to finally disobey and diverge from the ways of the Party, afterwards he then plots against it to hurt and sabotage them as much as possible until change has submerged over Oceania. The final allusion that appeared to me was the final ending of the Apple Macintosh Ad, when in the end you find out when the computer will be introduced "And you'll see why 1984 won't be like "1984"", directly quoting George Orewell's book was a very wise move by Apple when making the Allusion to finalize the idea of the commercial.

Part F: The RSA Animate - Language as a Window into Human Nature brings out the reasoning of complexity of the human language, the First aspect of it is Dominance, Communality, and Reciprocity that signifies the meaning of when you communicate with a stranger, family, close friend, whoever it shall be this video explains how interacting with specific people leads to either the same wavelength and understanding, or a divergent understanding, which can lead to the moment of unpleasant awkwardness. The unique way of how male and female co-exist and communicate brings references to George Orwell's expressionless system of language that is Newspeak, a controlled language created by totalitarian members of the Inner Party as a tool to relinquish freedom of thought and concepts that pose an alarming threat to the Party. The conception that is perceived through the eyes of people is understanding when situations of Individual knowledge and Mutual Knowledge should come in to play. Individual knowledge is when you and some other person know the same person and what exactly he/she did that is only known in the minds of you two alone, for example the student of a prestigious University witnesses a fellow student cheat on the final exam and also noticed that only one other person in the class noticed as well. An example of a mutual knowledge situation can referenced to Orwell's 1984 by including their controlled language of Newspeak, in one of the scenes of the story Winston arrives at fellow co-worker Mr. Parsons home to help them with a plumbing issue, noticing and aware of the Junior spies who are their children but all of them displaying their strong feelings for the Party. The children resemble the Mutual knowledge that is brought out in the discussion of the RSA Animate by having the same mindset in which they all think and know what the individual is reasoning inside their mind.