Tuesday, September 29, 2015

English I: Of Mice & Men Blog Work for 9-30

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

3. Click here to access a Quizlet review of Steinbeck’s characters. Play “Scatter” and complete a test for a grade of “A.” If at first you don’t succeed, take the test again.

20 comments:

Collin O'Donnell said...

1) They're not bound by the same aspect of the dream. Lennie wants rabbits more than anything on the ranch, but George loves the stove, the food, the house. They also use Candy, the swamper, as a way to get money, and then they "edit" their dream because they are going to have Candy tend the chickens and the garden. In my opinion, yes, their dream is realistic, but it's starting to cross the line with the amount of food George thinks they're going to have.

2) The woods is large, but very ovular. It was difficult to get lost in, but intimidating. The path was beaten with tires from bikes, and feet. There was a jump right near the center of the path, for the dirt bikes that ride out there sometimes. When it becomes near dusk, the rays of sunshine come through the trees saying their final goodbyes before they leave to go and light up the moon for the night. The animals thrive on the berries and nuts from the trees, and the old fox dens are untouched since they were abandoned by their owners. There was one pond, that when in the summer, dries up, and then in the spring all the snow that melted turns it back into a water filled pond. There is always deer out there, and usually someone in a hunting stand watching them with a camera.

Chase Brooks said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

George and Lennie are bound by the common dream of owning their own farm. This dream is realistic because George knows some people who are selling 10 acres of land the only unrealistic aspect is the $600 dollar price tag. George values the idea of living of the fat of the land and being independent while Lennie is obsessed with the aspect of tending to the rabbits. There dream gets closer to being realized when Candy overhears them talking and tells them that he can put forward $350 for the farm making the dream closer.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

Walking down the train tracks you can feel the wooden planks and the sharp rock underneath your feet. You can hear the frogs ribbiting and birds chirping. The dead leaves paint the ground orange and is filled with empty cans and other trash left from kids. The trees spring up from around the train tracks like a tunnel. The green foliage is so vibrant and bright.

SeanB said...

Sean Burke A Block

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

Answer: Their dream is to live on a ranch where they don't have to listen to anybody. Their dream is realistic because if they get Candy to give them some money they will have enough at the end of the month. They do value the same aspects of their dream, they both want to not have to work for anybody. Steinbeck uses Candy to further their dream because he wants to go to the ranch with them and he's willing to pay for it. Steinbeck also uses the Boss to define their dream because Lennie and George don't want to work for anybody anymore.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

Answer: The trees sway back and forth with the wind, as the river has a slow current. The leaves are changing color as Fall approaches. There is a silence in the empty house as the bright sun shines through it. The abandoned house is only inhabited by rats and fungus. The house is miles away from the rest of the world and is collapsing under its own weight.

robert said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

The dream of having enough land to live off of that Lennie and George have is to have rabbits and enough fields to grow food to survive and they'll have a cow some pigs maybe a goat to milk.Now with Candy's help the dream seams possible together the three could be living on that fatta lan. Steinbeck uses Candy to further define this idea by having him say he'll put 300$ into the farm as long as he don't get canned.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

Down the river and over the bush lays a clearing where the bird chirp and deer feed.You can hear the river running and see the leaves swaying down from the trees. The sun shines through the leaves left hanging in a way speckling the ground below.You can hear the cows left loose moo in the distance. Suddenly two young boys arrive through the thickly settled woods and clime a tree only to race and see who can reach the top.one sways like a monkey branch to branch getting higher in elevation with every swing. The other is having trouble staying close he has less balance and small arms that can hardly pull his weight. Then on the top of the trees lighs the greatest prize in the woods, a view seeking the mountains in the distance with the sun slowly setting right between a valley. -Robert Topham

Theo E. said...

1.) In "Of Mice and Men" the dream Lennie and George are bound by is one of living off the fat of the land, as of the recent chapter the dream has become possible due to Candy being able to help them. The reason George wants this farm is to be independent and to not have to work for anyone else, but Lennie just wants to tend the rabbits. Steinbeck uses other characters to make it easier for this dream to become a reality like candy put 350 or so into it and them being able to make enough to buy off the land.

2.) Deep in A hidden land is A lone town, inside the town is a small market place and some small pathways to other sections, in the middle of the square is a large wooden and stone clocktower looking over the town giving it the towns name "clock town",there is a small tunnel leading to the calm purple observeatory looking over the town, outside the town is a small ranch. To the south the Swamps, to the West, the greatbay, to the north the snowheads, and the east the henea canyon. The world is in danger, as the moon is being lowered to hit the clocktower and destroy everything, its up to the hero in green to stop this force in 3 days.

Dylan said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

The dream of George and Lennie, is that they want to go buy a farm. They want to buy this farm because they found this house that is only $600. They are going to to work at many different farms, so that they can get enough money and buy the house. Their dream is realistic because they recently just got Slim to go in with them, and he already has more than half of the money. They both value aspects of the farm, but I think that they value different aspects. Lennie values all of the rabbits, but George values it because he does not having to do as much work as they do because they can just leave, or do anything. They will not have anybody tell them what they can or can not do because they will be in charge. Lastly, Steinbeck is trying to define their dream a s a fantasy.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

A few miles away from my house, a place to go and chill with people. With whistling trees in the distance. The leaves blew from miles South. A very bright wooden gazebo that you can see through the fog in the distance. The sun was fading into the distance ever so slightly second by second. As it slowly goes down the streetlight flickers on. Then, eventually the dewy freshly cut grass waves in the wind. Then Dylan Smith shows up.

-Dylan Smith

dani w said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

Yes, I think George and Lennie's dream is realistic. If Lennie and George save up their money they can afford the house and rabbits, and they can live off the crops that they make. Many people live like this so I think it is a realistic dream. No, they do not both value the same aspects of the dream. Lennie is more focused on the rabbits while George is focused on not having to work for other people and being independent. Steinbeck uses the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream by involving Candy, who is old and does not want to be at the ranch anymore because Carlson shot his dog who he raised since he was a puppy. Carlson said he was old and not useful anymore, and Candy takes that personally because he is also old and not as useful. So Candy wants to help Lennie and George make their dream come true and just do it.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

It is the middle of the summer, the sun is just coming up. A few miles away from my house, the Xfinity Center is filling up, lines going to the ends of the parking lot. There's merch tables everywhere with band tees and meetup tickets. In the far left corner of the center is the youtuber meet up, and in the center of it all are the main stages. Near the main stages is the schedule for the day, that goes from ten a.m. to 10 p.m. The crowd for the main stage goes from as close to the stage as you can get to the schedule board. The merch tables are scattered throughout the entire place like a maze. As the crowd screams, the band starts.

Dani Witoski

Anonymous said...

in the middle of the night its cold and the only light u see is a head light and lound noises ,and kids go to watch ,sand gets in everyones eyes and then u soon see a dirtbike swing around the conor, soon the children scream with accsetmeant the cilidren fell leaves fall on them and suddenly look up they see that only trees are covering them they cant see the moon or stars in the sky ,the children rather watch a dirt bike ride by then look up at the moon and see the shooting stars float by the children soon have to go home but the bikers stay out the children miss a big crash .they here the sound and get frightend and then run as fast as they can they soon see a ambelince zoom by the children see the parimedicks go to the trail .There hang out spot is gone.


brianna lopez

JennaD said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

1.) Lennie and George have a dream about living in a huge house with rabbits and mice. Lennie wants rabbits on the ranch that’s the only thing Lennie wants. I think their dream is realistic because they both want to live in their own house with rabbits and mice together. But, George thinks they will run out of food when they get there own house. Steinbeck uses Candy to define George and Lennie because Candy tells them he will help them with the garden and the chicken.

2.) The water is very warm tons of rocks. You sit out on the deck watching the waves of the ocean and sounds of the waves crashing, and the windy trees. We are miles away from Dennis Port. Quiet neighborhood with kids silently playing with their families. The water is warm with little fish and crabs.
Meghan Vegnani

JennaD said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?
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George and Lennie's´ dream is to own their own farm and not have to work for anyone else. Their dream is realistic because they want to work hard to own their own farm and it is possible. They don't value the same aspects. George likes the dream because he values the idea of independence, while Lennie values taking care of the rabbits and being able to pet them whenever he wants. The author uses the character Candy to further define the story when Candy says that he´ll work on their farm. This defines the dream because George always says how he'll have people work for him instead of him and Lennie working for someone else and getting paid little.



2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

Snow covers the tall trees in the backyard of a small house. Sun creeps through the thick branches, and snow falls delicately on the soft snow mounds. Footprints appear one by one as the small children play in the cold, white blanket. Sunlight streaks the ground lightly, reflecting off the freezing stream. The breaths of children are as visible as smoke. Screaming, laughing, and happiness all around. A mother stays inside the warm, homey kitchen, making pies and hot chocolate for the children when they come inside. Cold, little hands are warmed by the mug, and throats soothed by the warmth of the hot chocolate. The fireplace blazed a bright, glowing flame that warms the house. The scent of gingerbread fills the living room as it is being served.

Jenna Pesa

Jack Weaver PRO MLG BLOGGER said...

1) Their dream is to own their own house and to live off the “fatta” the land because george wants to not have to work for anybody and Lennie wants to tend the rabbits that they will have at this house. Their dream is very realistic because of the fact that now they are doing it with candy and he has a good amount of money saved up so they only have to save up for about a month and they will be able to afford the house. They do not value the same things in this dream, George values the fact that they will have freedom and will not have to work for anyone, while Lennie values the fact that he will be able to tend the rabbits when they get the house. He uses candy to help them get their dreams because he is able to help chip in money so they can make their dream more of a reality. Also it shows that other people don't have a dream like that so it shows how important it is to them, because of the fact that they travel together also shows how important it is to them, because if they were traveling a lone then they could not afford buying a house on their own.










2) I am gonna be talking about my vacation home in Jamestown, Rhode Island. When you first show up and you step up on to the porch you start to feel the breeze from the ocean. Then you start to get the smell of the salt water from the bay. You step out onto the beach and you feel all the rocks from under your feet (this place does not have sandy beaches). You stick your feet into the water and you feel how chilled it is. During the night you have an amazing view of the Newport Bridge and you fell like you are in paradise.

MATTHEW QUINN said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

Their dream is to live off the fatta’ of the lan’ which means that they just want to live off what nature gives them. They want to have their own farm with their own rabbits cats everything. Their dream is very realistic. They almost have enough money to buy the farm now with Candy. Yes, they do both value the same aspects. They both just want to live on what nature gives them. He uses the other characters to show that they can’t do whatever they want. If they try to do whatever they want, they will get fired so they have to follow rules. If they have their own farm, then they don’t have to follow any rules.


2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

The sun shines through the blinds. The speaker is loud with music. The orange and black walls surround the room. The cool air from the blowing fan cools the room.

Matt Quinn

Mady said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

George and Lennie’s dream is to live on a farm with animals and to make money living on it making profit. This dream is realistic because they are making money and have a plan. Lennie’s aspect of the dream is rabbits and George’s aspect is to “live off the fatta the lan”. Steinbeck uses the other characters to further define George and Lennie’s dream by using Candy because he has $350 stored and he wants to join in on the dream. Everyone else does not seem to be involved in the dream because they are independent and move from place to place without anyone else to travel beside them.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the
style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

On the horizon lies a magical, fun place. Loops, swirls, swoops, screams, kids, fried dough. A place like no other. My stomach rumbles as it goes up and up and up, clickity- clack, clickity- clack the coaster goes. Watch out, it’s at the peak. “We’re about to go dow- AHHHH!!!!!” Screeches left the frightened people's mouths as they were scared for their lives. Excitement and fear is what you’ll potentially find here.

jonathangiguere said...


Lennie and george's dream is to own their own little house on a 10 acre farm by themselves and own all sorts of farm and lennie wants to have rabbits because they are soft and they want to own this by themselves so they don't have to be working all the time for someone else and not get any of the crops and they don't want to be told what to do and when to do it. lennie and george's dream was not looking like it was going to happen anytime soon because they were only getting 50$ a month and lennie was not the brightest person and there was a good chance he was gonna do something stupid and get them fired. after they were talking about it in the bunk house when they forgot candy was on the bed and when george was done telling the story candy said that he would like to come to and he had 250$ saved up so it looked like they could get it at the end of the month. in the dream lennie wants the farm mainly for the rabbits but george wants to get the house so he can have some independence and not be told what to do but he can work for himself and keep the crops that he grows. steinbeck uses other characters to further define the dream by having them get bossed around and curly was trying to scare george and lennie wanted to leave but they have to make the money to buy the house and when they have enough they will no longer be getting bossed around




2. The hockey rink, when you walk into the hockey rink you feel the cold air and the smell of the ice and as you get on the ice you feel the cold crisp air on your face and as you are skating the cold air engulfing your body as your blades are cutting the surface of the ice slapping the puck with the stick and the ring of the post as the puck passes the goalie's pad and the sound of the buzzer indicating the puck has passed the goal line.

emilym said...

George and Lennie have a dream. There dream is to have their own farm. The dream isn't realistic because they are never going to be able to get all of that money. They need $600 or more to get this farm and the equipment. George wants to get work done, have his own farm, and feel free. Lennie on the other hand wants to have rabbits and animals. Other characters help out by when Slim brings in the dogs and Lennie wants them.

A little town in Mass that goes by them name Norton. In the small town there is a ton of little houses and stores. One of the streets are named West Main St. On the street, there is a little red house. In that little red house there are a ton of rooms. In one of thoughts rooms there is a bedroom. When you walk in the door you will see a messy room. If you turn to the left, you will see a handicapped sign. if you turn to the left, you will see a wall of mirrors. You will also see my bed. Most of the time you will hear the cars going by.


Emily Melberg

angel said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

Lennie and George were having a conversation on George’s dream about the barn that george was having a dream on it. George was having a dream that the place is realistic. George can be the boss and never get fired and can go wherever he wants. Candy hears what Lennie and George are talking about the barn and wants to go them and make that happen. Steinback uses candy to help George and Lennie make there dream come true.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

My grandpa lives in Guayama i go there every time i go to Puerto Rico. I would like to go to Puerto Rico in the winter because its hot every day over there and the sounds i hear is alot of roosters in the morning and when it rains it helps u sleep faster. At the beach they have beatiful plam trees almost ever where i go.

Anonymous said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

There dream is to get a house and live off the land and take care of animals, have there own farm.they think by this dream it will lead them to better life. i think that there dreams are realistic beacuse they can get or bulild a house eventally. also if candy goes with them and gives them money then they would have a farm and animals.yes they both value it beause lenny really wants to get rabbits and george really wants to have a house.when they put candy into there conversation and he wants to follow there dream beacuse its a good dream.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.
upstate where there are long blue rivers, the sound of animals,the huge mountains. small town only a few people, 1 gas station. were everyone talks with a silly accent. a big brown covered bridge that crosses over the river. - angelina bartolillo

Catherine whittington said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

George and Lennie’s common is dream is the dream of their own home. They want to live by “the fatta the land” together, and they want rabbits and a farm, all of their own. Their dream is realistic because they have been making a stake, just for the land. Candy, now putting in three hundred and fifty dollars into the dream is making it all even more realistic. They both value the same aspects of the dream because George wants money, Lennie wants rabbits, and they both want a home together. Candy, another character that further defines George and Lennie’s dream is used by Steinbeck to show that their dream isn’t only a good idea to them. Anyone would love to live a life like Lennie and George dream of. All the other men are on their own, and they would never look at a dream like that as realistic because they travel on their own and wouldn’t be able to afford something like that.




2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well.

The bunk house on the ranch is a rather large building. It’s an unfinished home filled with many bunks, five set up with blankets for the workers. The walls and floor are plain, unpainted and the floor has been walked on by insects, men, and mice. Over the bunks there are shelves of two planks for the men and their belongings, filled up with the workers’ stuff. On the other side of the building, there was a stove with a small table. Around the table there were a few chairs for the men, and on the table lay their playing cards.

Jarod Fucci said...

1. George and Lennie are bound by a common dream. Identify this dream and consider the following: Is their dream realistic? Do they both value the same aspects of the dream? How does Steinbeck use the other characters to further define George and Lennie's dream?

George and Lennie's common dream is to have their dream home together. Their idea of their dream house is a farm with all kinds of animals but most importantly they have to have all different colored rabbits for Lennie. Their dream could become very possible because they found land and now they have Candy's three hundred and fifty dollar investment towards their dream. With Candy helping George and Lennie with the money their dream is becoming more and more possible. Both and George and Lennie value the same aspects because George wants something that he can call his own and make money. Lennie is satisfied because then he would get his rabbits that he's always wanted. Steinbeck uses Candy another character in the story to define George and Lennie. For Example, to Candy, George, and Lennie think that their dream is the best thing for them which is very true. Its true because all the other men who are migrant farmers aren't looking own their farm their just looking for the next place to work. If George and Lennie succeed with their dream they wouldn't have to be like the rest of the men.

2. Now that we’ve read a few chapters of the novella, we’ve discussed how Steinbeck lays the groundwork for each chapter with a careful depiction of settings. He also uses local color- details indicative of a particular environment- to add realism to his setting. Write a short passage (in the style of Steinbeck) that describes, in lucid detail, a setting that you know well

The house on the ranch is huge because it has to fit all the workers. The house is filled with bunks every where. There's nothing special about the house its just has simple and plain walls and floors. They have a small kitchen area with a stove and a small table with not many chairs but enough so they can play cards when they aren't working.