Friday, October 12, 2007


Seniors: The Kite Runner


As you begin reading The Kite Runner, use this post to comment on the following: Hosseini's prose, subject matter, and use of relevant literary terms. Please take extensive notes for both note-checks and discussion facilitation.
During and after our visit(s) to the computer lab, post any worthwhile supplemental facts, research, links or other resources here. Please be sure to cite your sources.


115 comments:

Anonymous said...

Alyssa Ruta
English D

I love the book so far. The main reason why I didn’t want to keep reading was because I want to stay with the class. I like how he uses different literary terms and then explains them right after. He is educating the reader with a new language. I have been taking detailed notes to keep the characters and events straight.

Anonymous said...

Eric Olson
Class E


So far the Kite Runner has been a great book to read. Its unlike all the other books we have read so far, and I enjoy the different material. Many different literary terms have been used in the book, and they are very easy to recognize. The characters have been hard to keep a tract of, but note taking has helped me identify who everyone is. I hope the book keeps getting better and better so i can keep enjoying it.

Anonymous said...

The first four chapters of The Kite Runner so far have not lived up to what I was expecting. The much acclaimed novel has started very slow in my opinion. All detail, no substance. However, I do enjoy the style of writing from a child’s point of view. The last line on page 34 has grabbed my attention and foreshadows the conflict to come.

-Lauren Southworth

Anonymous said...

John Cunniff
English Period D

I think the Kite Runner is a really good book so far. I don't like many books, but this book is very interesting. I think it's kind of Sad that Hassan's mom ran away and that Baba wishes Amir was more like him. Hosseini provides great imagery throught the first four chapters. I feel like I can connect to the characters even though they are from Afghanistan.

J BLISS said...

I like the book so far and can not put it down. I, like Alyssa want to keep reading but don’t want to go too far but the first few chapters are real page turners. I like the diction, using words we do not understand but then telling us what they mean but giving us the chance to assume what it means. We are in a Flashback now and I like that because it makes me go back to the original call from the fathers’ friend and how it is ironic that he calls and talks to Amir because he is no where near the age of him. Hosseini also foreshadows a lot about Amir and his relationship with his father and Hassan.


Justin Bliss

Rachael Maggiani said...

I definitely agree with Alyssa, the book is amazing. I like the author's writing style because he's very descriptive and you can really picture what's happening in your head. I read ahead a little though; I suppose I don't have as much self-control as Alyssa. Sorry, class.

Anonymous said...

So far, I think that the book is good. It is interesting to learn about another culture. I like how the author explains the different vocabulary. I find it helpful for the reader and easier to understand.

Brianna Cote
English D

Anonymous said...

The beginning of the book was slow, but after the first few chapters it picked up. I like how the author gives you clues to his relationships with his father and Hassan as you read deeper into the book. Even though Amir idolizes his father and Hassan seems to be his best friend, it’s not like that at all. The part I thought that was really sad was how Baba and Ali were just like Amir and Hassan when they were younger, but because of social classes, Ali is still a servant.

Jessica Nartowicz
English D

Anonymous said...

I really like the book so far. I find it very interesting to see how Hosseini describes a whole new world, a world that many of us aren’t familiar with. I’ve already learned so much about the Islamic culture and how different life is over there compared to here in the United States. I agree with Alyssa about how he uses the literary terms throughout the novel. You’re learning a new language, a new culture. I also am taking meticulous notes in order to remember the events and characters.

-Brielle Bowman
D,Class

Anonymous said...

David Cooksey
Class E

The book ,although strange at times, is good. I find it interesting how fast he manages to immerse you in his former culture and allows you to understand what his life was like. It is fascinating that in his native language there are so many honorifics, not just Mrs. Or Mr. like our boring English has, but one for literally every kind of relationship. His use of terms from his language have a significant impact on the picture that the reader creates in his or her mind. It was a brilliant move on his part.

Anonymous said...

It was pretty interesting, the type of literary terms the author was using. For example he would talk about something the reader wouldnt know about, like the word 'Kochi'. Afterwards he would describe what it meant and how it would relate to the story. The 'Kochi' were nomads that passed through Kabul on their way through the mountains north. The author would do this with several different words in the novel making us aware of what they meant. Since there are no sparknotes or cliffnotes of this book I'm forced to read it. Unlike some other books, this one catches my attention.

James kellogg
Period E English

Anonymous said...

Nadya Kaltsunas
English D

I think the book is very interesting and I cant wait to keep reading it to find out what happens. Hosseini being from the Arabic decent uses words in the book from the Arabic Language. I am Lebanese and can understand and speak Arabic so I understand what he is saying when he says something in Arabic. It is a good way for the readers to understand a new language and culture.

Anonymous said...

I thought the Kite Runner was a well-written story and a very fast read. First off, I liked how the author started the book in a more recent time of his life and then went on to tell the story of his past. Throughout the novel the author explains the various characters’ diverse appearances, such as Ali’s leg and Hassan’s harelip, and the numerous personality traits like Baba’s masculinity and sternness. The author, Khaled Hosseini, also provides the reader with detailed and colorful descriptions of Afghanistan. Occasionally, the author will place an Afghanistan word into a sentence to but when he does he makes sure to give the reader the tools to figure out the word or will tactfully place the definition after the word. Along with a new Afghanistan vocabulary, Hosseini keeps the reader interested by using many different sentence variations and cliff hangers making the book a quick page turner. However, some scenes in the novel prove to be very graphic but without them, the book would not be so world renowned. Overall, I truly enjoyed the Kite Runner and am glad our school is reading it. Hopefully, it will stay in the curriculum for years to come.

Jordan Penney
English: D

Jeff said...

I think the book has been excellent at this point. Hosseini does an incredible job in switching time periods. I also like how he talks about himself writer his first story. The incredible use of irony in his story is great, and what is better is that there is irony in what Hassan says about the story. Hassan saying the man should just use onions to make tears makes me laugh. This is because Rahim had told Amir that his story was great so Amir thought about that as Hassan read the story, but when Hassan was finished he made the whole event ironic by noticing the man in the story could have a simple solution to make tears.

Anonymous said...

Stephanie Bryant
English D

So far, I love the book. In fact, if it weren’t for all the other homework I had to do, I’m pretty sure I might have finished it all. I particularly liked how Hosseini was able to incorporate new and interesting vocabulary into his writing without having to stop every two seconds and explain to the reader what the native word actually meant. I also liked how he used such a large amount of detail in his writing to make you feel as if you were right there with him in his home country. Hosseini was also able to effectively maintain the seriousness and intensity of the story while including a little background about how he became interested in writing to begin with. I thought that that part was very interesting. I also, liked how Hosseini touched upon some of the social issues of his time, and country by referring to Amir’s friend, Hassan as being of a lower social class than him, and how even though they feed from the same mother, and had known each other, and grown up with one another their entire lives, they could never truly be considered friends. That “Amir was a Sunni, and Hassan was a Shi’a, and nothing was ever going to change that. Nothing.” I thought this quote was really intense, and it really made me think about social statuses in general, and how crazy they can be at times, to the point where they can end up controlling people’s lives, and the way they act and treat one another…It’s scary. I can’t wait to read on.

Anonymous said...

Personally, I am not really into this whole reading gig. But this book is legitimately good and has definitely captured my interest. I like how he gives us views into the Afghani culture and the language, then he takes time to explain what they mean. Also, he has a very interesting story, it is hard to believe that some of these events actually took place. I find this book keeps me wondering and that is key to capturing my interest. All in all I approve, you can keep it in the curriculum, as long as the class is mature enough to take this book seriously.

-Ryan Kok

Glassman said...

This book started off pretty slow, like most do. I like how Hosseini expresses the bond between Amir and Hassan but claims that thier backgrounds differ in a way that could split them up. Although he states that regardless of what they are, they still learned how to walk, talk, and play together.

Anonymous said...

I enjoy reading the book so far. Its seems like its going to be a powerful book as the way its starting off with the two best friends Amir and Hassan seperated by social classes. The literty terms that he uses relate to the story and hes uses them well. He is showing the reading a new type of culture though this noval. Also I have been taking notes mostly on the characters and who their related to.

~Josh Spilewski~

Anonymous said...

Keith Kelleher
English D

The book is really good so far. I really am enjoying reading it. Nothing in the book has been boring at all so far. The author's use of literary terms adds to why the book is interesting. This book leaves you wanting to know what happens next.

Anonymous said...

Katie Adler
Class D

So far I believe The Kite Runner to be a very interesting and intriguing book. I think that it’s very well written, and Khaled Hosseini did an excellent job of incorporating literary terms into the novel. I think it’s really helpful how he uses his own Iranian words throughout the novel, but he doesn’t leave us wondering what they mean. It’s blatantly there for you. By doing this, he gives you a sense of his own culture and background. I am taking thorough notes, and will continue to do so. I think that this novel will be one of my favorites.

Anonymous said...

I like this book so far basically because it wasnt etched into a rock 190000 years ago like the other stories we started with this year. I like when the books cover relatively modern subjects and have relatable issues. I also appreciate the way that Amir gives detailed information about the culture and seeting , and how he gives the reader Afghani words and some literary terms and defines them and gives insight on them. Its as if he is guiding the reader through the novel. So far... I like it.... Not love it like you said we would ... but I like it.

Josh Kirkpatrick
English IV D

Anonymous said...

I am really enjoying the book so far. I like how the author made the literary terms easy to recognize, and how he explains them right after. The terms also give us insight to a different language. I am looking forward to keep reading and see what will happen throughout the book.
Kellie Hansen
English E

Anonymous said...

Alicia Scanlan
English D

I absolutely love the book so far. Kite Runner seems like it is only going to get better and I can not wait to read on. The literary terms have been really easy to identify so far. The characters are a little hard to pronounce and keep track of but after being exposed to them so much it became less of a challenge. I’m excited to read on in the book and understand more of the Afghan lifestyle.

Anonymous said...

Ryan Goodman
Class E

Kite Runner is an enjoyable book with a interesting plot. The story keeps the reader looking for more and just waiting to read another page. While the main portion of the book, so far, seems to take place in a flashback, you still get the sense that it's happening as you read. Another good use of a literary device is the foreshadowing that takes place right in the first chapter and throughout the rest. This book will undoubtedly one that I am unable to put down and will thoroughly enjoy.

Anonymous said...

As i read about how my other classmates view the book i feel somewhat left out. After the exciting way you presented the book to us i felt that i too was interested in starting it. I went into the book with great enthusiasm and high expectations but as a continued to read i found myself quite board. I would like to learn more in the D.F's i hope we will continue having and maybe get into the story more. I do want to enjoy the book and im trying to do just that.

Melissa Graham: Class D

Anonymous said...

John Ricca
English E

I have found Kite Runner to be an entertaining and educational read thus far. I am impressed with how the author has given us a glimpse into the culture of the Afghani’s and meanwhile maintaining a very intriguing story. Dissimilar to many of our other required readings, this book offers an indication of what life is like in a foreign third world country. As many of my other classmates have said, this book is very hard to put down, and has unexpectedly snatched my interest. Throughout reading this novel, I have picked up on many implications of foreshadow.

John Todd said...

John Todd
English D

I really like it so far. I like how Khaled tells the story as if he were talking to you. He doesn't try to word his sentences like he was writing a five star novel by Shakespeare or anything like that. He wrote it as if he was sitting there telling you the story personally. I like the swears too; just because it gives you a sense of reality and it shows that he isn't going to hold anything back in the book.

Rachael Maggiani said...

So, this has absolutely nothing to do with Kite Runner, so you don't have to post this if you don't want to. I just wanted to say that I LOVE the Jackson Pollock painting at the bottom of the blog. Pollock is THE MAN.

Anonymous said...

Joe Mitchell
Class D

Thus far, having read the first several chapters of The Kite Runner, I agree that it is a very good book. Normally, I don't like this type of genre, but I find this novel fascinating and hard to put down. Not because it is an especially well-written or interesting book, but because life in Afganhistan was the complete opposite of what I had imagined. The author does a good job at surprising the reader to the extent that they will not want to stop reading. I was pleasantly surprised when I found out that people who live in a country so ravaged by war and violence, were able to lead normal lives similar to our own, even if it was a few decades ago.

Zack Schleicher said...

The book kite runner, I think is one of the best books I have read throughout my high school career. I can’t put the book down because I just want to read more to see what happens. I’m already a couple chapters ahead of the class. The author uses a lot of literary term but does an excellent job of explaining them. I like the fact that when he uses a word from a different language he will give you clues to what the word means. The discussion filitation is also a big help of understanding Kite Runner. I continue to hope that the book will get better and better.

By Zack Schleicher

Anonymous said...

-Brian Bettencourt

This book is awesome. I love his writing style. The best part is how he mixes all the needed facts for the story to make sense with the actual story, so that you get all the information, yet there is no boring narrator. I have really enjoyed the book so far and I may have read ahead a little bit.

John Tizzle said...

Most Afghans are Orthodox Sunni Muslims, but there are also many Shi'ites, including a number of Ismailis

(http://www.infoplease.com/spot/afghanistan1.html)

Has a 40% unemployment rate

(http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html)

Birth Rate: 46.2/1000
Infant Mortality Rate: 157.4/1000 Life Expectancy: 43.8

(http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html)

Katherine Amara said...

So far, I think that "The Kite Runner" is a great novel. I like how all the characters are so unique, and I also like how the book contradicts the stereotype that we have for Afghanistan (such as the idea that all Afghanis are poor, or the thought that their whole lives are based on war.) I also find Hassan's character to be very interesting from what I have read so far because of his innocence and because he is so genuine in everything that he says. The three facts regarding Afghanistan's culture are listed below.

About 20 percent of Afghan children die before their fifth birthday while about 1,600 out of every 100,000 Afghan mothers die while giving birth or because of related complications. (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/28713.php)

Female illiteracy rates as high as 85% in Afghanistan (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/28713.php)

In great-power relations, Afghanistan was neutral until the late 1970s, receiving aid from both the United States and the Soviet Union. In the early 1970s the country was beset by serious economic problems, particularly a severe long-term drought in the center and north. Maintaining that King Muhammad Zahir Shah had mishandled the economic crisis and in addition was stifling political reform, a group of young military officers deposed (July, 1973) the king and proclaimed a republic. Lt. Gen. Sardar Muhammad Daud Khan, the king's cousin, became president and prime minister. In 1978, Daud was deposed by a group led by Noor Mohammed Taraki, who instituted Marxist reforms and aligned the country more closely with the Soviet Union. In Sept., 1979, Taraki was killed and Hafizullah Amin took power. Shortly thereafter, the USSR sent troops into Afghanistan, Amin was executed, and the Soviet-supported Babrak Karmal became president.
(http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0856490.html)

Rachael Maggiani said...

Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination, being 90% of Muslims are Sunni. They follow Abu Bakr, who they believe to be Muhammad's successor. Their Holy Cities include Mecca, Medina, and Jerusalem, and major holidays are Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr.

Shi'ite Muslims make up 10% of the Muslim population, and they follow Ali, who is the closest relative of Muhammad. Holy Cities include Mecca, Medina, Jerusalem, Najaf, and Karbala. Major holidays include Eid al-Adha, Eid al-Fitr, and Ashura.

Jeff said...

"Trade in smuggled goods into Pakistan once constituted a major source of revenue for Afghan regimes, including the Taliban, and still figures as an important element in the Afghan economy, although efforts are underway to formalize this trade. " (http://www.infoplease.com/country/profiles/afghanistan.html)
The aid agencies are falling behind in their efforts to deliver enough emergency relief to Afghans to avoid a large loss of life this winter. A UNICEF representative estimated that, in addition to the appalling total of 300,000 Afghan children who die of "preventable causes" every year, 100,000 more children might die this winter. (http://www.refintl.org/content/article/detail/773/)
Illiteracy is the single greatest barrier to women’s progress in Afghanistan, according to a report recently released by the United Nations (UN) Secretary General, Kofi Annan. After seven years of fundamentalist rule in which the Taliban government denied women the right to an education, an estimated 79 per cent of women and girls in Afghanistan cannot read. (http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/afghanistan_7183.html)

Jeff Moore
Block D

Anonymous said...

1. In Afghanistan, the total adult literacy rate as of 2005 is 28%.
http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/afghanistan_afghanistan_statistics.html

2. The percent of the population using improved drinking water sources in 2005 is 39%. http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/afghanistan_afghanistan_statistics.html

3. The population of Afghanistan has a life expectancy at birth of 46.5 years.
http://www.salaam.co.uk/themeofthemonth/december01_index.php?l=4

-John Cummings
D Class

Anonymous said...

Afghanistan's literacy rate is 36% as of 1999.
(http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html)

The Taliban did not allow girls to go to school and women were not allowed to work outside the home. They were also prohibited from leaving their home without a male relative to accompany them.Those that went against those rules risked being beaten or even shot by officers.
(http://www.infoplease.com/spot/taliban.html)

Islam means “surrender to the will of Allah."
(http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0001468.html)

Jordan Penney
English: D

Anonymous said...

-Brian Bettencourt

1. Different ethnicities in Afghanistan include Pashtun (38 percent), Tajik (25 percent), Hazara (19 percent), and Uzbek (6 percent).

http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/places/countries/country_afghanistan.html

2. The life expectancy in Afghanistan is 46.

http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/places/countries/country_afghanistan.html

3. The religious groups include Sunni Muslim 80%, Shi'a Muslim 19%, Other (Hindu, Christian) 1%.

http://www.afghan-network.net/Culture/facts.html

Anonymous said...

Katie Adler
3 Interesting Facts

In 2005, the annual death rate in Afghanistan was 370.
(infoplease.com)

Two-thirds of Afghanistan is ruled by the Taliban, they wanted to force Islamic law over a unified Afghanistan.
(answers.com)

The life expectancy in Afghanistan is only 46 years old.
(http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/places/countries/country_afghanistan.html)

Anonymous said...

Brianna Cote
Class D

Afghanistan does not rank in the top ten countries with the largest Muslim population.(infoplease.com)

Listening to music was forbidden by the Taliban.(oxfam.org)

Watching television and videos was made illegal by the Taliban.(oxfam.org)

Anonymous said...

I greatly enjoyed The Kite Runner by Khalad Hosseini. He uses many different literary techniques that keep you glued to your seat. The way the author makes you want more is in some ways infuriating. The book gives the reader a feeling of sadness for Hassan as well. It was very sad that Hassan's mother left him as a child and laughed at him when he was born. The book truly reveals what is really happening in the country and gives the reader a true sense of what Afghan life is like.

John Cummings D Block

Anonymous said...

Keith Kelleher
English D

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Muslim year when Muslims traditionally fast. It is one of the most important months in the Islamic calendar.
http://www.afghan-network.net/Culture/Ramadan/Intro.html

The Taliban is one of the mujahideen "holy warriors" `groups that formed during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan from 1979-1989.
http://www.infoplease.com/spot/taliban.html

The official languages of Afghanistan are Pashtu and Dari.
https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=5030064583967117001&postID=6884346404422650828

Anonymous said...

Lindsay Tilden

So far the Kite Runner is an exceptional book. I very rarely find myself actually immersed and enjoying a book assigned in my English class, but I find myself having a hard time putting it down. The characters lives are intricate and interesting, and I can’t help wondering what happens next. I love the historical aspect of the book, because it is helping me understand the situation in Afghanistan that I have been ignorant to. The way Hosseini tells this story is also amazing. The dark tale is told with an air or normality, yet at points it is sharply intense and powerful. I cannot wait to continue reading the book and find out what else it holds.

Anonymous said...

Facts about Afghanistan:

Pashtuns, like Amir, make up 44% of the total Afghani population; Tajiks make up 25% and a dozen other ethnic groups make up the rest of the population (Frontline World).
In Afghanistan, more than 50 different languages are spoken (Frontline World).
Only 12% of Afghanistan land is arable; the rest is mountainous or barren (Frontline World).

Lauren Southworth

Anonymous said...

Brielle Bowman
D, Class

-In Afghanistan, there are 19 physicians per 100,000 people (Oxfam.org)

-The Taliban ruled in Afghanistan from 1996-2001. They banned many things such as all images of people or animals. This included stuffed animals, dolls, photos, and posters. (Oxfam.org)

-The Taliban didn’t allow boys and girls to play together. They had to play separately. (Oxfam.org)

-birthrate: 46.2/1000 (infoplease.com)

-life expectancy: 43.8 years (infoplease.com)

Rachael Maggiani said...

p.s. - the site I used for the religion information was:

http://www.religionfacts.com/islam/comparison_chart/islamic_sects.htm

Anonymous said...

Joe Mitchell
Class D

1. There are up to 70 students per class, all sitting on the floor in bombed-out highschools in Afghanistan. Some students were as old as 27 as a result of lost years of education during Taliban rule. -pbs.org

2. Only about 40 out of every 100 people in Afghanistan are literate.
-deploymentkids.org/afghanistan.pdf

3. Afghanistan is called the "crossroads of Central Asia"
-infoplease

Anonymous said...

One theme of this novel, or atleast of the beginning of the book, pertains to the innocence of childhood. Even the the children were forced to deal with racism and prehudice, they tried to put aside and be friends, even if society wouldn't let Amir and Haasan be buddies.

Brian Finnster
DBlock

Anonymous said...

--Only 14% of all births are attended by skilled health staff.

http://www.worldbank.org.af/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/SOUTHASIAEXT/AFGHANISTANEXTN/0,,menuPK:306010~pagePK:141132~piPK:141109~theSitePK:305985,00.html

--Life Expectancy: 42.46
--Population: 28,513,677

http://www.eurasianet.org/resource/afghanistan/index.shtml

--It is among the poorest and underdeveloped countries in the world.

http://www.mapsofworld.com/afghanistan/facts-about-afghanistan.html

-Ryan Kok

Anonymous said...

Intriguing Facts
1. The life expectancy is 43.8 years old; a person would not have even retired yet, probably with 10 or 15 years left to work. http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html

2. Sunni : Shiite ratio; 4:
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html

3. As of 2000, one half of males can read, still a fairly small amount, but only one out of every five women is literate.
http://encarta.msn.com/fact_631504708/Afghanistan_Facts_and_Figures.html

4. Percent access to basic care - 29%\
http://www.afghanaid.org.uk/about_afghanistan/figures.phtml
Intrigued?

Brian Finney

Anonymous said...

The name 'Taliban' means religious student, and the original Taliban members were traditional Islamic scholars. Their version of Islam is very strict and dogmatic. Under Taliban rule, women were forced to wear traditional veils (burqas) and banned from working (except as nurses for women and children). Girls' schools were closed and men were forced to grow beards and pray five times a day. Television and the public playing of music were banned, and the Taliban entered people's homes to destroy television sets and family photographs. (http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/kidsweb/world/afghan/afghantaliban.htm)

In 2005, the unemployment rate in Afghanistan was 40% and in 2003, the population below the poverty line was 53%.
(https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/print/af.html)

The life expectancy of an Afghani is only 43 years.
(http://www.govspot.com/know/afghan.htm)

John Cunniff
Period D

Anonymous said...

Nina Estremera
English D

1)The war between anti-Communist Muslim Afghan guerrillas (mujahidin) and Afghan government and Soviet forces left Afghanistan with severe political, economic, and ecological problems. More than 1 million Afghans died in the war and 5 million became refugees in neighboring countries.

SOURCE: A. H. Cordesman and A. R. Wagner, Lessons of Modern War, Vol. III (1989)

2)If a man fears death, he will accept fever -Afgan Proverb

3)Ethnicities: Pashtun 42%
Hazara 9%

Anonymous said...

Stephanie Bryant
English D
3 intriguing facts
on Afghanistan


1.)Music is represented chiefly by traditional folk songs, ballads, and dances.

The attan dance derived from Pashtun areas is the national dance. It is performed in a large circle with the dancers clapping their hands and quickening the movements of their feet to the beat of the music. On vacation holidays or weekends Afghans often gather to play music and sing at a picnic on a river bank or in a woodland.


2.) Twelve years of primary and secondary schooling were expected, although many Afghans could not attend because they lived in areas where there were no schools.


3.) Literacy was estimated to be about 29 percent for all Afghans aged 15 and older in 1990, about 44 percent for males and about 14 percent for females.

The ancient art of storytelling continues to flourish in Afghanistan, partly in response to widespread illiteracy. This age-old practice of telling folktales, through music and the spoken word, is a highly developed and much appreciated art form.


Others:

- Characteristically, the family is the mainstay of Afghan society. Extremely close bonds exist within the family, which consists of the members of several generations. The family is headed by the oldest man, or patriarch, whose word is law for the whole family. Family honor, pride, and respect toward other members are highly prized qualities.


-khan means(large landowner)


-The diet of most Afghan villagers consists mainly of unleavened flat bread called nan, soups, a kind of yogurt called mast, vegetables, fruit, and occasionally rice and meat. Tea is the favorite drink.


-A favorite sport in northern Afghanistan is a game called buzkashi, in which teams of horsemen compete to deposit the carcass of a large headless calf in a goal circle. Afghans also play polo and ghosai, a team sport similar to wrestling. The most important holiday in Afghanistan is Eid and Nowruz, or New Year's Day, which is celebrated on the first day of spring.


Source:

www.afghanistans.com/Information/People/Culture.htm

Anonymous said...

Lindsay Tilden

-Only 28% of people in Afghanistan aged 15 and over can read and write.
-In 1970, the crude death rate in Afghanistan was 26 per 1,000 people. In 2005 it has decreased to 19 per 1,000.
-The life expectancy in Afghanistan in 1970 was 39 years; it has now increased to 47 years.

http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/afghanistan_afghanistan_statistics.html#27

I find these important to the book because they highlight certain aspects in the situation in Afghanistan. The young life expectancy can be attributed the turmoil that is starting to show itself in the Kite Runner. The literacy rate is only 28%, and that is probably because of the great difference in social classes, where possibly only the very wealthy are educated.

Anonymous said...

1. “Afghanistan- 31,889,923- birth rate 46.2 per 1,000 populations”
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0934668.htm

2. “Afghanistan- Islam (Sunni 80%, Shiite 19%), other 1%” http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0855613.html

3. “Afghanistan- 157.4 (mortality rate per 1000 live births)”
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0934744.html

The first fact is the birth rate of Afghanistan. This is important to the book because it shows how drastically it has changed from when Amir was in Afghanistan. When he was in Afghanistan it looked like their was more of the mothers dieing after giving birth then the babies dieing. The second fact is the religion percent in Afghanistan; the majority is Sunni which is what Amir and Baba and the minority is Shiite and that is what Alli and Hassan is. The Shiite is a minority and is the poorer of the two types of Islam. The third fact is the mortality rate in Afghanistan at birth and this is important because it shows how drastic the health conditions are over there, now. But it is different from when Amir was talking about it.

Alicia Scanlan

Justin Bliss said...

The name 'Taliban' means religious student, and the original Taliban members were traditional Islamic scholars.

Life Expectancy
46
OFFICIAL NAME:
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan


http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/5380.htm

http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/kidsweb/world/afghan/index.htm

Justin Bliss

Casey pipes said...

Intriguing Fact #1
Before then, the Taliban ruled Afghanistan under strict Islamic law. The punishments were severe: thieves had their arms or legs amputated, adulterers were stoned to death and drinking liquor resulted in lashings.

Under the Taliban regime, girls were forced out of school, and women were banned from holding jobs, required to wear full-body burqas and were rarely permitted to leave their homes.

Laws required men to grow their beards and prohibited Western-style clothing. Playing games, sports, flying kites, listening to music or watching TV were all forbidden and punishable.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/indepth_coverage/asia/afghanistan/keyplayers/taliban.html

#2
Much of Islamic secular art, like religious art, is decorated only with geometric and vegetal patterns and inscriptions, but many objects, whether glazed ceramics, carved ivories, intricately woven silks, or luxurious carpets, are decorated with lively human and animal figures set individually or in scenes.

http://www.pbs.org/empires/islam/cultureart.html


#3
About 90% of the world's Muslims are Sunni and about 10% Shia

http://www.islamfortoday.com/beliefs01.htm

Anonymous said...

3 interesting facts

Men were required to wear beards, and subjected to beatings if they didn't.

When the Taliban took Kabul, they immediately forbade girls to go to school.

A woman caught wearing fingernail polish may have had her fingertips chopped off.

John Ricca
English E

Anonymous said...

Eric Olson
Class, E

1. Life expect. rate is 43.2 years for males and 43.5 years for females.

2.There are 25,000 internet users in Afganistan.

3.Afganistan has 27,000 active military troops.

-All interseting facts came from the 2007 World Almanac and Book of Facts.

Zack Schleicher said...

Has a 40% unemployment rate

In Afghanistan, the total adult literacy rate as of 2005 is 28%.

Listening to music was forbidden by the Taliban.

oxfam.org

(http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html)

Anonymous said...

James Kellogg
English E


- Afghanistan is the same size as Texas

- 28.1% of the total population in Afghanistan can read and write.

- Afghanistan is the world's largest producer of opium.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/af.html#Intro

Adam Hart said...

I enjoy reading this novel because it is real. It helps explain how people live in Afghastan I always thought that the people there were all poor and illiterate living in shacks but I was wrong. This novel shows historical happenings and teaches us so much yet it is done in a riveting way. It is an adventurous and fun to read the best part is most of the story is a flashback yet it keeps me wanting to know what happens next to Amir although I know he becomes successful later in life in America. Adam H

Anonymous said...

-Only about 40 of every 100 people in Afghanistan can read. (google)

-The relationship between the Taliban and bin Laden is close, even familial—bin Laden fought with the mujahideen, has reportedly married one of his daughters to Mullah Muhammad Omar.
(infoplease)

-With the exception of the southwest, most of the country of Afghanistan is covered by high snow-capped mountains and is traversed by deep valleys. (infoplease)

Jennifer O'Brien

Anonymous said...

3 Interesting Facts
Ben Hastings
English E

The crackdown on opium also abruptly deprived thousands of Afghans of their only source of income.

Most of the Taliban's leaders were educated in Pakistan, in refugee camps where they had fled with millions of other Afghans after the Soviet invasion.

when the Taliban were defeated in the city of Mazar-i-Sharif one of Pakistan's largest religious schools shut down for a month and sent thousands of students to Afghanistan as reinforcements.
sources:
infoplease.com

Anonymous said...

David Cooksey
Class E


Donald Duck comics were banned in Afghanistan because he doesn't wear a shirt.

The only nation whose name begins with an "A", but doesn't end in an "A" is Afghanistan.

world's largest producer of opium; cultivation dropped 48% to 107,400 hectares in 2005;
better weather and lack of widespread disease returned opium yields to normal levels,
meaning potential opium production declined by only 10% to 4,475 metric tons; if the
entire poppy crop were processed, it is estimated that 526 metric tons of heroin could
be processed; many narcotics-processing labs throughout the country; drug trade is a
source of instability and some antigovernment groups profit from the trade; significant
domestic use of opiates; 80-90% of the heroin consumed in Europe comes from Afghan opium;
vulnerable to narcotics money laundering through informal financial networks; source of
hashish

Glassman said...

Sunni Muslim 80%, Shi'a Muslim 19%, other 1%

(www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geo... www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/af.html#People)

If a woman defies the veil by "flaunting", or barely showing parts of her body, she is given 74 stripes. (Lashings)

(http://www.ccds.charlotte.nc.us/History/MidEast/04/ransone/ransone.htm

Life expectancy at birth (years)45.49

(http://www.nationbynation.com/Afghanistan/Index.html)

Courtney Gallagher said...

Fact #1
Miss Afghanistan will be stoned to death if caught in the company of a male outside of her family. She is likely to be sold into an arranged marriage to a man who already has two wives.

http://www.kenlarson.net/code/afghann0.htm

#2
Falconry - A sport in which trained falcons were used for hunting.Falconry has a long history in the Middle East. Falcons were first used by man as hunting birds about 4,000 years ago in Asia Minor

http://www.sfusd.k12.ca.us/schwww/sch618/Sports/Sports.html

#3
A child about 3-4 years old eats with his left hand from the beginning. When his elders try to make him eat with right hand he desists from eating. His elders think eating with left hand is a sin.

http://www.understanding-islam.com/related/text.asp?type=question&qid=576&sscatid=178

Anonymous said...

This book has caught my attention right from the beginning. I actually enjoy reading it and want to keep going. The author gives me so much information, i really know whats going on in the country and in the character's lives. I cannot wait to keep reading.

Jennifer O'Brien

Brittney Costa said...

1.) There were 45,000 children enrolled in school in 1993, 19% were girls.
- infoplease

2.) When the Taliban took Kabul, they immediately forbade girls to go to school.
- infoplease

3.)Women must not talk or laugh in public.
- www.civicsandcitizenship.edu.au

Adam Hart said...

An amusement park in Kandahar On the city's outskirts, there is indeed an amusement park, with rides, a ferris wheel, popcorn and families having fun, just like in Canada. There were no women at this amusement park. Only fathers with their kids.
That's not to say there aren't problems. The electricity doesn't come on during the day, when the park operators need it — only at night. And because there isn't enough money in the civic budget, it may be months before any of the staff get a paycheque.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/reportsfromabroad/kandahar/2007/04/visiting_kandahars_amusement_p.html
__________________________________
Only 7% of homes in Afghanistan have a flush toilet, but 19% have a television.- The Week Magazine, 8/17/07

http://www.funfacts.com.au/weird-toilet-facts/
________________________________
Miss Afghanistan will be pregnant 3-4 times more often than Miss America. Unfortunately, her babies are 25 times more likely to die in the first year. One out of four will not see their 5th birthday.

http://www.kenlarson.net/code/afghann0.htm

________________________________
Adam H.

Ashley LaRochelle said...

1.) Kite Fighting--Participants cover the strings of their kites with a mixture of powdered glass and flour. Then they outmaneuver each other in order to cut the string of an opponent's kite. They do this by rubbing the strings together; this sport is mostly played by children and young teenagers.
-www.afghan-web.com

2.) A woman caught wearing fingernail polish may have had her fingertips chopped off.
- infoplease

3.) Photographs are illegal for all Taliban.
-www.civicsandcitizenship.edu.au

Anonymous said...

Brittany Nutter period-E

1) The average life expectancy of Afghanistan's population is only about 46 years. (Britianica)

2) The adult literacy rate in Afghanistan is only about 25 percent. (Britanica)

Anonymous said...

1. By the end of 1987 an estimated 9% of the population of afganistan had been killed. (cultures of the world:Afganistan:book)

2. Afghanistan's new anti-corruption chief has a shady past. Izzatullah Wasifi served nearly four years in a US prison for trying to sell heroin to an undercover agent in Las Vegas for $65,000. (http://prorev.com/afganinfo.htm)

Heather McPherson period:E

Ashley LaRochelle said...

I know this post is really late, but this was the only time I could post it. Anyways, so far I love this book, and I don't want to put it down, but I want to stay with the class. I love the way the author will use a foreign word, but then give the definition right after the use, so we know what it means. This gives me a greater knowledge of the language, and the culture of these unique characters.

Anonymous said...

Iris Brown
Block E

Just like Ashley's post, this was the only time I could post this as well. So far I am enjoying the book but for some reason I can't seem to get into it as much as I should be. As of now I'm falling behind but I think that when I catch up I will be able to enjoy the book more. I like how the book teaches us a new languge and a new culture without making it into a history class version of a book. This book keeps the readers wanting to read more.

rdewar said...

The Kite Runner is a beautifully written book, and you should all use it as a model for how one should write. While I will not spoil the ending, I feel it does not end as well as the rest of the novel deserves. Fortunately, A Thousand Splendid Suns, his next novel, is a complete novel and worthy of a read by all of you who like The Kite Runner.

Anonymous said...

Yeah....sorry about not telling my source when I posted on 10/19, it was (http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html)

~John Ricca
English E

Anonymous said...

1. Sunni : Shiite ratio; 4:
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107264.html

2.Women were prohibited from leaving their home without a male relative—those that did so risked being beaten, even shot, by officers of the "ministry for the protection of virtue and prevention of vice."
http://www.infoplease.com/spot/taliban.html

3.Ethnicities: Pashtun 42%
Hazara 9%


-Nadya Kaltsunas
English D

Anonymous said...

The kite runner computer lab


1.The poem Some fill with each good rain written by Hafiz reminds me of the kite runner because a stanza of it says:

“Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.”

It reminds me of Hassan’s loyalty that he has for Amir and the friendship that they share. It shows like it has a strong meaning for love for someone and that you shouldn’t give it to just anyone except someone you care about.

2.My reaction to the child stars moving to another part of Afghanistan because their lives are in danger is ridiculous. I think they should be transferred to American and protected in a place where they could have it. Also the rape scene is a crucial part in the book. Since the book relates back to that one scene multiple times throughout the novel. I don’t believe that the producers and directors will cut the scene out, I think they could change on how it will be done or how they kids dress when it will be done to not express that one part of their religion is dominating the other.

3.I believe that it is a good thing that a lot of people are going o his book signings and that he is getting the culture spread across the world and getting more people informed on how it is over there. It also shows how the Taliban came together and that they weren’t always terrorist they were just protecting their country at first to fight off the soviets and then they took it over. Its also good on how he is donating a lot of the money that he gets from the signings and giving back to his home country.

4.In the Article http://media.www.drurymirror.com/media/storage/paper740/news/2007/10/24/News/Kite-Runner.Movie.Premiere.Delayed-3051882.shtml
It’s the controversy about on how the boys are going to be moved to another part of Afghanistan for their own protection. It also says on that the movie date was pushed back to December 14th. The movie was originally going to come on today November 2nd but they want the boys in the United states for the releasing for their own protection. Paramount Vantage, the studio behind the film, says that the boys will remain in Kabul until the end of their school year on Dec 6; after completing the school year, the boys will move to the United States and return at the end of their summer vacation in March.

Josh Spilewski

Anonymous said...

Eric Olson
Class E


1. That I can no longer call myself, A man, a woman, an angel, Or even pure, Soul.
-This quote comes from the poem, I have learned so much. It directly relates to the Kite Runner because these are the feelings that Amir felt when he didn’t help Hassan in his time of need. Amir felt like an un-pure soul when he couldn’t build up the confidence to help his friend. Amir can no longer call himself a man or a good person, and this quote clearly displays how Amir felt.

2. After reading this article, you can understand all the controversy that comes along with making this film. It’s important to keep the children in this movie safe, and to not start a religious war within the country. I believe that it is necessary to keep the actors out of the country until the film is released, so the safety of the children is not put in jeopardy. Making sure a religious war doesn’t break out is also very important as well. Pastuns and Hazaras need to be monitored so a war doesn’t break out between the two.

3. After reading this article, you realize how popular the Kite Runner has become. It is number 7 on USA TODAY Best-Selling Books and isn’t going anywhere soon. Many book clubs have picked up the book, and many people are taking an interest in the not only the book but Afghanistan. People have also taken a bigger interest in the book based on the events on September 11th, wanting to learn more about the country.

4. Kite Runner rape scene raises controversy
- This article talks about the pivotal rape scene with Hassan. The article says that the scene will offend Afghans, and that Afghans want the scene to be taken out of the film. I can see why the Afghans want this scene to be taken out of the film, but by doing this, the film won’t show the actual truth of what happened. Removing this scene will make the movie less powerful and untruthful.

Anonymous said...

Ben Hastings
Class E

1. “The bright moon reflects your radiant face
your snowcapped cheekbones supply water of grace
my heavy heart desires an audience with your face
Come forward or must return, your command I will embrace.”

This stanza has to do with the Kite Runner in many different ways. In the part of the book when Amir starts to talk about the girl he meets saraja. When he first sees the girl he goes into deep description about what she looks like and how beautiful she is, and how he keeps talking about her.

2. The movie “The Kite runner” is going to bring out some disturbing and controversy to the child starts new life. The Kite runner is a book that displays sexual points and things that people look at as things you don’t talk about or shy away from. So my views on this article are that it is correct and it might bring these kids into danger. I think the parents of the child starts have a right to be disgusted with the way they treated the kids. For example giving them and incomplete script. Giving them a script that doesn’t show the entirety of the movie takes away the kids dignity and human rights no matter there race of religion.

3. This article shows the great success of the Kite runner and how it is increasing in popularity greatly. The author of the book Hosseini is getting great recognition for a great book. I have been told by a resource that it has been in the top 20 in books for almost 10 years. "This book generates a tremendous amount of goodwill for Afghanistan," Hosseini says. He’s right if you read the book and really get into it, it does show goodwill for Afghanistan. It gives you a different outlook on Afghanistan than the usual image of what its like.

4. The relocation of the boy actors in The Kite runner film is mainly because of the parents and how their children will be viewed when they return to there home land. They want the rape scene to cut out of the film. They know that if it is viewed by people of their country it will be frowned upon and show the image of Afghanistan as weak. The parents definitely do not approve of the scene and will not have it.

Anonymous said...

David Cooksey

“Some Fill With Each Good Rain” by Hafiz
Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.

This excerpt reminds me of Hassan’s nature. He is willing to let himself get hurt in order to protect Amir.

It is weird how at the begging people actual encouraged the boys to be in the movie, then went crazy when they did.

It is funny how he says he wants to keep the connections between his life and the book ambiguous in order to make clubs go crazy.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,305700,00.html I Think it is sad how the Afghans do not understand it is all pretend and that it isn’t really happening.

Anonymous said...

James Kellogg
11/02/07
Period E

1.) In the poem “Some Fill With Each Good Rain” by Hafiz he says ‘There are different wells within your heart. Some fill with each good rain, Others are far too deep for that.’ I think this could relate to the Kite Runner because it shows how Amir acted towards Hassan. We know Hassan is loyal to Amir and stood up for him against Assef. But when the tables are turned Amir does nothing to help his friend. He was always playful and nice to Hassan but when something terrible happens to him he does nothing about it. This can relate to the line in Hafiz’s poem about there being different wells within your heart.

2.) This article talks about the movie and how the character that played Hassan feared for his life. The scene with the raping was never brought to their attention until they got the script that day. His father and the son approved of it in someway to only show part of the scene with no nudity. (Unstrapping of the belt, the victim cries, and a drop of blood.) As long as the actors are being put in a safe spot away from harm then it seems fine to me. They are doing their best to keep them away from danger and accepted responsibility for both of their lives.

3.) The articles talks about how the book the “Kite Runner” became popular by just one person telling another. It became popular and the number of books being sold by them is getting higher and higher. Even colleges put it on the summer reading list and book clubs are starting to read it. The author Hosseini approved of the script of the movie and says that he likes it. Some people in the article talk about how they like the book and it talks about what is wrong and right and redemption. Hosseini also talks about how some of the book isn’t real and how his father Baba didn’t actually die. Another thing that was interesting was how the Taliban banned kite flying because of the book.

4. http://www.huliq.com/37940/hollywood-copes-with-cross-cultural-tensions-in-the-kite-runner

The following article talks about the two actors who play in the movie “The Kite Runner”. The film distributor is delaying the release of the movie by six weeks in order to relocate the boys before the film opens to keep them safe. The studio and the works both ensure the safety of the two young actors including a third boy who also played a small part in the film. On December 14 the movie is going to be released.

Adam Hart said...

Adam Hart
November 2, 2007
The Kite Runner
1.
“I Have Learned So Much” by Hafiz reminds me of how Amir is not a purse soul because of all the pain and suffering he has caused people I notice this in the verse below.
“That I can no longer call myself
A man, a woman, an angel,
Or even pure
Soul.”Hafiz
For some reason “What Do White Birds Say” by Hafiz reminds me of something having to do with Hassan I don’t know way I think because it talks about a lot of stuff but the verse below reminds me of how Amir never saw Hassan smile after the day of the tournament.

“But never would Hafiz laugh
At your blessed labor
Of finding peace.” Hafiz

2. I have some mixed feelings about this article. For one reason I think that the actors father got angry and told the London times that he fears his child’s life. Yet the company told him early into the project that there would be a “vicious sexual assault.” And they even rehearsed twice once with the boys father in the room. I think it is ridiculous because he knew what he was getting his son into at the time. It seems like the man just wants to suck some more money out of the company. I think its stupid that the studio is delaying the release of the movie because they made it they are afraid that the bootleg e will come out and the Taliban and other members of society will see it is just retarded because it’s a movie rape is never an easy thing for any religion or group of people there are a lot of opposes to it. But the company is doing a good thing movie the kids to a safe place, but its wrong because they are moving people from their homes that has to be hard to do to a person. Plus its not right that the studio was only paying these kids $1,000 or $1,500 that is less than SAG wages that is a terrible wage I could make that amount of money being an extra they got ripped off.

3. I find it kind of odd how the book has been out for a few years now and it only started to become popular when its paperback came out last year. I like the fact that I know the story is somewhat Autobiographical and yet its not. So I like known that half of the novel is real and half is fake that makes me happy to finally know the truth of the novel. I like how Hosseni is now raising money for Afghani causes with his tour and some of the proceeds of the book and that has to be a lot with the book selling more than it sold last year in half a year and his speeches cost up to like $200. It sounds good.

4. I went to this link http://www.boston.com/ae/movies/articles/2007/10/17/author_applauds_kite_runner_film_delay/ it talks about how the studio is moving the kids out of Afghanistan and how they will let them go back after a few months of the movies release.
Adam Hart

Ryan Goodman said...

E block

1) “Close your eyes for a moment
And maybe all your
fears and fantasies
Will end”
By Hafiz

This excerpt related to the Kite Runner in how for a long time Amir tried to run from his fears and regrets but eventually had to come to face them.


2) My whole reaction to that article was blurred by the way the characters looked. The image that I had of the characters was no where near the way they are depicted in the movie. This made me mad for basically no reason. Also the fact that it’s in Dari and going to be subtitle I a little disappointing but still understandable. Even so it is interesting that they’re using real children from Afghanistan to play the parts of Hassan and Amir.

3) I find the books sudden popularity to be interesting but well deserved and the article does help to show that.

4) http://www.xpress4me.com/news/uae/national/20003970.html

I think it’s good that the boys are receiving some protection and the fact that the studio is taking responsibility for them. However I think it is horrible that the boys are so threatened in their own country that they are forced to move away.

Anonymous said...

Hafiz was known for many of his love poems. In some of his poems he describes his love for the girl he loved. This reminds me of Amir loving Soraya in The Kite Runner. Also in one of the poems called “My Friend has Fled” by Hafiz, it reminds me of the way Amir left Hassan while he was getting raped, when he could of done something. Instead he fled and left Hassan with all that hurt.


1.) “Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.”

This line from “The Gift” reminds me of Amir and Hassan’s relationship. When it says “to cut pieces of their soul off with a knife then weave them into a blanket to protect you,” this is exactly what Hassan would do for Amir. He would do just about anything to stay loyal and to love Amir like a brother.

2.) The boys that played in the movie The Kite Runner are now accusing the filmmakers of mistreatment, saying that they weren’t informed of the rape scene. All movie theaters were destroyed by the Taliban because of this. They are waiting to release the movie until the boys school year ends. I understand why the Afghanistans are mad because of this movie because it is making them look like they act a certain way, it is kind of labeling them and their people, but there is no need to want to hurt these little boys acting in the movie.


3.) I think the Kite Runner should be making the number one spot. It is a great book, always having something interesting going on. It also deals with real life facts from Kabul and those type of countries, so the reader gets a little insight on whats happening over there. I believe this book would be even better knowing that it was autobiographical, that it actually happened to the author.

4.) http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,305700,00.html

“ I saw the film last night (Saturday) at a special screening and can tell you the scene is handled with great restraint and conveyed without any graphic revelations.”

Marc Forster, the director of the Kite Runner speaks about how he just watched the film for the first time and he says how the rape scene really isn’t that graphic. They tried to leave as much of it out as possible. He can understand how this could cause problems for the families involved.
Jennifer O'Brien

Britt Costa said...

1.) “I Have Learned So Much” by Hafiz
The line in the poem “the truth has shared so much of itself with me” I believe relates to The Kite Runner because Amir holds the truth about what really happened to Hassan. Since Amir did not tell anyone about what happened he has everything kept inside of him and he has to live with the truth everyday.
2.) I believe that all the people in Afghanistan are over reacting to the situation about the rape scene in the movie. I don’t think that they understand that incidents like this happen everyday to all different people. Also there are far more movies that show acts of behavior that is the exact same, but no one complained and no one was sued. Also the boys will learn a life lesson and they and many other children will learn that it is wrong and will never do something like that in their lives.
3.) My reaction to the USA Today article was a not a good one. I was very upset that they have spoiled a part of the book for me that I have not read yet. I don’t understand why you would write an article about a major and popular book and ruin it for many people. What about the people that haven’t even started reading the book yet? Other than that I really enjoyed the article because now I understand more about Hosseini and his choices for the events that happen. I just don’t understand why this book has been published for so long but is just now becoming popular. What made it become one of the number one books on the USA Today Best-Selling Books?
4.) http://www.reuters.com/article/entertainmentNews/idUSN0433804820071004?pageNumber=1
The studio discusses how they want to get the boys out of harms way so they are taking them and at the end of October, more than a month before their school year ends, and will travel with a tutor to the United States for several weeks.

Britt Costa

Anonymous said...

Heather McPherson
Your love
should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.

1. This verse is from the poem “Some Fill with Each Good Rain” by Hafiz. This verse in my opinion relates a lot to The Kite Runner because it describes the relationship between Amir and Hassan. In this verse Hassan would be the one who is cutting their soul into pieces and weaving them into a blanket to protect Amir.
2. I believe that this incident has gotten to out of control. The boys did the movie and made money but they also did it because of a good opportunity. I don’t think that the boys should get murdered or beat for doing this movie by the Afghanistan people. I know it was against their religion but I don’t think they need that harsh of a punishment.
3. I think that the book got more sellers and readers because it’s in my opinion easier to read and carry around. Also the book did get more reviews from word of mouth because I am reading it now in school and I told my mom to now read it. Also I cant wait till the movie comes out because I would much rather watch the movie then read the book. Even though I have to read the book it is very good and I would want other people to read it as well.
4. There is an article on the Boston Herald website that reads, Release of ’Kite Runner’ delayed over fears for young actors safety. This article tells how the Kite Runner movie has been delayed six weeks because of the chilren actors from afganistan. It states that if people see the film and the rape scene that they will act violently towards the child stars. This article shows the concerns and basically what will happen and will be done.

Anonymous said...

I Have Learned So Much

That I can no longer call myself
A man, a woman, an angel,
Or even pure
Soul.

1. This verse in the poem is related to the Kite Runner because I believe this is how Amir felt after he had witnessed Hassan get raped. I believe that he does not feel pure anymore because he did witness this and did not do anything to stop it or help Hassan.

2. I think that the movie should be played and the boys should be allowed to be a part of the movie without having to worry about being attacked by Afghans. I also believe that the rape seen should not have to be cut from the movie because it was a big part of the book. This part changed everything. The relationship between the two boys, and that later turned to Ali and Hassan having to leave.

3. I think that it is amazing how well the book did overall. Being in the top ten last year and last week still being number 7. I also think it is so good the turn out of his book discussion.

4. Kite Runner rape scene worries boy actor- This article discuss the dangers and pitfalls of the rape scene with the two boys. People started a petition to save the boys from doing this scene. I believe that this is a good idea and the boys should not have to do anything they don’t want to.
Kellie Hansen
English E

Justin Bliss said...

Justin Bliss

1. The verse from Hafiz poem “I Have Learned So Much” is “The Truth has shared so much of Itself with me”. This verse relates to The Kite Runner and the actions of Amir. When Amir watched his friend get abused the truth of life showed itself to him. Amir quickly learned life was not a field of roses, and these horrible things can transpire everyday.

2. When reading the article in the New York Times about The Kite Runner I thought it was shocking that the country of Afghanistan would be so up in arms about his movie. The boys having to be moved away from their homeland because of one scene in a movie. The article makes me wonder if the movie was worth it, if kid’s lives should be changed to make some money. The book was such a good piece of literature and now the movie is starting to tarnish its reputation.

3. I am not surprised that it took a year for this book to become immensely popular because Hosseini was not even an author prior to The Kite Runner. Now the book has become popular and for an obvious reason. The book is an amazing read and should be a top book. While Hosseini is not an author he write two moving books and travels the world to promote his book

4. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/04/AR2007100402542.html
This is the article talks about when movie can be expected to be released and that is sometime in the spring. The article also discusses how the boys are not safe in Afghanistan and had to be relocated. "Either people will think that the rape really happened, or maybe it will only be part of a movie, but it will still shame them. Either way, it will be a disaster." This quote shows that the movie will cause problems in Afghanistan and could cause rioters to harm the boys.

Anonymous said...

Brittany Nutter period-E


Love has
Befriended Hafiz so completely
It has turned to ash
And freed
Me


1.)I found this verse from the poem “I Have Learned So Much” by Hafiz. It relates to The Kite Runner because Amir befriends Hassan and is always there for him. He loves him like a brother and that love sets him free because it makes him feel safe and that nothing can hurt him.
2.)I personally think that it’s ridiculous that the parents are asking for so much money for the kids all because of one scene that barely shows anything. “Amad Khan Mahmoodzada, 12, told reporters at that time that he feared for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene. His father said he himself was misled by the film’s producers, insisting that they never told him of the scene until it was about to be shot and that they had promised to cut it.” I don’t think that a kid should have to fear for his life all because of a scene in a movie and that’s all it is, just a movie. It’s a movie about the book so basically it has to be exactly like the book so they can’t cut anything out. Also though if they had promised to cut it and they didn’t then they could get in trouble because they said that they would cut it. They shouldn’t be punished and harassed all because of the movie and there lives shouldn’t be in danger because of it either.
3.)Well I can see why people were mad that the book wasn’t all true because they were expecting it to be. “At the luncheon, Hosseini addressed the question he gets asked several times daily: Is Kite Runner autobiographical?Well ... yes and no.Yes, he grew up in Kabul in the '60s. Yes, his father was a diplomat, had servants and lost it all when the Soviets moved in. The family eventually landed in northern California, where Hosseini lives with his wife and two young children, Haris, 4, and Farah, 2."When I say some of it is me, then people look unsatisfied," he says. "The parallels are pretty obvious, but ... I left a few things ambiguous because I wanted to drive the book clubs crazy." I mean yea people were mad, but how can they be mad not all books are meant to be true stories. Some of it may be true and some of it may not be true, but that’s no reason to get mad about it and be disappointed.
4.)“Child actor's rape scene in 'Kite Runner' splits Bay Area Afghans” I found this article in the San Francisco Chronicle. People were saying that the movie should adhere strictly to the novel which it is based upon and I agree because if your going to do a movie about a book then it should follow all the things that happen in the book and if the person playing a certain character in the movie doesn’t like what is happening then they shouldn’t even be in the movie if they are going to complain about it. I also agree though that the children should be safe from harm, but why would people want to harm them there not doing anything wrong there just doing what they are supposed to do.

Glassman said...

Mike Glassman
11/2/07
Class, E
Kite Runner Online


1.
“The Truth has shared so much of itself
With me”
(I Have Learned So Much, by Hafiz)

It relates to The Kite Runner because Amir is haunted by the awful truth that he betrayed his friend Hassan in his time of need. The truth shares itself with Amir by saying that he is a coward and a terrible person who can never be forgiven by what he did.

2.
It’s pretty bad that American film makers are trying to make a movie about the ways of Afghanistan and they hate the idea. It is sort-of hypocritical because the film makers are putting the real-life scenarios of Afghani boys in a movie and the Afghans are ruining it. Its almost as if Afghans don’t want their culture to be found out because they know how bad it is.

3.
Hosseini compares his life to the book itself. It is not an autobiography of himself, he “draws parallels” from his life to the lives of the on-going lives of the Afghanis in the 60’s. His father, for example, is still alive, while in The Kite Runner, Baba dies.

4.
The USA Today article on The Kite Runner film states, “The scene in which the 12-year-old protagonist witnesses the brutalization of his friend — but does nothing to stop it — is one minute of a two-hour film and two pages of a 380-page novel. It plays on ethnic tensions that pervade the book, pitting an upper-class Pashtun bully against a lower-class ethnic Hazara boy.”
The main reason why the actors in the film need to get to safety is because of the rape scene with Hassan and Assef along with his cronies. Further filming cannot and will not be done until the boys are in a safer place, and they may not be able to return to their country after the film is made since a lot of Afghanis are going to be insulted by the movie.

Zack Schleicher said...

Zack Schleicher

1.) This verse came from the poem “I Have Learned So Much” by Hafiz. The verse is “That I can no longer call myself a man, a woman, an angel, or even pure soul.” This can relate to The Kite Runner through the main character Amir. He cannot call himself any of these things because he witnessed his supposed best friend Hassan get physically abused by Assef and Amir did nothing to stop it from happening.

2.) As I was reading this in the New York Times and read the article about the movie The Kite Runner I thought that it was shocking of how many problems this movie was having. The book The Kite Runner is a best seller, but making it a movie has caused so much conservers that it is making the book look bad. The two boy actor’s lives are in jeopardy because of this movie. However, I believe that these matters will settle down after the movie comes out.

3.) I think the article revealed a little too much information about The Kite Runner. It took me by surprise that it took this book a year to excel because it is such an intense novel. It is also very hard to believe that Hosseini, the author of the novel, is not the narrator of the book. There is a large amount detail with the narrator that it is hard to believe it is not him. However, this shows what a vast writer Hosseini really is.

4.) http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/04/AR2007100402542.html
This article talks about when the movie The Kite Runner is coming out. This article also goes into details about the big rape scene that is shot between the two boys. The scene is very conservers because it shows so many details. This also talks about how the two boy actors are in danger due to this graphic movie. -By Zack Schleicher

Anonymous said...

"Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you."

1. This excerpt from Some Fill with Each Good Rain greatly relates to The Kite runner. Ahmir has Hassan, who cares deeply for him. However, Ahmir doesn’t seem to give that love back. Hassan protects Ahmir and watches out for him. Ahmir wastes his love on others and items that aren’t as important to him in his life.

2. It is very upsetting that The Kite Runner is causing so much commotion in the Afghan homeland. It’s very said that these boys have to be put in protection for fear of their lives. The thing that makes me feel even weirder is that the actors are feeling mistreated for having all these attacks on them. They believe they could have prevented these threats. I also find it amazing that the Taliban would destroy all the movie theaters in Afghanistan. However, pirated DVD’s still get into the country.

3. It’s amazing that this book has touched and been read by millions of people world wide. There have been 17 printings of this book already. I find it interesting that some of the story is true, while other parts of the story are false. It is very inspiring to many Afghans even though the book is illegal in the country. I greatly enjoy how he wrote this book and is not afraid to portray his opinion.

4. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/kite_runner/news/1674574/
This story is about the Mahmidzada family and how the parents were upset about the rape scene and that the children have to be moved from their home town.

-John Cummings

Katherine Amara said...

Katherine Amara
1.
Close your eyes for a moment
And maybe all your
fears and fantasies

Will end.

If that happened
God would become an infant in your

Arms

This relates to The Kite Runner, because it is called “An Infant in Your Arms” and it relates to how Soraya wants to conceive. The poem, on one hand talks about actually having a baby, but unlike the poem, in the story, Soraya is unable to conceive. Although this is true, the poem could still seem relevant when considering the high hopes that Soraya and Amir had of conceiving.

2. After reading the New York Times article about the boys in The Kite Runner movie, I think that it is shocking that the boy would be in danger because of one movie. I feel that they should be taking whatever security measures are necessary, and possible, and I feel that this is a case where it is better to be safe than sorry. If the boy didn’t want to do the scene, than he shouldn’t have to but if he agreed then there is nothing he can really say. In the article, it stated “His father said he himself was misled by the film’s producers, insisting that they never told him of the scene until it was about to be shot and that they had promised to cut it.” If this is the truth, than I don’t think that the family should have to sacrifice their own safety and home so that a movie can stay true to the book.
3. When reading the USA Today article, nothing that was presented or mentioned surprised me at all. It doesn’t surprise me that the book was a worldwide success, and it definitely doesn’t surprise me that the book’s popularity was by mouth, because the way I heard about it was from my grandmother, who had heard it from one of her friends. I like the fact that Hosseini chose to leave the autobiographical question somewhat unanswered, and I think it definitely could play a part in the success of the novel. I think, according to the statistics thus far, this book will keep selling, and will only grow more famous as time goes on.
4. The article I chose was at website:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/04/AR2007100402542.html

This article starts out by briefly describing the process of casting the two boys for the roles of Hassan and Amir. It also goes into a detailed explanation of the situation with the two boys, and the threats that have been made against Hassan’s character. It is somewhat similar to the New York Times article, but goes a little more in depth about the specifics of the dangers that the boys are in.

Anonymous said...

-Brian Bettencourt

1.) “We are
People who need to love, because
Love is the soul's life”

This quote goes very well with Amir and Baba’s relationship. Amir respects and admires his father, but Baba doesn’t always show his love. Baba always seems to have a special spot for Hassan and Amir feels second best. Eventually the love is shown and the “soul’s life” is restored.

2.) It is terrible that the boys may have to be moved to America. I would be wicked mad if I was told I had to move to another country just because I played a part in a movie. I feel bad for the boys, but in the end it might work out for the best because they could end up in a nice house somewhere in California living a sweet life.

3.) Khaled Hosseini is pretty much doing work. He is the man at writing and I love his book. I’m happy for him because I feel that Amir has some qualities based from himself, mainly the writing aspect I feel.

4.) http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/10/11/MN57SM5KT.DTL

Anonymous said...

John Cunniff

1. An Infant in Your Arms

“Close your eyes for a moment
And maybe all your
fears and fantasies
Will end.”

This verse by Hazif relates to The Kite Runner in that Amir doesn’t tell anyone about witnessing Hassan get raped by Assef. Although he wants to be freed of his guilt, he never does tell anyone. It seems as though he just wants this incident to go away without taking any action. In the poem by Hazif, he explains that “you would have to nurse all creation” if you ignored all of your problems. Thus, the poem, An Infant in Your Arms, by Hafiz, can be related to The Kite Runner.

2. The article entitled, ‘The Kite Runner’ Is Delayed to Protect Child Stars, is very interesting. I didn’t even think that other Hazara’s would be offended by the movie. Now that I think about it, I think that although it occurred in the book, the rape scene should not be in the movie. The child actor who plays Hassan wasn’t even told about it until the scene was about to be shot. He was forced to do it, and now he has the potential to be harassed and even tortured by Hazara’s that are angry with the film.

3. Unlike Hosseini, I am not surprised so many people are buying the book. It is one of the best books, if not the best, that I have read. I think that it is good that the book is being added to summer reading lists, because I think it deserves to be read by students. I found it very interesting that the book came out in 2003, and just this month it was still number 7 on the USA TODAY Best-Selling Books list.

4. RELOCATION TO U.S. AND UAE
All three child stars -- Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, Zekiria Ebrahimi and Ali Danish Bakhty -- were schoolboys with no previous acting experience who were discovered by the film's casting director in Kabul.
The boys, each accompanied by a family member, will likely leave the Afghan capital, Kabul, at the end of October, more than a month before their school year ends, and travel with a tutor to the United States for several weeks, Colligan said.
Arrangements have been made for the boys to then go to the United Arab Emirates, where they probably will remain at least until March, when the new school year begins, she said.
By then, the film will have been released in theaters around the world. Although no commercial exhibition is planned for Afghanistan, the studio assumes that bootlegged DVD copies will make their way into the country.
If a perceived threat to the youngsters persists beyond March, they will be permitted to remain in the UAE indefinitely, Colligan said, adding, "They're not going back to Kabul unless they want to go back."
http://www.canada.com/topics/entertainment/story.html?id=3e88aaa4-f71d-4cb0-b708-611f91948125

I think that it is a good idea for the three boys to be relocated. As we all know, Afghanistan is not the safest place in the world today, and with this controversial scene in the movie, it may not be safe for the actors to stay there. Although they will leave all of their friends, it seems to be the right decision.

Anonymous said...

Alyssa Ruta
11/2/07
English D
Kite Runner Computer Lab

1.
The Stairway of Existence
“Love is simply creations joy.”

At the beginning of The Kite Runner Amir never felt any real love from his father. They both had many differences and Amir always longed to feel true love from Baba. In the middle of The Kite Runner when Baba and Amir moved to the United States their relationship became closer and Baba showed Amir the love he always longed for. They spent the rest of their time together as father and son with joy.

Lifts Beyond Conception
“Independent of this mind is my
Heart”

A lot of the reason that Baba never really showed that true love for Amir was because Amir was very independent and always followed his heart. He loved to write and create stories. He never wanted to play soccer like Baba wished he would. Amir never wanted to be friends with the kids in the upper class. He was friends with Hassan because they had always stayed true to one another.

2.
I feel like there is a lot of he said, she said, going on. I believe Mr. Forester when he says that there was a script given and a warning about the rape scene. That is a big part of the book and with out it many characters and the story would not be the same. I feel that the boy froze right before the scene was shot because he was nervous not because he wasn’t prepared for it. There should be protection provided to the families if they agree to want it. The script should have been read by every actor before they signed to do the film. This way every would know what was coming and what conflicts they would be putting themselves and their families into.

3.
I think that it is awesome that high school students are allowed to read and discuss a book that is being added to many college reading lists. I agree with Hosseini when he says that it is and is not an autobiographical essay. It is about him and his life but it is not meticulous in ever detail of his life. I think it is great that so many people are reading the book and enjoying it. People should read this novel to understand more about Afghanistan and the people that come from there. Since 9/11 I had images of what it was like there and what kind of lives people held there. Reading The Kite Runner broadened my image and taught me so much about Afghans.

4.
The boy and his family have the option to relocate after the school year is over. People comment that the scene should be taken out because it makes the writer and everyone else look bad. Well it makes the people who committed this crime look bad. It is the truth it is not something that never happened; people should realize that. The very last paragraph says that, “In the end it is all about making money.” I hope this movie is not about that because it means a lot more than that. Every aspect of this movie should be shown because every type of society needs to wake up and realize the truth.

Rachael Maggiani said...

“When has love not given freedom?
When has adoration not made one free?”
from the poem ‘What Do White Birds Say’


The Hafiz poem “What Do White Birds Say” can apply to The Kite Runner because Amir loved Baba, but Amir was not free from Baba’s judgment, and he was not free from himself trying to make Baba proud. So, his love and adoration for Baba did not give him freedom.


NY Times Article

In the New York Times article, it says that the boys were unaware of the rape scene that was in the movie. “His father said he himself was misled by the film’s producers, insisting that they never told him of the scene until it was about to be shot and that they had promised to cut it.” I think that maybe the filmmakers left out this part of the film to ensure that they got someone to fill the roles of Amir and Hassan. I also think that is a disgrace and they shouldn’t have done that, but I can’t prove that they did. Also, I think that it is odd that because a movie is made with a Hazara boy, the actor now fears for his life. the “Kite Runner” actor who plays Hassan, Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, 12, told reporters at that time that he feared for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene.”

USA Today Article

In the USA Today article, it talks about how popular The Kite Runner has become across America. Book clubs have been continuously reading the book, and it is on its third printing right now. The publisher says that the popularity spread through the word of mouth. “A mother tells a daughter. A friend calls a friend. Another paperback is bought.” Hosseini is also writing another novel, Dreaming in Titanic City.


Extra Article (from the Boston Globe, http://www.boston.com/ae/events/articles/2007/10/11/blog_report/?page=2)

The article discusses that the movie stars are fearful for their lives, and it raises questions about issues in exploitation. Also, it says that the CIA was involved in the situation, trying to keep everyone safe.

Extra Article (from Slate Magazine, http://www.slate.com/id/2176959/entry/2176960/nav/tap3/)

The article describes, in detail, the movie and the fact that the release date was delayed from November 2, 2007 to December 14, 2007. “As a former Afghan ambassador to the United States explained to Slate's Kim Masters, "to be raped or to be gay over there—it's unfortunately absolutely unacceptable," even when it's merely a dramatic simulation.”

Anonymous said...

Computer Lab Questions

1. Hafiz’s poem, entitled “Some Fill With Each Good Rain”, could be related to different situations and people. This poem is appropriate to relate to Amir’s life and his inner secrets. The first verse states “There are different wells within your heart. Some fill with each hood rain, Others are far too deep for that.” For me Amir’s heart is filled with deep wells also, some good and others unmoral. Amir is able to fill his heart with his multiple loves; his affection for Baba, his love for writing, Soraya, and his fondness for Hassan. However, Amir has deep canals within his heart, such as playing mean tricks on Hassan, and most importantly abandoning him when he needed him the most. The “good rain” may temporarily fulfill the wells, yet some wells are too deep to ever be filled with only rainwater.

2. After reading the New York Times article concerning the delay of the release of The Kite Runner movie, I am sadden by the fact that the boys live in a country where their lives are in jeopardy because of the recreating a scene in a book. The young actors have to be taken out of the country in fear of their safety and may not be allowed to return. Certain aspects of the movie offend the Haraza culture and some may want to harm the boys for disgracing their image. I do feel guilty though that I am awaiting the release of the film, instead of being concerned about the actors’ well being.

3. In response to the USA Today article, I believe Hosseini’s novel will be prominent in our culture for a long time, especially with the arrival of The Kite Runner movie. I feel that The Kite Runner is a good story, always holding my attention as I read and never do I want to put it down. However, overall I do not know if the book is amazing and I feel that the book, thus far, has not lived up to its high expectations. I praise Hosseini for traveling not only to promote his book, but also collecting money to build schools for woman in Afghanistan. Hopefully, the upcoming movie will give justice to the enjoyable read that The Kite Runner is.

4. http://www.iefilmi.com/293.html This website is short but does provide information relating to the destination of the three, relocated boy actors who were involved in the rape scene in the movie. According to the article, the transient move would allow the boys to return to school and their homeland in March.

Lauren Southworth
English D

Jeff said...

Jeff Moore
English D
1. In the poem “The Mountain Got Tired of Sitting” Hafiz writes “The Mountain got tired of sitting. Amongst a snoring crowd inside of me. And rose like a rip sun. Into my eye.” After listening to this, I instantly thought of Amir and Hassan. I thought of the guilt inside of Amir from watching Hassan get raped in the alley. The guilt inside Amir is the mountain. Amir’s guilt at first was kept inside of him, but in front of a snoring crowd, (His family sleeping in Jalalabad) Amir just has to let out his guilt. As everyone was sleeping Amir remarked that Hassan was raped because he just could not hold it in.
2. I think it is horrible that the boys have to be moved out of the country when the film is released, but I am not surprised at all. The reason I think the Afghans do not want this film to be made is because this rape scene probably does occur in Afghanistan. What is weird though is that the book “The Kite Runner” is cherished in Afghanistan, but for some reason they are protesting the movie. The people of Afghanistan are being hypocritical. The people of Afghanistan should face the facts and accept what truly happens inside their own society instead of trying to pretend it never happens.
3. I think “The Kite Runner” is almost like a cult. People are going crazy over the book, and its taking over four fifths of the book clubs in New Jersey. Khaled Hosseini has written an incredible book that is causing a snowball effect for people starting to read this book. The thing that is unique about this book is that it did not even become popular until the book came out in paperback. This book is loved by everyone like the Afghan ambassador, a reverend in New Jersey, and some incredible Senior Honors English teacher.
4. http://www.iefilmi.com/293.html The article says that the boys will be moved to the United States with at least one member from each family. The article also says that they will most likely remain there until March.

Anonymous said...

1. “Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.”
– Some Fill With Each Good Rain, Hafiz

This quote in context is pertaining to love. But I feel that it also relates to Amir and Hassan’s relationship. Amir never truly realizes the devotion Hassan has put into their bond. This quote symbolizes this devotion, Hassan would stop at no end for Amir and this quote depicts the extremes he would go to.

2. I feel bad that this film has led to such religious turmoil within the boys’ lives. For their safety it would behoove them to move to America for the time being until these issues can be sorted out. I wish for them that people could recognize this is just a film, but in that area of the world religion is not excused for any circumstance. The death threats are in fact a very serious issue. The fact that angers me is that the boys now say they are against this as well. There is a very slim chance that the studio did not inform them ahead of time about this scene.

3. I think it is great that this book has created so much hype and has been this successful. For Hosseini the timing could not be any more perfect. The war in the Middle East has created such an increase in American’s foreign interest. In turn, this has made The Kite Runner a very popular reading choice around the globe. The movie will only make things better. Because now, the words will be backed by the illustrations of Hollywood. And that will excite people even more.

4. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/04/AR2007100402542.html

--Ryan Kok

Anonymous said...

-Joe Mitchell
Class D

The Mountain Got Tired Of Sitting:

The clouds gave my soul an idea
So I pawned my gills
And rose like a winged diamond

Ever trying to be near
More love, more love
Like you.


1. I interpret this as Amir getting ideas for his books and stories (first verse), and then transitioning to him wanting to make Baba proud (second verse). He wants to be himself, but fears that Baba will not accept him if the father and son are not alike. The second verse says “ever trying to be near more love,” which could represent Amir trying to be closer with his father.

2. I find it unfortunate that so many Afghanis, the actor included, refuse to do something like act out a certain scene in a movie. Due to their culture, Afghanis don’t care whether or not the scene is real, they just don’t want to do it because of they think it is wrong. While they are right in the belief that rape is bad, they are wrong to harass someone about acting out a rape scene in a movie and getting violent about it. That scene is an essential part of the story, and in the end, it sends out a valuable message to the readers/viewers anyway.

3. It amazes me how big this book has gotten just recently, as it has been out since 2003. To go from 50,000 copies to 1.4 million is no small feat, and it just goes to show how good of a job Khaled Hosseini did in writing this story. People love it so much because they can easily relate to it, and provides an interesting story at the same time. Also, you can tell that some of the story is based off of the author’s life, as there are certain scenes that seem like they couldn’t have been made up.

4. The San Francisco Chronicle had an article discussing the possible violent outcomes that could result from a child rape scene in the upcoming novel-turned-movie, “The Kite Runner.” They mentioned that Paramount is offering to relocate the family of the child actor, as the family could lose dignity and be at the dangerous end of numerous threats. I think it is sad that because of the culture and religion of Afghanistan, people would threaten a child and his family. It shouldn’t have to resort to making a family, that has known the area for what has probably been their entire lives, move just so that they can stay safe.

Anonymous said...

Brianna Cote
English: D

1. “Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.”-Some Fill with Each Good Rain

This poem can be related The Kite Runner, specifically the relationship between Amir and Hassan. After Amir watches Hassan get raped by Assef, he, in a sense, is siding with Assef by not saying anything. Amir should realize that Hassan has essentially “cut off pieces of his soul” and is trying to protect him and be the true, loyal friend he has always been to Hassan.

2. After reading this article, I feel that the situation with the young actors is terrible. It is appalling to see that the conflict between the Pashtun and Hazara is so serious that the young boys and their families would have to be put under protection because of their involvement with the film. All of the controversy surrounding the movie is difficult to grasp but I feel that the people are taking the necessary precautions.

3. As I read this article, I agreed with the comments made by the people in reaction to the book. I believe that this book is moving and shares an important story with an even more important theme. I was surprised to learn that it was not an instant success but happy to see that now it has sparked numerous plans for stage productions and a feature film. I am interested to see how The Kite Runner will continue to impact people in the future.

4. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/10/11/MN57SM5KT.DTL

Anonymous said...

Brielle Bowman
English, D

1. The Mountain Got Tired of Sitting

The poem is similar to The Kite Runner in many ways. To me, the poem describes how Hassan has “become a jewel” in the eyes of Baba, who treats Hassan like a son. Amir notices that relationship between his father and his best friend and quickly gets jealous. “The mountains got tired of sleeping amongst a sleeping audience” means that Amir got tired of waiting for Baba to come around and notice him. Then, when it says “my soul gave my heart a brilliant idea” it is saying how Amir got the idea of setting Hassan up by planting his birthday presents (new watch and money) under Hassan’s mattress, just to make his heart happy and win back Baba.

2. After reading the article, I feel awful about the situation that the two young actors are put in. Personally, I feel it would have been best to have American or actors of a different country to play the roles in the movie. That way the conflict in the movie would not be mirrored in their real lives. Its sad to think that these two boys are going to be looked at differently for there whole lives just for playing a role in a movie. Hopefully, things will be able to work themselves out and this controversy can be resolved peacefully.

3. After reading the article, I agree with what the people are saying about the book. I think the book is very inspirational and promotes a good, valuable message to all readers. I couldn’t believe the success that the book got and its popularity. I find it very interesting how some of the book connects to Hosseini’s past and that such awful event could actually occur. It amazes me how different Afghanistan is from what I actually pictured it to be. Hosseini does an excellent job of describing the life that occurs in Afghanistan at the time and should be recognized for his work.

4. http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20071004/media_nm/kiterunner_dc_1

Anonymous said...

1. Select a verse or excerpt from Hafiz and relate it to some aspect of content/subject matter in The Kite Runner.

Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.

This excerpt relates to The Kite Runner because it relates to Hassan being raped and explains how God disapproves of it. It also highlights how Amir betrays by not protecting him in that situation when he needed him the most. Amir, although he had the fa├žade of being a true friend, he did not have the “valor and daring” vigor that a friend should have.

2. Offer your reactions to http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/04/movies/04kite.html.

After reading the article we feel that although the safety of the children is of the utmost importance the rape scene is an integral plot point in the novel and crucial to the overall moral of the story. The connection made between the audience and the movie would be weakened by exclusion of the scene. On the other side of the fence, the emotional and societal impact of performing the act on film could forever damage his self esteem and life.


3. Offer your reactions to http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/news/2005-04-18-kite-runner_x.htm.

I was thoroughly distraught because I was unaware of the death of Baba. Now when we read it we will look at Baba with a fond sadness. The growing success of the book is good because it is exposing the audiences to a more human side to Afghanistan.


http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/10/11/MN57SM5KT.DTL `

JESSICA NARTOWICZ
LINDSAY TILDEN

Anonymous said...

Poem
In Hafiz’s poem “The Stairway of Existence”, the line “We are people who need to love, because love is the soul’s life,” describes one of human’s deepest emotions, love. In the novel, The Kite Runner, Amir craves for his father’s love but his father’s love is torn between both Amir and Hassan. Amir, realizing this, risks his relationship with Hassan to gain all of his father’s love for solely himself.

New York Times Article
For the most part I felt the New York Times article was very knowledgeable on what was going on behind the scenes of the movie, The Kite Runner. The article was very informative on the troubles behind the scene and the real life dilemmas that followed. The two boys, playing Hassan and Amir, were faced with great danger once people from Afghanistan found out about the detailed rape scene and thus caused the boys to be relocated. Overall, the story was thorough in covering the current dilemma the movie and it’s actors are facing.

USA Today Article
In the USA Today Article, Hosseini’s accomplishments are praised which I feel is necessary for his world renowned book. I learned more about the book in this article rather than the New York Times article which focused mostly on the movie. Here, Hosseini gets a chance to answer some questions people have had about his book like if it was an autobiography. He says both yes and no. "When I say some of it is me, then people look unsatisfied," he says. "The parallels are pretty obvious, but ... I left a few things ambiguous because I wanted to drive the book clubs crazy." He purposely made it ambiguous so people could decide for themselves whether the book was fictional or not. I think that made the book even more interesting to read.

The New York Times article covered the relocation of the boy actors the best. Unlike the USA Today story, the New York Times focused mostly on the actors and the troubles that are pertaining to them currently.

- Jordan Penney

Anonymous said...

Nadya Kaltsunas
November 2, 2007
English



An Infant In Your Arms

If that happened
God would become an infant in your

Arms

And then you
Would have to nurse all

Creation!



This verse in the poem An Infant In Your Arms by Hafiz can relate to Hassan in the Kite Runner. Hassan is the type of person who will do anything for anyone. It seemed like he would put other people’s happiness before his own. Through out the Kite Runner Hassan did a lot of things for Amir. In this poem Hafiz says, “God would become and infant in your arms and then you would have to nurse all creation.” This relates to Hassan because he basically was nursing Amir and making sure that he was stable.


2. After reading the article in the New York Times I thought it was very disturbing. The commotion that the Afghani people were causing was unnecessary. The people took the time out of their day just to destroy the movie theatres, trying to prevent people from seeing the movie. While reading the novel I don’t think that it is demeaning to the Afghan people.

3. After reading the U.S. today excerpt I found out that Baba dies in the Kite Runner. I hadn’t read that far ahead to find out that he dies.

Katrina Idreos said...

Poem

Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.

This excerpt from the poem “Some Fill With Each Good Rain,” by Sufi poet, Hafiz addresses the importance of keeping your love “safe” and not just offering it to just anybody. In The Kite Runner, Amir does anything and everything that he can in order to win the love of Baba, even though Baba does not necessarily offer love back to Amir unless there is something in it for him, which seems like a waste of Amir’s love.

NY Times

This article is very interesting. I found it odd that the father of the boy playing Hassan, and the boy himself had said that they were not aware of the rape scene in the movie, and had they known they would not have agreed to do the movie. Also, in many movies in America there are scenes that involve rape, sexual assault, etc. and I was a little surprised that it is such a big deal in other parts of the world. Although I can understand why the actors and families would be upset by it, I do not think that the directors and writers would be able to take the scene out because it is an important scene in the book, and the theme, in a way, revolves around that event.

USA Today

This article was not really about the book or the movie, which I thought it would be because of the title, “‘Kite Runner’ Takes Wind.” The article was mostly about Hosseini and his career. I did, however, find the article interesting because it shows that although Hosseini is a successful doctor and writer, he is still very humble, like when he eats dinner with his fans.

ALMOST done.

Anonymous said...

Katie Adler

1.)The Kite Runner is a very touching story, which has very complex and original characters. All of these characters connect to their own cultures and love their people. Like in the Kite Runner, poems in The Gift, express that loving is only for those who are of real importance to you. For example, in the Kite Runner Baba and Ali have a love for one another, they are family and would do anything to protect the other. In the poem “Some Fill with Each Good Rain,” it says, “Your love should never be offered to the mouth of a Stranger, Only to someone who has the valor and daring to cut pieces of their soul off with a knife then weave them into a blanket to protect you.” In the Kite Runner, Baba feels that way towards not only Ali, but Amir as well. The poems touch on relating to a higher being, such as God. In the Kite Runner religion is a huge aspect. Both the novel and the Poems relate in a few different ways.
2The novel The Kite Runner is an excellent read. It offers the reader a look at the real Afghanistan. The fact that it’s being turned into a movie really excites me. Unfortunately, the actors that are in this movie didn’t know they would be risking their lives. I find it extremely sad that because of their effort to show and teach people about their culture, they are potentially under a huge risk. I think that if what the actors say is true, that they were tricked, and didn’t know about this scene, then the directors should be in full responsibility for their safety. I think it was a good idea for them to use real Afghani boys, it will give us the full effect, and help us relate better. However, I truly find it sad that their own people are rebelling against the poor children.
3When Khaled Hosseini wrote The Kite Runner, I don’t think he intended it to go so far. I was very surprised to read that his success happened so fast. I also found it interesting, that he got the idea to write it by finding out that kite running was now banned in Afghanistan. In the article it did mention how he claimed some of his novel to be autobiographical, but a lot of it was fiction. I think that the way he used his own memories and knowledge of his own culture to write this top selling book is amazing. The novel really opened the world’s eyes. USA today’s article really touched on how Hosseini was the next great author, and his success was a surprise to all.
4http://media.www.drurymirror.com/media/storage/paper740/news/2007/10/24/NewsKite-Runner.Movie.Premiere.Delayed-3051882.shtml
The boys from the Kite Runner will stay in Kabul until the end of their school year, and then be moved to the U.S., for their own safety.

Anonymous said...

Stephanie Bryant
11/2/07
(D)
Computer Lab Questions

1.) Select a verse or excerpt from Hafiz and relate it to some aspect of content/subject matter in The Kite Runner.

An Infant In Your Arms
“Close your eyes for a moment
And maybe all your
fears and fantasies
Will end.”

-This verse can be related to The Kite Runner
because it’s talking about how no matter how
much you may wish all of your fears and
haunting dreams away, they’ll always be there
unless you do something about it to make them
go away. Just like how Amir’s guilt is haunting his
dreams, until he decides to fix what he has done.

The Stairway of Existence

“We are
People who need to love, because
Love is the soul's life,
Love is simply creation's greatest joy.”

- This verse can be related to The Kite Runner
because it’s talking about how everybody needs to feel
loved, and that only when loved can people feel
the world’s greatest joy. Thus, people will go out of their
way to find love, such as Amir’s constant search for love
from Baba, and Hassan’s from Amir.


Some Fill With Each Good Rain

“Your love
Should never be offered to the mouth of a
Stranger,
Only to someone
Who has the valor and daring
To cut pieces of their soul off with a knife
Then weave them into a blanket
To protect you.”

-This verse can be related to The Kite Runner
because it’s talking about how you should never
show and, or give your love away to someone
who’s not going to appreciate it, but instead
to give it to someone who’s going to cherish
your love and who will be willing to do anything
to stand up for and protect you, just like the
relationship between Amir and Hassan, and how
Hassan is constantly standing up for and protecting
Amir.

Anonymous said...

Joshua Kirkpatrick
November 2, 2007

Kite Runner Computer Lab Assignment

1) The Stairway of Existence- I found that the poem The Stairway of Existence by Hafiz relates to the uproar over the child actor’s performance in The Kite Runner. After reading the New York Times Article about how the Hazara people of Afghanistan have become outraged with the rape scene in the movie, I felt that they were taking the movie as an insult directed towards them and not a movie intended to bring light upon the happiness and liveliness that exists in Afghanistan. I feel that the Hazara people are not following the great Afghani poet’s words “…We are people who need to love because love is the soul’s life…” The Hazara people seem to be focused on their “…pursuit of formalities and fake religious laws…” and only concerned with being angry and finding a person to blame for what they view as a derogatory film. When, the film is not a discriminatory film at all, rather a rational and modern depiction of Afghani life.

2) The New York Times Article on the possible threats to the child actor’s (in The Kite Runner) safety in their homeland of Afghanistan is very disturbing. It is astonishing that a group of people would be so insulted by a movie that they would want to hurt a small boy just for acting. No child should have to fear for his or her won life because of acting. Yet, Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, 12, who plays Hassan has, “to fear for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene.” I knew that there were vast discrepancies between American culture and religion and Afghani cultures and religion, but I never knew how inhumane and savage people could really be over a movie.

3) The USA Today article about The Kite Runner revealed very interesting information about the author, Khaled Hosseini, and the novel itself. I found, when reading the novel, that the story was almost too in depth and descriptive to be a fiction novel. The article gave me insight into how Khaled used his real life experiences and stories of his own to write the novel. I was surprised how much of his own life was incorporated into the story. The article sates that, “…he grew up in Kabul in the '60s…his father was a diplomat, had servants and lost it all when the Soviets moved in. The family eventually landed in northern California, where Hosseini lives with his wife and two young children, Haris, 4, and Farah, 2.” I was also surprised by the overwhelming popularity of the novel. “After an initial printing of 50,000, The Kite Runner is now in its 17th printing with more than 1.4 million books shipped.” The Kite Runner has become very popular with various groups of people across the world and has sold millions of copies.

4) http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/10/11/MN57SM5KT.DTL
This article deals with Bay area Afghans who are becoming split over the rape scene in the new movie The Kite Runner. It is amazing how far reaching and wide spread this religious issue has spread as a result of a single novel.
Josh Kirkpatrick
English IV - Honors

Anonymous said...

Iris Brown
Block E

1.)Hafiz says in one of his poems, “That I can no longer call myself a man, a woman, an angel, or even a pure soul”. This quote could have been said by Amir on the day he didn’t help his friend Hassan. When Hassan was in the ally he needed Amir to help him. Amir was too scared of getting hurt himself to help his friend at all. By not helping Hassan when he needed the most help, Amir could have said that he doesn’t have pure soul anymore.

2.)I believe that Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, one of the boys who play in the movie, could be telling the truth. That he and his father didn’t know about the rape scene during the movie. It is probably difficult to communicate at times between the characters from Afghanistan and the directors of the movie, who speak English. I think that is was a miscommunication between the directors and the actors.

3.)I didn’t know that Amir’s father, Baba, dies in the book. Unfortunately I haven’t gotten to that point in the book yet. I was disappointed to find this out so quickly. I’m just glad USATODAY didn’t mention how he dies.

4.)Since the movie had been released, it has been delayed by six weeks. This is because, of the rape scene with the actors who play Amir and Hassan in the movie The Kite Runner. When the boy and his father found out about the rape scene, both agreed. But when the day came to film the rape scene, the boy was in tears.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7028288.stm

Anonymous said...

Stephanie Bryant
Period D
Computer Lab Questions
(cont.)

2.)Offer your reactions to
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/04/movies/04kite.html

After having read the article about how the film version of “The Kite Runner” is being delayed in order to protect the child stars in the movie, I have to say that I’m pretty shocked. I would never have thought that making such a movie would cause such an upheaval in the Afghani culture. I understand that there has always been a clear-cut social class distinction between the Pashtuns and Hazaras which results in hatred between the two groups, but never did I think that by re-creating a novel about such groups and their daily life and trials, that such a culture would be so against it, and actually fear for the boys lives, especially the boy who is playing Hassan, the Hazara, in the movie. I think that it’s awful that people in a culture would take such a movie, and/or novel as an insult to their ways of life, and social ranks, and think of fighting due to such a work. I wish that the Afghani people could be able to see what the novel and movie is really trying to convey-that what has been going on between such opposite social classes must be stopped in order to help improve their culture and country as a whole-that the cruel things that take place in the novel and movie, do actually happen in real life, and that if something isn’t done soon, the Afghan culture in general is in a great deal of danger…against their own kind.

3.)Offer your reactions to
http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/news/2005-04-18-kite-runner_x.htm

After having read the article about the immense popularity of the Kite Runner, I’d have to say that I’m not surprised at all. In fact, such news just seems to make sense to me. To hear that such a novel is so well liked among hundreds and thousands of people worlds over and that the novel, originally done in an objection to Kite Running being outlawed in Afghanistan, has not only found its niche among people interested in that part of the world, but among everyone is to be expected. I’m also not surprised to hear that people who have read the novel have been telling everyone they know about it, because I too, have found myself doing the very same thing. With a book that contains as many universal themes, and as much impact on who-so-ever decides to pick the novel up and start reading, I can’t say that I can blame them, or myself for wanting to spread the word. After all, when something’s great, why not let everyone know, right?

4.) Find and discuss an article which details the relocation of the boy actors in the TKR film.

The article that I read to learn more about the relocation of the boys in TKR film was on the website www.slate.com/id/2175373/nav/navoa/. In the article it mentions that due to the growing violence and hostility in Afghanistan due to the film’s controversial rape scene, Paramount is planning to relocate the three boys, who will be playing Hassan, Amir, and Assef, in the movie to a spot outside of Afghanistan to continue filming the picture. However, it is unclear whether the actors and their families will agree to leave their country, and if so, how long they might stay away.

Vanessa Corkery said...

Vanessa Corkery Per. A

1)
Rembrandt Van Rijn
1606
Netherlands
Kathe Kollowitz
1914
Belgium

Vincent Van Gough
1889
oil on canvas
Paris France

Paul Gauguin
1888
Spain
Gregory Gillespie
Italy
1901
Pablo Picasso
1901
Italy

Paul Cezanne
1879
Russia
Susanna Coffey
1994
New York, New York


Brett Gamache
Italy
2001



2) Out of all these self portraits, Brett Gamache, Susanna Coffey, and Pablo Picasso, they all have a certain style or mood to them. Brett Gamache’s portrait has more shadows and has a higher contrast than Susanna Coffey or Pablo Picasso. They are all life like paintings done in oil but they create a different mood done by the artist. Brett Gamache was enforcing a very sad or relaxed mood in his self portrait. Susanna Coffey was trying to create a painting with blue tones and closely related colors. The self portrait painting of Pablo Picasso has dark shades of blues as it goes with his dark clothing and hair. He most likely thought of these colors and they would stand out since that is what it seemed that he was going for. His face is white and the composition has a high contrast against the black and blue tones.

3) The strongest self portrait is Brett Gamache. He made his self portrait stand out in such a way that made me really like it. He created a sense of realism that he made himself seem life like. It was even more interesting to me because when I met him last year I had a sense of what he looked like and then I see the self portrait painting that he had done and it is almost exactly like him. The colors that Brett used made a balance and everything balanced out with the colors and tones that he used for each section the right shade was used to achieve this realism. All of these hues and shades of tones applied in such contrast created the certain form as a person would be shaped as and Brett did this in a special way which he achieved this form as so perfect to the form of himself. Throughout the composition, with all of the realistic forms, contrast, textures, values, and tones they come together to create an emphasis, a focal point in the composition. In the painting it would be Brett’s face since that is the subject matter of his self portrait and the first thing that the viewer is drawn to when they see the painting.


4) An artist might choose to focus on self portraits because they may be drawn to how they look and they may like painting someone that they know really well as themselves. As the artist paints this picture of themselves again and again they may come to find out that each self portrait that they paint will get better and better at it and they will look more like themselves as they do these portraits. Certain artists may be drawn to this kind of art as they enjoy doing it and seeing their improvements. There are also so many different styles and mediums that artists can use, they may like to do a self portrait of themselves and then render a bunch in a different mood, style, or medium. They can paint, do oil pastel, oil painting, pencil, chalk pastel, etc. But most famous artists use oil painting as the most common for self portraits.