Sunday, September 21, 2008

Seniors: New York Times Article

Click here to read the New York Times article regarding the controversy over The Kite Runner film. Post a brief summary with at least 6 quotes here and be sure to discuss your feelings regarding the article. This is due on 9-26.

9 comments:

Rickie said...

'The studio distributing “The Kite Runner”...is delaying the film’s release to get its three schoolboy stars out of Kabul in response to fears that they could be attacked by Afghans angered by the film's rape scene.' is what they said. I'm spectacle on this. Is it really because, "Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada told reporters at that time that he feared for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene?" It makes me question what happened. "His father said he himself was misled by the film’s producers, insisting that they never told him of the scene until it was about to be shot and that they had promised to cut it." But they didn't, did they? "The Taliban destroyed nearly all movie theaters in Afghanistan, but pirated DVDs often arrive soon after a major film’s release in the West..." so what are they worried about? "The film’s director, Marc Forster, said he saw “The Kite Runner” as “giving a voice and a face to people who’ve been voiceless and faceless for the last 30 years.” Is this true? Is he referring to the all intense rape scene? Well i can't answer these questions when i have not sen the movie, but i definitely will when i see it!

Jessica Schneider said...

The article talks about the rape scene a young boy had to do who played Hassan and how he and the others from the movie had to be movied for their safety because they were getting death threats. I feel as if the studio didnt fully explain to the boy and his family the rape scene, whether or not the studio actually did exaplin it i question if the boy and his family actually understood what was going to happen. I definatly do think the studio should financially support the boys untill adulthood because they had to move away from their homes because they feared their lives, their lives were compleatly turned around. Im looking forward to see the movie in class!

Anonymous said...

'The studio distributing “The Kite Runner,” is delaying the film’s release to get its three schoolboy stars out of Kabul — perhaps permanently — in response to fears that they could be attacked by Afghans angered by the film's culturally inflammatory rape scene.'

"In an effort to prevent not only a public-relations disaster but also possible violence Central Intelligence Agency counterterrorism operative in the region to Kabul to assess the dangers facing the child actors."

"Though the book is admired in Afghanistan by many in the elite, its narrative remains unfamiliar to the broader population, for whom oral storytelling and rumor communication carry far greater weight."

"The Taliban destroyed nearly all movie theaters in Afghanistan, but pirated DVDs often arrive soon after a major film’s release in the West. As a result, Paramount Vantage, the art-house and specialty label of Paramount Pictures, has pushed back the release of the $18 million movie by six weeks, to Dec. 14, when the young stars’ school year will have ended."

'Perhaps not coincidentally, the “Kite Runner” actor who plays Hassan, Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, 12, told reporters at that time that he feared for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene. His father said he himself was misled by the film’s producers, insisting that they never told him of the scene until it was about to be shot and that they had promised to cut it.'

"In the final version of the film, the rape is conveyed impressionistically, with the unstrapping of a belt, the victim’s cries and a drop of blood. The filmmakers said they were surprised when Ahmad Khan and his father told The Sunday Times of London in January that they feared for their lives"

"Those involved say that the studio doesn’t want to be taken advantage of, but that it could accept responsibility for the boys’ living expenses until they reach adulthood, a cost some estimated at up to $500,000. The families, of course, must first agree to the plan."

-Rockwell

Judy said...

"The studio distributing “The Kite Runner,” a tale of childhood betrayal, sexual predation and ethnic tension in Afghanistan, is delaying the film’s release to get its three schoolboy stars out of Kabul — perhaps permanently — in response to fears that they could be attacked by Afghans angered by the film's culturally inflammatory rape scene." This country took this movie so offensively that the child stars' lives were thought to have been in danger. There were extreme measures that had to done in order to protect these child stars. " The boys and their relatives are now accusing the filmmakers of mistreatment, and warnings have been relayed to the studio from Afghan and American officials and aid workers that the movie could aggravate simmering enmities between the politically dominant Pashtun and the long-oppressed Hazara." The producers didn't mean for this movie to become as big as a controversy that it became. "Perhaps not coincidentally, the “Kite Runner” actor who plays Hassan, Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, 12, told reporters at that time that he feared for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene. His father said he himself was misled by the film’s producers, insisting that they never told him of the scene until it was about to be shot and that they had promised to cut it." The rape scene caused an enormous controversy and it was thought to be a disgrace to their country, showing this scene in a movie. Everyone has a different perspective and interpretation of this rape scene being included in this movie but to this country it is just something that is thought to be prohibited from movies and didn't want to be made public.

Anonymous said...

"The studio distributing “The Kite Runner,” a tale of childhood betrayal, sexual predation and ethnic tension in Afghanistan, is delaying the film’s release to get its three schoolboy stars out of Kabul in response to fears that they could be attacked by Afghans angered by the film's culturally inflammatory rape scene." "Though the book is admired in Afghanistan by many in the elite, its narrative remains unfamiliar to the broader population, for whom oral storytelling and rumor communication carry far greater weight." "The Taliban destroyed nearly all movie theaters in Afghanistan, but pirated DVDs often arrive soon after a major film’s release in the West." "In the final version of the film, the rape is conveyed impressionistically, with the unstrapping of a belt, the victim’s cries and a drop of blood." I think this movie touched a nerve in the afghany people. It made them face the reality about the flaws in there culture. The movie and book have many connections to everyday life in Afghanistan and some of those issues need to be brought in the public and possibly worked through.

-Michelle Kilburn

Darren said...

I deffintly want to see this movie. But for all the money that its cost them to make it and trouble it cost those three kids it better be worth it. I liked reading this article because it explains what happens over there when people are trying to help people out. Like the producers of this film weren't trying to make fun of the Hazara people by making a kid get raped.(come on now seriously, READ THE BOOK!!!!) 1"If we're being overly cautious that's O.K." I don't understand why there was so much fuss about the kids getting hurt or beat up because the producers of the film had there backs no matter what. 2"They should not play around with the lives and security of people." I agree with this because I wouldn't want to be taken out of my school and leave and pretty much disown my friends, also have my parents have to leave there friends eiher. 3"The Hazara people will take it as an insult." I agree with this because I wouldnt want to see my friends or anyone get raped thats just an horrible thing to happen to anyone. 4"giving a voice and a face to people who've been voiceless and faceless for the last 30 years." I agree with this because the Hazara people with treated with such racism and always made fun of for everything. They have had to go through so much that I am thankful for what I have here in America. 5"There was such innocent to them, despite all they been through." The Hazara people have been through so much since they have even been around you can forget about the stupid racism issue that we had here in America between the whites and blacks, this is way worse in my eyes and it still goes on today as we sit in our desks at school. 6"Nothing will be done to put any kid at risk." I agree because if your putting kids at risks your not stopping what already goes on in Kabul and it is pretty much pointless to do it.

Anonymous said...

“The studio distributing “The Kite Runner,” a tale of childhood betrayal, sexual predation and ethnic tension in Afghanistan, is delaying the film’s release to get its three schoolboy stars out of Kabul — perhaps permanently — in response to fears that they could be attacked by Afghans angered by the film's culturally inflammatory rape scene.” I think that the film studio is responsible for protecting these boys; they starred these boys knowing that they could be in danger of an attack if the Hazara people where to be offended.

“The boys and their relatives are now accusing the filmmakers of mistreatment, and warnings have been relayed to the studio from Afghan and American officials and aid workers that the movie could aggravate simmering enmities between the politically dominant Pashtun and the long-oppressed Hazara.” Although the film makers should have to take care of the boys; however, I also believe that the boys and their families should have known the dangers of what could happen before agreeing to the role.

“Perhaps not coincidentally, the “Kite Runner” actor who plays Hassan, Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, 12, told reporters at that time that he feared for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene.” Again, he should have known that his fellow Hazara would feel offended by it, and refused the role.

“Mr. Forster emphasized that casting Afghan boys did not seem risky at the time; local filmmakers even encouraged him” With all that is going on in Afghanistan today, how does that not sound risky?

“Mr. Forster said that during rehearsals he considered including a shot of Hassan’s pants being pulled down, exposing his backside, and that neither Ahmad Khan nor his father objected. But the morning the scene was to be filmed, Mr. Forster found the boy in tears. Ahmad Khan said he did not want to be shown nude, Mr. Forster agreed to skip that shot, and the boy went ahead with the rape scene. Mr. Mahmoodzada confirmed this” If the Foster agreed to skip the shot but then the boy should not have gone alone with it.

“So on Sunday Rich Klein, a Middle East specialist at the consulting firm Kissinger McLarty Associates, flew to the United Arab Emirates to arrange visas, housing and schooling for the young actors and jobs for their guardians.” The film makers did what they should have. They helped, and paid for the boys to get to safty.

-Sean H

Christopher Anderson said...

"The studio distributing “The Kite Runner,” a tale of childhood betrayal, sexual predation and ethnic tension in Afghanistan, is delaying the film’s release to get its three schoolboy stars out of Kabul — perhaps permanently". According to the 'New York Times' this film is creating alot of tension between the people in Afghanistan.

"The boys and their relatives are now accusing the filmmakers of mistreatment, and warnings have been relayed to the studio from Afghan and American officials and aid workers that the movie could aggravate simmering enmities between the politically dominant Pashtun and the long-oppressed Hazara". The production of the movie angered many Hazaras due to it's depiction of discrimination and oppression to the Hazara people.

"The Taliban destroyed nearly all movie theaters in Afghanistan, but pirated DVDs often arrive soon after a major film’s release in the West. As a result, Paramount Vantage, the art-house and specialty label of Paramount Pictures, has pushed back the release of the $18 million movie by six weeks, to Dec. 14, when the young stars’ school year will have ended". The Taliban, an active group in Afghanistan, took action and destyed nearly evey theatre in the country. Paramount Pictures had to delay the release six weeks so that the actors were out of school.

"Perhaps not coincidentally, the “Kite Runner” actor who plays Hassan, Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, 12, told reporters at that time that he feared for his life because his fellow Hazara might feel humiliated by his rape scene. His father said he himself was misled by the film’s producers, insisting that they never told him of the scene until it was about to be shot and that they had promised to cut it". Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada and his father were mislead and lied to by not revealing the details of the rape scene and the potential outcome of it.

"On Tuesday the elder Mr. Mahmoodzada, reached by cellphone, rejected this account, and said he never learned the rape was a plot point until the scene was about to be shot. He also said his son never received a script". The actors did not even know that the rape scene was even part of the plot nor was the actor scripted on how to act the part.

"In the final version of the film, the rape is conveyed impressionistically, with the unstrapping of a belt, the victim’s cries and a drop of blood". After the actor admitted the humility of being nude during the scene, the decided to use certain parts to depict the scene in a cleaner way.

This article is a lucid indication to the world of the reaction among the Afghani people. This film produced massive amounts of violence and tension!

Brianna said...

(1)“The Kite Runner,” a tale of childhood betrayal, sexual predation and ethnic tension in Afghanistan." (2) "The boys and their relatives are now accusing the filmmakers of mistreatment, and warnings have been relayed to the studio from Afghan and American officials and aid workers that the movie could aggravate simmering enmities between the politically dominant Pashtun and the long-oppressed Hazara."(3)“They should not play around with the lives and security of people,” she said of the filmmakers. “The Hazara people will take it as an insult.” (4)"The filmmakers said they were surprised when Ahmad Khan and his father told The Sunday Times of London in January that they feared for their lives." (5) "Those involved say that the studio doesn’t want to be taken advantage of, but that it could accept responsibility for the boys’ living expenses until they reach adulthood."

I feel that the producers delaying this movie or permanently removing it, is a wrong decision. There are so many morals and themes to go by in the book and the movie to. The afghany people shouldn't look at it as something bad, but as a real life experience that some people do go through.