Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Poetry of Song: Plagiarism in Music

Musical plagiarism is complex, subjective, and a bit confusing. For decades, blues musicians have covered or restructured older songs as homage to past musicians. An artist may borrow lines, make allusions, or sample. Occasionally, artists take issue with this "borrowing" and sue.

For blog-work this week, research and listen to some examples of musical plagiarism. Identify: 1) the definition of plagiarism 2) at least one example of a truly plagiarized song (paragraph explanation) and 3) at least one example of a coincidental relationship between 2 songs(paragraph explanation). Discuss your findings here. In the spirit of avoiding plagiarism and associated transgressions, you must cite (MLA format) at least 3 sources for each argument. Citations will also allow you to incorporate periodicals and other resources that may offer some direct evidence to support your claims. On the left side of this blog, you will find some of the many useful citation tools available to you.

Some notable instances include (listed as original/supposed plagiarism): Chiffon's "He's So Fine"/George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord"; Tom Petty's "Mary Jane's Last Dance"/The Red Hot Chili Peppers' "Dani California"; Queen's "Under Pressure"/Vanilla Ice's "Ice, Ice Baby" , Joe Satriani's "If I Could Fly"/Coldplay's "Viva La Vida" and, most recently, Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven"/The Black Keys' "Little Black Submarines". Tyler Robidoux found an interesting one, so feel free to consult him as well. You are not limited to these examples, so feel free to find your own.

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

Chris Robinson
Period G
1) Plagiarism can tend to be taken “as copying another's work, or borrowing someone else's original ideas” according to Plagiarism.org, although it is a lot more serious than just so. The definition of plagiarism is “to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own,” and to “commit literary theft,” both in accordance with Plagiarism.org.

2) Joe Satriani sued Coldplay for the copyright infringement of his song If I could Fly. Satriani “stands to make a sizable profit if the jury agrees,” according to Daniel Kreps (2008), for all the hits that Coldplay made off of their song Viva la Vida. Hartley Engle (2008) stated that “evidence is pretty convincing” towards Coldplay being guilty, especially since their and Satriani’s songs sound eerily similar when played together. Again in accordance to Hartley Engle (2008), Coldplay’s song “sounded fresh and original,” despite the similarities between their song and Satriani’s. Many music experts were brought in to clarify that Satriani’s music was ripped off by Coldplay. Although, there are many claims that Coldplay’s song happened to sound similar to Satriani’s song.

3) Queen’s Under Pressure and Vanilla Ice’s Ice Ice Baby sounded very similar in some aspects. The beat of Ice Ice Baby sounds very similar to Queen’s song, so Vanilla was threatened with a law suit because they didn’t “bother to license,” according to Benedict.com, even though the song was not intentionally copyrighted. Benedict.com also came to say that Vanilla Ice “sampled the most identifiable riffs” from Queen’s song Under Pressure. Now, these pieces are noticeable, but there are arguments stating that this was just coincidence, especially since there was no real law suit to say that Vanilla Ice plagiarized. Queen “settled out of court” (Chacha.com, 2011) over the dispute between their song and Vanilla Ice’s.

Anonymous said...

Chris Robinson
Period G
1) Plagiarism can tend to be taken “as copying another's work, or borrowing someone else's original ideas” according to Plagiarism.org, although it is a lot more serious than just so. The definition of plagiarism is “to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own,” and to “commit literary theft,” both in accordance with Plagiarism.org.

2) Joe Satriani sued Coldplay for the copyright infringement of his song If I could Fly. Satriani “stands to make a sizable profit if the jury agrees,” according to Daniel Kreps (2008), for all the hits that Coldplay made off of their song Viva la Vida. Hartley Engle (2008) stated that “evidence is pretty convincing” towards Coldplay being guilty, especially since their and Satriani’s songs sound eerily similar when played together. Again in accordance to Hartley Engle (2008), Coldplay’s song “sounded fresh and original,” despite the similarities between their song and Satriani’s. Many music experts were brought in to clarify that Satriani’s music was ripped off by Coldplay. Although, there are many claims that Coldplay’s song happened to sound similar to Satriani’s song.

3) Queen’s Under Pressure and Vanilla Ice’s Ice Ice Baby sounded very similar in some aspects. The beat of Ice Ice Baby sounds very similar to Queen’s song, so Vanilla was threatened with a law suit because they didn’t “bother to license,” according to Benedict.com, even though the song was not intentionally copyrighted. Benedict.com also came to say that Vanilla Ice “sampled the most identifiable riffs” from Queen’s song Under Pressure. Now, these pieces are noticeable, but there are arguments stating that this was just coincidence, especially since there was no real law suit to say that Vanilla Ice plagiarized. Queen “settled out of court” (Chacha.com, 2011) over the dispute between their song and Vanilla Ice’s.

Cody said...

1. Plagiarism is a piece of writing or other work reflecting such unauthorized use or imitation Plagiarism can be found in songs as well. To do this, artists may use a similar tone compared to other songs.

Citation: "Plagiarism." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .

2. Everyone knows the song, “Viva La Vida” and Joe Satriani. Years ago, Coldplay released “Viva La Vida” which sounded too similar to Joe Satriani’s song. “Viva La Vida” almost had the exact same melody. Coldplay didn’t even ask for permission to use that melody. They could easily get sued in this case, but for now, nobody is making a big deal about it. If I was with Coldplay, I would have asked Joe Satriani if I could use that melody so that I wouldn’t get sued or have anything else bad happen.

Cody said...

1. Plagiarism is a piece of writing or other work reflecting such unauthorized use or imitation Plagiarism can be found in songs as well. To do this, artists may use a similar tone compared to other songs.

Citation: "Plagiarism." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .

2. Everyone knows the song, “Viva La Vida” and Joe Satriani. Years ago, Coldplay released “Viva La Vida” which sounded too similar to Joe Satriani’s song. “Viva La Vida” almost had the exact same melody. Coldplay didn’t even ask for permission to use that melody. They could easily get sued in this case, but for now, nobody is making a big deal about it. If I was with Coldplay, I would have asked Joe Satriani if I could use that melody so that I wouldn’t get sued or have anything else bad happen.

inken o said...

1.
Plagiarism definition:
“Plagiarism is defined in dictionaries as the "wrongful appropriation," "close imitation," or "purloining and publication" of another author's "language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions," and the representation of them as one's own original work” (wikipedia)

2. A truly plagiarized song is “dani california”by the red hot chili peppers who copied Tom Petty’s “Mary Jane’s Last Dance”. The instrumental song by Pettey includes an interesting bass solo that the red hot chili peppers formed into vocals and used in their own song. Confronted with the obvious plagiarism they say that this happened unintentionally.

3.
An really obvious example of plagiarism is Led Zeppelin’s “stairway to heaven” versus The Black Keys’ “little Black submarines”. The soft guitar and the really careful voice seem really similar in both songs and people accuse The Black Keys of copying Led Zeppelin
In Rock it is really common that band build their music on pieces that existed before.

On youtube, brandon lace created the following high rated comment :”So what it sounds like stairway. The chord progression from stairway was inspired by "Taurus" by spirit, who Zeppelin toured with, who in turn were inspired by jazz music of the 50`s. That's the way music works, particularly blues and rock and roll music. Everything is a rehash or an improvement on something somebody did before. Think Robert Johnson, to muddy waters, to B.B king, to Jimmy Page. It`s how music works.” This quote was supported by many youtube users.
“i think LBS is the opposite to stairway, so instead of up you go down and a broken heart is blind not all that glitters is gold?! that's my view of it. i just wish that had put some feedback in as that heavy part was about to kick in.”, says Chris “Hokes” Dorgan in a Fanforum where different parties argue over the connection between the two songs.
It seems obvious. Even people who didn’t know about the plagiarism, notice that they have heard this familiar guitar art before. Looking for an answer, Brad asked his question at Yahoo: “In the Black Keys' new album, "El Camino", their track "Little Black Submarines" has a chord progression in the refrain that sounds eerily similar to another song I've heard before, but I can't figure out what it is. It's been bugging me since I bought the album yesterday. Does anybody have any idea what it could be?”

My personal opinion is that it just sounds too similar for not being copied. But since it is Rock it seems fine to share good ideas.

Dan Fillingim said...

1. Plagiarism -The unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work (ask.com)
-the "wrongful appropriation," "close imitation," or "purloining and publication" of another author's "language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions," and the representation of them as one's own original work (wikipedia)
-an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own, as by not crediting the original author (dictionary.com)
2. Vanilla Ice has clearly plagiarized Queen’s song “under pressure” with their song “ice ice baby”. They stole the very recognizable beat that Queen has made and put in their song. As soon as you play the song “ice ice baby” you immediately know the beat Vanilla Ice has stolen, that is if you know the song by Queen. That was a very successful song and one of a kind by Queen and Vanilla Ice tried to gain success from stealing the iconic beat Queen has used and putting it in a song of their own. Vanilla ice in a way made half a song and used someone else’s beat because they probably did not want to make one of their own.
3. There is possible accidental plagiarism in the song my “my sweet lord” by George Harrison. The beat to George’s song and the song “He’s so fine” by Chiffons is very similar. This was accidental because it is a very basic beat and George’s band might have just been playing around on their instruments and found a good beat, not realizing that the beat was already used. Back in that age of music most of the rhythms and beats sounded similar because they did not have much technology to make unique rhythms and make their bands stand out. The bands that could do that though were very successful.

Anonymous said...

Emily B.

1. According to the Merriam- Webster dictionary to plagiarize is “to steal and pass off (the ideas or words if another) as one’s own; use (another’s production) without crediting the source.”
2. Defining whether music is plagiarized or simply a homage to past musicians is very difficult. Many songs utilize lines or pieces of music used by other artists and people take no notice. However, when people do notice, and when people get angry, that is when you get brought to court on plagiarism charges. Although the Vanilla Ice dispute “was settled out of court” (Jones), his “fading reputation was ruined for good” (Jones). The plagiarism involved in this song was not the lyrics, but the base line. Antony Heywood states that the stolen portion came from “a sample of the baseline from the Queen and Bowie record” (Heywood). Although the plagiarism did not result in an official court case, Vanilla Ice and Queen with David Bowie settled it privately which, many have assumed, resulted in the loss of money on Vanilla Ice’s part hurting his budding reputation (Catching Up With. . . Vanilla Ice, 2006). In an interview, Vanilla with on a Washington D.C. radio broadcast Vanilla Ice admitted vaguely that “I was influenced by the same musicians” (Catching Up With. . . Vanilla Ice, 2006) not necessarily confirming that the song “Ice Ice Baby” was directly plagiarized, but also not denying that other artists did have influence on his music. The Vanilla Ice and Queen with David Bowie case for plagiarism, not settled in court, but settled privately depicts one example of intentional musical plagiarism.
3. Plagiarism is a rising issue in the music industry. The first case of musical plagiarism involved George Harrison’s plagiarism of Chiffon. Eventually the court ruled that Harrison was guilty of plagiarism. However, plagiarism is very difficult to determine and in the case of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Tom Petty, I am led to believe that the plagiarism was accidental. U.S. radio host, Dan Gaffney accused the Red Hot Chili Peppers of plagiarizing Tom Petty and played the song on the radio to “the uncanny similarities between the two tracks” (Red Hot Chili Pepper Plagiarism Rip Off Tom Petty, 2006). The producer of the radio station, Jared Moriss, agreed with Gaffney and directly pinpointed the plagiarized aspects. He said “the chord progression, the melody, the tempo, the key, the lyrical themes, they are identical” (Daniel Melia) were the plagiarized parts of the song. The host and the producer were both able to detect the direct similarities, however, Tom Petty does not believe the song was stolen “note for note” (Petty Turns a Blind Eye to Chili Peppers Plagiarism, 2006). The fact that the artist of the “original” song does not believe the Chili Peppers plagiarized supports the idea that this was an accidental plagiarism. Petty was quoted in an interview saying “’if someone took my song note for note and stole it maliciously, then maybe I would sue” (Petty Turns a Blind Eye to Chili Peppers Plagiarism, 2006), and this again strengthens the idea of the accidental plagiarism. Only a few people called out the Red Hot Chili Peppers on plagiarism without consulting the band, and Tom Petty, the writer of the “original” song was willing to “turn a blind eye” proving that perhaps the plagiarism was accidental.

Amanda Paulhus said...

Plagiarism is an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without crediting that author's work as their own, as by not crediting the original author.
Plagiarism is the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work.(http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Plagiarism)
The instance of the red hot chili peppers song “ Dani California” and Tom petty’s song” Mary Jane’s last dance” is, in my opinion, not merely coincidence. I see two completely different styles of music that are too similar to be not plagiarized. The red hot chili peppers simply have a completely similar sound; although there is no other evidence throughout the song of plagiarism. It is thought to be plagiarism in the introduction to the song because of the similar drum beat and flow of the music and I agree with this, as well as the idea that both songs have the same sort of flow and story line. They both start out with this story of a girl whether it is “Mary Jane” in Petty’s song or the anonymous girl who was “born in the state of Mississippi”, both songs explain the starting and story of a girl’s life. This idea is supported in an article when the author writes “From “Dani California:” Getting' born in the state of Mississippi / Poppa was a copper and her momma was a hippie / In Alabama she was swinging hammer.” From “Mary Jane’s Last Dance:” She grew up in a Indiana town / Had a good looking’ mama who never was around / But she grew up tall and she grew up right / With them Indiana boys on an Indiana night.” (© (c) Can West Media Works Publications Inc., 2006)
An example, in my opinion, of a sheer coincidence is in the case of Led Zeppelin’s “stairway to heaven” paired with Black keys “little black submarines”. Both the vocals and the guitar rhythm are supposedly taken in this pair. Because the melody of both the vocals and the guitar are similar I believe this is not a true instance of plagiarism. My Idea is supported by Alexandra Palace in her article “Black keys review” when she claims, "Little Black Submarines", earlier in the set, starts with Auerbach imploring a telephone operator as "Stairway To Heaven" by Led Zeppelin is invoked beneath. Then it locks into a hairy groove that somehow manages to sound like a pop song.” (Alexandra Palace, 2012). My opinion is also supported in an album post review when the speaker says “They know how to play blues like Robert Johnson. They know how to wail like Zeppelin. They know how to croon like Al Green. Now, they can add rock n’ roll like the Stones to their list.”(http://genericflow.wordpress.com/). This supports my opinion because they may know how to sound LIKE Led Zeppelin but I agree that they did not purposefully plagiaries their song “stairway to heaven”. They created an entirely different background story and plot; although their vocals and instrumentals are seem allusive in some occasion, they are not the same.

acm2012 said...

1. The definition of plagiarism is an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own, as by not crediting the original author <"Plagiarism." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com. Web. 29 Apr. 2012. .

2. The song “My Sweet Lord” by George Harrison is clearly a copy of The Chiffons’ “He’s so Fine.” According to a web article about the lawsuit, “a judge said Harrison “subconsciously plagiarized The Chiffons’ My Sweet Love.” <"George Harrison vs. The Chiffons or My Sweet Lord Is So Fine | Songs Alike." Songs Alike Music Blog: Similar Songs Pop Music Mash Ups. Web. 29 Apr. 2012. . An additional source added “it was note-for-note identical to a song called He’s So Fine.” "Plagiarism, Copyright, and New Media." Mantex. Web. 29 Apr. 2012. . Harrison also stated that “It would have been very easy to change a note here or there and not affect the feeling of the record.” (http://performingsongwriter.com/george-harrison-my-sweet-lord/) <"George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord" Copyright Infringement Case." Performing Songwriter: Music News, Interviews and Stories. Web. 29 Apr. 2012. .





3. The two songs, “Viva La Vida” by Coldplay, and “If I could Fly” by Joe Satriani, are thought to be copies of each other. The song by Coldplay seems to have the same rhythm and guitar parts as the Satriani song. An article about this lawsuit states that “Coldplay countered by swearing that they’d never heard “If I could Fly,” which they also said, “lacked originality” (Kreps, 2009). (Kreps, Daniel. "Satriani's "Viva La Vida" Copyright Suit Against Coldplay Dismissed." Rollingstone.com. 16 Sept. 2009. Web. 27 Apr. 2012.) Another source states that Coldplay “states that if there are any similarities between our two pieces of music, they are entirely coincidental.” (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/28143485/ns/today-entertainment/t/coldplay-responds-viva-la-vida-lawsuit/) . Coldplay clearly did not intentionally plagiarize Satrini and Coldplay’s drummer, Will Champion stated that “when you become one of the biggest bands in the world, people will accuse you of stealing something when you know you didn’t.” (http://www.stereotruth.net/2009/05/coldplay-speaks-out-about-2nd-viva-la-vida-lawsuit/) <"StereoTruth.net." Coldplay Speaks Out About 2nd ‘Viva La Vida’ Lawsuit. 11 May 2009. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. http://www.stereotruth.net/2009/05/coldplay-

Emily Anderson said...

Emily Anderson
1. Plagiarism is the act of taking someone’s idea, making it your own, and taking credit for coming up with it originally. Music is something that has been plagiarized many times. It can also be very easily plagiarized. Whether it is a certain beat, lyrics, musical component, or any other musical element, it can lead to major legal trouble.

2. Two songs that are famous for being in the center of talk on plagiarism are “Under Pressure” by Queen and “Ice, Ice Baby” by Vanilla Ice. Queen composed their song before “Ice, Ice Baby” came out, allowing for Vanilla Ice to be accused of plagiarizing “Under Pressure.” Listening to the two songs provides a clear reasoning for the suspicion of plagiarism. The case was never taken to court, but “the result was a massive out of court settlement that stripped Vanilla Ice of the majority of the royalties from the sales of the hit single and album” (Hub Pages). Vanilla Ice admitted in an interview with MTV in 1990, “We sampled…from [“Under Pressure”] but it’s not the same bass line.” Vanilla ice digresses from his accusations and is confident that he did not plagiarize. Also, he never even bothered to give Queen any credit for the song (Copyright Website). If he did, he would not have been in the center of this controversy. Although he admitted to the songs being only similar, Vanilla Ice paid compensation to Queen for the accusation of plagiarism which ended the case outside of court.

"David Bowie, Queen and Vanilla Ice." Vanilla Ice and Queen. Copyright Website, 2011. Web. 27 Apr. 2012.
"The Song Reminds the Same – Musical Plagiarism in Pop Music." HubPages. 2012. Web. 27 Apr. 2012.
Van Winkle, Robert M. "Vanilla Ice on "Ice, Ice Baby" vs. "Under Pressure"" Interview. Music Television. 1990. Television.


3. An example of a coincidental relationship between two songs in my opinion is Coldplay’s “The Scientist” and Sum 41’s “Pieces.” Although many people say that Sum 41 plagiarized form Coldplay, I do not think they did. Critics notice the similarities that “they both use the same progressions in the same places, with only that difference at the end of the chorus.” These, however, are very common progressions that a lot of songs use. People also use the argument that the two songs played at the same time show that they are pretty much the same. Common videos that express this either speed up Coldplay’s song or slow down Sum 41’s to make them match up, even though people think that “you can play both songs at the same time and have them match perfectly.” In reality, the two songs play at a different pace. In the defense of Sum 41, “several remixes of [“The Scientist”] exist, and its riff has been widely sampled.” This could just be because, again, the musical element in the song is very common and it is not owned by one person or band. In my opinion, “Pieces” by Sum 41 and “The Scientist” by Coldplay are examples of coincidental plagiarism.
"Coldplay vs. Sum 41 ANTI-plug - Plagarism the Scientist Pieces at Newmoanyeah." Newmoanyeah: Hip, Geeky Pop-culture Features, Reviews, Advice, and Plugs at Newmoanyeah. 24 Jan. 2005. Web. 27 Apr. 2012.
DVD Talk Forum." DVD Talk Forum. 26 Feb. 2005. Web. 29 Apr. 2012.

"Sum 41's "Pieces" = Coldplay's "A Rush of Cold Blood To The Head" [Archive] - Music & Musician Forums." Sputnikmusic. 2012. Web. 27 Apr. 2012.

Meghan B said...

Meghan Burgess

Dictionary.com defines plagiarism as an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of the author’s work as one’s own, and not crediting the original author

Queen accused Vanilla Ice of plagiarizing their song, “Under Pressure,” to create his song “Ice Ice Baby.” This case was never brought to court, since it was completely obvious that Vanilla Ice did steal the rhythm (famous copyright infringement plagiarism cases in music). Vanilla Ice slightly modified the rhythm, so that it was no longer an exact replica of Queens (Wright). He thought that by doing so, he would not have to credit the original artist because it was no longer the original song. He recalls that he was not expecting the backlash that was produced by his hit song, and the he was just inspired by other musicians (Washington post). Although Vanilla Ice did not admit to stealing Queens song, he makes it extremely obvious that he took the rhythm and tweaked it so it would be his own.

One of the widest known cases for plagiarism within music was the case between Coldplay and Joe Satriani. When Coldplay came out with the song “Viva la Vida,” Satriani noticed that the arrangement of lyrics sounded eerily similar to the guitar in his song, “If I Could Fly.” Satriani came to believe that the song included large amounts of original material from his songs. He is demanding any and all profits that Coldplay makes from this song (Kaufman). Coldplay told the public that if the songs sound alike it is only a coincidence and they did not plagiarize Satriani in any way (Coldplay). A financial settlement was reached between the two musicians in an out of court agreement, dismissing the case from court (Kaufman). Satriani did not make Coldplay give a statement saying that they plagiarized his song, proving the point that this was a case of accidental plagiarism.

Emily C said...

Plagiarism: to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own : use (another's production) without crediting the source.

I don’t believe that Tom Petty’s song “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” was stolen by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, “Dani California”. The song has similar ideas sound wise, but the whole points of the songs are different. According to Stan Walker, Short Stack, Michael Paynter, Amy Meredith, “Tom Petty himself has admitted their could be a little of his track 'Mary Jane's Last Dance' in 'Dani California' but he is not convinced that the Chilis stole bits of the tune on purpose.” Even Tom Petty himself doesn’t believe it to be true, there are so many songs out there that it is possible to run into others like it. Also stated by Scott (2006), “And a lot of rock ‘n’ roll songs sound alike”, therefore again proving that he doesn’t believe that this song was taken. Apparently, Tom Petty said “But I don’t believe in lawsuits much. I think there are enough frivolous lawsuits in this country without people fighting over pop songs.” (Josh Hathaway, 2006)
Cites:
"Chili Pepper's 'Dani California' Not Petty." - Take 40. Stan Walker, Short Stack, Michael Paynter, Amy Meredith. MCM Media, 6 July 2006. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .
Scott. "Tom Petty Responds To Red Hot Chili Controversy - Stereogum." Stereogum. Rolling Stones, 29 June 2006. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .











The song “Sweet Little Sixteen” by Chuck Berry was clearly stolen by the Beach Boys “Surfin’ USA. According to Adam Wagner (Aug 6) “The rhythm, structure, melody, lyrics & vocal cadence of Chuck Berry’s “Sweet Little Sixteen” is heard all over again in “Surfin’ USA”.”. When listening you can clearly hear the distinctions, Chuck Berry also heard the distinctions and “successfully sued the Beach Boys, causing all subsequent releases of "Surfin' U.S.A." on compilation albums to credit Berry alongside Brian Wilson, who wrote the new lyrics” (Raphael). The Beach Boys clearly stole this from Chuck Berry and made valid points, that when people listen to Surfin’ USA, it can be credited to Chuck Berry. Jamie Frater argues “The tune has a catchy melody, which has become one of the most recognizable in music history.”. People now relate more to the Beach Boys when given the tune, but it was an original idea by Berry and was stolen from them.
Cites:
Frater, Jamie. "Top 10 Popular Music Rip-Offs." Listverse. Wordpress. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .
Hathaway, Josh. "Tom Petty Is Not Suing The Red Hot Chili Peppers." - Blogcritics Music. 29 June 2006. Web. 29 Apr. 2012. .
Raphel. "Chuck Berry Sued the Beach Boys for Using His Music Which Song Was It and Did He Win the Suit?" WikiAnswers. Answers. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .
“The Beach Boys Surfin USA Sounds like Chuck Berry’s Sweet Little Sixteen Sounds Just Like." The Beach Boys Surfin USA Sounds like Chuck Berry’s Sweet Little Sixteen. Sounds Just Like. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .

Eric L's Blog said...

Eric Linfield
4/26/12
Class: G
1. Plagiarize – To steal and pass off the ideas or words of another as one’s own. Use another’s production without crediting the source.
2. A song that was truly plagiarized was the hit from Vanilla Ice, called “Ice Ice Baby” which stole the rhythm of the bassline in Queen & David Bowie’s “Under Pressure”. Vanilla Ice thought he could take the bassline and avoid being sued by using an altered timing instead of the original timing. Vanilla Ice was completely wrong and had to settle out of court with Queen and David Bowie for an undisclosed amount of money.
3. In one case of similar sounding songs, there is Tom Petty’s “Mary Janes Last Dance” and Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Dani California.” There was never a court case between the two bands due to Tom Petty’s lack of interest in pursuing the matter. Petty said that he did not care about it at all and that there are enough pointless lawsuits in America anyway so there would be no point to it. He felt that there was no “malicious intent” to RHCP’s song so there was no reason to make a big deal about it.
Citations
"Famous Copyright Infringement Plagiarism Cases in Music." Fair Wage Attorney. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .

Shayna said...

1. Plagiarism is when someone takes credit for someone else’s work.
2. Chiffon's "He's so Fine"/George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord": the songs both have the same sound to it. The music is very similar. Even the tone of the voice is the same, and also the pitch is the same. “My Sweet Lord was originally created before “He’s So Fine” came out.

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