Friday, September 27, 2013

Journalism Class Work for 9-27

Please respond to the following directives with a comment posted here. It is wise to work on your responses in Word, to save them as a document, and then paste and post here.

1. View your Edline grade report. Be sure to take care of any missing work.

2. Please update your Edline email. This is how I will forward to you the emails from Ken Ross.

Question A: Was the research from the Atlantic article qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods? Explain your answer with evidence, integrating the 4 basic quote integration techniques (paragraph). Cite the article in MLA format (cite each quote; list the article as a Work cited). This will require you to use the MLA resources linked on the left side of Mr. Kefor's blog. Be sure to locate the MLA format for a magazine/periodical.

Question B: Offer a proposal for 3 distinct data-driven journalistic pieces- one qualitative, one quantitative, and one mixed methods.

5. As peers complete Question B, respond to each comment (direct response with peer's name) and rank the success of each concept from 1-3. Respond to all peers by the end of the block.

28 comments:

Sean Mathews said...

The Atlantic Article is a qualitative data driven research article. It is qualitative because it's data is derived from personal experience, "I decide to do my daughter's homework for one typical week" (Greenfeld). The essay is written like a diary to his week, "Wednesday" he titles a passgae, then writes, "3 hours" (Greenfeld) to record the time. He also uses quantitative data by using statistics. He includes a section to backup his personal experience with solid numbers. "According to a University of Michigan study" he says, "42 percent of students they have homework 5 or more days a week".

Greenfeld, Karl. "My Daughter's Homework is Killing Me." Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 27 Sept. 2013.

gabrielle bergeron said...

A. The article was mixed methods because Karl Greenfield experienced the homework load himself which makes it qualitative. It is quantitative because he writes down the actual amount of hours he spends doing homework and the number of homework assignments he does.

Cody Shannon said...

The research from the Atlantic was qualitative because much of the article was based off of observations and experiences. The author, Karl Greenfield, spends a week doing his daughter's homework to experience first hand just how heavy of a work load she has. Karl explains: "I am surprised by the amount of reading,"(Greenfield). Karl could not understand how such a young student could be required to read so much each night. Karl fell asleep while, "Esmee stays up until a little after midnight to finish her reading,"(Greenfield). Karl never received this amount of homework as a kid. He states, "I don’t remember how much homework was assigned to me in eighth grade,"(Greenfield). Karl often found his daughter doing what seemed like pointless homework exercises. "What possible purpose could this serve?". Less homework should be given and more free time should be granted to younger students.

kylie werner said...

A. The research from the Atlantic article was more qualitative than quantitative. The qualitative aspects of the Atlantic article were the various conversations he had with parents/teacher/his daughter, his observations about the quantity of homework,and the experiences he had wrote about throughout the whole week he was doing the homework, with this article being one big experience in general. The only quantitative qualities that was presented was the accuracy of the amount of homework and the amount of hours it took to complete the homework. It does have both qualitative and quantitative qualities, but it leans more on the qualitative side of the two. I would put this article under the qualitative type.

Gianna Larson said...
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huup33 said...

A: The Atlantic Article uses mixed methods. Karl Greenfield reveals an overload of qualitative data collections from describing the homework every night, "We have 11 algebra equations"..."also have to read 79 pages of Angela’s Ashes"..." There is also the Earth Science test tomorrow on minerals"(Greenfield), to explaining his observations of his daughters behavior, "my daughter teary-eyed and exhausted but still trudging to school"(Greenfield). This article became quantitative when he made note of how much time he took every night to do the work.

Greenfield, Karl. "My Daughters Homework Is Killing Me". Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 27 Sept. 2013.

Casey Holmes said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lizzie said...

A. The Atlantic article uses mixed methods. It interviews other student’s parents and other adults on whether teachers give too much homework and also collects data on how much time it takes a student to do all their homework. Esmee’s dad wants to find out if the other students from her class take just as much time on their homework as Esmee does. “…an e-mail chain started by the class parent to seek chaperones for a field trip, I removed the teachers name, changed the subject line, and then asked the other parents in the class whether their children found the homework load onerous,” Esmee’s dad waiting patiently for a response, “Half the class’s parents responded that they thought too much homework was an issue.” Esmee’s dad asked all the parents and they came back with conclusions. He took data not only from parents but also from other countries, “The irony is that some countries where the school systems are held us as models for our schools have been going in the opposite direction of the U.S., giving less homework and implementing narrower curricula built to encourage deeper understanding rather than broader coverage.” Esmee’s dad wonders why the teachers give more homework than the schools that show up as a model for us. While he asks parents and gathers information from other schools, he also asks the teacher how she feels about homework, “the teachers usually respond in one of two ways. They nod sympathetically and agree that the kids do have a lot of work, as if they have nothing to do with the assigning of it.” Interviewing and gathering information from others give Esmee’s dad the idea of doing her homework and seeing how long it takes him. He calculates how long it takes her to do her homework, “during the school week, she averages three to four hours of homework a night and six and a half hours of sleep.” While Esmee takes a long time doing homework, her dad struggles and experiences having six and a half hours of sleep. This article using qualitative because Esmee’s dad interviews parents and gathers information from other schools and teachers, but it’s also quantitative because he calculates how long it takes for his daughter to do her homework in one night that is why the Atlantic Article uses mixed methods.

Lauren MacGray said...
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Lauren MacGray said...

In the Atlantic Article, “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing Me” is an example of mixed methods. It is mixed methods because it interviews other student’s parents and other adults on whether teachers give too much homework. Also, the father does an experiment, a case study, and observes the daughter’s homework every night which is an example of qualitative data. While on the other hand, the father is measuring how much homework the daughter is getting every night and how long it is taking him to do it which is an example of quantitative data. Esmee’s dad mentions, “During the school week, she averages three to four hours of homework a night and six and a half hours of sleep.”(Greenfeld). This is an example of quantitative data because it is dealing with numbers, in other words, it is focusing on exactly how long it is taking his daughter to do homework every night. “Every parent I know in New York City comments on how much homework their children have. These lamentations are a ritual whenever we are gathered around kitchen islands talking about our kids’ schools.”(Greenfeld). This quote from Esmee’s dad requires him to have asked/interviewed other student’s parents how much homework their kids get every night. Therefore, this quote portrays an example of qualitative data. When comparing Esmee’s amount of homework to every other students’ in 9-12 grade, he states, “Data from a 2007 National Center for Education Statistics survey showed Americans students between grades nine and 12 doing an average of 6.8 hours of homework a week.” (Greenfeld). This is another example providing quantitative data because not only does it say that that students get a lot of homework, but it gives you the average amount of hours that students actually spend time on their homework. With qualitative data, it takes a lot of observations and case studies to get actual information. For instance, when Esmee’s dad goes to check up on her, he is very shocked disappointed. “One evening when Esmee was in sixth grade I walked into her room at 1:30 a.m. to find her red-eyed, exhausted, and starting on her third hour of math.” (Greenfeld). This Atlantic Article, “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing me”, focusing on how much homework Esmee gets a night and how long it takes her to do it portrays many examples of qualitative and quantitative data, in other words, mixed methods.

Keenan Coffey said...

In the Atlantic article, the author used mixed methods in this piece of writing. Both numbers and qualities were expressed in this piece. This means it was both qualitative and quantitative. A quantitative journalistic survey could be the amount of people that like wendys or mcdonalds.

Alexa DosReis said...

Question A: Karl Greenfield wants to personally experience the workload his daughter gets for homework every night: “I wonder: What is the exact nature of her work that is turning her into a sleep deprived zombie every morning?” (The Atlantic). When Greenfield starts her math homework he feels, after flying through the eleven problems, is over confident. He recorded “Total time: 3-5 hours/ If my daughter came home and said she had no homework, I would know she was lying” (The Atlantic). “Parent-teacher conferences at the Lab School” he claims, “are what I imagine speed dating to be like” (The Atlantic). As Greenfield progresses through the week of homework he documents each day like entries in a day “Monday…3-5 hours/ Tuesday….3 hours/ Wednesday….3 hours/ Thursday…..1.5 hours/Friday…I have till Monday to finish my homework” (The Atlantic). The personal involvement he has can be referred to as qualitative data because it is a record of an experience he has during his research and as he goes through the week of doing his daughter’s homework with her he kept a record of the day, what homework was assigned, and how many hours it took to complete it. This would be considered quantitative data because it is a numerical set of data. Therefore over this entire article contains a mixed use of methods.

Kylie Barrows said...
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Christine Remick said...
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Carli Arcaro said...
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Carli Arcaro said...
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Carli Arcaro said...

In the article, “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing Me” by Karl Taro Greenfield, he uses mixed methods of both, qualitative and quantitative methods. This means that he uses observations, conversations, and profiles while on the other hand he uses numbers in the sense that he emailed back to many other parents asking about their thoughts and opinions on whether they think their children are getting to much homework. To start, Esmee’s father puts his opinion in when he starts doing her homework, “I am surprised by the amount of reading.” (Greenfeld)He thinks that Esmee has too much reading to do and shouldn’t be given this much to do in just one subject. Next, the teacher sends out an email and the father reply’s, “that night, in an e-mail chain started by the class parent to seek chaperones for a field trip, I removed the teacher’s name, changed the subject line, and then asked the other parents in the class whether their children found the homework load onerous.”(Greenfeld)He wanted to see what other parents of the children thought so he took a survey of them. He found out that most of them thought the same thing but they didn’t want to say anything because they thought they were the only ones. Now, he goes to parent teacher conferences and has a conversation with Esmee’s teacher, “In each conference, I urge the teachers to give less homework.” (Greenfeld)

Greenfeld, Karl. "My Daughter's Homework is Killing Me." Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 1 Oct. 2013

Gianna Larson said...

In the article “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing Me,” it is qualitative data. It is qualitative data because the father is having the personal experience of doing his daughters homework. “I decide to do my daughter’s homework for one typical week” the father says. Esmee stays up until midnight just to do her homework. “Some evenings, when we force her to go to bed, she will pretend to go to sleep and then get back up and continue to do homework for another hour,” the father doesn’t want her to keep staying up to do homework. After a few minutes, replies started coming in from parents along the lines of “Thank God, we thought we were the only ones,” “Our son has been up until 2 a.m. crying,” and so forth. “Half the class’s parents responded that they thought too much homework was an issue.” This quote shows the qualitative data of the father asking the other parents what they think of all the homework. “My wife and I decide to go out to dinner, and on our way up Hudson Street, we run into another couple we are close friends with. This couple’s oldest daughter also goes to Lab. She’s at home doing homework.” This also shows the other parents have their daughter at home doing a lot of home work also. (Greenfield)


Greenfeld, Karl. "My Daughter's Homework is Killing Me." Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 1 October. 2013

Christine Remick said...

The article “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing Me” in The Atlantic is written by Karl Taro Greenfeld, a concerned parent. Throughout the article he used a series of mixed methods- both qualitative and quantitative information. Mr. Greenfeld was concerned on whether or not his daughter, Esmee, was given too much homework to do at home. He would often catch her staying up late into the night finishing up homework assignments and waking up dreary eyed. “’Some evenings,”’ Karl commented. “’When we force her to go to bed, she will pretend to go to sleep and then get back up and continue to do homework for another hour.”’ (Greenfeld) This is an adult who has not been to school in many, many years, he was not in touch with how the teachers dealt with the homework now. This was a mystery and Karl was determined to solve it. "'That night, in an e-mail chain started by the class parent to seek chaperones for a field trip, I removed the teacher’s name, changed the subject line, and then asked the other parents in the class whether their children found the homework load onerous."' (Greenfeld) Greenfeld used qualitative data right here by collecting the other parent's opinions on the subject of too much homework.

"'According to a University of Michigan study, the average time spent weekly on homework increased from two hours and 38 minutes in 1981 to three hours and 58 minutes in 2004. Data from a 2007 National Center for Education Statistics survey showed American students between grades nine and 12 doing an average of 6.8 hours of homework a week—which sounds pretty reasonable compared with what my daughter is assigned—and 42 percent of students saying they have homework five or more days a week."'(Greenfeld) This is quantitative data because this factual information has numbers in it.
Another parents responded saying the same things along the line of "'we thought we were the only ones,”' or “'Our son has been up until 2 a.m. crying,”' (Greenfeld) Karl was not the only one thinking that his kid was working too hard. This is how Karl Taro Greenfeld’s article is a mix of both qualitative and quantitative data.

Greenfeld, Taro Karl. “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing Me” Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. 1 Oct 2013

Cody Shannon said...
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Casey Holmes said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Casey Holmes said...

Part A
The article “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing Me” is mixed methods piece of journalism. It is mixed because he is doing an observation and collects data from the teacher and different sites. “Every parent I know in New York City comments on how much homework their children have,” (Greenfield) which is qualitative because it is the sort of a quote not a person connection. “One evening when Esmee was in sixth grade I walked into her room at 1;30 a.m. to find her red-eyed, exhausted, and starting on her third hour of math,” (Greenfield) which is a qualitative because he has learned from observations. “Data from a 2007 National Center for Education Statistics survey showed Americans students between grades nine and 12 doing an average of 6.8 hours of homework a week-“ (Greenfield), which would be quantitative since it is showing a survey from 2007. “She says that in her class in her class, they have more than one midterm every term.” (Greenfield) This shows a quantitative use in this article. Karl Greenfield has used both quantitative and qualitative literary terms to describe his side of the story.
Greenfeld, Karl. "My Daughter's Homework is Killing Me." Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 1 Oct. 2013

Part B
What is the difference between the Mansfield and Norton freshman volleyball team?

Cody Shannon said...

The research from the Atlantic was qualitative because much of the article was based off of observations and experiences. The author, Karl Greenfield, spends a week doing his daughter's homework to experience first hand just how heavy of a work load she has. Karl explains: "I am surprised by the amount of reading,"(Greenfield). Karl could not understand how such a young student could be required to read so much each night. Karl fell asleep while, "Esmee stays up until a little after midnight to finish her reading,"(Greenfield). Karl never received this amount of homework as a kid. He states, "I don’t remember how much homework was assigned to me in eighth grade,"(Greenfield). Karl often found his daughter doing what seemed like pointless homework exercises. "What possible purpose could this serve?". Less homework should be given and more free time should be granted to younger students.

Greenfeld, Taro Karl. “My Daughter’s Homework Is Killing Me” Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. 1 Oct 2013

Kylie Barrows said...

The Atlantic article is a qualitative data driven research article. This article is qualtive because it is from a father's point of view. Karl Greenfield spends a week doing his daughter homework to experience what his daughter encounters through a daily basis. Esmee is like a everyday normal student. She stays up way too late to finish the large amount of homework given to her each and every night, "some evenings when we force her to go to bed, she will pretend to go to sleep and then get back up and continue to do homework for another hour." Her father does not believe that it is healthy to continuously stay up late every night. Karl Greenfield does not understand why the teachers give there pupils so much homework. This article is a qualtive article because the father had a hands on experience with the amount of work an average daughter gets a night.

Greenfeld, Karl. "My Daughter's Homework is Killing Me." Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web Sept. 2013.

Matt's Journalism Blog said...

The research from the Alantic article utilized mixed methods. The author, Karl Greenfeld, did all of his daughters homework for a week. One example of quantitative data he collected is when he started an e-mail chain, “That night, in an e-mail chain started by the class parent to seek chaperones for a field trip, I removed the teacher’s name, changed the subject line, and then asked the other parents in the class whether their children found the homework load onerous.” He recorded data from others, therefore this is quantitative. One example of qualitative data Karl recorded is when he did his daughters homework. "Tonight we have 12 more algebra equations," says Karl, and "45 more pages of Angela’s Ashes, and a Humanities project." This was a personal experience because he physically did it himself, and is therefore qualitative data. Another example of qualitative data is when he has to read his daughters book. "I sneak in and grab her copy of Angela’s Ashes and catch up on my reading, getting all the way to page 120." Says Karl. He had to actually read the book, and that is why this is another form of qualitative data. Karl Greenfeld utilized qualitative, and quantitative data, or mixed methods.

Greenfeld, Karl. "My Daughter's Homework is Killing Me." Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 27 Sept. 2013.

huup33 said...

B. Where is the best place in the world?
Quantitative-make a survey with many places around the world that attract the most tourists.
Qualitative- why is a place your favorite?
Mixed Methods- comparing peoples favorite places they stated with reasons why in a poll or survey.

Lizzie said...

A. The Atlantic article uses mixed methods. It interviews other student’s parents and other adults on whether teachers give too much homework and also collects data on how much time it takes a student to do all their homework. Esmee’s dad wants to find out if the other students from her class take just as much time on their homework as Esmee does. “…an e-mail chain started by the class parent to seek chaperones for a field trip, I removed the teachers name, changed the subject line, and then asked the other parents in the class whether their children found the homework load onerous,” (Greenfeld) Esmee’s dad waiting patiently for a response, “Half the class’s parents responded that they thought too much homework was an issue.” (Greenfeld) Esmee’s dad asked all the parents and they came back with conclusions. He took data not only from parents but also from other countries, “The irony is that some countries where the school systems are held us as models for our schools have been going in the opposite direction of the U.S., giving less homework and implementing narrower curricula built to encourage deeper understanding rather than broader coverage.” (Greenfeld) Esmee’s dad wonders why the teachers give more homework than the schools that show up as a model for us. While he asks parents and gathers information from other schools, he also asks the teacher how she feels about homework, “the teachers usually respond in one of two ways. They nod sympathetically and agree that the kids do have a lot of work, as if they have nothing to do with the assigning of it.” (Greenfeld) Interviewing and gathering information from others give Esmee’s dad the idea of doing her homework and seeing how long it takes him. He calculates how long it takes her to do her homework, “during the school week, she averages three to four hours of homework a night and six and a half hours of sleep.” (Greenfeld) While Esmee takes a long time doing homework, her dad struggles and experiences having six and a half hours of sleep. This article using qualitative because Esmee’s dad interviews parents and gathers information from other schools and teachers, but it’s also quantitative because he calculates how long it takes for his daughter to do her homework in one night that is why the Atlantic Article uses mixed methods.

Greenfeld, Karl. "My Daughter's Homework is Killing Me." Atlantic 18 Sept. 2013. Web. 1 Oct. 2013.

gabrielle bergeron said...

• Qualitative
o Quantitative

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
• How does a teachers correcting workload affect the amount of work and what kind of work they assign to their students?
o How does the number of assignments teachers have to grade affect the number of assignments they assign to their classes?
2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
• How does Edline affect student’s attitudes?
o How many students say Edline strongly affects their attitudes?
3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
• What are students attitudes concerning school renovations?
o What percent of the students like the new school renovations?
4. Students’ political affiliations
• How do students’ parents affect their political affiliations?
o How often are students’ political affiliations influenced by their parents?
5. How students choose electives
• How do students choose electives based on graduation credentials?
o How much of an affect do graduation credentials affect the choice of electives?
6. How seating charts affect academic performance
• How do seating charts affect the academic performance of students?
o How severely do seating charts affect the performance of students?
7. Try it for your topic!
• How do students feel towards the updated version of the Iphone (Ios7)?
o What percentage of students feel the update was a good idea? How many feel it was not a good idea/ what parts of the update cause th