Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Journalism: 10-1

Before you start: please be sure that you have an active, current email tied to your Edline account.

PART A: DATA-DRIVEN JOURNALISM

Copy and paste the following data collection methodologies into Word. Begin by constructing a research question for each of the following topics. Discuss, with specificity, how each research question might be framed and approached as a qualitative quantitative endeavor. Paste the results in your final comment posted here. Below is a sample answer in italics.

TOPICS:

1.       Teachers’ correcting workloads

2.       Student attitudes concerning Edline

3.       Attitudes concerning the school renovations

4.       Students’ political affiliations

5.       How students choose electives

6.       How seating charts affect academic performance

7.     Try it for your topic!
 

Favorite NHS athletic team to root for: Research question: What autumn athletic team draws the most fan attendance? A qualitative approach may include interviews with students not currently involved in seasonal athletics (to avoid bias), and determine conclusions based upon the reasoning provided by the sample population; a quantitative approach may include the researcher’s effort to count the number of fans for a game of each sport for several weeks, ultimately examining the ratio between the number of athletic participants and the number of fans.


PART B: REVISITING FRIDAY’S TRANSGRESSIONS

There were no complete responses to Friday’s class work. Revisit the directions and submit any components that you missed on Friday.
 
PART C: Develop your research question and find sources for Thursday's class work.

23 comments:

Casey Holmes said...

1) How can you correct teacher’s workload?
It could look as a qualitative presentation because you could interview teachers and the people that give the workloads to experience both sides of the story. It could also be quantitative by doing a survey to ask how they handle workloads if they want more or less workload.

2) What are the students attitudes concerning Edline?
A way to present this information in a qualitative form you could interview the students by asking what the efficiency is and good or negative input of Edline. For quantitative you could count the number of people that use Edline on a daily basis.

3) What are your attitudes toward the new school renovations?
A qualitative form to use to answer this question is to look around the school and see how people respect or appreciate the school. A quantitative is to ask people that come to the school what they think it was like compared to a year or two years ago.
4) Do students have a lot of political affiliations outside of school?
The qualitative is to ask lots of people if they know anything about the government or if they know anything at all. And then quantitative is to have a survey of the government.
5) How do students decide to choose their electives?
A qualitative approach would be to go into all of the electives and ask people what made them want this subject. A quantitative approach would be to interview all the elective teachers and see what percentage seem interested in the class.
6) Do you think seating charts affect academic performance?
A qualitative could be to ask for a class with a seating chart and one with not a seating chart to give their class’s average grade and see which one is better. A quantitative is to ask serious students which they think works better for them.
7) What is the difference between the Mansfied and Norton freshman volleyball team?
I would ask girls from each town how their team is run and how well they like it. Also a quantitative I would give them a survey and compare the percentages from each team.

Keenan Coffey said...

1.Teachers’ correcting workloads
-What makes teachers complain about the amount of correcting they have to do?
-How much work do teachers have to grade a night?

2.Student attitudes concerning Edline
-What features of Edline makes it beneficial
-How many problems do students have with it?

3.Attitudes concerning the school renovations
-How do renovations make people more happy?
-How many ways have Norton High benefitted from this?

4.Students’ political affiliations
-Do students parents shape their affiliations with a certain political party?
-How many students are persuaded by their parents?

5.How students choose electives
-Do students take into account with how electives look on a college application?
-How many electives were chosen last year that were chosen out of impulse?

6.How seating charts affect academic performance
-Do students do worse in a class when they sit by their friends?
-How many students benefit from having their peers near them?

7.Try it for your topic!
-Where would be students' first choice for a fast food restaurant if location didn't matter and why?
-How many people favor McDonalds over any other fast food restaurant?

Keenan Coffey said...

1.Teachers’ correcting workloads
-What makes teachers complain about the amount of correcting they have to do?
-How much work do teachers have to grade a night?

2.Student attitudes concerning Edline
-What features of Edline makes it beneficial
-How many problems do students have with it?

3.Attitudes concerning the school renovations
-How do renovations make people more happy?
-How many ways have Norton High benefitted from this?

4.Students’ political affiliations
-Do students parents shape their affiliations with a certain political party?
-How many students are persuaded by their parents?

5.How students choose electives
-Do students take into account with how electives look on a college application?
-How many electives were chosen last year that were chosen out of impulse?

6.How seating charts affect academic performance
-Do students do worse in a class when they sit by their friends?
-How many students benefit from having their peers near them?

7.Try it for your topic!
-Where would be students' first choice for a fast food restaurant if location didn't matter and why?
-How many people favor McDonalds over any other fast food restaurant?

Nicole Littlefield said...

1.What classes take the most time to correct the work?
Qualitative- what factors make the teachers take so long to correct?
Quantitative- how many hours of work does each individual student spend on work for each class?
2.Is edline used to its fullest potential?
Qualitative- why does each student and each teacher actually use edline for?
Quantitative- how can edline be improved?(survey)
3.Are the school renovations helping or hurting?
Qualitative- do you find benefit in the school renovations?
Quantitative- many people want the renovations, yay or nay?
4.Do you keep up to date with politics?
qualitative- why or why not?
quantitative- how many people are democratic vs. republic?
5.What electives attract you more?
Qualitative- why? teachers, subject, activities ect.
Quantitative- what elective is the best? survey
6.Do seating charts effect academic intake?
Qualitative- why would sitting near friends help or harm your education?
Quantitative- How many students actually use the seating chart to their advantage?
7.Are the vegetable at school lunches satisfying?
Qualitative- why do you or why do you not enjoy our school's vegetable options?
Quantitative- what could improve our vegetable intake as student?

Keenan Coffey said...

1.Teachers’ correcting workloads
-What makes teachers complain about the amount of correcting they have to do?
-How much work do teachers have to grade a night?

2.Student attitudes concerning Edline
-What features of Edline makes it beneficial
-How many problems do students have with it?

3.Attitudes concerning the school renovations
-How do renovations make people more happy?
-How many ways have Norton High benefitted from this?

4.Students’ political affiliations
-Do students parents shape their affiliations with a certain political party?
-How many students are persuaded by their parents?

5.How students choose electives
-Do students take into account with how electives look on a college application?
-How many electives were chosen last year that were chosen out of impulse?

6.How seating charts affect academic performance
-Do students do worse in a class when they sit by their friends?
-How many students benefit from having their peers near them?

7.Try it for your topic!
-Where would be students' first choice for a fast food restaurant if location didn't matter and why?
-How many people favor McDonalds over any other fast food restaurant?

Lauren MacGray said...

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
Qualitative: What make teachers unhappy about the amount of work they have to correct?
Quantitative: Does the amount of time it takes teachers to correct their students work affect how much work is given to their students?

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
Qualitative: How do students view the efficiency of Edline?
Quantitative: How many nights per week do students tend to use Edline?

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
Qualitative: Does learning in a new environment have a positive effect on the students’ grades?
Quantitative: How many students’ grades have improved since the new school renovations?

4. Students’ political affiliations
Qualitative: Do students’ parents affect their opinion on political affiliations?
Quantitative: How many students’ political affiliations are shaped by their parents?

5. How students choose electives
Qualitative: Do students choose electives based on their interests or what looks better for colleges?
Quantitative: How many students actually take the electives that they’re interested in?

6. How seating charts affect academic performance
Qualitative: Do students who sit closer to their friends in class tend to have lower grades?
Quantitative: How many students who sit by their friends have lower grades than those who sit around strangers?

7. Watching soccer or hockey on television – my topic
Qualitative: When given the opportunity to watch soccer or hockey, why do some people favor one over another?
Quantitative: How many people favor to watch soccer over hockey on television?

Anonymous said...

Sean Bostrom
10/1/13
Period F Journalism



1. Teachers’ correcting workloads? A quantitative approach could be how many number of students’ papers a teacher corrects daily or weekly, a qualitative approach could be the way the teacher grades the workloads/they could have a more effective way than others.

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline? A quantitative approach could be the number of students who check/use Edline to see their progress, a qualitative approach could be how often Edline gets updated.

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations? A qualitative approach could be interviewing students and seeing their thoughts on the new renovations, a quantitative approach could be to count the number the students who like/dislike the renovations to the school.

4. Students’ political affiliations? A quantitative approach could be the number of students who are either Democrats or Republicans, a qualitative approach could be if your parents have any effect on your choice


5. How students choose electives? A quantitative approach can be the number of students who choose electives because they like the teacher or they believe the elective will be easy, a qualitative approach could be if the elective challenges their skills or not.

6. How seating charts affect academic performance? A quantitative approach could be how many students do their work when they are not seated next to their friends, a qualitative approach could be the change in a student’s grade whether it goes up or down.

7. The style of shoes kids wear? A quantitative approach could be the number of students who wear the same brand of sneakers to those who wear different styled shoes, a qualitative approach could be which brand of shoe is more popular in today’s world.

Sean Mathews said...

TOPICS:

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
How fast should teachers correct finished work? Should students expect a maximum time fame for when they will receive graded work by? A qualitative research would be a survey of students that are frustrated with getting work back too late. A quantitative research could be conducted by keeping track of each teachers work load and how fast the correct work.

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
Do you consider edline a useful and resourceful aspect of learning? Why? A qualitative research could be conducted by asking students if they use edline regularly and why or why not? A quantitative research method could be conducted by keeping a tally of the # of students who use it and # of students who don’t.

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
How do you view the school renovations? What parts of the new school renovations are your favorite/most impressive or least impressive? A qualitative research would consist of interviews that ask NHS students what they like most about it. A quantitative research method would be a count of how many students are generally impressed and how many don’t like the renovation.

4. Students’ political affiliations
What are students’ political views? How are they influenced to affiliate with a political party? A qualitative research method would be an interviews of students about their political views. A quantitative research would be conducted by collecting a list of students and how they affiliate.

5. How students choose electives
How do students choose their electives? A qualitative method would be interviewing students about how they choose them based on career interest? Or based off of their friends? A quantitative research method would be how many students get their wanted electives and how many get placed randomly.

6. How seating charts affect academic performance
How do students perform in classes with no seating plan? How do they perform with a seating plan? A qualitative research method would be by asking students how they feel their work is affected by their seat. A quantitative research method would be to look at the grades of students who are in both classes with and without seating plans and compare them.

7. Try it for your topic!

What are the biggest factors in deciding where to go to college? A qualitative research would be interviewing students who plan on going away to school and asking them which factors are most important to them. A quantitative research would be a comparison of how many students are going to a school based on their major vs. how many are going based on other factors.



Sean Mathews said...

TOPICS:

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
How fast should teachers correct finished work? Should students expect a maximum time fame for when they will receive graded work by? A qualitative research would be a survey of students that are frustrated with getting work back too late. A quantitative research could be conducted by keeping track of each teachers work load and how fast the correct work.

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
Do you consider edline a useful and resourceful aspect of learning? Why? A qualitative research could be conducted by asking students if they use edline regularly and why or why not? A quantitative research method could be conducted by keeping a tally of the # of students who use it and # of students who don’t.

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
How do you view the school renovations? What parts of the new school renovations are your favorite/most impressive or least impressive? A qualitative research would consist of interviews that ask NHS students what they like most about it. A quantitative research method would be a count of how many students are generally impressed and how many don’t like the renovation.

4. Students’ political affiliations
What are students’ political views? How are they influenced to affiliate with a political party? A qualitative research method would be an interviews of students about their political views. A quantitative research would be conducted by collecting a list of students and how they affiliate.

5. How students choose electives
How do students choose their electives? A qualitative method would be interviewing students about how they choose them based on career interest? Or based off of their friends? A quantitative research method would be how many students get their wanted electives and how many get placed randomly.

6. How seating charts affect academic performance
How do students perform in classes with no seating plan? How do they perform with a seating plan? A qualitative research method would be by asking students how they feel their work is affected by their seat. A quantitative research method would be to look at the grades of students who are in both classes with and without seating plans and compare them.

7. Try it for your topic!

What are the biggest factors in deciding where to go to college? A qualitative research would be interviewing students who plan on going away to school and asking them which factors are most important to them. A quantitative research would be a comparison of how many students are going to a school based on their major vs. how many are going based on other factors.



Alexa DosReis said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lauren MacGray said...

Part B:
• Qualitative: When given the opportunity to watch soccer or hockey, why do some people favor one over another?
• Quantitative: How many people favor to watch soccer over hockey on television?
• Mixed Methods: How many people prefer to watch soccer over hockey, vice versa, and why?

Nicole LaCouture said...



1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
Although some students may feel that the workload they are assigned are equal to teachers, Do you feel as though teachers have too much work to correct?
Has the workloads affect the amount of assignments that are given each week?

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
Is edline a useful tool or do you feel as though many students do not access it? Why?
Does edline actually help students academically or does it benefit teachers more than students?

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
How have the school renovations affected your high school experience and how has it changed it positively and negatively.
Do you find the renovations to be a distraction rather than a benefit currently?

Students’ political affiliation
Do you believe that teens parents’ have an influence on their political beliefs? How do you feel about this specific topic?
Most teens are not extremely attentive to political debates. Do you believe that the influence of others affects their political opinions?

4. How students choose electives
Most students choose electives depending upon what they think would be the easiest class to take or what classes their friends are taking. Do you think students disregard the academic aspect of electives when selecting? Why or why not?

Electives are a way for other students to discover other interests that they could pursue as a career. Do you believe electives are a way to jump start college for high school students?

5. How seating charts affect academic performance
Most students find seating charts to be an unnecessary but teachers find it helpful in getting their work done completely. What are your thoughts on seating charts and how they help academic performance amongst students?

Seating charts cause an organized sense of communication amongst teachers and students. Why do you think it’s crucial for some teachers to have seating charts?

Nicole LaCouture said...

TOPICS:

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
Although some students may feel that the workload they are assigned are equal to teachers, Do you feel as though teachers have too much work to correct?
Has the workloads affect the amount of assignments that are given each week?

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
Is edline a useful tool or do you feel as though many students do not access it? Why?
Does edline actually help students academically or does it benefit teachers more than students?

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
How have the school renovations affected your high school experience and how has it changed it positively and negatively.
Do you find the renovations to be a distraction rather than a benefit currently?

Students’ political affiliation
Do you believe that teens parents’ have an influence on their political beliefs? How do you feel about this specific topic?
Most teens are not extremely attentive to political debates. Do you believe that the influence of others affects their political opinions?

4. How students choose electives
Most students choose electives depending upon what they think would be the easiest class to take or what classes their friends are taking. Do you think students disregard the academic aspect of electives when selecting? Why or why not?

Electives are a way for other students to discover other interests that they could pursue as a career. Do you believe electives are a way to jump start college for high school students?

5. How seating charts affect academic performance
Most students find seating charts to be an unnecessary but teachers find it helpful in getting their work done completely. What are your thoughts on seating charts and how they help academic performance amongst students?

Seating charts cause an organized sense of communication amongst teachers and students. Why do you think it’s crucial for some teachers to have seating charts?

Levi Kahn said...

Levi Kahn
TOPICS:

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
How does the amount of work that a teacher corrects correlate to their student’s grades?

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
What is the general opinion held by the student body concerning Edline?

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
How do the school’s renovations affect the efficiency and effectiveness of the school?

4. Students’ political affiliations
What are the majority opinions of the students involving their political affiliations and how does it affect their relationships with each other?

5. How students choose electives
What is the process that students use to select elective classes and how do their choices affect which electives are offered each year?

6. How seating charts affect academic performance
How do teacher’s seating charts affect academic performance compared to open seating classes?

7. Try it for your topic!
How do party’s candidates affect its following compared to its stance on issues?
(is it more about the candidate or the issues) registered voters
Which factors are most influential in voters’ decision making for presidential elections?

Qualitative: Ask around, what makes a good candidate? What sets a political party apart in your mind?
Quantitative: Who should be the next President? Who would you vote for? Why?
Mixed Methods: How many people would vote for each candidate? How many people support/disagree with certain issues? why?




Lizzie said...

Part A
TOPICS:
• Quantitative
• Qualitative

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads:
• Does the amount of workloads affect the amount of hours it takes correcting the papers?
• How does the teachers correcting workloads depend on how many classes they have a day?
2. Student attitudes concerning Edline:
• Does the amount of hours students use on edline effect the student’s attitudes?
• How does edline affect the attitudes the students have towards school?
3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
• Does the amount of hours the workmen spent on the school renovations affect the students attitude toward the school.
• How does the school renovations affect the students attitudes?
4. Students’ political affiliations
• Does the amount of people will different political opinions affect the students’ political affiliations?
• How does the family members affect the students’ political affiliations?
5. How students choose electives
• Does the popularity on a certain elective affect the students choose the electives?
• How do the purpose of each elective make the students choose which one they want?
6. How seating charts affect academic performance
• Does the amount of friends near the student in class affect their academic performance?
• How does the seating chart affect the student academic performance?
7. Try it for your topic!
Cats or dogs?
• Does the popularity on one animal affect the other kids to decide what animal to choose if they aren’t a fan of either?
• How does one choose between cats or dogs to have as a pet?


Part B
Quantitative: Does the amount of people whose favorite season is summer like hot weather more than cold?
Qualitative: How does one decide whether they like hot weather or cold weather better?
Mixed Method: How many people like hot weather or how many people like cold weather and what makes you choose that type of weather?

Alexa DosReis said...

TOPICS:

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads: How do teachers attitudes towards the workload of homework they need to correct correspond to the student’s attitude to getting homework back? This research question might be framed as a qualitative endeavor because the question is asking for an opinion so therefore it would require personal interactions with people to know their point of view.

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline: How do students attitudes concerning edline fluctuate with teacher’s consistency in updating grades? This research question would require qualitative research because this question is asking for personal opinions from students about a school program and this research and therefore require the documentation of these opinions in words.

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations: How do students attitudes about learning in a school under construction differ from the town’s attitudes of having to pay for it? This question would require qualitative data because people may love the fact the school has finally received renovations; however the people who had their taxes raised may feel the school renovations were not as needed as it was led on to be.

4. Students’ political affiliations: How do students affiliation with politics before they are 18 changes when they are finally eligible to vote? This research question might be framed as a qualitative endeavor because this answer would be based on the student’s personal involvement in politics to not being as involved as they could be.

5. How students choose electives: Are student’s choice of electives correspond to what they want to do in college or is it just for fun? This question might be framed as a qualitative endeavor because students choose electives based on personal interest or need for the knowledge and experience with the topic therefor would require the personal interaction with the students to know why they chose what they did.

6. How seating charts affect academic performance: How are students’ academic performances affected when seated with friends to being seated according to a seating chart? This question would require quantitative data because this kind of information can be recorded through the tracking of students grained and the comparisons of the data from when the seating chart wasn’t enforced to when it was.
7. Steroid taking athletes: Do the pressure of receiving a college scholarship for athletes drive them to use performance enhancers like steroids? This question would require both qualitative and quantitative data because this kind of research can be recorded or documented. A survey can be done to chart the number of high school athletes competing for a scholarship that turned to steroids to step up their performance. However a personal interview can also be done in order to get a feel for their state of mind which led them to feel that turning to drugs was their only option.

Christine Remick said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Christine Remick said...

1) How are the teachers’ changing the work load effecting students academics?

This could be considered quantitative because the school could do research on surrounding schools and get numbers on how many students do well with certain amount of homework. A qualitative approach would be interviewing the students and getting their opinion on homework and if they think that they receive too much.

2) Do students who use Edline more concerned with their grades with the students who do not?

If this was to be a quantitative experiment then I would ask two students who do and do not use Edline to give me their grades and percentages for the semester. I would then compare the two and make my observation. A qualitative experiment would be talking to a group of students and getting their opinion on whether or not having an Edline makes them more aware of their grades.

3) How do students who like the look of the new building feel coming to school in comparison to the students who do not like the new renovation?

A qualitative approach would be asking the upperclassmen, who had the experience of the old high school, their opinion in comparison to the freshmen who just entered the school. A quantitative approach would be getting a tally on who finds the new renovation nice and who doesn't.

4) How do students, that are Republicans, feel about how the school system is run in comparison to the Democrat students?

A quantitative approach would be simply finding out who are Republicans and who are Democrats and have a debate with questions based on the school system. A qualitative approach would be doing a school wide vote on the topic if they were happy with it or not.

5) How do the electives that students pick tell something about their personalities?

A quantitative experiment would be asking students in certain classes why they choose that certain elective and if they had any real interest in it. A qualitative experiment would be looking at student or multiple students and counting how many electives of a certain subject they've taken and see if that matches up with their personality as a student.

6) How do seating charts effect a students ability to learn?

A quick qualitative experiment would be having a teacher let the students choose their seats for a day & then do a quick head count on how many people are actually laying attention. Then the next day have the teacher choose the seats and then do another head count on who is paying attention. A quantitative experiment would be asking the opinions of the students on whether or not sitting next to their friends effected their grades.

7) Do more students listen to music while doing homework or do more students not listen to music?

A quantitative approach would be having a group of students do homework in a group and get a head count of how many people pull headphones out and listen to music. A qualitative approach would be asking them a series of questions such as: do you listen to music while you do your homework? (Why/why not) What type of music?

Carli Arcaro said...

TOPICS:

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads

2. Student attitudes concerning Edline

3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations

4. Students’ political affiliations

5. How students choose electives

6. How seating charts affect academic performance

7. Try it for your topic!



1.) Are the teachers of Norton High getting too much to grade in too little of time?
This could be quantitative by going around asking teachers in a survey if they feel over whelmed in how much they have to grade and compare the numbers in responses. This could be qualitative could be to ask certain teachers their opinion on this situation and how they personally feel.
2.) Are the student’s attitudes positive about the use of edline?
This could be quantitative by talking to a class full of students and see how many kids find it useful to check grades and homework virtually online versus the kids who don’t. This could be qualitative by observing and seeing who chooses which one.
3.) How do the students in the past feel about the new school renovations?
This could be quantitative by going around to colleges and asking how some females feel about missing the new school by a year versus how the males feel about it and record who has more of an irate feeling towards missing the renovations. This could be qualitative by asking the teachers who they think would be more upset about it, the males or females.
4.) How do students who are republican in comparison to democrats, feel about how teachers actually teach their lessons?
This could be qualitative by splitting up the republican and democratic students and having a discussion and we can see which has a stronger argument to record as the quantitative as a ratio.
5.) Do students choose electives based on what their friends pick to be in the same classes or are they picked by what class they want to enroll in?
This could be quantitative by talking to the students in an elective class and see who is very good friends in it and who isn't. Qualitative would be finding out how many people are good friends and how many aren't or don't even know each other at all in a chart.
6.) Would sitting next you your bestfriend help you focus on your work more or less?
This could be quantitative by observing two best friends demeanors and grades who sit next to each other while comparing it to two kids who sit next to one another who don't know each other would be qualitative.
7.) Try it for your topic!
How is the every day college life different from a high school life?
Quantitative: I could make a survey and pass it out around my sisters campus looking for students opinions on what differs from the everyday school life.
Qualitative: I would record the results and see how they vary from how much the daily schedule had changed mentally and physically.

Gianna Larson said...

1. How does the teacher’s amount of workloads given to students really affect them and the amount of work they do per week?
How many teachers are affected by the workloads?
2. How does the students attitude towards edline, affect their grades in their classes?
Based on varying amounts of grades, how much do the grades vary from student to student by good or bad?
3. Why do the students really concerned about the school renovations?
How many students on ratio from students to teachers are affected?
4. Students’ political affiliations



5. How students choose electives
Based on students interests, how do they choose what electives they take?



6. How seating charts affect academic performance


7. Try it for your topic!
By looking at teachers walls, what assumptions can you make about teachers based on the certain things on their walls?

Matt's Journalism Blog said...

Matt Whittington
Journalism F
Teachers’ correcting workloads, Research question: Do teachers get too much work for their salary? A qualitative response would include interviewing family members of teachers to avoid bias. A quantitative response could include documenting the amount of work in and out of school teachers undergo for one week.
Student attitudes concerning Edline, Research question: Does Edline assist students in achieving better grades? A qualitative response could include interviewing students that both do, and do not use Edline. A quantitative response might include taking Edline away and seeing if grades decrease.
Attitudes concerning the school renovations, Research question: How does the student body feel about attending a school undergoing renovations? A qualitative response might include interviewing students from each grade. A quantitative response would include seeing if students want a new school or not.
Students’ political affiliations, Research question: Should high school students under the age of 18 be able to vote? A qualitative response could include interviewing the candidates for office. A quantitative response could include seeing if they vote with their friends, or if the go with their best choice.
How students choose electives, Research question: Do students choose electives based on interest, or difficulty? A qualitative response might include interviewing students in both easy, and difficult electives. A quantitative response might include taking away easy classes to see what they choose.
How seating charts affect academic performance, Research question: Do seating charts assist students with staying on task? A qualitative response could be if you interview students that have graduated, or teachers. A quantitative response could be to record the average grade before, and after a seating chart.
Try it for your topic! Research question: How do the students at Norton High School feel about all of the fees they are expected to pay, such as: athletic user fees, class dues, or the parking fee? A qualitative response could be to ask the students or even their parents who usually end up paying the fee.

Khokhlan said...



1. Teachers’ correcting workload
How does a teacher correcting work affect the amount of work a student receives in the future? How does this affect students stress levels?
2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
How does a student’s attitude concerning Edline affect the way they do in school? Does this cause them to get lower scores in school?
3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
How does the new building motivate people to achieve bigger goals? On average are people getting better grades with the renovated building.
4. Students’ political affiliation
How Does where a student lives affect their political affiliation? How often does a student’s location affect their affiliation?
5. How students choose electives
How does a student choose their electives’ based on what they plan on doing in the future? How many students choose electives that support their future profession?
6. How seating charts affect academic performance
How does the seating of a student affect how their test scores are? How often does a student in the front participate on average compared to students who sit somewhere else?
7. Try it for your topic!
Student’s musical preference
Do students prefer Radio music when they drive, or do they turn their own personal music? And why.

Iain Brouwer said...

1. Teachers’ correcting workloads
Teachers have been known to correct a large amount of work due to the multiple classes they teach.
Teachers back in the day had to work harder because they didn’t have the grading technologies that present teachers have today.
2. Student attitudes concerning Edline
Edline is very useful for kids who need to catch up on a lot of missing work or to view their homework if they missed it.
Edline helps out children compared to before edline when children used resources when they don’t know what to do such as friends which might not be useful.
3. Attitudes concerning the school renovations
Many kids like what the school renovations have done because it’s a lot easier to get from class to class and the amount of money put in it was useful and worth it.
Before the renovations, the school was deteriorating with missing ceilings, pipes in view, and other poor conditions.
4. Students’ political affiliations
Many students simply do not care about views on politics.
5. How students choose electives
Students chose electives on how fun they are and how much work they estimate and is required for them to take that class or consider taking that class.
Other students chose electives on how helpful it will be to their future and they want the best ones possible whether they be hard or not.
6. How seating charts affect academic performance
Seating charts tend to make students more focused on their work due to uninterest to the students located near them.
Nowadays, people tend to be put in seating charts, which from my experience, have made me more focused on the class rather than who I am seated nearby or next to.