Sunday, March 23, 2008

Lord of the Flies


Freshmen: choose 7 literary terms to define. For each term, provide examples by finding and quoting at least 2 excerpts from the novel. Include respective page numbers in parentheses after each quote.

Click here for a Link to Literary Terms

29 comments:

Blog Manager said...

Sydney Colbert
B Block English


Characterization: The techniques by which an author develops characters
“The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward the lagoon.” (Page 7)

“Signs of life were visible now on the beach. The sand, trembling beneath the heat haze, concealed many figures in its miles of length;” (Page 18)

Symbol: The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for.
“We can use this to call the others.” (Page 16)
“That’s right. Can’t catch my breath. I was the only boy in our school what had asthma.” (Page 9)

Setting: The time and place in which the story occurs.
“… a great platform of pink granite thrust up uncompromisingly through forest and terrace and sand and lagoon to make a raised jetty four feet high.” (Page 12)
“The undergrowth at the side of the scar was shaken and a multitude of raindrops fell pattering.” (Page 7)

Dialogue: Conversation between characters.
“‘My auntie told me not to run,’ he explained, ‘on account of my asthma.’”
“‘ Ass-mar?’” (Page 9)
“ ‘No grownups!’”
“ ‘That pilot.’” (Page 8)

Conflict: A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)
“ ‘Let him have the conch!’”
“ ‘A snake-thing. Ever so big. He saw it.’”

Motif: Recurring word(s), references, or images usually employed to reinforce theme.
“…on account of my asthma…” (Page 9)
“…blow the conch…” (Page 15)

Narrator:

Anonymous said...

Characterization—the techniques by which an author develops characters

•The fat boy glanced over his shoulder, and then leaned toward Ralph. He whispered.
“They used to call me Piggy.” (Page 11)

•“Piggy was shouting something, his face pleased, his glasses flushing.”(Page17)


Symbol— the concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for peace.

•“A conch he called it. He used to blow it and then his mum would come. It’s ever so valuable.” (Page 15)

•“My Auntie told me not to run,” he explained, “on account of my asthma.” (Page 9)
(Piggy is fat and ironically he has asthma)

Setting— the time and place in which the story occurs

•“This is an island. At least I think it’s an island. That’s a reef out in the sea. Perhaps there aren’t any grownups anywhere.” (Page 8)

•“The undergrowth of the side of the scar was shaken and a multitude of raindrops fell pattering.” (Page 7)

Protagonist—the central character in a story

•“By the time Ralph finished blowing the conch the platform was crowded.” (Page 32)

•“So you see,” said Ralph, “We need hunters to get us meat. And another thing” (Page 33)

Conflict—A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)

•“A snake-thing. Ever so big. He saw it.” (Page 35)
(The littluns thought it was a monster)

•“You cut a pig’s throat to let the blood out,” said Jack, “otherwise you can’t eat the meat.”(Page 31)

Dialogue—Conversation between characters

•“My Auntie told me not to run,” he explained, “on account of my asthma.”
“Ass-mar? ” (Page 9)

•“Aren’t there any grownups at all?”
“I don’t think so.”(Page 8)

Motif—Recurring word(s), references, or images usually employed to reinforce theme

•“on account of my asthma”(Page 9)

•“blow the conch” (Page 15)

Suzanne
Class B

Anonymous said...

1. Character—An individual who participates in the action of a literary work. “ my auntie told me not to run, on account I have asthma” Page 8. “ Ralph shook his head and increased his speed”. Page 9.
2 Setting—The time and place in which the story occurs. “ no grown ups” page 8. “ here the beach was interrupted abruptly by the square motif of the landscape” page 12
3. Plot—the chain of events that take place in the story. “look a shell” page 15 . “vote for chief Ralph said. Page 23
4. Characterization-—The techniques by which an author develops characters. “ He's not fatty hes piggy” page 21. “ there twins Same and Eric” page 21.
5. Conflict—A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.) “ let vote for Ralph piggy said no jack says roger” page 22. “ We don’t want you as leader jack said” page 24
6. Climax—The moment of peak interest and intensity and/or the turning point in the story “ yah Ralph leader!!!” page 24 “ come on jack said where explorers” page 26
7. Theme—The central idea or message of a literary work “here the beach was interrupted abruptly by the square motif of the landscape” page 12. the boy lowered himself down the last few feet of rocks and began to pick his way toward the lagoon” page 1.


Stephen Tessier period B

Anonymous said...

Characterization—The techniques by which an author develops characters

Piggy says: “That’s right. Can’t catch my breath. I was the only boy in my school what had asthma. He also said: “And I’ve been wearing specs since I was three.” (p. 9)

“The fat boy glanced over his shoulder, then leaned toward Ralph. He whispered. ‘They used to call me Piggy.’ (p. 10)



Mood—The atmosphere or feeling created by a literary work, partly by a description of the objects or by the style of the descriptions.

“Signs of life were visible now on the beach. The sand trembling beneath the heat haze, concealed many figures in its mile of length: boys were making their way toward the platform through the hot, dumb sand.” (p. 18)

“The pink granite of the next cliff was further back from the creepers and trees so that they could trot up the path. This again led into more open forest so that they had a glimpse of the spread sea.” (p. 27)



Imagery—Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences

“He snatched his knife out of the sheath and slammed it into a tree trunk. Next time there would be no mercy. (p. 31)

“He raised his arm in the air. There came a pause, a hiatus, the pig continued to scream and the creepers to jerk, and the blade continued to flash at the end of a bony arm.” (p.31)



Metaphor—A comparison of two dissimilar things not using the words like or as

“Here the roots and stems of creepers were in such tangles that the boys had a thresad through them like pliant needles.” (p. 26)

“A rock, almost detached, standing like a fort” (p. 29)



Rising Action—The part of the plot in which complications develop and conflict intensifies.

“The pile was so rotten, and now so tinder-dry, that whole limbs yielded passionately to the yellow flames that poured upwards and shook a great beard of flame twenty feet in the air.” (p.41)

“More and more of them came. Taking their cue from the innocent Johnny, they sat down on the fallen palm trunks and waited.” (p. 18)




Symbol—The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for peace


Piggy says: “That’s right. Can’t catch my breath. I was the only boy in my school what had asthma. He also said: “And I’ve been wearing specs since I was three.” (p. 9)

“Ralph’s right of course. There isn’t a snake-thing. But if there was a snake we’d hunt it and kill it.”



Dialogue—Conversation between characters

“No grownups!” The fat boy thought for a moment. “That pilot.” (p. 8)
“Aren’t you going to swim?” “I can’t swim, I wasn’t allowed. My asthma” “Sucks to your ass-mar!”


~Brian Gannon

Anonymous said...

Conflict- A struggle between characters or forces(external) or within a character (internal)
“ Piggy stirred.
‘I’ll come’
Ralph turned to him.
‘Your no good at a job like this’
‘All the same-’
‘We don’t want you’ said Jack flatly ‘Threes enough’
Piggy’s glasses flashed
‘I was with him when he found the conch. I was him before anyone else was’”(24)

“I was chief, and you were going to do what I said. You talk. But you cant even build huts-then you go off hunting and let out the fire-“(70-71)

Dialogue-Conversation between characters.
“’I haven’t finished yet.’
‘But you’ve talked and talked’
‘I’ve got the conch’” (81-82)

“’Jacks been everywhere-‘
‘Where could a beast live?’
‘Beast my foot!’ (87)

Imagery-Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences.
‘He wore the remains of shorts and his feet were bare like Jacks’ (56)

‘The glittering sea rose up, moved apart in planes of blatant impossibility; the coral reef and the few stunted palms that clung to the more elevated parts would float up into the sky, would quiver, be plucked apart, run like rain drops on a wire of be repeated as in a n odd succession of mirrors.’(58)

Point of View-The perspective from which the story is told, and or the narrative method by which the story is told.
‘He leapt to his feet and trotted back to the pool, just as Maurice did a rather poor dive’ (65)
‘The boys chattered and danced. The twins continued to grin.’(69)

Setting-The time and place when the story takes place
‘The shore was fledged with palm trees. These stood or leaned or reclined against the light and their green feathers were a hundred feet up in the air. (9)

‘The glittering sea rose up, moved apart in planes of blatant impossibility; the coral reef and the few stunted palms that clung to the more elevated parts would float up into the sky, would quiver, be plucked apart, run like rain drops on a wire of be repeated as in a n odd succession of mirrors.’(58)

Metaphor - comparing using not like or as.
‘Some act of God-a typhoon perhaps,…’(12)

--Annie Ledbetter

Anonymous said...

Symbol—The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for peace
The conch is a form of symbolism in The Lord of the Flies. When there is a lot of noise, there had to be a way to make everyone quiet again. Ralph and everyone agreed to use the conch. “Ralph smiled and held up the conch for silence” [23] “He used to blow it and then his mum would come. It’s ever so valuable—“[15]


Imagery—Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences
Imagery is used to describe either a character, or a scene. “He was a boy of perhaps six years, sturdy and fair, his clothes torn, his face covered with a sticky mess of fruit.” [17] “The coral was scribbled in the sea as though a giant had bent down to reproduce the shape of the island in a flowing chalk line but tired before he had finished.”[29]

Cliché—A trite and overused expression or idea
Piggy would always use his asthma as an excuse not to run. “My auntie told me not to run,” he explained, “on account of my asthma.” [9]
“I can’t swim. I wasn’t allowed. My asthma—“[13]

Characterization—The techniques by which an author develops characters
When the character talks it’s almost like they are characterizing themselves. Ralph says, “Sucks to your auntie!”[13] Jack says, “I ought to be chief because I’m chapter chorister and head boy, I can sing C sharp.” [22]

Dialogue—Conversation between characters
He whispered. “They used to call me Piggy.”
Ralph shrieked with laughter. He jumped up.
“Piggy! Piggy!”
Ralph—please!”
Piggy clasped his hands in apprehension.
“I said I didn’t want—“
“Piggy! Piggy!” [11]

Antagonist – The person or force that opposes the protagonist
Jack turned on him.
“You shut up!” [46]

Suddenly Jack shouted in rage. “Are you accusing me--?” [51]






Elizabeth Hunter

Anonymous said...

Onomatopoeia—Words that imitate sounds.

Setting— The time and place in which the story occurs.

“The ground beneath them was a bank covered with coarse grass, torn everywhere by the upheavals of the fallen trees, scattered with the decaying coconuts and palm saplings.”pg.10

“Behind this was the darkness if the forest proper and the open space of the scar.”pg.10

Imagery—Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences.

“The boy with the fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward the lagoon”pg.7

“The shore was fledged with palm trees. These stood or leaned or reclined against the light and there green feathers were a hundred feet in the air.”pg.9

Tone—The attitude of a writer towards a subject, as comes through in the “voice” of the words used.

“I don’t care what they call me” said confidentially “so long as they don’t call what they used to call me at school.”pg.11

“I could swim when I was five. Daddy taught me. He’s a commander in the Navy.”pg.13

Point of View—The perspective from which the story is told, and/or the narrative method by which the story is told, e.g., first person, third person, etc.

“Piggy looking determined took off his shorts”pg.13

“Round and down to the rock where the scar started. “That’s the quickest way back.”

Mood—The atmosphere or feeling created by a literary work, partly by a description of the objects or by the style of the descriptions.

“Wearily obedient, the choir huddled into the line and stood there swaying in the sun.”pg.20

“A storm of laughter arose and even the tiniest child joined in.”pg.21

Simile— A comparison of dissimilar things using the words “like” or “as”.

“So long as your hunters remember the fire”pg.53

“They talk and scream. The littluns. As if the island wasn’t good enough” pg.52

TIM DEMARTIN CLASS B

Anonymous said...

Conflict— A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)

‘“Shut up,” said Ralph absently. He lifted the conch. ‘“Seems to me we ought to have a chief to decide things.”(22)

“’Shut up, you! Shut up!” “Percival Wemys Madison would not shut up.”(87)


Dialogue— Conversation between characters

“Let’s have a vote.”
“Yes!”
“Vote for chief!”
“Let’s Vote-” (22)

“It’s hot!”
“What did you expect?”
“I didn’t expect nothing. My auntie-”
“Sucks to your auntie!” (13)



Imagery— Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences

“The ground beneath them was a bank covered coarse grass, torn everywhere by the upheavals of fallen trees, decaying coconuts and palm saplings.”(10)

‘“Look! We’ve killed a pig- we stole up on them – we got in a circle-‘
‘Voices broke in from the hunters.
‘We crept up-
‘The pig squealed-”(77)

Setting— The time and place in which the story occurs

“This is an island. At least I think it’s an island.”(7)

“The ground beneath them was a bank covered coarse grass, torn everywhere by the upheavals of fallen trees, decaying coconuts and palm saplings.”(10)




Diction— A writer’s choice of words, which includes both vocabulary and syntax.

“I can’t swim. I wasn’t allowed. My asthma-”
“Sucks to your ass-mar!” (13)

“Here and there, little breezes crept over the polished waters beneath the haze of heat. When these breezes reached the platform the palm fronds wound whisper, so that spots blurred sunlight slid over their bodies or moved like bright, winged things in the shade.” (15)


Characterization— The techniques by which an author develops characters

“The fat boy glanced over his shoulder, then leaded to ward Ralph. He whispered. ‘“ They used to call me ‘Piggy.’” (11)

“The boy with fair hair…” (7)



brendan curtin

Anonymous said...

Austin Tocci
B Block English



1. Imagery- Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences
A. “The piglet tore loose from the creepers and scurried into the undergrowth.” (31)
B. “The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward the lagoon” (7)
2. Irony- A contrast between what is said and meant or between what is expected and what happens
A. “He snatched his knife out of the sheath and slammed it into a tree trunk.” It is ironic that he hesitated to kill when he wants to kill something so badly.
B. “’ Aren’t there any grownups at all?’ ‘I don’t think so’” it is ironic that only kids survived
3. Symbol- The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for peace
A. Piggy said “-a conch; ever so expensive. I bet if you wanted to buy one, you’d have to pay pounds and pounds” the conch is a symbol because it brought all the kids together. (16)
B. “They were at the lip of a circular hollow in the side of the mountain.” (28) The mountain is a symbol because it is where everyone got to know each other and it is where they are going to try to flag down a ship.
4.Characterization- The techniques by which an author develops characters
A. “The fat boy stood by him, breathing hard. ‘My auntie told me not to run,’ he explained. ‘on account of my asthma’” (9)
B. “Piggy rose dripping from the water and stood naked, cleaning his glasses with a sock” (13)
5. Conflict- A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)
A. “’ They used to call me Piggy.’ Ralph shrieked with laughter. He jumped up. ‘Piggy! Piggy!’ (11)
B. “’ You’re talking too much,’ said Jack Merridew. ’Shut up, Fatty’ (21)
6. Setting- The time and place in which the story occurs
A. “They were at the lip of a circular hollow in the side of a mountain.” (28)
B. “ this was an island: clambering among the pink rocks” (28)
7. Dialogue- Conversation between characters
A. “He was attacked!” “He’ll be alright” (8)
B. “Aren’t you going to swim?” “I can’t swim” (13)

Anonymous said...

Characterization—The techniques by which an author develops characters
“The naked crooks of his knees were plump, caught and scratched by thorns. He bent down, removed the thorns carefully, and turned around. He was shorter than the fair boy and fat. He came forward, searching out safe lodgments for his feet, and then looked up through thick spectacles.” (Page 7)

“The creature was a party of boys, marching approximately in step in two parallel lines and dressed in strangely eccentric clothing. Shorts, shirts, and different garments they carried in their hands; but each boy wore a square black cap with a silver badge on it.” (Page 19)

Imagery—Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences
“The shore was fledged with palm trees. These stood or leaned or reclined against the light and their green feathers were a hundred feet up in the air. The ground beneath them was a bank covered with coarse grass, torn everywhere by the upheavals of fallen trees scattered with decaying coconuts and palm trees. Behind this was the darkness of the forest proper and the open space of the scar.” (Pages 9-10)

“When these breezes reached the platform the palm fronds would whisper, so that spots of blurred sunlight slid over their bodies or moved like bright, winged things in the shade.” (Page 15)

Dialogue—Conversation between characters
“We got most names,” said Piggy, “Got ‘em just now.”
”Kids’ names,” said Merridew, “Why should I be Jack? I’m Merridew.”
(Page 21)

“Jack’s in charge of the choir. They can be—what do you want them to be?”
”Hunters.” (Page 23)

Protagonist—The central character in a story
Ralph counted.
“I’m chief then.” (Page 23)

“Listen, everybody. I’ve got to have time to think things out. I can’t decide what to do straight off. If this isn’t an island we might be rescued straight away. So we’ve got to decide if this is an island...” (Page 23)

Antagonist – The person or force that opposes the protagonist
“I ought to be chief,” said Jack with simple arrogance, “because I’m chapter chorister and head boy. I can sing C sharp.” (Page 22)

“The boy came close and peered down at Ralph, screwing up his face as he did so. What he saw of the fair haired boy with the creamy shell on his knees did not seem to satisfy him. He turned quickly, his black cloak circling. (Page 20)

Symbol—The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for peace
“My auntie told me not to run,” he explained, “on account of my asthma.” (Page 9)

“We can use this to call the others. Have a meeting. They’ll come when they hear us—” (Page 16)

Conflict—A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)
“All right. Who wants Jack for chief?”
With dreary obedience the choir raised their hands.
“Who wants me?”
Every hand outside the choir except Piggy’s was raised immediately. Then Piggy, too, raised his hand grudgingly into the air.” (Page 23)

“You told ‘em. After what I said.”
His face flushed, his mouth trembled.
“After I said I didn’t want—”
“What on earth are you talking about?”
“About being called Piggy. I said I didn’t care as long as they didn’t call me Piggy; an’ I said not to tell and then you went and said straight out—“
Stillness descended on them. Ralph, looking with more understanding at Piggy, saw that he was hurt and crushed. He hovered between the two courses of apology or further insult.” (Page 25)



Andrea Giglio

Anonymous said...

Characterization: The techniques by which an author develops characters.
- "He took off his glasses and held them out to Ralph, blinking and smiling, and then started to wipe them against his grubby windbreaker. An expression of pain and inward concentration altered the pale contours of his face. He smeared from his cheeks and quickly adjusted the spectacles on his nose." (Pg. 9)
- "Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin, and bony; and his hair was red beneath the black cap. His face crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness. Out of this face stared two light blue eyes, frusterated now, and turning, or ready to turn, to anger." (Pg. 20)
Dialogue: Conversation between characters.
- "Tell us about the snake- thing."
"Now he says it was a beastie."
"A snake- thing. Ever so big. He saw it."
"Where?"
"In the woods." (Pgs. 35 and 36)
- "I got the conch," Said Piggy indignantly. "You let me speak!"
"The conch doesn't count on top of the mountain," said Jack, "so you shut up." (Pg. 42)
Imagery: Word and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences.
- "Near to Ralph's elbow a palm sapling leaned out over the lagoon. Indeed, the weight was already pulling a lump from the poor soil and soon it would fall. He tore out the stem and began to poke about in the water, while the brilliant fish flicked away on his side and that. Piggy leaned dangerously." (Pg. 15)
- "Here and there, little breezes crept over the polished waters beneath the haze of heat. When these breezes reached the platform the pal fronds would whisper, so that spots of blurred sunlight slid over their bodies or moved like bright, winged things in the shade." (Pg. 15)
Conflict: A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)
- "I got the conch," Said Piggy indignantly. "You let me speak!"
"The conch doesn't count on top of the mountain," said Jack, "so you shut up." (Pg. 42)
- "You told 'em. After what I said." His face flushed, his mouth trembled.
"After I said I didn't want-"
"What on earth are you talking about?"
"About being called Piggy. I said I didn't care as long as they didn't call me Piggy; an' I said not to tell and then you went an' said straight out-" (Pg. 25)
Mood: The atmosphere or feeling created by a literary work, partly by a description of the objects or by the style of the descriptions.
-"You told 'em. After what I said." His face flushed, his mouth trembled.
"After I said I didn't want-"
"What on earth are you talking about?"
"About being called Piggy. I said I didn't care as long as they didn't call me Piggy; an' I said not to tell and then you went an' said straight out-" (Pg. 25)
- "I was choosing a place," said Jack. "I was just waiting for a moment to decide where to stab him."
"You should stick a pig," said Ralph fiercely. "They always talk about sticking a pig."
"You cut a pig's throat to let the blood out," said Jack, "otherwise you can't eat the meat."
"Why didn't you-?" They knew very well why he hadn't: because of the enormity of the knife descending and cutting into living flesh; because of the unbearable blood.
"I was going to," said Jack. He was ahead of them, and they could not see his face."I was choosing a place. Next time-!" (Pg. 31)
Simile: A comparison of dissimilar things using the words “like” or “as”
- "The breezes that on the lagoon had chased their tails like kittens were finding their way across the platform and into the forest." (Pg. 34)
- "For yards around the fire the heat was like a blow, and the breeze was a river of sparks." (Pg. 41)
Anecdote: A short narrative, usually reporting an amusing event.
- "I was choosing a place," said Jack. "I was just waiting for a moment to decide where to stab him."
"You should stick a pig," said Ralph fiercely. "They always talk about sticking a pig."
"You cut a pig's throat to let the blood out," said Jack, "otherwise you can't eat the meat."
"Why didn't you-?" They knew very well why he hadn't: because of the enormity of the knife descending and cutting into living flesh; because of the unbearable blood.
"I was going to," said Jack. He was ahead of them, and they could not see his face."I was choosing a place. Next time-!" (Pg. 31)
- "A tree exploded in the fire like a bomb. Tall swathes of creepers rose for a moment into view, agonized, and went down again. The little boys screamed
at them. "Snakes! Snakes! Look at the snakes!" (Pg. 46)

- Emma Jackson
Block B

Anonymous said...

Conflict- A struggle between characters or forces(external) or within a character (internal)
“ Piggy stirred.
‘I’ll come’
Ralph turned to him.
‘Your no good at a job like this’
‘All the same-’
‘We don’t want you’ said Jack flatly ‘Threes enough’
Piggy’s glasses flashed
‘I was with him when he found the conch. I was him before anyone else was’”(24)

“I was chief, and you were going to do what I said. You talk. But you cant even build huts-then you go off hunting and let out the fire-“(70-71)

Dialogue-Conversation between characters.
“’I haven’t finished yet.’
‘But you’ve talked and talked’
‘I’ve got the conch’” (81-82)

“’Jacks been everywhere-‘
‘Where could a beast live?’
‘Beast my foot!’ (87)

Imagery-Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences.
‘He wore the remains of shorts and his feet were bare like Jacks’ (56)

‘The glittering sea rose up, moved apart in planes of blatant impossibility; the coral reef and the few stunted palms that clung to the more elevated parts would float up into the sky, would quiver, be plucked apart, run like rain drops on a wire of be repeated as in a n odd succession of mirrors.’(58)

Point of View-The perspective from which the story is told, and or the narrative method by which the story is told.
‘He leapt to his feet and trotted back to the pool, just as Maurice did a rather poor dive’ (65)
‘The boys chattered and danced. The twins continued to grin.’(69)

Setting-The time and place when the story takes place
‘The shore was fledged with palm trees. These stood or leaned or reclined against the light and their green feathers were a hundred feet up in the air. (9)

‘The glittering sea rose up, moved apart in planes of blatant impossibility; the coral reef and the few stunted palms that clung to the more elevated parts would float up into the sky, would quiver, be plucked apart, run like rain drops on a wire of be repeated as in a n odd succession of mirrors.’(58)
Metaphor - comparing using not like or as.
‘Some act of God-a typhoon perhaps…’(12)
‘…the boys had to thread them threw like pliant needles.’ (26)
Characterization—The techniques by which an author develops characters
“’He was shorter than the fair boy and very fat’”(7)
“’He was a boy of perhaps six years , sturdy, and fair, his clothes torn, his face covered with a sticky mess of fruit.’” (16)

~Annie Ledbetter
B Block

Anonymous said...

Imagery—Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences: “The fair hair boy began to pick his way as casually as possible toward the water.”pg.8 “He took his glasses and held them out to Ralph, blinking and smiling, and then started to wipe them against his grubby wind breaker.”


Characterization—The techniques by which an author develops characters: “The faired hair boy lowered himself.”pg7 “The fat boy thought for a moment”pg8


Onomatopoeia—Words that imitate sounds: “Wacco!”pg33 “Bong!” pg33



Dialogue—Conversation between characters: “We could go by the shore. There’s fruit” “That’s right”pg108 “How does he know we’re here?” “They’d tell him at the airport.” Pg14


Mood—The atmosphere or feeling created by a literary work, partly by a description of the objects or by the style of the descriptions. “Shut up!”pg89 “Nuts!”


Setting—The time and place in which the story occurs: “The undergrowth at the side of the scar was shaken and a multitude of raindrops fell pattering”pg7


Tone—The attitude of a writer towards a subject, as comes through in the “voice” of the words used. : “ Shut up!” Ralph said absently. “No Grownups!”

-Joey Wilkes

Anonymous said...

Characterization—The techniques by which an author develops characters
 “He was shorter than the fair boy and very fat.” (page 7)
 “The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward the lagoon.”(page 7)

Conflict—A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)
 “I can’t swim. I wasn’t allowed. My asthma-.”(page 10?)
 “Let’s have a vote.” Both candidates wanted to win.(page 23)

Dialogue—Conversation between characters
 “I don’t care what they call me,” he said confidentially,” so long as they don’t call me what they use to call me in school” Ralph was faintly interested. “What was that?”(page 11)
 “I can’t swim. I wasn’t allowed. My asthma--.” “Sucks to your ass-mar”(page 13)



Flashback—An account of something that happened before the story or earlier in the story.
 “I saw the other part of the plane.” (page 9)
 “My auntie told me not to run,” he explained, “On account of my asthma.”(page 9)

Foil—A character who provides a striking contrast to another character
 “Jack and Ralph smiled at each other with shy liking.”(page 23)
 “Jack and Simon pretended to notice nothing.” (page 24)


Irony—A contrast between what is said and meant or between what is expected and what happens
 “My Auntie told me not to run,” he explained, “on account of my asthma.” (Page 9)
(Ironic because he can’t help out around the island as much as the others)
 “The older boys first noticed the child when he resisted.” (page 35)

Setting—The time and place in which the story occurs
 “Every point of the mountain held up trees,” (page 30)
 “We’re on an island.” (page 32)


-Kristin Murray
class b

Anonymous said...

Conflict - A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)
“You’re talking too much,” said
Jack Merridew. “Shut up,
Fatty.”(21)

“There was a ship. Out there.
You said you’d keep the fire
going and you let it out” (70)

Imagery - Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences
“He had taken off his school
sweater and trailed it now
from one hand, his grey shirt
stuck to him and his hair was
plastered to his forehead.”(7)

“The naked crooks of his knees
were plump, caught and
scratched by thorns.”(7)

Characterization—The techniques by which an author develops characters
“I can’t swim. I wasn’t
allowed. My asthma-” (13)

“My auntie wouldn’t let me blow
on account of my asthma.” (16)

Symbol—The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for peace
“We can use this [the conch] to
call the others. Have a
meeting. They’ll come when
they hear us.”(19)

“Piggy knelt by him, one hand
on the great shell, listening
and interpreting to the
assembly.”(34)

Setting—The time and place in which the story occurs
“We’re on an island. We’ve been
on the mountaintop and seen
water all around. We saw no
houses, no smoke, no
footprints, no boats, no
people. We’re on an
uninhabited island with no
other people on it.”(32)

“There, where the island
petered out in the water, was
another island; a rock, almost
detached, standing like a
fort, facing them across the
green with one bold, pink
bastion.”(29)

Dialogue—Conversation between characters
““We ought to draw a map,” said
Ralph. “only we haven’t any
paper.”
“We could make scratches on
bark,” said Simon”’(27)

““What do you mean?”
“There wasn’t any smoke. Only
flame.””(42)

Point of View—The perspective from which the story is told, and/or the narrative method by which the story is told, e.g., first person, third person, etc.
“He tried to be offhand and not
too obviously uninterested,
but the fat boy hurried after
him.” (8)

“Here at last was the imagined
but never fully realized place
leaping into real life.” (15)


~Jill Wry

Anonymous said...

Sydney Colbert
B Block English
NEW VERSION!!!
March 25, 2008


Characterization: The techniques by which an author develops characters
“The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet of rock and began to pick his way toward the lagoon.” (Page 7)

“Signs of life were visible now on the beach. The sand, trembling beneath the heat haze, concealed many figures in its miles of length;” (Page 18)

Symbol: The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for.
“We can use this to call the others.” (Page 16)
“That’s right. Can’t catch my breath. I was the only boy in our school what had asthma.” (Page 9)

Setting: The time and place in which the story occurs.
“… a great platform of pink granite thrust up uncompromisingly through forest and terrace and sand and lagoon to make a raised jetty four feet high.” (Page 12)
“The undergrowth at the side of the scar was shaken and a multitude of raindrops fell pattering.” (Page 7)

Dialogue: Conversation between characters.
“‘My auntie told me not to run,’ he explained, ‘on account of my asthma.’”
“‘ Ass-mar?’” (Page 9)
“ ‘No grownups!’”
“ ‘That pilot.’” (Page 8)

Conflict: A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)
“ ‘Let him have the conch!’”
“ ‘A snake-thing. Ever so big. He saw it.’”

Motif: Recurring word(s), references, or images usually employed to reinforce theme.
“…on account of my asthma…” (Page 9)
“…blow the conch…” (Page 15)

Narrator: The speaker in literary work
Ralph is the narrator in this novel.

Anonymous said...

Metaphor-Something used to represent something else.

'All round him the long scar smashed into the jungle was a bath or heat' (page 7)

'These stood or leaned or reclined against the light and their green feathers were a hundred feet up in the air' (page 9)


Simile-A comparing sentence using like or as.

'The creepers were as thick as their thighs and left little but tunnels for further penetration.' (page 27)

'Within the irregular arc of coral the lagoon was still as a mountain lake.' (page 10)


Setting-The locale or period in which the action of a novel, play, film, etc., takes place

'He climbed over a broken trunk and was out of the jungle.' (page 9)

'Piggy appeared again, sat on the rocky ledge, and watched ralphs green and white body enviously.' (page 12)


Characterization-The creation and convincing representation of fictitious characters.

'Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin, and bony; and his hair was red beneath the black cap.' (page 20)

'He was old enough, twelve years and a few months, to have lost the prominent tummy of childhood and not yet old enough for adolescense to have made him awkward.' (page 10)


Character-A person in a book

"They used to call me piggy." (page 11)

"But Merridew" (page 20)


Dialogue-Conversation between two or more people

"Piggy!"
"Piggy!"
"Oh, Piggy!" (page 21)

"Piggy! Piggy!"
"Ralph-please!" (page 11)


Conflict-Discord of action, feeling, or effect; antagonism or opposition, as of interests or principles

"I cant swim i wasn't allowed. My asthma..." (page 13)

"I ought to be cheif," said Jack with simple arrogance..." (page 22)

~cassie eagerman~

Anonymous said...

1) Imagery – Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences.

“All three where hot, dirty, and exhausted. Ralph was badly scratched.” (Pg. 27)
“High over this end of the island, the shattered rocks lifted up their stacks and chimneys” (Pg. 27)

2) Symbol – The concrete expression of an abstract idea, or literal representation of a figurative meaning, such as a heart for love or a dove for peace.

Conch shell-“That’s what the shell’s called. I’ll give the conch to the next person to speak. He can hold it when he’s speaking.” (Pg. 33)
Beastie- “And I was frightened, and started to call out for Ralph.” (Pg. 85)

3) Dialogue – Conversation between characters.

Piggy Stired. “I’ll Come.” Ralph turned to him. “You’re no good at a job like this.” (Pg. 24)
“Almost too heavy.” Jack grinned back. “Not for the two of us.” (Pg. 39)

4) Conflict – A struggle between characters or forces, or within a character.

Jack&Piggy- “You’re talking to much” Said Jack Merridew, “Shut up, Fatty.” (Pg.21)
Jack&Ralph- “If I could only get a pig! I’ll come back and go on with the shelter.” (Pg 55)

5) Setting – The time and place in which the story occurs.

Island with no Adults- “No grownups!” (Pg. 8)
Crashed on Island- “There was a pilot. But he wasn’t in the passenger cabin, he was up in front.” (Pg. 8)

6) Motif – Recurring word, reference, or image usually employed to reinforce theme.

“Beastie” (Pg. 36) (and many other pages) Represents fear.

7) Characterization – Techniques by which an author develops characters.

Ralph- “The boy with fair hair lowered himself down the last few feet…” (Pg. 7)
Piggy- “my auntie told me not to run,” he explained “on account of my asthma.” (Pg. 9)

-Mike Costa
Block B

Anonymous said...

Characterization: The techniques by which an author develops characters.
- “ Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin and bony: and his hair was red beneath the black cap.” (pg 20)
- “I was the only boy in our school what had asthma,” said the fat boy with a touch of pride. “And I’ve been wearing specs since I was three.” (pg 9)

Climax: The moment of peak interest and intensity and/ or the turning point in the story.
- “Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Spill her blood.” (pg 69)
- “You let the fire go out.” (pg 69)

Comedy: Depicts humorous incidents in which protagonists are faced with moderate difficulty but overcome them and the play ends happily.
- “I’ve been thinking,” he said, “about a clock. We could make a sundial. We could put a stick in the sand and then-” “And an airplane, and a TV set,” said Ralph sourly, “and a steam engine.” (pg 64)
- “ I can’t swim. I wasn’t allowed. My asthma-” “Sucks to your ass-mar.” (pg 13)

Irony: A contrast between what is said and meant or between what is expected and what happens.
- He whispered. “They used to call me ‘Piggy.’” Ralph shrieked with laughter. He jumped up. “Piggy! Piggy!” (pg 11)
- “That little ‘un-” gasped Piggy- “him with the mark on his face, I don’t see him. Where is he now?” (pg 46)

Settings: The time and place in which the story occurs.
- “This is an island. At least I think it’s an island.” (pg 7)
- “Ralph sat on a fallen trunk, his left side to the sun.” (pg 32)

Simile: A comparison of dissimilar things using the words “like” or “as”.
- “The darkness seemed to flow round them like a tide.” (pg 120)
- “They tried the forest but it was thick and woven like a bird’s nest.” (pg 116)

Tone: The attitude of a writer toward a subject, as comes through in the “voice” of the words used.
- “Ralph pursed his lips and squirted air into the shell, which emitted a low, farting noise. This amused both boys so much that Ralph went on squirting for some minutes, between bouts of laughter.” (pg 17)
- “We shan’t keep the fire going. We’ll be like animals. We’ll never be rescued.” (pg 92)

Sarah Tenglin

Anonymous said...

1.Characterization- The techniques by which an author develops characters. "they used to call me piggy. Ralph shrieked with laughter. He jumped up. Piggy! Piggy!" (Page 11) The pause was only long enough for them to realize what a enormity the downstroke would be. Then the piglet tore loose from the creepers, and scurried into the undergrowth" (Page 31)

2. Conflict- a struggle between characters(external) ,or within a character(internal). " Don't you want to be rescued. All you can talk about is Pig!Pig!Pig!"
(Page 54)
Ralph was on his feet too shouting for quiet, but no one heard him"(Page 38)

3. Foreshadowing- a hint of what is going to happen. "A snake-thing ever so big, he saw it"( Page 35)
"As if, said Simon, the beastie, or the snake-thing was real"(Page 52)

4. imagery- words, or phrases that recreate vive sensual experiences. "They found a piglet caught in a curtain of creepers" (Page 31)
"The great rock loitered, poised on one toe"(Page 28)

5. Personification- to give human traits to an innanimate object "The great rock loitered, poised on one toe"(Page 28)
"the shattered rock held up their stacks, and chimneys"

6.Rising Action-the part of the plot in which complications develop." A snake-thing ever so big, he saw it"(Page 35)
"What d'you mean there wasn't any smoke, only flame."

7.Setting- The time, and place in which the story took place."The ground beneath them was a bank covered with cooarse grass, torn everywhere by upheavals of fallen trees."(Page 9-10)
"The tide was coming in, and there was only a narrow strip of firm beach"

Justin St. Jean
Block: B english

Anonymous said...

Metaphor-comparsion without using like or as ex. "all around him the long scar samashed into the jungle was a bath of heat" "these stood or leaned or reclined agianst the light their green feathers are a hundred feet up(p.9)

Simile- a comprasion using like or as ex "the creepers were as thick as thier thighs and left little but tunnels for futher pentration"(p.27) "Within the irregular arc of coral the lagon was still as mountain lake" (p.10)

setting- time aand place the story takes place in ex. "he climbed over the broken trunk and was out of th jungle"(p.9) "piggy appaered agian,sat on the rock ledge"

chracterization- portrayal; description of a chracter ex. "inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin and bony and his hair was red"(p.20)"He was old enough, tweleve years old and a few months to have lost his proment tummy..."

Chracter- someone in the novel
ex"they use to calll me piggy"(p.11)"but merridew"(p.20)

Dialogue- when someone is talking ex. "piggy""piggy""oh piggy" p.12
"piggy""piggy""ralph please" p.11

Conflict- conflict occurs when the protagonist is opposed by some person or force in the play ex. "I cant swim, I want allowed my asthma" (p.13) " I ought to be cheif" said jack with argoance. (p.20)
-Patrick Traverse

Anonymous said...

Characterization—the techniques by which an author develops characters

1.Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin and bony; and his hair was red beneath the black cap. (20)

2.He was old enough, twelve years and a few months, to have lost the prominent tummy of childhood and not yet enough for adolescence to have mode him awkward. (10)


Metaphor—A comparison of two dissimilar things not using the words like or as

1.All around him the long scar smashed into the jungle was a bath of heat. (7)

2.The shore was fledging with palm trees. These stead or leaned or reclined against the light and their green feathers. (9)


Dialogue—Conversation between characters

1.“Piggy” “Piggy” “Oh Piggy” (21)
2.“ Piggy , Piggy”
“Ralph-please” (11)


Conflict- A struggle between characters or forces(external) or within a character (internal)

1.“I can’t swim, I wasn’t allowed. My asthma.” (13)

2.“I ought to be Chief” said Jack with simple arrogance… (22)


Setting-The time and place when the story takes place

1.He climbed over a broken trunk and was out of the jungle. (7)

2.Piggy appeared again, sat on the rocky edge and watched Ralph’s green and white body enviously.(12)


Chracter- someone in the novel

1.“They used to call me piggy” (1)
2.“But Merrdew” (120)


Simile— A comparison of dissimilar things using the words “like” or “as”.

1.The creepers were as thick as their thighs and left little but tunnels for further penetration.(27)

2.Within the irregular arc of coral the lagoon was still as a mountain lake. (10)

Lindsay White
Block F

Anonymous said...

Characterization: "Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin, and bony; and his hair was red beneath the balck cap. His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness."(20)

"he, was a skinny, vivid little boy, with a glance coming up from under a hat of straight hair that hung down, black and course."(24)

Setting: "Here and there, little breezes crept over the polished waters beneath the haze of heat."(15)
"Here the beach was interrupted abruptly by the square motif of the landscapes."(12)

Conflict: "I hit him, said Ralph indignatly. I hit him with my spear, I wounded him." (114)

"kill the pig! cut his throat! kill the pig! Bash him in!" (114)

Irony: "There was a ship. Out there. You said you'd keep the fire going and you let it out!"(70)

"They might have seen us. We might have gone home-."(70)

Imagery: "It was roughly boat-shaped:humped near this end with behind them the jumbled decent of the shore."(29)

" Jack's face was white under the freckles."(31)

Similie: "The reef enclosed more than one side of the island, lying perhaps a mile out and parellel the the what they now thought of as their beach."(29)

"The darkness seemed to flow round them like a tide."(120)

Personification: "Here, the eye was first attacked to a black, bat-like creature that danced on the sand, and only later perceived the body above it."(19)

"the sand, trembling beneath the heat haze......"(18)

Derek Schwartz F

Anonymous said...

Val Hall
Block F

1.Characterization: The techniques by which an author develops characters

-"Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin, and bony; and his hair was red beneath the black cap. His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness."(20)

-"He was a skinny, vivid little boy, with a glance coming up from under a hat of straight hair that hung down, black and course."(24)

2.Setting: The time and place in which the story occurs.

-"Here and there, little breezes crept over the polished waters beneath the haze of heat."(15)

-"Here the beach was interrupted abruptly by the square motif of the landscapes."(12)

3.Conflict: A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)

-"I hit him with my spear, I wounded him." (114)

-"Kill the pig! Cut his throat! Kill the pig! Bash him in!" (114)

4.Irony: A contrast between what is said and meant or between what is expected and what happens.

-"There was a ship out there. You said you'd keep the fire going and you let it out!"(70)

-"They might have seen us. We might have gone home."(70)

5.Imagery: Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences.

-"It was roughly boat-shaped: humped near this end with behind them the jumbled decent of the shore."(29)

-"Jack's face was white under the freckles."(31)

6.Simile: A comparison of dissimilar things using the words “like” or “as”.

-“The coral was scribbled in the sea as though a giant had bent down to reproduce the shape of the island in a flowing chalk line but tired before he had finished.” (29)

-"The darkness seemed to flow round them like a tide."(120)

7.Personification: to give human traits to an inanimate object.

-"Here, the eye was first attacked to a black, bat-like creature that danced on the sand, and only later perceived the body above it."(19)

-"The sand, trembling beneath the heat haze..."(18)

Anonymous said...

1.Characterization: The techniques by which an author develops characters

-"Inside the floating cloak he was tall, thin, and bony; and his hair was red beneath the black cap. His face was crumpled and freckled, and ugly without silliness."(20)

-"He was a skinny, vivid little boy, with a glance coming up from under a hat of straight hair that hung down, black and course."(24)

2.Setting: The time and place in which the story occurs.

-"Here and there, little breezes crept over the polished waters beneath the haze of heat."(15)

-"Here the beach was interrupted abruptly by the square motif of the landscapes."(12)

3.Conflict: A struggle between characters or forces (external) or within a character (internal.)

-"I hit him with my spear, I wounded him." (114)

-"Kill the pig! Cut his throat! Kill the pig! Bash him in!" (114)

4.Irony: A contrast between what is said and meant or between what is expected and what happens.

-"There was a ship out there. You said you'd keep the fire going and you let it out!"(70)

-"They might have seen us. We might have gone home."(70)

5.Imagery: Words and phrases that recreate vivid sensory experiences.

-"It was roughly boat-shaped: humped near this end with behind them the jumbled decent of the shore."(29)

-"Jack's face was white under the freckles."(31)

6.Simile: A comparison of dissimilar things using the words “like” or “as”.

-“The coral was scribbled in the sea as though a giant had bent down to reproduce the shape of the island in a flowing chalk line but tired before he had finished.” (29)

-"The darkness seemed to flow round them like a tide."(120)

7.Personification: to give human traits to an inanimate object.

-"Here, the eye was first attacked to a black, bat-like creature that danced on the sand, and only later perceived the body above it."(19)

-"The sand, trembling beneath the heat haze..."(18)

-Mike Twitchell

Anonymous said...

Characterization: The method used to develop a character.
- "You're talking too much," said Jack Merridew. "Shut up, Fatty."(pg21)
- "He's not Fatty," cried Ralph. (pg21)

Mood: The emotional attitude the author takes towards their subject.
- "This is our island. It's a good island. Until the grownups come to fetch us we'll have fun." (p35)
- "There was no laughter at all now and more grave watching." (p36)

Personification: Giving human qualities to animals or objects.
- "Creepers cradled them." (p39)
- "The hair was creeping into his eyes again." (p82)

Imagery: Language that affects one or all of the five senses- seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling and touching.
- "The sun in the west was a drop of burning gold that slid nearer and nearer the sill of the world." (p43)
- "Jack stood there, streaming with sweat, streaked with brown earth, stained by all the vicissitudes of day's hunting. (p49)

Onomatopoeia: A word that imitates the sound it represents.
- "Wacco!" (p33)
- "Doink!" (p33)

Conflict: The struggle found in fiction.
- "It broke away-
Before I could kill it-but- next time!" (p33)
- "We haven't made a fire," he said, "what's the use. We couldn't keep a fire like that going, not if we tried." (p42)

Dialogue: A conversation between two or more characters.
- "I got the conch," said Piggy indignantly. "You let me speak!"
"The conch doesn't count on top of the mountain," said Jack, "so you shut up." (p42)
- "I wish my auntie was here."
" I wish m father... Oh, what's the use?"
"Keep the fire going." (p94)

Courtney Williams
Block. F

Anonymous said...

Setting- “The ground beneath them was a bank covered with coarse grass” (10)
“out there, perhaps alike a way, the white surf flinked on a coral reef beyond that the sea was dark blue”(10)

Characterization- “Inside the floating clock he was tall, thin, and bony” and he was red beneath the cap” (20)
“There was morise, next in size among the choir to jock, but broad and grinning” (21)

Imagery- “The three boys walked briskly on the sand” (25)
“He sighed, bent, and laced up his shoes” (38)

Similie- “The darkness seemed to flow around them like a tide” (120)

-Meg O'Neal
block F

Sara. said...

Characterization:
Pg 9: “I was the only boy in our school that had asthma, “said the fat boy with a touch of pride, “and I’ve been wearing specs since I was three.”
Pg 20: “…he was tall, thin and bony, and his hair was red beneath his cap.”

Climax:
Pg 69: “Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Bash her in.”
Pg 69: “You let the fire go out…”

Comedy:
Pg 64: Piggy said, “I’ve been thinking about a clock. We could make a sundial. We could put a stick in the sand and-“
“-and an airplane, and a T.V. set,” said Ralph sourly, “and a steam engine”
Pg 13: “I can’t swim. I wasn’t allowed. My asthma-“
“Sucks to your assmar!”

Irony:
Pg 11: “They used to call me Piggy.” Ralph shrieked with laughter. He jumped up, “Piggy! Piggy!”
Pg 46: “That little ‘un…” gasped Piggy,”-him with the mark on his face, I don’t see him, where is he now!?”

Setting:
Pg 7: “This is an island. At least I think it’s an island.”
Pg 32: Ralph sat on a fallen trunk; his left side to the sun.

Simile:
Pg 120: The darkness seemed to flow around them like a tide.
Pg 116: They tried the forest but it was thick and woven like a birds nest.

Tone:
Pg 17: Ralph pursed his lips and squirted air into the shell, which emitted a low, farting noise. This amused the boys so much that Ralph went on squirting for some minutes, between bouts of laughter.
Pg 92: We shan’t keep the fire going. We’ll be like animals. We’ll never be rescued.

Anonymous said...

I've been exploring for a little bit for any high-quality articles or blog posts in this kind of house . Exploring in Yahoo I ultimately stumbled upon this website. Reading this information So i'm happy
to exhibit that I have a very excellent uncanny feeling I discovered just what I needed.

I most certainly will make sure to don?t omit this web site
and provides it a glance on a constant basis.



Stop by my site :: cheap dental implants