Thursday, December 4, 2008

"God Grew Tired of Us"

Seniors- after viewing "God Grew Tired of Us", consider and respond, with highly specific and well articulated analysis, to the following prompts:

1. A benefit of this documentary lies in the opportunity to view our own (American) culture through the eyes of the Dinka. What aspects of our culture, which we may or may not take for granted, are polarized by this different perspective?

2. Construct a "mini-essay" which compares and contrasts the "American Dream" with the "Sudanese-American Dream". Use specific references to the film and the novel.

3. In the film, John is reunited, after 17 years, with his mother. She expresses her elation through a Dinka song and dance, a traditional expression of joy. How does John respond to this? How does this poignant moment illustrate the paradoxical experience of East African immigrants?

35 comments:

Anonymous said...

Brown Says
Questions 3
In the film after john reunites with his mother she is very overwhelmed. she is jumping for joy and he is casually walking up to her. He almost seems embaressed by her reaction foreshadowing his change. He is being americanized already and it was between a short period of time. She coems with all her possessions in one little bag. The african immigrants do not care what other's think as long as they express there feelings and this is what happens.

Anonymous said...

Question 3.

John is reunited with his mother who is straight from Sudan and still retains the culture of Sudan. John however, has learned the culture of America and forgotten some of the aspects of Sudanese culture. This makes the reunion a little awkward when his mother begins to do the ceremonial dance of celebration and he is a little embarassed. He understands that dancing in public is frowned upon in America, but his mother does not. This shows that East African immigrants face a larger problem than fitting into American culture but also fitting in with their own culture once they've adapted to the way of living in the United States.

Seamus Slattery

Anonymous said...

Grover W
I believe our culture is very different than the Sudanese peoples life. I believe they knew that they were getting a very good oportunity so they wanted to take full advantage to make money and get an education because they dont have as many chance in Sudan. I believe many people dont take work as serious as they should because we are constantly building up to our future and some people dont have that oportunity to even get a chance to work at all.

Anonymous said...

#3)
When John is reunited with his mother after 17 years of seperation she is all excited and happy and she expresses her elation through a Dinka song and dance, a traditional expression of joy. She was jumping and screaming and yelling/ singing of happiness. John's response to his mothers expressions is at first he seems embrassed almost because of his mothers actions. But then he is smiling, laughing and crying of joy that he is with his mother again. John has been Americanized over the time being in America and he didn't even notice is untill he was reunited with his mother.

-Nick S.

Anonymous said...

Katie K.

#3.

After 17 years of John not seeing his mother he finally got to. While seeing them reunite it was happy and it was sad all at the same time. John responds to his mom's expression of joy by crying because he felt happy, realived and sad at the sametime. This paradoxical experience led John to feel many different feelings because he was happy his mother and him were reuinted once again, and sad because he felt as if he had left a big part of him back in Africa to come to America like his home, his people, his family and everything he knew. The experience to see two different worlds John knew was interesting to me because it was bitter sweet.

Anonymous said...

Brown Says:
Number 1
In America everything is basically handed to us without though of compassion or the grattitude of how lucky we are to have this. They anazlyze this in the movie and kind of point it out to us when we see the difference in living conditions. We see how proud we are of where we come from and stay with out fear of being killed or such.Also about having our full family around or nearby at all times whereas with them some don't have parents or haven't seen since six or younger. We have many packaged food and running water which they would need to make our go fetch to have. We have many possessions that are basically guarnteed to us like food, shelter, and everyday possessions.

Anonymous said...

When John first sees his mother he is very happy. She is very happy and she shows this through an Dinka song and dance. When John sees this it doesn't really phase him. He in a way ignores. This moment it shows that he misses home because his family but also hes happy to be in America were there is peace and he can better himself in many ways.

Joe Alberico

Bri Cunningham said...

3. When his mother starts doing the dance, he was just standing there. It looked like he was almost embarassed when she was dancing in front of everyone and the cameras. When he showed embarassment on his face, that established that he was becoming americanized. That moment proved that the american way of life was rubbing off on him. It was obvious that he was completely thrilled to see his mother standing with him in America, after 17 years. They are very excited to come to America and that's why they celebrate. Although, they don't really want to leave their country because that is their home.

Jessica Schneider! said...

"God Grew Tired of Us"

1. In the movie it shows how the Dinka culture has little to none of the resources we have here in America so when introduced to these resources the lost boys are amazed. The aspects that are polarized are simple things like toilets, running water, electricty, "ready" made food, and the the culture on Americans in general. In Sudan it is common to talk to people you dont know and you are able to walk up to someone and ask them what is wrong, but in the US if you saw someone crying along the road you would just keep on walking. At the ending of the movie Daniel has a job at a natural food store and he see's a woman crying so he approaches her and asks her what is wrong, that is a part of his culture to approach people like that but its not something you would see everyday in America. There is a part of the movie when the lost boys first get to America and a group of the men are in a food store being shown everything and they approach the bakery and see donuts and dont know that its food, this is an example of an aspect of our culture that is polarized through their perspectives.

Anonymous said...

1. The benefit of seeing our culture through the eyes of the Dinka is fascinating in my opinion. It is almost equivalent to them going forward into the future. The way that they live they have to prepare all of their foods while we have edible products that are pre-made or that you can order. We take things like this for granted, watching the former lost boys marvel at potato chips, grocery stores and mistakenly eat condiments really shows how different our cultures really are.


-Nick J

Chris A. said...

Our culture is really exposed by the Dinka in the documentary. Since they come from an entirely different culture, they reveal to us more about our own culture. For example: Dinka culture says that entering another's house is acceptable. In America you would not just enter even your best friend’s house without some sort of permission. Our culture, to some, is high-paced and can be cold. Everyone goes off to work at different places and many seem to be in a hurry. Another cultural difference is that in American cities you don't just converse with everyone on the street. The Dinka find this concept to be very unfriendly. Most Americans take for granted electricity and technology. If you can not see, you flick a switch and the entire room is illuminated. In the African countryside this concept is not even imaginable. Every corner of the United States, except for extremely rural parts, has a grocery store where food can be purchased. The Dinka men in the documentary can not believe that there is prepared food that you can simply buy. The perspective of the Dinka highlights American culture is a way that we do not see it.

Anonymous said...

1. I think alot of people take alot of things for granted. For example, being with your family everyday. Alot of the Dinka haven't seen anyone in their families in years. Another thing is having a job. No one really wants to work, but it's a good thing to have.

2. The "American Dream" is to have like a nice home, money, a family, and maybe a dog. Alot of American teenagers dream to be proffesional athletes, famous musicians, or actors and actresses so they can be rich and have anything they want.
The "Sudanese-American Dream" is to be able to go back to Sudan, that and to be reunited with their families. In the movie they focused on saving up money to send back to the lost boys to help them with schools and such.

3. At first, when John's mom fell and she was doing that like screach he had tears in his eyes. Then when she was doing the dance he was standing on the other side of who I think is one of his siblings, with a smile. He also doesn't do the dance with his mom, it's almost as if he didn't know what to do. This moment illustrates that he is now an American aswell as Sudanese and Dinka, while his mother is representing only the Sudanese. While John's mother was in her Sudanese dress, he was in a suit and tie picking her up at the airport and he got there by driving his car.
-Jay

~Judy said...

In the film, John is reunited with his mother after 17 years. She expresses her elation through a Dinka song and dance, a traditional expression of joy. John doesn’t really know how to respond to this. He is just keeps on holding on his mother making sure that she is okay. He doesn’t know what else to do. This is all that he knows to do. He is somewhat is embarrassed but doesn’t know what to react. He has been in America for such a long time and so he in a way doesn’t remember a lot about his culture. The Dinka are especially excited to go the U.S. Yet they hate that they are neglecting their country. She didn’t know what to do. I guess that the Dinka’s way of expressing joy was through a song and dance.

Matt Reeves said...

1) Many of us take for grant some of the things that others don’t even have. Running water is one of these commodities that many have not seen. Electricity is by far the most unusual things that others from countries like Sudan have never seen. We as a society are use to these things being around and are dumbfounded when we encounter someone who doesn’t know what these things are.

Anonymous said...

Question 1

I know see things in a different perspective in terms of my everday American life. Things like going to the grocery store, celebrating Christmas, or having a job are things that I do take for granted. These things are very different for immigrants from Africa or any country for that matter. When these Sudanese immigrants go to the store, they are in a parallel universe of foriegn goods. I am sure that it would be the same way if I went to Africa and went to one of their stores. Liekwise with other places that i take fro granted and don't view as obscure to immigrants.

Seamus Slattery

Matt Reeves said...

3) When John is reunited with his mother who for the past 17 years was thought to be dead, the both are filled with joy. When his mother expresses her feelings through a Dinka song and dance he is sort of embarrassed but his best to hide it. John is embarrassed because he has gotten use to the way that things go in America and when his mother danced he was hit with a reminder of everything that he left in order to be where he was.

Darren said...

3) John is reunited with his mother after seventeen years of seperation they meet at the airport. He meets his sister and mother there and his mother breaks down crying and preforms a traditional dance of joy for her son John. John is surprised by this dance but he is full of emotions he begins to cry, also he seems like sort of embarresed because he has gotten use to American customs and that just somthing you dont see everyday in America. His mother is representing is native culture and where John is originally from, and John represents his new life now in America and how much he has changed is views and culture on people.

Anonymous said...

nigel
1. A benefit of this documentary lies in the opportunity to view our own (American) culture through the eyes of the Dinka. What aspects of our culture, which we may or may not take for granted, are polarized by this different perspective? The probability of getting a job in America is very high. My opinion is that some people take that for granted. it is hard to get jobs in Africa. And that’s why the Sudanese value their jobs so much. When most immigrants migrate here they see it as an opportunity for upliftment for their families as the money here is very high compared to most countries. There is great opportunity here, I think that some Americans don’t know it.

Anonymous said...

1.A benefit of this documentary lies in the opportunity to view our own (American) culture through the eyes of the Dinka. What aspects of our culture, which we may or may not take for granted, are polarized by this different perspective?

We take many every day things for granted here in America. One of the biggest aspects of our lives that we take for granted is being educated. We have been educated on things like how to use the shower, stove, sink, bathroom, TV, computers, beds, and electricity. They have never seen these items before and we almost need them in our lives to survive. We have the knowledge of these basic and common things that they could never even imagine. One other important thing we have grown up with, that they have not, is we have freedom. We have the Freedom to work, go to school, make money, and have our own belongings. The people of Sudan and other African countries don’t have all of these things in there life as we take advantage of in our lives.

2. Construct a "mini-essay" which compares and contrasts the "American Dream" with the "Sudanese-American Dream". Use specific references to the film and the novel.

The American Dream is a common want of wealth, love, and happiness for Americans. Everyone wishes to have the ideal life. Americans want the biggest and the best, but they also want it in the easiest way possible. The Sudanese immigrants have a different idea of the American Dream. These people think life is honestly about working hard, having a strong family, and making something of themselves through educations and hard work. Many Americans have been driven by this want of being the best has closed our eyes to what is really important. These Sudanese people have a stronger sense of what true happiness and of what is really important in life.


3. In the film, John is reunited, after 17 years, with his mother. She expresses her elation through a Dinka song and dance, a traditional expression of joy. How does John respond to this? How does this poignant moment illustrate the paradoxical experience of East African immigrants?

After a long 17 years of being separated from his mother and family, John and his mother were finally being reunited. He dressed up in a nice suit and headed to the air port. At first he was very proud that he was going to see his mother again. Once he saw her, he ran to her. They hugged and his mother began to do a ritual dance of the Dinka that shows her happiness. John has been in America for a significant amount of time and has adopted to live here. So when he saw her dancing in front of tons of people and cameras, he was torn. He wanted to still hold his Dinka heritage but an other part of him knew how to act and behave here in America. He almost seemed slightly embarrassed and so happy at the same time. This causes him to realize he has changed but he still loves Africa and his family.


Michelle Kilburn

Anonymous said...

1. Just about every aspect of our culture is polarized by this different perspective. We take everything for granted in America, from lights, to bathrooms, to ready to eat food, to just getting a job. We don’t realize how different it is in other, foreign countries; the majority of us would not be able to survive in places like Sudan and other third world countries, because we are so accustomed to our luxuries and laws and freedom.

-Andrew R.

Anonymous said...

1. A benefit of this documentary lies in the opportunity to view our own (American) culture through the eyes of the Dinka. What aspects of our culture, which we may or may not take for granted, are polarized by this different perspective?

I think, we as Americans take so many things for granted. This film show just how much we do. One of the biggest things we take for granted is our food supply. We have more than enough food to feed our people, yet so may people go hungry in our very own country. Another ting is our freedom. We have the freedom to do as we please and say and think and be. We are not murdered for our opinions or for our race. Also we take for granted our families. We can, for the most part, see our families when ever we want. If we need them, they are always there. For the lost boys, they are separated from their families and sometimes don’t even know if they are alive or not. Another thing that I saw we took for granted by watching this film was our opportunity to work and make money. All of the Lost Boys we saw were so very grateful for the opportunity to work and make money for themselves, and to support themselves.



-Elizabeth Estremera

Anonymous said...

#1
A benefit of this documentry lies in the opportunity to view our own culture through the eyes of the Dinka. Some aspects of our culture, which we may or may not take for granted are things like grocey stores which is great to have and we don't even realize it. Other countries fight and have to go out and find food for themselves and family or they don't eat. Other things that we as American's take for granted is shelter and our homes also running water and electricity. These are things that other countries don't have that we us everyday and don't even think about. Other countries think about how there going to get food and water for the day and if that food and water they find isn't going to kill them from disease or something. Also they have to relie on fire and for heat and light where they are. America also has many ways of transportation like cars, boats, planes, helicopters, trains, etc. Other countries don't have some of these things and they have to walk everywhere or ride a bycicle. Thats some of the things that American's take for granted. It's almost like we're spoiled.

-Nick S.

Steve said...

There are many songs of war. War is a conflict carried on by force of arms, as between nations or between parties within a nation; warfare, as by land, sea, or air. You can use war in many ways. The best songs that i think have a big impact on war is One by metallica and U2 Sunday Bloody Sunday. These two songs impacted me the most and showed me how much war really means.
One by metallica details the hell on earth of a wounded soldier who is left nearly immobile as well as deaf, dumb, and blind, but unable to die. "Landmine has taken my sight Taken my speech Taken my hearing Taken my arms Taken my legs Taken my soul Left me with life in hell." This show you this soldier suffered and wanted to die. The difference between this song and U2 is that U2 visualizes whats going on. Doesnt stay on one person an focuses on him or her. "Broken bottles under childrens feetBodies strewn across the dead end street." This shows whats going on during this war.In conclusion we all need peace no war. But that never happens someone always has a grudge and reacts with viloence. I say that violoence makes the problem worse then it has to go.

Anonymous said...

Katie Kolodziejczyk

#1

Some aspects I feel that us Americans take for granted is a roof over our heads and food on the table.I think that most of us never think of what we would do if we had neither and how we are so lucky and fortunate to have what we have to live in and eat for food. Another thing I think us Americans take for granted are their jobs. Alot of people think they deserve their job because they have the education needed, but as day after day goes by people look at work as hell and one of the least desirable places to go to. But the sad thing is it takes getting fired, or getting laid off or even a recession in our economy to be greatful for the jobs we have and to also be thankful.

Anonymous said...

Katie Kolodziejczyk

#2

When I think of the "American Dream" it makes me think of the word "want". When I think of the "Sudanese-American Dream" I think of the word "need". I feel as though the American Dream is to have tons of money and to live well off, better then your neighbors, filthy rich even famous. The Sudanese Dream is to do with what you have and to have only what you need to support yourself and learn. This is supported in the movie "God Grew Tired of Us" as some of the Loss Brothers found jobs that paid minimum wage, even less just to work and make something of themselves. Americans feel a sence of embaressment working at McDonals and other fast food places to serve others because we are expected more from the others and competition is cruicial. I feel as though if Americans can have the determination and sense of worth like Sudanese-Americans, then everyone would become equal and worry about their individual characters and less about the materialistic things surrounding them.

Chris A said...

What is the American Dream? Native-born Americans and Sudanese-Americans see the dream in slightly different ways. They both concern the fact that your labor can be rewarded if you want it to.
People who are born here in the United States view the American Dream as a chance to become very prosperous and wealthy. Growing up in American culture on often sets the standards very high. Many Americans are concerned with how much money they will make, or how many cars they will have. The American Dream is really the idea that if you try, you may succeed in life. If you want to make a lot of money, then go for it. For most Americans this concept is exaggerated. Instead of enjoying our freedoms, Americans (myself included) take for granted what we have. Sure we can have a Viper if we want it, but we should be content with being able to get around in the first place. For many people born in the USA the American Dream is really a sort of fantasy.
The Sudanese-American people see the dream differently. Being born in a land where you were lucky to be alive, the potential of the United States was unfathomable. They see the American Dream as a chance to live life with many luxuries that they did not have in Africa. While people from America complain because their house isn’t perfect, Sudanese-Americans are grateful for a roof over their head. They just want to live in safe houses, drive to work, and attend school. To these people the American Dream is really the chance to live and succeed. To live life the way they want to.
There may be several differences but there are similarities. Both views feature the potential to live life in a desirable way. They both involve goals both financially and non-financially. They both are based on the idea of independence and personal success.

Chris A. said...

3. After seventeen years John is Reunited with his mother. When she sees him in the airport she runs over to him. She instantly starts to sing and dance as a traditional expression of joy. In American culture this traditional act could easily be mistaken for a seizure. The singing is mainly shrieking. The dancing involves throwing herself to the floor. John reacts almost with embarasment. He reacts this way because life in the USA has altered him slightly. He has been partially Americanized. He acts almost as if the Sudanese tradition will spoil his status in America, undo his success in the United States. It is paradoxical in the sense that the once foreign American culture is now the definition of normal.

Jessica Schneider said...

God Grew tired of us, and what is the what.

3. John has been in the United States for quite some time now and he has grown used to American customs and way of life, although he hasnt forgotten about his east african way of life. In the film John often tries to contact his family and send them money, he gets ahold of his mother and is finally reunited with her after 17 years. He goes to the airport to pick her up and when they see eachother she greats John with hugs and tears but also a Dinka song and dance, which is a traditional expression of joy. John is very happy to see his mother clearly, he is happy with tears, but at the same time he seems a bit embarassed when she does her song and dance, he seems embarassed because of the way he has become accostemed to American way of life and his mothers actions arent among what you would see everyday in the US. The poignant moment illusrartes the paradoxical experience of East African immigrants by showing how they express their feelings and emotions.

- Jessica Schneider!

Jessica Schneider said...

God grew tired of us, and what is the what.

2. The American dream in the 19th and 20th centries has changed from working hard to get fame and wealth to, "get rich quick," which means doing anything to achieve money and power even if it means walking all over other people. People think that money will buy them happiness but it wont, however it might if you deserve the wealth with hard work. But the Sudanese American Dream is very different from ours, watching the video, "God Grew Tired of Us," and reading, "What is the Waht," it shows us how we take the littlest things in life for granted. Their dream is to simply support themselves in the US with average jobs, like working at Mc-Donalds, to them that is a dream, they even work more than one job. To them education is also a dream to them, something us high school students take for granted, pople like Valentino, John, Panther, and Daniel thrive off education and want it so badley. In the US we take a lot of things for granted, while we should be living and appricating things more like the Sudanese people.

- Jessica Schneider

Anonymous said...

In the novel What is the What by Dave Eggers a quote with significant meaning is “It is criminal that all of this has happened, has been allowed to happen. In a furious burst I kick and kick again, flailing my body like a fish run aground. Hear me, Christian neighbors! Hear your brother just above! Nothing again. No one is listening. No one is waiting to hear the kicking of the man above. It is unexpected. You have no ears for someone like me." In this quote Eggers is expressing the difficulty that Valentino faces when try to get people to understand the difficulties he’s faced through out his life. Examples of when others can not understand are, having to suffer through genocide, fleeing from your home and the way in which he gets robbed.
When Valentino was just a young boy he witnessed tragic events of genocide. His home was attacked and many of the members of his village including his family and friends where murdered. On account of the attack the surviving boys had to flee the homes and lose everything that they had. They walked in large groups and always stuck together, going through many difficulties such as extreme hunger, deadly illnesses, attacks, and having difficulties getting along with those from other villages. Not long after arriving in America Valentino opens the door to a woman asking to use the phone, being naive he lets her in. This woman turns out to be one of two robbers; the other enters in behind her. During the process of the robbery Valentino is called some discriminating things such as “Africa”, and is also hit and kicked repetitively.
In conclusion Eggers novel What is the What shows the difficulties that Valentino has in explaining the tragic events that have occurred to him throughout his life. Examples of when others can not understand are, having to suffer through genocide, fleeing from your home and the way in which he gets robbed

Sean Holland

Anonymous said...

Eric Brown Says
question 3
After John is reunited with his mother it is a mixed emotion event. They are very overwhelmed with this but in this short time apart things have changed. Thethings that have change is him being Americanized.
By americanized i mean he has become more like us. Before he was warm hearted, outgoing, and caring. Not that he still are those things but more of forgot about them. He realizes he lives in America now that "time is money". He is more independent so he strives off of work and that minimizes his creativity. In east africa everyone is friends with eachother basically like family. In America you can not trust anyone and this has rubbed off on him to.
After not seeing your mother for 17 years wouldn't you feel joyed to see her. In this case he felt more embarressed than joyed. As she starts her dance that shows her excitement he gets very upset with her. He knows everyone is watching because in America that is not a custom to them. The love she has creates her to dance. The love to be free makes him embarressed. His strive yo be a free is not always free. As you can see here they've taken his creativty which individulizes from others.

Anonymous said...

1. Things that we may not take for granted are, being able to work. Most Americans do not like the idea of working but the Dinka are more than happy to work for their own money. Some American’s would not like to live in an apartment and would rather to be living in a house, but the Dinka are just happy to have a place to live.


2. There are several differences between the American Dream, and the Dinka-American Dream. Most Americans just want to get rich as quickly as possible and do as little work as possible. In the Dinka-American Dream, it’s the complete opposite; they don’t care about where they live. Their just happy to be able to “work” for the money they get and the things that they have. Like when John is working at a McDonalds most Americans would not want to work there, but John is more than happy too.

3. When John’s mother performs the dance, John looks happy to see his mother but he didn’t seem to like that she was doing it in front of everyone. This shows the changes that John has gone through since not seeing his mother.

Sean Holland

Anonymous said...

2. Construct a "mini-essay" which compares and contrasts the "American Dream" with the "Sudanese-American Dream". Use specific references to the film and the novel.

the american dream consists of having a nice house,nice car,beautiful wife,etc. While the sudanese dream is to make sure their family are well in the sense that they have food,a place to live,clothing and in some cases, attempt to get them in the country. Both are basically the same,because when all is done everybody just wants to be happy. But to get to that goal both dreams go in different directions. for example: the American will work towards buying a house, while the sudanese will work towards the supporting of their family in Sudan. Everyone basically has the same dream, it's just how people live and dream that makes us different

nigel williams

Anonymous said...

3. In the film, John is reunited, after 17 years, with his mother. She expresses her elation through a Dinka song and dance, a traditional expression of joy. How does John respond to this? How does this poignant moment illustrate the paradoxical experience of East African immigrants?

John responds to his mom's dance with tears of happiness but in my opinion he seems embarrassed by his mom's appearance and the commotion she caused at the airport

nigel williams

ASH said...

Ashlee Perrotta
December 15, 2008
English, E
“God grew tired of us”

1. The American culture compared to the Dinka culture is a breath of fresh air. We take granite of many things here in America and this document shows us exactly what. When it comes to sinks, toilets and showers, we are already pro’s by like age nine. In the Dinka culture, there is not even running water. A few other miscommunications we have with the Dinka culture is food. There was a bag of chips in the film and they did not know that you could just open the bag and eat it.
2. “mini essay”
The American dream and the Sudanese dream tend to differ in many ways. In the film, “God grew tired of us,” John the leader of the lost boys “pact” has a very inspirational role. As a young boy, he was very tall and because of his height, looked as if he were an adult figure. The boys looked up to him with much respect and learned many things from him. The Sudanese dream is to lead a life out of poverty and always from all the madness, as to where the American dream is to lead a successful, wealthy, first class life.
John is a very inspirational person. He has witnesses much stress and tragedy through out his life time and can be looked upon as a well inclined individual. He has many goals in set. Although Americans look at it as not that great, John receives a job with McDonalds. He feels much gratitude and pride in his job because back in Sudan, there are no establishments or companies like the ones that are offered in America. The American culture usually looks and McDonalds and figures it not to be such a great job unless you are desperate. This is something that we Americans take for granite. The American dream is to get a good education, go to a great college and graduate and become a first class citizen. Some high achieving parents get mad or frustrated with their children for not doing their best in school, but it is only because they do not want their children to throw away opportunities. American culture can tend to be snotty and needs to be frowned upon when it comes to the world of employment.
The Sudanese dream differs from the American dream in more than one way. Americans need to take the time to look around and catch the big picture rather than just the life you lead. They take many things for granite and attention should be drawn more effectively to this subject.

3. John has not seen his mother In the past 17 years. They are reunited in America. When they see each other there are tears and hugs and kisses, but she starts to do a traditional dance. John gets embarrassed because of this dance and because he is so used to American culture, but he is still happy. He gets embarrassed only because people were looking, but he is still happy and it is a Sudanese cultural custom.