Thursday, March 22, 2012

"Out, Out-" Thesis Statements

38 comments:

Anonymous said...

Shifting from enthusiastic to a more depressing mood in "Out, Out", Robert Frost uses direct personification, graphic imagery, and time-period diction in order to portray the idea of inevitable death in life.

EvanD Period C

Amanda S. said...

Shifting between impersonal and personal descriptions of the saw mill in "Out, Out--," Robert Frost employs casual personification, insensitive diction, and injurious imagery to criticize the social acceptance of the dangers of such an industrialized society.

Hannah Lavendier said...

Containing an allusion to Shakespeare's "Macbeth" in the title of his poem, "Out Out-", Robert Frost utilizes a nonchalant tone, strong personification, and devious puns in order to demonstrate the continuation of "affairs" in life despite death occuring during the Industrial Revolution.

Anonymous said...

Shifting from a happier to a more solemn tone in Robert Frost's "Out, Out-", the "buzz saw" is a symbol of the new machinery used during World War I and that you never know who is suddenly going to go next.

-Danielle M.

Anonymous said...

Incorporating dark humor in “Out, Out-“, Robert Frost uses morbid satire, pestilent personification, and repulsive repetition to discuss the futility in avoiding death and to point out the insubstantial nature that death embodies for those who witness it.

-Joel Sitte

Anonymous said...

In the poem "Out, Out-" by Robert Frost, the author employs fatal personfication, emotive repepition and depressing mood to show, despite tragedies, people continue on after loved ones have "snarled and rattled" to their deaths.

Michelle Carignan

David A. said...

Shifting from an excited to a solemn tone in "Out, Out-," Robert Frost employs dark personification, a Shakespearian allusion, and pulsing imagery in order to discuss the inevitability of moving on from death; "and they, since they were not the one dead, turned to their affairs."

Anonymous said...

Moving from happy times to fading memories, Robert Frost, in his poem Out, Out utilizes rugged personification, satirical dialogue, natural narrative to show that life can be full of irony, and life and can from a nice call to “supper” to death and lost memories.
-Meredith Davern

Matt Kelley said...

In “Out, Out” Robert Frost utilizes animalistic personification, dark repetition, and depressing irony to show the reader that whether it is in a literal sense or in a figurative sense that all people are truly “dead”.

Catherine Worrall said...

Shifting from a sweet depiction of a carefree work day to a harsh representation of its disastrous results in “Out, Out –", Robert Frost utilizes excessive personification, light alliteration, and a dark tone to convey the idea that the innate selfishness of humanity leads to catastrophic ends.

Emily said...

Shifting from an occupational to a morbid tone in "Out, Out-" Robert Frost employs dark satire, agricultural imagery and mechanical personification in order to convey the reality of life, how quickly it begins and how quickly it ends, as others just continue on with "their affairs".
Emily Boockoff

Emily said...

Shifting from an occupational to a morbid tone in "Out, Out-" Robert Frost employs dark satire, agricultural imagery and mechanical personification in order to convey the reality of life, how quickly it begins and how quickly it ends, as others just continue on with "their affairs".
Emily Boockoff

Melanie Huynh said...

Alluding to Shakespeare's Macbeth in his title "Out, Out-", Robert Frost employs throbbing imagery, gross personification, and subtle puns in order to present the fact that life goes on after death; "since they were not the one dead, [they] turned to their affairs."

Chengqi Gao said...

Shifting from life to death in "Out, out-", Robert Frost utilizes Shakespearean allusions, dark puns, and aggressive personification to emphasize the importance of life and since we are "not the ones dead" should move on and turn to our own "affairs."

Anonymous said...

Erin Chancey:
Shifting from an indirect to a very specific tone in "Out, Out" Robert Frost incorporates morbid personification,Shakespearian allusions, and dark imagery to prove that life must go on even after death; "And they, since they were not the one dead, turned to their affairs."

Hannah C. said...

Using vivid characterization, intense imagery, and third person perspective in "Out, Out-" Robert Frost describes how a young boy bleeds to death and his family "turned to their affairs" "since they| Were not the one dead".

Anonymous said...

Brittany Harnedy

Gradually transitioning from an emotional state to a state of detachment and indifference in “Out, Out-“, Robert Frost incorporates loud personification, elegant metaphors, and realistic imagery in order to depict how one’s eventual forgetfulness of a death is necessary yet selfish at the same time.

cmb24 said...

Alluding to Macbeth in Out, Out Robert Frost depicts classified personification, elaborate imagery and unique structure to illustrate that the simplest of tasks can pull you away from life in the blink of an eye.

cmb24 said...

Alluding to Macbeth in Out, Out Robert Frost depicts classified personification, elaborate imagery and unique structure to illustrate that the simplest of tasks can pull you away from life in the blink of an eye.

Anonymous said...

Chris Robinson
Period A

Shifting from the snarles and rattles of the buzz saw to the shock from amputation in "Out, Out-," Frost creates an allusion to 'McBeth,' but also speaks about how little a death means to the people, when they "turned to their affairs" immediatly after the boy's death and saw "no more to build on there."

Emily C said...

Shifting from a grim to a nonchalant mood in “Out, Out-“, Robert Frost uses satanic personification, fatalistic imagery, and casual point of view to describe how people continue “to their affairs” even if a life has “ended”. Emily Christy

Anonymous said...

Shifting from the pleasantness to the horror of buzz sawing in "'Out, Out-'", Robert Frost utilizes active personification, desensitized tone, and contrasting characterization in order to convey the narcissistic nature of humans in which they "turned to their affairs" even in the presence of a tragic death. - Dan Kehoe

Anonymous said...

Joshua Willis
Thesis: Depicting the tragic end of a man's life in "Out, Out-", Robert Frost utilizes powerful personification, a desensitized tone and sad irony to convey the brevity of life and how easily those who "were not the one dead" move on.

Anonymous said...

Shifting from fateful to detatched mood in the poem "Out,Out_", Robert Frost ampliphies powerful personification, "rueful" imagery, and grim symbolism to demonstrate that regardless of who you are in life, with or without you, the world's people will continue on with "their affairs".
-SUSAN MEYER

Brianna Barrows said...

Brianna Barrows
Transitioning from an aloof to detached suggestion of tone in “Out, Out,” Robert Frost utilizes illustrative personification, parallel allusions, and nonchalant imagery to demonstrate adjudicating fate of who lives and who dies, and “since they were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.”

Katie Durst said...

Transitioning between emotional and gruesome despair, in “Out, Out –“ Robert Frost provokes the poem using gloomy imagery, morbid personification, and dreary symbolism to emphasize the carelessness of society, as they “turned to their affairs” recently after the tragic death of the young boy and the loss of his hand.

Katie Durst
English A Block

Anonymous said...

Amanda Murphy

Creating an emphasis on the boy’s passivity and innocence in “Out, Out –“, Robert Frost uses aggressive personification, rich imagery and indifferent tone to suggest that the people of this small town have nothing to do but move on with their lives and return to “their affairs” after the boy’s death, just as soldiers on the battlefield.

Anonymous said...

Shifting from a grim to a desensitized tone in “Out, Out-,” Robert Frost incorporates aggressive personification, structural pauses, and nonchalant imagery to explain how indifference is the only way to cope with the boy’s death and they must return “to their affairs.”

Kristen MacGray

Anonymous said...

Steve Burrill
Period A

Shifting from the mundane activity of buzz sawing to the possibility of death in "Out, Out-", Robert Frost utilizes a fatalistic tone, aggressive personification, and active imagery to evoke his idea that if a problem arises and your "not the one dead" you will “turn to (your) affairs” with no remorse.

Dalton said...

Shifting from the hysteria of the accident to the ironic return of normalcy in "Out, Out-," Robert Frost geniously fuses gruesome imagery, violent personification, and a grim tone in order to explain how even when such a grave event occurs, such as death, that life continues on for the living because they are "not the one dead."

mike adler said...

shifting from the mundane activities of everyday life to a rare unfortunate accident in "out, out-" Robert frost uses fatalistic imagery, intense personification and a nonchalant tone tone in order to enforce the idea that once death has chosen its next target, it is impossible to escape.

Anonymous said...

Marco Orlando



Shifting from the typical duties of the buzz saw, to an abstract sense of evil and carless intention, Robert Frost utilizes grim imagery, suspicious tone and demonic characterization in order to imply that the accident was a result of the buzz saw's careless and possessed nature.

Anonymous said...

Brian loud

Shifting from grim to a casual mood in "out,out-", Robert Frost utilizes formidable mood, personification, and dark imagery to portray the idea of the buzz saw having its own mind

Anonymous said...

Brian loud

Shifting from grim to a casual mood in "out,out-", Robert Frost utilizes formidable mood, personification, and dark imagery to portray the idea of the buzz saw having its own mind

sarapish said...

Transitioning from a quiet, serene setting to a morbid, desolate reality, in Robert Frost's poem, "Out, Out-", the coupling of subtle repetition and distinct imagery collide to produce a warning of the dangers of war as well as the unjustifiable cruelty of nature and people who, with time, all move forward.

Anonymous said...

Shifting from impersonal and personal descriptions in "Out, Out", Robert Frost utilizes strong personification, emotive repetition and natural narrative in order to show the reader the reality of how life begins and how life ends.

-Shayna Rahwan

Jamie Tyree said...

Transitioning between an uneasy and nonchalant tone in "Out, Out-", Robert Frost displays rumbling imagery, unmistakable personification and magnetizing structure in order to pull the reader into the sudden image of a boy's unfortunate fate, bringing him to the end of life, where "his pulse took fright" and his heart slowed to "Little-less-nothing!"

(sorry this is late, had no idea it was supposed to be posted!)

22569 said...

"Out, Out" shows that carelessness has reprocussions. And children should always be supervised regardless of personal trust or overall skill. From a poetic standard; it shows imagery, accidental repetition, prospective to one's feelings, irony and moral standards. Back then a young boy had to proove his worth to stay with someone's family regardless of the bloodline. If the boy knew about the safety rules we have now, his death could've been prevented. The family could've showed a little sympathy after all he was their employee and son. But I think Robert Frost was doing that on purpose to kind of sneak in the idea of the boy being a family slave. On the same token he didn't care about the family and only wanted his hands back to normal. At the beginning of the story the boy gets distracted to show he cares about his sister. But when they get to the hospital, his attitude and morality escapes him a little. And states "don't let him take my hand, please sister don't let him take it".