Saturday, January 5, 2013

Orwellian Parallels: AP English Literature


Part A: To supplement our reading of 1984, I am asking you to consider the qualities of both utopian and dystopian societies. Visit the two links below (of course, these are not put forth as actual utopias, but undeniably represent facets of idealistic societies). Offer a brief synopsis of each. Then, discuss the qualities that you identify as synonymous with utopias and dystopias.

The World: Dubai

Denmark: The Happiest Place on Earth


Part B: Click here. View the document. Construct a thesis statement connecting the content of this article to 1984.


Part C: Click the links below to explore the images of North Korea on "The Big Picture". Peruse the photographs and read all of the captions. After viewing a number of images from multiple links, choose 3 that you feel echo- or, perhaps, represent distinctions when compared with- 1984. Construct 3 separate theses that identify and articulate between image and text.

Recent Scenes from North Korea
Peering Into North Korea
A North Korean Anniversary and Debut
Tension in the Koreas

Part D: Study the following songs. Analyze the lyrics, and compose a paragraph that pinpoints the relationship between the songs and the novel. Though all of the songs are allusive, their contextualization and universal ideas may differ from Orwell's. To enhance your understanding, you may wish to view the videos while reading/following the lyrics in a separate window.

"Testify" by Rage Against the Machine: audio/video
"Big Brother" by Stevie Wonder: audio/video
"2+2=5" by Radiohead: audio/video

33 comments:

Matthew Carlin said...

Part A: Upon indulging the assigned materials, a pattern seemed to appear between the two societies of the islands off Dubai (as I will later name Build Your Island) and Denmark the post consumerist society of unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchists (or simply the Danes). Each form of society was being built with people in mind, the Build your Island idea of a personally customized paradise versus the simple subsidized life of the outgoing Danes. The islands are resembling that of the Big Brother society of George Orwells novel, 1984 where the society is custom built for those who own the land (in the case of the islands, it’s the property owners/renters). Each island can be handcrafted into the “perfect paradise” with island sculpting technology and the ability to design everything from the grain of sand to the model of the house on the property, much like the all powerful “party” in 1984 who dominated even the lives of those in their “paradise” . The Danes however are the happiest people in the known world, their government subsidizes even their own friendships such as if a group of four went out for the night; the government would pay them for it and though they have the money for a car each Dane prefers the comfort of their own bike .

Part B: Researching the prospect of the mind through brain waves Marcel Just with his invention to read the thoughts of a person resembles that of the 1984’s Big Brother society through the art of employ deceptive techniques, invasive tools and the misguided intentions in order to provide the world with a device that will read the mind of others, and prevent the spread of violence and crime in the world.

Kara said...

Part A: To supplement our reading of 1984, I am asking you to consider the qualities of both utopian and dystopian societies. Visit the two links below (of course, these are not put forth as actual utopias, but undeniably represent facets of idealistic societies). Offer a brief synopsis of each. Then, discuss the qualities that you identify as synonymous with utopias and dystopias.

Denmark, a northern, cold, land, somehow boasts the happiest people on earth, despite having the highest taxes. These high taxes, in fact, mean that the government covers all education and health costs, and provides child and elderly care. It also means that incomes are more equal, so people do not choose a career solely based on income. Even a garbage man says that he lives a happy life, because he has a short workday and friendly customers along his route. The thing that is proposed as making the Danes the happiest people is that their priorities are social groups, rather than material items and wealth. This also causes them to have a high level of trust in each other.
The World is presented as a paradise consisting of 300 resort islands off the coast of Dubai. The video proposes that The World will contain various residential areas, as well as resort and commercial offerings. It sets up transportation hubs that will minimize transport time, and keep everything just minutes apart. However, the video is from 2007, and notes at the bottom that The World has, somewhat ironically, been cancelled because of the 2008 financial crisis. The Wikipedia article reveals that only one island even has a building on it today, which is just a show home. This envisioned paradise never came to be because its cost was too high for the modern world to practically build.
Both of these places are clearly more evocative of utopias than dystopias. Denmark, in particular, is a picturesque place, though it may not be meteorologically ideal. Denmark’s population is also quite happy and friendly, and has their needs covered by the government due to high taxes. Both utopias and dystopias typically have high government involvement, in fiction. Denmark fits this standard. At least from the provided article, Denmark seems to be a definite utopia.
The World, on the other hand, is conceptually a utopia, but the overambitiousness of the project means that it cannot come to be, keeping the standard that a utopia is impossible to achieve in today’s world. One might even say that The World is distinctly dystopian in its nonfictional form, as it is an abandoned wannabe paradise that boasts only one building, which is a representation of an ideal that never came to be.

Anonymous said...

A. The initial video is an introductory video to The World islands located off the coast of Dubai. These man-made islands are designed to resemble the continents of the world, each with its own distinct resort culture. Similar to a utopia, The World islands are broken up into sections that serve different purposes. Some islands are used to house tourists and resorts while others are used for commercial reasons. Each island’s purpose is significant because it aids in the progress of the group as a whole, similar to the breaking up of Oceania in 1984.
The Denmark article is very intriguing. The article itself is intended to explain to readers who the happiest people in the world are and why. Surprisingly, Denmark can be found at the top of the list. Although its people, often pay 50% income tax, most of them are content with this outrageously high number because much of the money goes directly back to them through health care and education. In fact, the government provides subsidies for almost anything. This concept of sharing wealth for the greater good of the nation is not new. Orwell’s characters are also conditioned to provide much of what they own to the party in order to benefit the nation as a whole.
B. Although 1984 and Tech That Reads Your Mind both discuss the concept of mind reading, 1984 utilizes a fictional approach complete with actual mind reading used to prevent Thought Crime while Tech That Reads Your Mind discusses a commercialized purpose for the science-fiction concept.

Dan Rafuse

LCerullo said...

The World Dubai-
Opening up to an artificial archipelago constructed offshore of Dubai, the video highlights The World, an innovative island paradise that captures the imagination. This example leans dominantly towards a utopia where enjoyment and recreation are paramount. One quality I noticed was that each island contained identical buildings whether they were estates, commercial, or resort level constructions. This is common with utopias and dystopias as well which quite often eliminate any room for individuality or variety outside the norm. The video also highlights all of the resort’s amenities attempting the pass along the idea that there is no need to go anywhere else, “everything you could ever desire now or in the future is here”. Complete (induced) contentment is synonymous with utopias.

Denmark- The Happiest Place on Earth-
To my own surprise it looks like Denmark pulled out the gold in regards to the happiest people on Earth. Their society is deeply utopian in that public happiness is exceptionally high. In addition to this fact, their communities are deeply interconnected; a strong association, friendship, and camaraderie exist among the Danes. Personally, I feel the most utopian aspect of Denmark is that each and every citizen are true equals, even the garbage man can hold his head high since their people do not carry the petty stereotypes of other nations which prize status and occupation, like our own. This umbrella like equality is not only utopian (and dystopia essentially) it greatly benefits their government, people, and general happiness.

Tech That Reads Your Mind-
Providing a concrete example of what could truly be the tools of our future (thought) police in the article, the author sheds lights on current experiments regarding monitoring of brain activity and interpretation of that activity; frighteningly akin to the devices of 1984’s police force.

-Luke Cerullo

Anonymous said...

1/9/13
Amanda Ward

A) The Dubai idea of manmade islands created to offer the ideal vacation situation is a great example of a dystopian society. Virtually without flaw, on the computer the society seems like the perfect place to live. However, after time and nature take its course the society has no chance of survival. It is comprised of mini sand islands that take a shape similar to a map of the world. Waterways connect the islands and offer a transportation mechanism that could work although what happens when the tide comes in and out? Another cool idea is how close it is to the mainland. It is about 6 minutes to travel from continent to island which is very convenient and I thought, interesting. Overall, the idea is cool and futuristic but almost unrealistic.
The Danish article is very interesting and hopeful. If the Danes can be trustworthy, happy, and earn livings all at the same time, why can’t the rest of the world? I think Denmark is thriving because the government has figured out how to take money from the people but then give it back to them in different ways. A personal connection I have is that my dad’s best friend from childhood moved to Copenhagen when he was a young adult and has fallen in love with it over the years. He married his wife in Denmark and they have three children, all seeming very happy with their lives. When we Skype with my dad’s friend, Eric, we can see his house is quaint and cozy and he tells us of his life in Denmark. To me, this proves that Denmark is a very happy place.
B) Utilizing riveting imagery, structural diction, and strategic juxtaposition to foreshadow the future, Orwell and the author of the internet article create distinctions between reality and fantasy by figuring out the possibilities of “thought identification”.

C) 1) Photo 9; Recent Scenes from North Korea.
Showing the ideas of abandonment of individuality, self- sacrifice, and eternal hiding, “Photo 9”, indicates similar ideals compared in 1984, ultimately mirroring the extreme societies.

2) Photo 7; Peering into North Korea.
Capitalizing on the topic of groups instead of individuals, this image employs a sense of similarity between 1984’s anti- individuality and sense of fear portrayed throughout the book.
3) Photo 31; Peering into North Korea.
Portraying a loss of individuality in “1984”, “Photo 31” signals an idea in hope showing a woman bicycling, wearing a color of her choice which mirrors the individual thoughts of Winston.

D) The song Testify
represents the rage felt throughout the book within Winston. Although Winston’s rage was more subdued, lyrics such as, “To numb me and purge me now, Of thoughts of blaming you”. It is similar to the crimes Winston was charged with in “1984”, also known as “crimespeak” or “crimethought”. Also the idea of a strict society is shown throughout the song and how the strictness is shown “right outside our door.”
“Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder is directly related to “1984”. Wonder uses direct characters and ideas straight from the book, like “You say that you're watching me on the tele.” Wonder’s tone throughout the song seems calming and soothing which contradicts the lyrics but also makes the lyrics easier to understand.
The last song, “2+2=5” by Radiohead captures the repetition of daily life in “1984” by repeating the lyrics “payin’ attention” and “yeah I feel it, I needed attention”. Radiohead uses “attention” which is the same thing Winston wanted of Julia. In a world of no attention, Winston needed it, which is also portrayed in the song. The sounds of the song is rather eerie which is similar to the mood of the book too.




Ashleigh Korona said...

A.
In the video of The World- Dubai, Dubai exhibits qualities of a dystopian society through the separation of the country. The country of Dubai is sectioned off first into four main districts and then into areas populated by people of a particular class. Even though there is signs of a dystopian society there is also clear evidence of a utopian society. Dubai is a beautiful place filled with lush landscape and lovely modern structures that are like any other modern place in the world, but seemingly even better. There is no real poverty or reasons for a miserable population like in 1984. It is like these people know they are living in a beautiful utopia but they are unaware of the underlying dystopia that lives with in their society.
Studies conclude that Denmark is the happiest place in the whole world, but why are these people so happy? The society they live in is a much different society than ours that has a different set of values. In Denmark they have some of the highest taxes in the world, this is because their government pays all healthcare and education fees for their people. This results in the people liking their government and being able to feel more at ease about some of the stresses that come with life. This system makes these people feel secure. Their approach to social status is also much different than ours. They view all careers, as long as they are happy with their choice, which most of them are, as a noble choice. People there do not think it is a low position to be a garbage man or a carpenter. Most people in the country belong to come kind of social club or gathering reminds me of the dystopia of 1984, where all the people had to belong to such things. A strong reminder of a dystopian society is the people’s bind trust in their government and other people. I suppose the trust does take a lot of stress away from one bu to us it seems too crazy to be real.

B.
In the 60 minutes article “Tech that reads your mind” there is a definite shift from the wonder of new technology to the scary real possibility of the dystopia of George Orwell’s “1984” seen through specific diction, scary quotes, and eerie allusions gives the impression of a dystopian society due to this “thought identification.”

Kayla Lantos said...

Part A.
The World: Dubai is a hypothetical series of land masses that would be placed in the ocean and resemble the world. They would consist largely of homes and resorts with a small commercial area. Although it seemed to be a positive, utopian society, it seemed eerie. It’s off in the middle in the ocean, separated from society by a boat (and helicopter?) ride. And even though it’s an exact copy of the world, which clearly already exists, at the end the speaker claims that there is “nothing like it.” The possibilities of what that means are terrifying and certainly hint at some elements of dystopian society. However, I do not think this could ever happen considering that land masses cause water to rise and we already have a slight problem with oceans threatening to consume our coastlines.
Denmark definitely seemed more utopian, because at least the majority of the population was happy. The government there is very involved, taxing them 50-70% of their income for services which involve free education and health care, along with subsidized social gatherings. But they are satisfied with this arrangement. And they seem to live in harmony without social castes and largely free of criminal tendencies that plague the United Sates. It is definitely different, but perhaps it is not terrible for a government to exercise more control if it makes their people the happiest in the world.

Part B.
George Orwell imagined police who read your thoughts in his futuristic dystopian novel “!984,” a technology which may be realized according to a 60 minutes interview with researchers studying the ability to read people’s “thoughts and intentions,” and possibly use the invasive technology to catch criminals.

Colby Sears said...

The concept of a utopian society is nearly unreachable: an idyllic paradise in the real world with few social and economic issues. Although the idea of such a society in the modern day is nearly nonexistent, incarnations of the utopian model can most certainly be found in certain countries around the world, including the real-life paradise of Dubai and the home of the happiest people on earth, Denmark.
Located off the sandy coast of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, the World, a world so geographically close to accepted society yet so removed from society as a whole, is a man-made, artificial archipelago of multiple islands constructed into the shape of a world map. Consisting of nearly 300 private islands segregated into four unique categories – estate homes, private homes, vacation resorts, and community destinations – the World has been referred to as “an island paradise where unprecedented opportunity can be found that is almost as rare as the ambition required to envision it”. The World fits the mold of the ideal utopia in nearly every aspect, and prides itself on being the “ideal mix of sand, sea, and sky” where multi-family residential developments coexist alongside grandiose estate homes. The World is a perfect society that is almost too overtly perfect, where problems are limited and opportunity is limitless for each citizen with the privilege of residing there.
In another part of the real world vastly different yet eerily similar to the microcosm of the synthetic World, the country of Denmark has been proven to be “the happiest place on earth”. Following studies and questionnaires conducted by social scientists and polling experts, the seemingly ordinary country is home to the world’s population of happiest people, where class distinctions are blurred and societal trust in one another reigns supreme. Denmark represents the aspects of a utopia in a different respect, in which the citizens rather than the society itself embody what it means to live in a perfect world. (not finished)

Nicole Miller said...

Nicole Miller
This is what i have so far and was able to do in class
Part A(so far):
Dubai, “The World,” is a modern feat found nowhere else in the world. It consists of sculpted islands, with their own hubs for transport from island to island. Each area contains their own commercial and retail shops for a self-sustaining paradise. It is considered to be the most innovative creation on Earth, and the only one of its kind.
Denmark, according to multiple studies, is considered the happiest place on Earth. The only thing that negatively impacts the emotions of the Danish people are their high taxes, but due to these taxes, the government covers all health care and education, and allows the citizens to choose a career based on interest rather than on potential income. Following suit, there is a stronger emphasis on social fabric, rather than materialistic items, as 92% of all Danes are involved in some sort of social group.

Seth Killingbeck said...

A.Dubai is a man made resort consisting of a grouping of islands that is roughly in the shape of the continents of the world. The islands allow for a beautiful and serene environment for its guests and residents to live in without fear of disaster. This is where it begins to have a utopian feel as the entire island is a micro-world in its form as previously mentioned. This form combined with the generally peaceful atmosphere as well as the sheer accessibility to everyone represents how a unified world should be. It’s a clean society with a beautiful and pure society to live in hence giving it its perfect feeling.
Denmark is a nation that has been able to evolve its small population into a trusting and proud people. It is capable on relying on and trusting its government in order to support its population fully. The sheer happiness of its people is based around its social structure. Danes are not concerned with material wealth because of how the government manages everything. No one person believes they are a social class of their own as a garbage man can make the same wage as any specialist or a prince can work amongst his subjects without fear. This unified society would explain why the Danes are so happy they live in what can be regarded as the most closely utopian society on Earth.
B. Through developing means to monitor the thoughts of individuals, both 1984 and reality both are capable of monitoring the thoughts of the people in their respective societies.
C. The first image in “Recent Scenes from North Korea” depicts a series of seats that are colored in such a way that is forms the faces of their rulers. This strange source of propaganda is very reminiscent of Big Brother’s face in 1984. This odd anomaly in the society is reflective of all the propaganda in the novel. It transcends their leaders into an every watching and god-like presence much like Big Brother does for the Party. This parallel is strikingly similar to Orwell’s work.
The sixth image from “Peering into North Korea” depicts an incredibly rural region of the nation which is very similar to the slums where the proles of Orwell’s work dwell. This striking resemblance emphasizes the dystopian appearance of the communist nation as its social classes are similar to that of the book when it comes to the working classes living in rural regions and being mistreated. The inequality is a terrifying reminder that the world is still evolving in some regions for the better and in others into an Orwellian nightmare.
The seventeenth photo of “A North Korean Anniversary and Debut” depicts a military parade in front of a government building which features pictures of their leader. This is similar to the hangings in Orwell’s work. Only instead of Big Brother and Oceanian soldiers it’s the North Korean Army celebrating their communist regime. The propaganda of their leader is also quite similar to Big Brother. Most of the dystopian elements of North Korea can be paralleled to Orwell’s fear.

Anonymous said...

A.
The World:
This link, feeling more like a sales pitch than an informational video, tries to communicate to the viewer the absolute unique perfection that defines “The World” island complex located in Dubai. Filling the excerpt with grand and sweeping, though computer generated, views of the location, the viewer is enveloped in the ultra-modern construction and organization of the paradise. Clearly catering to the upper class, the developments are all rather large and spotlessly maintained, suggesting a strong sense of organization and harmony. The luxurious, harmonic, and expansive qualities of this constructed paradise represent the glory that supposedly exists there, emphasized by the richly dramatic speaker to fully communicate the utopian characteristics of “The World”.
Conversely, this complex is heavily developed and tightly organized, with each type work or existence categorized and all but assigned to a location within the complex. In addition, the amount of space between the living quarters is extremely small, offering potential for social conflicts to flare up between disagreeing people placed and kept in such close proximity. In an attempt to compensate for the paradoxically wildly expensive shortcomings of the development, the garish speaker in the commercial strives to impart a feeling of decadence on the audience in a way which is overly appealing and reminiscent of Orwell’s “comrades”, who advocate for Big Brother in a sickeningly respectful and stifling way.
The Happiest Place on Earth:
Denmark, possibly the real happiest place on earth, is home to some of the most trusting and self fulfilled humans on the planet. With an almost absolute absence of concern for material wealth, the Danes turn their focus and attention to happy social relationships and pride in their jobs. With a government which serves to make them feel “tucked in”, the Danes frequently describe their own happiness levels as within the top 20% on the globe. Their society is crisscrossed with the utopian concepts of trust, self fulfillment, and meaningful social connections. Perhaps most importantly, the people of Denmark almost always choose to explore their true passions for careers, with little worry about financial implications of their decisions.
Reflective of the career organization in 1984, the selections of the Danes in their job market are based solely on their interests or levels of proficiency within that field; not monetary gain. With the exception of members of the Inner Party, the Party workers in 1984 toiled solely for the advancement of their government. Like many of the more submissive members of the Orwellian society, the members of Danish society find fulfillment in this kind of work. However, the Danish people are achieving a sense of fulfillment and work to serve themselves with the aid of their government, while the Party members simply blindly serve and obscure and idyllic figure who demonstrates little interest in their well being.

-B. Dague

Joe Carlin said...

PART A
The World, a paradise structure of community, man-made islands, is the place to be. These islands resemble the Earth’s geographical structure with clubs shaped like continents. It is a metropolis for those who chose to stay there whether as a full time home or merely for vacation. There are many waterways that control a pleasant stream of traffic. It holds many key aspects to a utopian society. For example they are very modern in physique and offer many commercial shopping with beautiful scenery and prosperous areas. This is a key component to a happy person’s dream. However with that being said it too has dystopian aspects. It does have low density populated areas and can become very secluded easily due to weather conditions.
Denmark on the other hand is a land of pure utopian society. They live in a day of age were most of them will score themselves as an eight out of ten on the happiness scale. Some aspects that would appeal as dystopian are the fact that they pay between fifty to seventy percent of their incomes as taxes. With that information it appears to be a very poor society and very tight with money. That is actually the opposite of their economical standpoint; they might pay high taxes however their government pays for their healthcare and their education as well as takes care of their elderly. Denmark also is a very trusting community and use bicycles as a mode of transportation due to the environmental benefit.
PART B
Thesis statement:
Though the 60 Minutes article and 1984 are very similar in discussing aspect of invading the thoughts of any person and the technology they use, they differ in their main focus where 60 Minutes is directed towards the relation of information as a technological advancement and a new world of possibilities where as 1984 focuses mainly on using this technology as a mode of being able to punish a person and as a threat to the people.
PART C
Pictures:
From the first link, picture twenty, is a picture of uniformity, the novel 1984 has much more freedom in comparison due to the fact that 1984 might be a uniformed society, they are able to have some facial expression as well as emotion while the females in this image are not allowed to have an expression, they all must be strong and in doing any activity in the same manner.

Jillian Allard said...

Part A
The first link, “The World: Dubai”, is a YouTube video about a network of tropical islands. These glorified sandbars will be shaped to resemble the major continents of the world and become home to private citizens. A network of channels and waterways will serves as transportation. The second link, “Denmark: The Happiest Place on Earth”, is an article concluding that the citizens of Denmark are the most satisfied with their lives. The people are heavily taxed, but this means that most jobs have the same salary. Residents are then free to choose their careers based on their interests, not monetary gain. The location in Dubai appears to be a utopia because of the tropical weather and modern structures. Denmark seems to be an ideal society because all of the citizens are happy, the government pays for health care and there is no oppressive class structure. The first “utopia” could easily be a dystopia because of its secluded nature and risk of destruction by natural disasters. Denmark’s happiness relies on faith in the government since the politicians control the majority of the money, the health care and education in the nation.
Part B
Although both works touch upon the topic of private thought, 1984 shows how external forces can govern the individual mind while, “60 Minutes” explores the scientific possibility of linking brain scans to specific ideas, displaying the controversy that surrounds invading the most intimate human freedom.
Part C
1. Although both works utilize the customary playing of the national anthem, Orwell has the patriotic tune sound before each news announcement while, in “Recent scenes from North Korea: Picture 16” the anthem is played at hourly intervals, to delineate societies where propaganda is saturated into every facet of life.
2. Both clearly depicting an environment where the benevolent, supreme leader watches over all citizens, Orwell and “Peering into North Korea: Picture 20” utilize large displays of their governments’’ head to reinforce the ever-present notion of control.
3. Both works presenting a society where citizens devoutly regard their single leaders, Orwell and “A North Korea Anniversary and Debut: Picture 26” employ massive public displays to show the false to show the false nationalism that is forced upon the peoples of each respective nation.

Jillian Allard said...

Part D
The influence of Orwell’s 1984 is vast, spanning several different nations and generations. Testify by Rage against the Machine directly quotes the book around the two minute and fifty second mark saying “Who controls the past now controls the future/Who controls the present now controls the past/Who controls the past now controls the future.” This reference is appropriately placed because the song is about the reassuring front politicians and the media present to the public despite the turmoil that is occurring. Propaganda, desensitization and governmental control over the masses are core themes of 1984. The title of Stevie Wonder’s song, Big Brother, is an obvious reference to the leader of Oceania’s ruling body in Orwell’s book. An initial analysis of the lyrics reveals more connections between song and book. “You’re watching me on the tele” is strangely evocative of the teloscreens that monitor Oceania residents, as are the dark, deplorable living conditions. The last lines of the song claim that all true leaders are dead and the government is causing widespread negativity in the lives of citizens; in 1984, leaders who oppose the Inner Party are eliminated and citizens who embrace their individuality are vaporized, creating a dystopia. Similar to the previous song, Radiohead’s song title was most likely inspired by Orwell’s work. In 1984, Winston Smith believes that the Party is so powerful it possesses the ability to convince its residents that 2+2=5, the name of the last song. This song describes an evil force that is influencing their life and the fact that there is no escape; this is thematically similar to 1984 where a government party, not the devil, is controlling people and there is no way to break free. At the very end of the song, the validity of what is occurring is hesitantly questioned. In Orwell’s novel, the tentative questioning of commonly accepted ideals occurred in the beginning, but Winston is forced to embrace those very notions by the end of the work. These modern songs that allude to Orwell’s work are a testament to 1984’s powerful message.

Seth Killingbeck said...

“Testify” by Rage Against the Machine is a song about corrupt modern politics. It relates to the novel because of its themes of control and futility among politics today. It speaks of how the government is full of lies much like the Party. They are slaves to their government just as party members are. The group vocalizes its hate in this song.
“Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder aside from being a direct allusion also shares much in common with the novel as well. It accurately describes the themes of Orwell’s work through the use of its lyrics. From the eternal feeling of being watched to the eternal slavery, it is all depicted in this song. It speaks of poor living conditions which were very similar to that of the flats that the party members called home. The life of the narrator is just as full of paranoia and pain as Winston’s is.
“2+2=5” by Radiohead incorporates themes of oppression and false thoughts that are similar to Orwell’s work. The title says it all with its obviously false answer to a simple math question yet the lyrics try and state otherwise. The lyrics constantly argue against the norm just as Winston did in the Novel. The progressively insane tone of the singer also adds to this. Overall the song is full of lies.

Jordan Ledwith said...

Part A:
The first video contains qualities that one would think a utopian society would possess. It seemed as though the people living in this society would be on vacation all of the time based on the set up of the land. In the article about Denmark being the happiest place on earth, it is evident that the people of Denmark actually enjoy lives. Even those who do not think they are the happiest people on earth seem to consider themselves very happy people, which cannot be said about most other places. People seem to generally like the way of life they have, and they do not have much to complain about.
Both of these societies seem to have qualities of utopian societies. The first one in the video seemed like it was a very easy place to live. It seems like the people who live there will always be on vacation. There were many aspects that seemed like the inhabitants would be very happy with their way of life. There are not many aspects of this that could be associated with the concept of a dystopia. However, there are many aspects that can be considered an aspect of a dystopian society. The video makes it seem like everything is being controlled, especially when they discuss the location of the people in the world. It makes it seem like everything is being controlled and the people living in the society have no control over their own lives. This idea is very much like the idea of dystopian societies. In the article, Denmark seems like a real utopian society. For example, social status does not matter as much which can lead to a person considering themselves happier in general. The citizens seem content with the lives they lead. People seem to trust each other and are not worried about too many bad things happening to them. It seems that the people of Denmark are very trustworthy because of their high level of happiness.
Part B:
Focusing on the harmonizing relationship of mindreading and “thoughtcrime” between the 60 Minutes article “Tech That Reads Your Mind” and George Orwell’s “1984”, the article utilizes intimidating examples and the ever impending threat of new technology to further allow these comparisons to be seen between the two works.
Part C:
1.) In the eighteenth image from Recent Stories from North Korea, the image of Kim-II Sung reflects an eerie resemblance to that of the Big Brother posters depicted in George Orwell’s “1984”, displaying the idea that the two societies possess similar qualities in the overpowering, all controlling leadership style of the government.
2.) In the twenty-first image in Recent Stories from North Korea, the soldiers presented in the picture are all dressed the same, there are no differences in their facial expressions, and they are all walking in step, proving how controlling and demanding the government of North Korea is compared to that of the dystopian society depicted in “1984”, the two do not appear to be that different.
3.) In the twenty-seventh picture from A North Korean Anniversary and Debut, a little boy is depicted wearing a military hat, hinting at the idea that is presented in “1984” that the children are more or less slaves to the government, following their orders and ideals before they get a chance to form their own opinions.

Jordan Ledwith said...

Part D:
The songs “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine, “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder, and “2+2=5” by Radiohead all contain obvious references to George Orwell’s Novel, “1984”. The first song by Rage Against the Machine is basically taking a political standpoint against the government issues of the time. This relates to “1984” directly, not only because a passage of the novel is used in the song, but also because some of the viewpoints presented in Winston’s character can be presented in the song. Winston did not agree with the tactics of the government and wanted to overthrow it somehow. These aspects can be found very clearly in the song. In the second song by Stevie Wonder, he uses the concept of Big Brother to convey his distrust and dislike for the political and social issues in society. Stevie talks about his dislike for politics in our country and how he feels that he is always being watched, hence the constant mention of Big Brother. In the third song by Radiohead, there is the obvious mention of 2+2=5 which is presented in “1984”. This idea is used, in both the song and the novel, to display that things only convey the meaning that one perceives. We can be seeing something as a truth, but the only real thing making it seem truthful to us is our ability to accept it as a truth. Both the novel and the song hint at this idea.

Kara said...

B: In the “60 Minutes” article, the author alludes to the Orwellian concept of thought control, using futuristic imagery, easy-to-follow diction, and fascinating interviews to truly convey “that there is no science fiction anymore.”

C:
THESIS 1: http://bo.st/ZJa0iM
This photograph of North Korea, which is of an old, dirty-looking city, is described by its caption as having “hardly any traffic to be heard after dark,” and no nightlife, due to the fuel crisis of the city. This evocation of a modern city with limited amenities is quite like the city in 1984, with its apparent poverty, its strict laws, and the fact that “Every hour, on the hour, from 6 am to midnight, loudspeakers blast out a patriotic song.”

THESIS 2: http://bo.st/dCYJqn
The picture of several people in their apartment being visited by Kim Jong-Il presents a side of North Korea that surprisingly contrasts with 1984. Though North Korea and 1984’s Oceania have their similarities, the two have fundamental differences, like the hands-on approach of North Korea’s leaders, the more apparent militarism of North Korea, and the definite class distinctions in Oceania.

THESIS 3: http://bo.st/10gmdN5 and http://bo.st/fW7iDg
These two very similar pictures of North Korea are directly evocative of 1984’s society. The two pictures feature signs that say “If (our) party decides, we will do it!" and "Long live Great leader Kim Il-Sung and his revolutionary ideology!" These signs would not be out of place in Oceania; Oceania shares similarities with North Korea, such as their devotion to a sole leader, their mandatory compliance with a single political party, and their omnipresent propaganda.

Kara said...

D: (oops my hand slipped and I wrote an essay)
(can I have extra credit)
(just kidding but I could totally go on about 2+2=4 in particular)

Though many forms of media have drawn from Orwell’s writing, music has the unique quality of capturing emotion audibly, while also being a form of poetry, added to by the intonation of the vocalist. While many songs draw their inspiration from Orwell’s 1984, three prime examples are “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine, “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder, and “2+2=5” by Radiohead.
“Testify,” released in 2000, is a song about propaganda and media influence. However, its Orwellian lines are more than just incidental. In particular, the lines “Who controls the past now controls the future/Who controls the present now controls the past/Who controls the past now controls the future/Who controls the present now?” directly relate to a major theme of 1984: the permanence of the regime in Oceania. As the main character, Winston, discovers, even if one is to begin a resistance, the government is still overpowering. The government of 1984 does control the past: every piece of text and media in existence is being constantly edited to keep the current ideals factual. Anything that opposes the beliefs of the Party is erased. Therefore, because history is rewritten, the Party does control the past. By keeping this system continuous, they effectively also control the future.
“Big Brother,” which even sports a title straight from the pages of 1984, was released in 1972. The first two lines, “Your name is big brother/You say that you're watching me on the tele,” describe the telescreens in 1984 that held all Party members under surveillance constantly. In the next verse, Wonder says that “Your name is big brother/You say that you got me all in your notebook.” This refers to the government of Oceania’s practice of constant surveillance again, alluding that each action is also being recorded for future use. While Wonder uses heavy Orwellian imagery, his song is, wholly, more related to the politics of the real world.
“2+2=5,” released in 2003 by Radiohead is common of their songs: it hides a hidden meaning behind somewhat surreal lyrics. Its title refers to the slogan of the same name used in 1984 to explain the Party’s power over reality. The slogan asks the question “if everyone believes it, does that make it true?” this fits the surreal nature of Radiohead’s lyrics and artwork, making the listener question reality from the very beginning of the song, with its stuttering instrumentation. The opening lines, “Are you such a dreamer/To put the world to rights/I'll stay home forever/Where two and two always makes a five,” immediately relate back to the thought control imposed by the Party in 1984. Winston dreams of making things change, even if a bit, but he is thwarted and subdued by the Party eventually. “Are you such a dreamer to put the world to rights?” is exactly the thing that could be asked of Winston. Can he really make things change? He may as well stay home in safety, where the reality of the Party is comfortably imposed. The rest of the song continues along the same theme, describing how one may set up an untruth to be mandatorily believed. In whole, the song is nothing but an Orwellian exploration of how truth can be created.

Jennifer Golden said...

Part A:
The idea of creating a utopian society is commonly entertained. Many times utopian societies have been attempted and failed, as most of those created by the Transcendentalists during the Great Awakening. The video, “The World- Dubai” offers one common view of a utopian society. This island paradise essentially is the idealized vacation home, an island, with stores and restaurants and everything one needs for a great vacation. I assume that the people who would vacation here would most likely be rich, and thus the cost of vacationing there would not matter. The way it is presented through this commercial, with the panoramic views, the swooping camera angles and the narrator’s calm voice, attempt to make this miniature world seem more desirable. I feel as if this society would appear utopian, but when living in it, it would quickly become dystopian. His would be because all the buildings seem alike, people would conform, individuality would be lost and they would be too controlled. Also, this is because life would be too easy there and people would have nothing to live for, nothing purposeful to do.
The article “Denmark: the Happiest place on the Earth” shows a different view of a Utopian society. Life there is not intended to be that paradise, yet the Danes are the happiest people. Their high taxes, while somewhat annoying, allow them to choose a career solely by deciding what they enjoy. Danes do not need to worry about the price of healthcare, child care, or schooling. Their government provides for them and they feel safe and secure in their Scandinavian country. The Danes do not feel, though, as if the government is stealing their money, but rather as if they are all working and doing their party to create their ideal home. The article states that people leave their babies outside in strollers, unwatched, when just quickly running into a store. They obviously trust the other Danes and their country to leave a baby. There is also no social hierarchy in profession, as the garbage collector makes as much as a banker and is perfectly happy collecting garbage and no one views this as a terrible job.
Typically it seems as if utopian societies provide for people, opportunities, life necessities, etc. A utopian society is void of crime and monetary issues. People there are happy. In contrast, dystopian societies can either be too controlling forcing conformity as in 1984, or can be the exact other extreme and being lacking any central government thus chaotic.

Part B:
The developing ability to read thoughts through brain scans as explained in the 60 minutes article is similar to the thoughtpolice in 1984, thus validating Orwell’s warning of the dangerous path humanity is taking.

Jennifer Golden said...

Part C:
“Peering into North Korea” #20: Depicting a building with a large picture of Kim II sung, a former North Korean leader, this image closely parallels 1984 and the posters of Big Brother everywhere dictating the civilians lives.
“A North Korean Anniversary and Debut” #27: Showing a young North Korean boy in uniform, this picture is much like the junior spies league of 1984, both branding strong patriotism into children from a very young age.
“A North Korean Anniversary and Debut” #21: This image which captures a military parade during North Korea’s 65th anniversary celebration and its cheering audience, bares a shocking similarity to the annual Hate Week of Orwell’s 1984.
“Tension in the Koreas” #24: Illuminating the political party propaganda, and association to one specific leader, this picture of a North Korean hillside spelling out "Long live Great leader Kim Il-Sung and his revolutionary ideology" echoes the same ferocious party propaganda with the figurehead Big Brother in Oceania in 1984.

Jennifer Golden said...

Part D:
These three songs all allude to, or draw parallels to Orwell’s dystopian society in 1984. The first song “Testify” by Rage Against the Machine has several similarities. The chorus “We found your weakness and it’s right outside your door. Now testify” is just like room 101 in 1984 and how the Party and O’Brien would use a prisoner’s biggest fear or weakness to force a confession or a betrayal out of a prisoner, many of whom were innocent. The second to last stanza, “Who controls the present now controls the past. Who controls the past now controls the future. Who controls the present now?” is exactly what Winston discovered in 1984. The party controlled the present, thus they could change the records and change the past to fit their current purposes and their desired future. Also, if one is to google those three lines of the lyrics, as I did by accident, some of the websites will be about George Orwell as well as the song. The last line, “The war is right outside your door” is telling that the fight humanity needs to be fighting is not against other countries overseas, but rather right there at home, against corrupted governments and the path humanity is heading down, a path Orwell was warning against.
The second song “Big Brother” by Stevie Wonder has an obvious connection to 1984 right in the title! Some of the lines also directly allude to Orwell’s novel, such as, “You say that you're watching me on the tele”, and “You say that you're tired of me protesting”. In this song, Stevie Wonder is relating the country leaders, presumable American presidents, as being Big Brother. His message is that he is unimportant to these leaders, they only care when they need his vote. He is just an unimportant man, like every other. The argument connecting Stevie Wonder’s ghetto to the proles could also be made since they are run-down and he wants to be on the other side, perhaps to join the “Party” and Oceania, especially since the proles were cared very little about, and “You've killed all our leaders”. The last line “You’ll cause your own country to fall” also really illuminates the warning that 1984 was issuing to humankind to watch out before humanity self-destructs.

Jennifer Golden said...

Part D Continued:
The third song, “2+2=5” by Radiohead, like “Big Brother” has an allusion to 1984 right in the title, as in Orwell’s novel O’Brien forced Winston to believe that two plus two equals five in order to show him how after being told again and again, one begins to doubt the formerly obviously correct answer and instead believe this new one. The song also explains this. One line states “I try to sing along but the music’s all wrong” showing how the speaker is trying to fit in and believe what is commonly accepted, trying to conform. He can’t. He can’t because he is like Winston, trying to hide that he doesn’t believe this but he knows in his mind, his soul and his heart that what he is being told is completely wrong. Hence the repeated lyrics “But I’m not” and “Cos I’m not”. What is also interesting is the actual video itself. At first it keeps showing the picture equation of a cow plus a pig equals a bird. The bird could represent freedom and happiness. As the video progresses the pigs are obviously in power. They are living a good, easy life, while the cows shrink and starve and one even is crucified, which presents it as being a Christ figure, a martyr, persecuted under false or unfair accusations. The choice of animals is interesting since is Orwell’s Animal Farm, the animals repel and it is the pigs that take charge and oppress all other farm animals, perhaps this video has also drawn a parallel to that.. Throughout the entire song the speaker is arguing against what he is being told, but at the end he switches from “But it’s not” to “maybe not”, showing that be no longer believes, no longer trusts his own thoughts and will instead conform to the beliefs he is being told are right despite their being illogical. In the end of the video the cow dies, like at the end of 1984 humanity has died. All three of these songs are political and are calls to action. They present the problem of the corrupted government and provoke thought, perhaps anger, and a willingness to change things in the listener. This was also a main purpose of Orwell writing 1984.

Anonymous said...

Rachel Anderson

A. Dubai, an elegant, manmade island designed to please tourists, represents a community based on a universal strive toward perfection and an unrestricted effort to please those who spend time there. Denmark, a dreary and basic country on the surface level, is an example of a community based on simplicity and trust, as well as self-fulfillment and equality. Because of their portrayal as idealistic communities and the infusion of hope into the lives of their citizens, these two locations can be classified as Utopian societies. A contrasting society, called a dystopia, would be inherently characterized by segregation, inequality, oppression, hierarchy, and ultimate control by the government.
B. Though 1984 and Tech that Reads Your Mind both discuss the government’s ability to intercept human thoughts, 1984 approaches the idea from a fictional standpoint, discussing the detrimental psychological effects of such practices, while Tech that Reads Your Mind approaches the matter from an investigative perspective, analyzing the science behind it; both pieces, however, are written to question the morality of scanning one’s brain without permission.

Anonymous said...

Rachel Anderson

C. Depicting a scene from North Korea’s Mass Games in “Recent Scenes from North Korea,” Eric Lafforgue uses multi-faceted imagery and an amalgamation of smaller images to reflect the North Korean emphasis on the group over the individual.
Showing scenes of war and despair in “Peering into North Korea,” the photographer incorporates dark shadows, melancholy faces, and grimy scenery in order to reveal the detriments of a dystopian society.
Showing scenes of destruction in “Tension in the Koreas,” the photographer employs symbolic explosions and emotional facial expressions to criticize the negative effects of dystopias.
D. Orwellian concepts from 1984 have been influential in American society and been infused into social media, often alluded to in popular music. In the song “Testify,” Rage Against the Machine incorporates Orwellian viewpoints, criticizing the power of the government and question who controls the past, present, and future. Stevie Wonder also alludes to Orwell in his song “Big Brother,” using the character of Big Brother as a symbolic representative of a group, bearing Wonder’s criticism of those who watch while their country falls apart. In “2+2=5,” Radiohead uses the Party’s beleifs from 1984 to construct an analysis questioning the effects of unrestricted government intervention.

Anonymous said...

A)Dubai is an idealistic utopia. It consists of islands perfectly shaped by sand, sea, and air in the form of crescents that are placed to model “the world”, and on these islands all the homes and private beaches look the same, just like the people in 1984 as they wear matching overalls and uniforms with the same indifferent demeanors. Transportation here is efficient with hubs, which consist of strategic waterways for boats to use to optimize time, resembling the system of Oceania’s “the tubes” in which everything is efficient. In a way, the islands look like a cell, with a sand bar skirting the outside like a cell wall, and this wall is semi-permeable as there are key outlets to the outside world. This island, thus, seems protected, isolated from the world sort of like Oceania, which only has limited access through these outlets for war, and these gateways are heavily guarded like they are in a cell because they don’t want people to be slipping out like ribosomes and such would, and after all they wouldn’t need to be slipping out when there is “sunshine year round.” The only thing to be concerned about is erosion by sea, which surrounds and flows through Dubai, and for Oceania the erosion is inside and out as well with the enemies of The Party.

Denmark is scientifically one of the happiest places in the world. After asking people on the streets of Denmark to rate their happiness they rated high, and came to the conclusion that the only thing to complain about are the high taxes, but in turn everything from healthcare and education the government provides. Everyone feels “tucked in”, content and happy as they are cared for by the government like a child: protected, like how The Party protects the members from reality. Also, nobody is above anybody else as all jobs are equal, because anyone from trash men to royalty can work low end jobs and still live in a “middle-class neighborhood”, while in 1984 the Inner Party lives separated and above others. Gatherings to share happiness are randomly spurred called “hygges” which are similar to the minutes of hate in 1984, as everyone comes together and finds solace in hate, like they do in happiness. Also here, the Danes are involved with clubs, like how Julia and others are with the Anti-sex League to avoid suspicion, while the Danes do it for fun. Oceania is content with its success like Denmark is with its happiness.

B) According to ABC’s staff on “60 Minutes” scientists have found the capacity to be thought police through various participants who were willing to undergo various tests under stunning technology globally, the only question that remains is not what ones thinking, but what a future “Supreme Court case [will rule] about this” and how much invasive power it allows the government to have.

C) In image one of “Recent Scenes from North Korea, Kim Jong Un and Kim II Sung have plastered their faces among Korea like Big Brother from 1984 with his posters everywhere, to demonstrate how power is in the community which consists of area and numbers.

In image thirty-seven of “Peering into North Korea” a woman is on watch duty looking for enemies of The Party like Winston is from 1984, through her position and demeanor she seems reluctant and detached from her duty, like Winston who never fully assimilates as he has hope in his eyes, representing how one day everyone will be caught like Winston by the thought police, and her on camera.

In image thirty-two of “Tension in the Koreas” a couple gaze through barb wire into North Korea as they are restricted like Winston to venture beyond the border of one’s government, as the photo shows with its ill expressions, an offset composition, and dreary lighting how there is no freedom under an oppressive government.

ash. carlson

Christine Lattouf said...

Christine Lattouf
Date: 01-09-12
Class: B
AP English

Orwellian Parallels
Part A:
The World – Dubai
A place like Dubai cannot be found anywhere else in the world. It displaces the epic achievement for the people of Dubai. The design of the country that include hubs that are ports for water development and islands, which will be ultimate exclusivity, and that can form a high density of a family community. It brings a whole new concept to a get a way, with its modern design. In addition, the World Islands of Dubai are man-made islands that are shaped into the continents of the world. Dubai is an example of most likely an example of a utopian society because of its peaceful location, which can be beneficial for the health of others. While this may relieve stress it may also cause anxiety for some people because it is isolated from the rest of the world, which can cause it to be a dystopian society.

Christine Lattouf said...

Demark: The Happiest Place on Earth
Using social science techniques we were unable to classify the happiest place on earth. The happiest place on Earth happened to be the unexpected Demark. Even America, the land of the free and home of the brave, and with the being supposedly the richest and most powerful country it only ranks number 23 when it comes to happiness. Social scientists gave hundreds of thousands of people around the world a questionnaire that asked, “How happy are you?” Danes in general have very little to complain about which explains their level of happiness. It is amazing to think that people who pay some of the highest taxes are the happiest people, but this is the result in the exchange for covered health care and education, and is spent more on children and the elderly than any other country. A banker takes home as much money as an artist because of high taxes. People do not choose their careers based on income or status, so they are able to choose a whatever career that they will love, while still being able to earn the same amount of money as the person next to them, who is in a completely different field. They have time to be with their families and they have time to do what they enjoy. To sum it up the Danish live simple lives with not as many worries like the rest of the world, with results in the high happiness. Ninety-two percent of Danes belong to some kind of social clubs where they meet friends and participate in activities. Danes also display an amazing level of trust in each other, and their government, which alleviate their worries. In addition most Danes prefer bicycles even though they can afford cars, which show how they find happiness in the simplest items in life. Demark stands to be a utopian society because the people there are happy with their government and where they stand in life, but Demark could potentially turn into a dystopian society if the people do not agree with the high taxes, which are enforce by the government, or if health care is no longer covered.

Extra Video: Dubai's Future Architecture
This video shows that Dubai is a society that is ahead of it’s time. Already ahead of the world in architecture and is still moving forward. With the different shapes of builds that have never been imaged, Dubai stands to been an individual compared to the rest of the world. The future Architecture of Dubai is what I picture, the Party’s buildings to look like; tall but have a futuristic look. But ironically each building is an individual, because each has their unique design to make them stand apart. Where in 1984, every building would possibly have looked the same for equality.
Extra information: http://www.ssqq.com/archive/vinlin23dubai.htm
I wanted to get more information about Dubai because it fascinated me. What really stuck out to me on this website, is the contrast between the 1990 picture and the 2003 picture. It is an unbelievable transformation, and still a project in progress that estimate to be worth about 90 billion dollars. The Burj Dubai Tower, completed in 2008, became the world’s tallest building. In addition, its population is increasing, right now it’s at one million. It is amazing to see how fast a nation can develop and how great its capability is. In addition 15% of the Worlds cranes are in the city of Dubai, which shows that this city wants to be ahead of the world and will do anything to. The modern day architecture in Dubai is all ready ahead of its time. The ideas that they come out with are beyond the rest of the world’s imagination.

Anonymous said...

D) (Extra) Lykee Li sings a song called “I’m good, I’m gone” which resembles Winston from 1984. The first stanza in the song is all about cautiousness: hiding in the corner like Winston trying to hide his unorthodoxy, checking over his shoulder in paranoia as he waits to be caught by the thought police. In the second stanza he is switching corners, signifying how Winston revealed himself to O’Brien, which leads to him “stomping” his old thoughts out of his mind under interrogation as he walks “the line” of reality and everything being in his “head”. Winston would strain himself for the party, sweating for them, but “it’s all okay” because he is sacrificing himself for them even though all his work is in vain as he gets caught for being “not okay” and not knowing the real way to think until O’Brien teaches him, giving him new traits to complete the transformation so that he will no longer be himself “at the phone”.

In Radiohead’s song the opening presents the “2+2=5” concept as another basic fact like O’Brien did to Winston at the ministry of truth. O’Brien is talking to Winston saying that he is not paying “attention” and Winston hypnotically responds “I needed attention” which he soon loves as he learns to love Big Brother. But in the middle it is hard for him to break his old ways, as these thought of the past keep coming back like “flies”. And eventually he surrenders his thoughts to the Party with a “hail” (an allusion to Hitler) as he starts to see that his reality is no longer definite, but a “maybe”; the conversion is complete.

Stevie Wonders song “Big Brother” parallels 1984 as Winston seems to be talking to Big Brother as he speaks in second person to him with “your name”. He notes how he watches him on the telescreen, keeping notes on him and how he is just another dead, “nobody” enemy of the party to him. He calls himself the “president” of his soul, as he affirms his individualism and how nobody can sway his vote and opinion away from himself, until the “someday” comes when they will get hold of him on the “other side”. He hates the conditions he is living in as a ghetto and blames it on Big Brother as he is not part of his government that he says will “fall” as there are no leaders, no man behind the name anymore, just a concept.

Rage the Machine’s song “Now Testify” first represents Winston as a blank slate, ready to be pumped full of the Party’s “mantra” as he is now succumbing to become orthodox. He most likely succumbed to it because his “weakness...is right outside the door”, as Winston’s transformation was complete with the loss of love for Julia as he literally was faced with his greatest fear—rats. He could not “testify” against the party no more as he was paralyzed with the only option of to lose his old self to become a new member to get away from the pain and fear that the Party converted him with. And now Winston can be another instrument for The Party to control time and humanity, which is the “war” he needs to fight now “outside” (no longer internal) for Big Brother.

ash. carlson continued

Christine Lattouf said...

Part B:
Both “60 Minutes” and “1984” share the idea of being able to read someone’s mind. However, “60 Minutes” focuses and explores the process scientists have to go through to read someone’s though, which is by using an fMRI, and “1984” demonstrates the more developed side to controlling thoughts, which are monitored by the think police. From the conflict of controlling minds show in “1984”, bring of the controversial question of whether it is ethical to scan someone’s brain for a potential tool for police.

Part C:

Recent Scenes from North Korea
To view the outside world and for the outside world to see into both societies of North Korea and the Party stands to be impossible, but as depicted in photo twelve in “Recent Scenes from North Korea” and as implied in “1984”, both of their high powers have ways of spying at their enemies.

Peering Into North Korea
Both North Korea and the Inner Party do not allow outsiders to gain information from the inside, and if someone does they will be arrested, therefore it is unknown to the common residents what each government is hiding, but as depicted in photo two of “Peering Into North Korea” there are some people that their curiosity at the risk their safety, just as Winston had done in “1984”.

A North Korean Anniversary and Debut
Photo number twenty seven of “A North Korean Anniversary and Debut” depicts a boy of about four or so, wearing a North Korean army hat, in both the North Korean’s and the Party’s society the youth are brought up to love and worship their leaders.

Christine Lattouf said...

Part D:

"Testify" by Rage Against the Machine: audio/video

Invest into the future. Who controls the present now controls the future stays true, because what one decides to do will affect the outcome of the future. In 1984 the past could be altered, which would then alter the future. In 1984 Oceania was fighting another nation, which later switched to a different nation, and the members of the Party had to believe what their leader, Big Brother said was true. The declarative “Now testify,” relates to 1984 because the members of the Party were controlled by fear and had to believe everything they were told by the higher power.

"Big Brother" by Stevie Wonder: audio/video

This song statements that Big Brother, the leader in 1984 is watching someone on the tele, which is referring to the telescreen in 1984. The telescreen watched each of the Party member’s move. To the Inner Party, everyone is a “nobody”, but all of their records were on file. The songwriter of “Big Brother” says that they live in the ghetto and that their name is secluded, which can be a parallel to where the proles live and that this person must be prole. The writer goes on to say that someday they will move to the other side, indicating that they will come to love Big Brother and join the Party.

"2+2=5" by Radiohead: audio/video
The first thing we see in the video by Radiohead is “2+2=5”, which is an allusion to 1984. In this video some kind of animal is illustrated drinking out of what looks to be a bottle of alcohol, which is an allusion to the Party members force to drink victory gin. The pigs in the video are supposed to represent the inner Party members. The pig goes on to eat the other creature, showing that they are more powerful than the other animal. The other animal is then shown to be dead on a cross, which is a biblical allusion to Jesus, to show that the good are suffering for the sake of others. This is also a form of torture, and in the book 1984, member of the Party that when against the Party’s beliefs were tortured until that believed what the power said and loved Big Brother, then they were killed.
Extra song: “Big Brother” by David Bowie
To loyal members of the Party, Big Brother stood to represent the savior of all. People who went against the Party’s beliefs were tortured until they believed that Big Brother was the savior just like Jesus. Big Brother is presented as a Jesus figure in this song, and like Jesus, Big Brother’s followers had to love him. However, Big Brother tortured people, like Winston, until they final believed Big Brother’s ideas and until they felt a sense of love for Big Brother. Big Brother is also wanted in this song as is indicated by the last line, and by this being the last line, we see that this person is most likely brain washed.

Christine Lattouf said...

Christine Lattouf
Date: 01-09-12
Class: B
AP English

Orwellian Parallels
Part A:
The World – Dubai
A place like Dubai cannot be found anywhere else in the world. It displaces the epic achievement for the people of Dubai. The design of the country that include hubs that are ports for water development and islands, which will be ultimate exclusivity, and that can form a high density of a family community. It brings a whole new concept to a get a way, with its modern design. In addition, the World Islands of Dubai are man-made islands that are shaped into the continents of the world. Dubai is an example of most likely an example of a utopian society because of its peaceful location, which can be beneficial for the health of others. While this may relieve stress it may also cause anxiety for some people because it is isolated from the rest of the world, which can cause it to be a dystopian society.
Demark: The Happiest Place on Earth
Using social science techniques we were unable to classify the happiest place on earth. The happiest place on Earth happened to be the unexpected Demark. Even America, the land of the free and home of the brave, and with the being supposedly the richest and most powerful country it only ranks number 23 when it comes to happiness. Social scientists gave hundreds of thousands of people around the world a questionnaire that asked, “How happy are you?” Danes in general have very little to complain about which explains their level of happiness. It is amazing to think that people who pay some of the highest taxes are the happiest people, but this is the result in the exchange for covered health care and education, and is spent more on children and the elderly than any other country. A banker takes home as much money as an artist because of high taxes. People do not choose their careers based on income or status, so they are able to choose a whatever career that they will love, while still being able to earn the same amount of money as the person next to them, who is in a completely different field. They have time to be with their families and they have time to do what they enjoy. To sum it up the Danish live simple lives with not as many worries like the rest of the world, with results in the high happiness. Ninety-two percent of Danes belong to some kind of social clubs where they meet friends and participate in activities. Danes also display an amazing level of trust in each other, and their government, which alleviate their worries. In addition most Danes prefer bicycles even though they can afford cars, which show how they find happiness in the simplest items in life. Demark stands to be a utopian society because the people there are happy with their government and where they stand in life, but Demark could potentially turn into a dystopian society if the people do not agree with the high taxes, which are enforce by the government, or if health care is no longer covered.

Christine Lattouf said...

Extra Video: Dubai's Future Architecture
This video shows that Dubai is a society that is ahead of it’s time. Already ahead of the world in architecture and is still moving forward. With the different shapes of builds that have never been imaged, Dubai stands to been an individual compared to the rest of the world. The future Architecture of Dubai is what I picture, the Party’s buildings to look like; tall but have a futuristic look. But ironically each building is an individual, because each has their unique design to make them stand apart. Where in 1984, every building would possibly have looked the same for equality.

Extra information: http://www.ssqq.com/archive/vinlin23dubai.htm:
I wanted to get more information about Dubai because it fascinated me. What really stuck out to me on this website, is the contrast between the 1990 picture and the 2003 picture. It is an unbelievable transformation, and still a project in progress that estimate to be worth about 90 billion dollars. The Burj Dubai Tower, completed in 2008, became the world’s tallest building. In addition, its population is increasing, right now it’s at one million. It is amazing to see how fast a nation can develop and how great its capability is. In addition 15% of the Worlds cranes are in the city of Dubai, which shows that this city wants to be ahead of the world and will do anything to. The modern day architecture in Dubai is all ready ahead of its time. The ideas that they come out with are beyond the rest of the world’s imagination.