Friday, March 15, 2013

AP Class-work 3-15

1. I want to be sure that you are aware of the online resources available to you from the College Board. If you should need or want supplemental resources, this is one of several sites to visit. Today, begin with the "Multiple Choice Section Scoring Guide"- be sure that you are familar with the formula for this section's scoring. Then, open the 1999 released exam and complete the first 2 sections of Multiple Choice (submit here as a comment to this post). If you should finish early, review the multiple choice breakdown tables and the Q3 materials.

2. Work on your Olde School Vocabulary homework.

20 comments:

Seth Killingbeck said...

1.D.
2.B.
3.D.
4.E
5.A.
6.D.
7.C.
8.C.
9.E.
10.B.
11.E.
12.D.

14.E
15.C.
16D.
17.A.
18.E.
19.E.
20.E.
21.D.
22.A.
23.E.
24.A.
25.C.
Seth Killingbeck

Kayla Lantos said...

Scofflaw- A habitual law-breaker
donnybrook - a free-for-all or a drunken brawl (Etymology: from Donnybrook Fair, proverbial for carousing and brawling, held in County Dublin in Ireland until 1855.)
Mesonoxiam: Pertaining to midnight
snickersnee - To stab and cut with a knife or sword.
http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/unuwords.htm
Old words no longer in use (but we can change that):
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/16/funny-old-words_n_1676253.html#slide=1224145
Soothfast- Truthful, honest
Mammothrept- A spoiled child
Whisternefet- A sharp slap
Lasslorn- Sadness due to being stood up by one’s lady-friend
Fussock- A fat lady

1. B
2. B
3. C
4. D
5. B
6. B
7. A
8. C
9. E
10. B
11. E
12. B
13. C
14. D
15. C
16. B
17. A
18. C
19. E

Kayla Lantos said...

20. E
21. C
22. A
23. A
24. A
25. B

Anonymous said...

Brent Condon

Noggin (noun): A person's head
Maverick (Noun): Loner
Doozy (noun): Extraordinary Etymology: Some people believe that the word doozy is derived from daisy, the flower. However, the word may also be based on a car that had a similar sounding name to doozy.
1)B
2)B
3)C
4)D
5)B
6)D
7)B
8)C
9)E
10)A
11)A
12)E
13)D

14)D
15)C
16)E
17)A
18)C
19)E
20)E
21)C
22)A
23)E
24)A
25)B

Christine Lattouf said...

Christine Lattouf
Date: 03-20-13
Class: B.

Ye Olde School Vocabulary:

Foozle - Do clumsily, bungle, make a mess of. Etymology: perhaps from German dialect fuseln to work carelessly
First Known Use: 1888

Maffick - To exult riotously; to celebrate with boisterous rejoicing and hilarious behavior. Etymology: "to celebrate boisterously," 1900, from Mafficking, a nonce-verb formed punningly from Mafeking, British garrison town in South Africa whose relief on May 17, 1900, during the Boer War, was celebrated wildly in London. OED reports the word "confined to journalistic use." By now it might as well write, "confined to dictionaries." The place name (properly Mafikeng) is from Tswana and is said to mean "place of rocks," from mafika, plural of lefika "rock, cliff" + -eng "place of."

Brabble - Paltry, noisy quarrel. Etymology: perhaps from Middle Dutch brabbelen, of imitative origin
First Known Use: circa 1530

Goluptious - Delightful, luscious; splendid, magnificent

Christine Lattouf said...

Christine Lattouf
Date: 03-20-13
Class: B.

Ye Olde School Vocabulary:

Foozle - Do clumsily, bungle, make a mess of. Etymology: perhaps from German dialect fuseln to work carelessly
First Known Use: 1888

Maffick - To exult riotously; to celebrate with boisterous rejoicing and hilarious behavior. Etymology: "to celebrate boisterously," 1900, from Mafficking, a nonce-verb formed punningly from Mafeking, British garrison town in South Africa whose relief on May 17, 1900, during the Boer War, was celebrated wildly in London. OED reports the word "confined to journalistic use." By now it might as well write, "confined to dictionaries." The place name (properly Mafikeng) is from Tswana and is said to mean "place of rocks," from mafika, plural of lefika "rock, cliff" + -eng "place of."

Brabble - Paltry, noisy quarrel. Etymology: perhaps from Middle Dutch brabbelen, of imitative origin
First Known Use: circa 1530

Goluptious - Delightful, luscious; splendid, magnificent

Christine Lattouf said...

Christine Lattouf's Multiple Choice:

1. b.
2. b.
3. c.
4. d.
5. b.
6. d.
7. d.
8. c.
9. d.
10. c.
11. e.
12. b.
13. c.
14. d.
15. c.
16. b.
17. a.
18. c.
19. e.
20. e.
21. e.
22. a
23. a.
24. e.
25. b.

Jennifer Golden said...

1. B
2. C
3. E
4. E
5. E
6. D
7. B
8. C
9. E
10. A
11. B
12. B
13. D

14. C
15. C
16. B
17. D
18. C
19. E
20. E
21. C
22. E
23. B
24. A
25. B

Gaberlunzie- a wandering beggar
Gobemouche- a highly gullible person
Tatterdemalion- a child in rags
Batrachomyomachy- making a mountain out of a molehill, a fight over nothing. ( etymology: comes from a Greek poem with this word this word in greek as the title which translates to "The Battle of Frogs and Mice" which was a satire about the Trojan war "molehill" becoming a ten year "mountain".

Anonymous said...

Amanda Ward

bamboozle: to fool or cheat
dilly dally: to procrastinate, from middle English (Babington)
smoogle: kiss and hug at the same time

Matt Carlin said...

1.B
2.B
3.C
4.D
5.B
6.D
7.A
8.C
9.E
10.A
11.E
12.B
13.C
14.C
15.C
16.B
17.A
18.c
19.E
20.C
21.C
22.A
23.A
24.E
25.B

Nicole Miller said...

Nicole Miller
Section 1
1. B
2. B
3. C
4. D
5. B
6. D
7. A
8. C
9. E
10. A
11. E
12. C
13. C

Nicole Miller said...

Nicole Miller
section 2
14. E
15. C
16. D
17. A
18. C
19. E
20. E
21. C
22. A
23. A
24. A
25. B

LCerullo said...

MC Answers:
1. B
2. B
3. C
4. E
5. B
6. D
7. A
8. C
9. D
10. A
11. E
12. B
13. D


14. D
15. C
16. B
17. A
18. C
19. E
20. E
21. C
22. A
23. A
24. E
25. B

Kayla said...

Kayla Murphy
1.B
2.B
3.C
4.D
5.B
6.E
7.D
8.C
9.E
10.E
11.E
12.B
13.D
14.C
15.C
16C
17.A
18.C
19.E
20.E
21.E
22.A
23.A
24.E
25.B

Anonymous said...

Abactor- (noun) A cattle thief.

Gobemouche- (noun) literally a fly swallower; a credulous person; one who believes everything they hear. Etymology: Goubemouche originated from the French two centuries ago. Gober is French for to swallow and mouche is French for a fly, together in French it means literally a fly swallower or a credulous person who accepts everything said to him as true, as they are open-mouthed and ready to swallow whatever comes their way whether a fly or incredulous information.

Flapdoodle-(noun) nonsense; bosh.

Caitiff- (adjective) cowardly, despicable.

Foofaraw- (noun) frills and flashy finery; a disturbance or to-do over a trifle; fuss.

Syzygy- (noun) the nearly straight-line configuration of three celestial bodies (as the sun, moon, and earth during a solar or lunar eclipse) in a gravitational system.

MC
1.B 2.B 3.C
4.D 5.B 6.D
7.A 8.C 9.E
10.A 11.B 12.B
13.C 14.D 15.C
16.B 17.A 18.C
19.E 20.E 21.C
22.A 23.A 24.A 25.B

Ash C.

Kara said...

1999 Exam:
1) B
2) B
3) C
4) D
5) B
6) B
7) A
8) C
9) E
10) A
11) E
12) B
13) B
14) D
15) C
16) B
17) A
18) C
19) E
20) E
21) D
22) A
23) A
24) E
25) B

Words:
Bablatrice - A female babbler
Gadzookery - Use of archaic words or expressions (some irony/paradox here?)
Snollygoster - A dishonest politician, especially shrewd or calculating
Origin as defined by the Online Etymology Dictionary: 1846, American English slang, fanciful coinage.

LCerullo said...

Ye Olde Vocabulary List:

1. argle (verb): to argue obstinately. Etymology: 1580’s from argue, perhaps by influence of haggle. Reduplicated form argle-bargle (sometimes argy-bargy) "wrangling" is attested from 1872.

2. bloviate (verb): to speak pompously or brag. Etymology: 1857, American English, a Midwestern word for "to talk aimlessly and boastingly; to indulge in 'high falutin'," according to Farmer (1890), who seems to have been the only British lexicographer to notice it. He says it was based on blow (v.) on the model of deviate, etc.

3. blunderbuss (noun): a gun with a flared muzzle or disorganized activity. Etymology: 1650s, from Dutch donderbus, from donder "thunder" (Middle Dutch doner, donder, from Proto-Germanic *thunaraz; see thunder (n.)) + bus "gun" (originally "box, tube"); altered by resemblance to blunder.

4. borborygm (noun): a rumbling of the stomach. Etymology: also borborygmus, 17c., from Latin borborigmus, from Greek borborygmos, from borboryzein "to have a rumbling in the bowels," imitative.

5. boustrophedon (noun): a back and forth pattern. Etymology: 1783, ancient form of writing with lines alternately written left-to-right and right-to-left, from Greek, literally "turning as an ox in plowing," from bous "ox".

6. cockamamie (adjective): absurd, outlandish. Etymology: American English slang word attested by 1946, popularized c.1960, but said to be New York City children's slang from mid-1920s; perhaps an alteration of decalcomania.

7. dudgeon (noun): a bad mood, a huff. Etymology: 1570s, duggin, of unknown origin. One suggestion is Italian aduggiare "to overshadow," giving it the same sense development as umbrage. No clear connection to earlier dudgeon (late 14c.), a kind of wood used for knife handles, which is perhaps from a French word.

8. eructation (noun): a burp, belch. Etymology: "belching," 1530s, from Latin eructationem (nominative eructatio) "a belching forth," noun of action from pp. stem of eructare "to belch forth, vomit," from ex- "out" + ructare "to belch," from reug- "to belch" (cf. Lithuanian rugiu "to belch," Greek eryge, Armenian orcam), probably of imitative origin. Related: Eruct; eructate.

9. fardel (noun): a bundle, burden. Etymology: c.1300, from Old French fardel (13c., Modern French fardeau) "parcel, package, small pack," diminutive of farde, perhaps from Arabic fardah "package."

10. hobbledehoy (noun): a clumsy or awkward youth. Etymology: 1530s, of uncertain origin and the subject of much discussion. First element is probably hob in its sense of "clown, prankster" (see hobgoblin), the second element perhaps is Middle French de haye "worthless, untamed, wild," literally "of the hedge."

Taylor Saltmarsh said...

Taylor Saltmarsh

1.) B.
2.) B.
3.) C.
4.) D.
5.) A.
6.) D.
7.) C.
8.) C.
9.) E.
10.) A.
11.) A.
12.) C.
13.) D.
14.) C.
15.) C.
16.) C.
17.) A.
18.) C.
19.) E.
20.) E.
21.) C.
22.) A.
23.) E.
24.) A.
25.) B.

Taylor Saltmarsh said...

Taylor Saltmarsh

1.) B.
2.) B.
3.) C.
4.) D.
5.) A.
6.) D.
7.) C.
8.) C.
9.) E.
10.) A.
11.) A.
12.) C.
13.) D.
14.) C.
15.) C.
16.) C.
17.) A.
18.) C.
19.) E.
20.) E.
21.) C.
22.) A.
23.) E.
24.) A.
25.) B.



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