Tuesday, April 1, 2014

D Block: Paragraph Drafts for Archetypal Analyses

12 comments:

Kathryn Ward said...

A common archetype throughout literature is the battle between good and evil, a hero representing the light and his antagonist portraying the dark in their world (Osbourne 2). The archetype itself, “appears immune to changes wrought by time,” due to it’s importance in human nature (Osbourne 2). Fights between what some think as right and what others think as wrong occurs frequently in the world around us. The story of Harry Potter is an example of how this symbolic situation occurs in literature; “Harry embodies the archetypal Hero, and as such he finds in his way a long road of trials to overcome before he can face his [archetypal villian],” (Faria 17). J.K. Rowling states the battle as: “Neither can live while the other survives, and one of us is about to leave for good…,” (737). The fight between Harry and Voldemort shows the battle between innocent good nature of a child against the greed and hatred developed in an adult.

shaeleen hughes said...

Looking back upon the brilliant 80’s movie The Breakfast Club it can be obviously stated that it is an outlandish combination of outcasts. This curious group of characters found idiosyncratic and meaningful common ground while spending a day in detention together. “You see us as you want to see us - in the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain, and an athlete, and a basket case, a princess, and a criminal…” (John Hughes) One can reach an obvious conclusion that every character in said movie is an outcast, however one character seems to stand out more so than the others; John Bender. Bender fits the definition of an outcast perfectly which states, “The Outcast: A figure who is banished from a social group for some crime (real or imagined) against his fellow man. The outcast is usually destined to become a wanderer..” (Gonzo, AP Lang. “Character Archetypes.” Common Archetypes in Literature. Web. 1 April 2014.) John Bender is often scrutinized as a criminal mind with inferior morals. -Shaeleen Hughes

Molly Daniels said...

The good vs. evil archetype can commonly be seen in almost every major piece of literature, whether the evil and good is represented as two sides or two entities. As in The Chronicles of Narnia, the White Witch represents evil and temptation, while Aslan symbolizes goodness and purity. (Lewis) Aslan is a fabled lion who the entire world of Narnia loves. (Lewis) The White Witch stole the throne using enchantment and evil. Lewis weaves an enchanting tale of four children: Peter, Edmund, Lucy, and Susan--tumble through a wardrobe and into another world. Encased in an everlasting winter, the world suffers under the harsh rule of the White Witch. She signifies evil and temptation for Edmund, who suffers from jealousy of Peter and a thirst for power. (lewis) However, he fights it and the four siblings ally with mythical creatures, signifying good; and therefore, the battle of Good vs. Evil. (Lewis) As Winma Carvajal describes, Aslan leads the battle against the White Witch in an epic battle of Good vs. Evil. The good vs. evil archetype is a cut black and white stereotype. The good is the polar opposite of evil; kind, caring, and willing to fight for the minority, It is, essentially, light vs. darkness. And yet, in Isaiah 45:7, it states, “I form light, and create darkness; I make peace, and create evil; I am Hashem, that does all these things.” It is stating that while God is the creator of good, he also creates evil and that without evil there could be no darkness. The reason this archetype is so evident in literature is because is clearly represents the “ideal” human morals and the opposite of them. We seek to create so clearly defined sides of good and evil because it is in human nature to “pick a side” and if one side is evidently better than the other, then it makes it simple. In my experience, no human has ever been able to maintain a completely unbiased opinion and refrain from passing judgement. Similarly, despite the supposedly unrelated “juror pool” in the court of law, if it is a case concerning the rape of a minor, women jurors will sympathetically have an inclination to believe the girl is the victim. The good vs. evil archetype is, in fact, and archetype because it is possibly the most common recurring theme in literature and embodies the human ideals as well as the negative aspects of human nature.

Haley Elliott said...

Throughout literature, characters are created to fit certain molds. Characters may also have the characteristics of a repeating symbol, known as an archetype. An example of an archetypes is the hero archetype. The hero archetype appears in religion, mythologies, and other epics of the world (Davis). Heros makes the judgement to leave home or their family because leaving will offer them more protection than staying where they are (Davis). The hero endures a journey with a loyal group of companions (Redirecting). In the course of the journey the hero will encounter monsters or monstrous men but the hero has help from divine or supernatural forces along with a strange and wise mentor (Redirecting). Additionally, the hero struggles for something important (Redirecting). A hero can be someone who is near god-like who faces physical challenges and external enemies; someone who has divine or supernatural origins; a person who faces the possible destruction of society; someone who is motivated by pure love to complete their quest; or when this person goes on a quest or journey for vengeance (Redirecting). Before the quest that the hero must endure, the hero is usually naive and inexperienced. In the novel Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, by Rick Riordan, the main character Percy Jackson is devised based on the archetypal cast of the hero. Percy Jackson possess the qualities of the hero archetype. Riordan’s novel is based off of the Greek mythologies. Percy has to leave home and attend a camp for demigods, kids who are half human half god, in order to protect himself and his mother (Riordan). Shortly after his arrival, Percy makes the decision to go on a quest to retrieve his mother who has been taken captive by Hades, the god of the Underworld (Riordan). Percy's friends, Annabeth and Grover, endure this journey with Percy. Along the way, Percy and his friends have several encounters with numerous monsters (Riordan). Throughout the whole trip, the fear of war and mass destruction looms over the trio (Riordan). The only way a war the gods can be prevented is if Percy can successfully complete his quest, returning Zeus’ lightning bolt on time (Riordan). Several times Percy has help from several different gods’ help in order to complete tasks (Riordan). Percy’s whole quest is driven by his love for his mother however he continues to struggle to get what he wants (Riordan). Percy posses the qualities of a the literature of a hero making himself an archetypal hero.

jack veglas said...


Paragraph one: Boo Radley


Throughout literature the recurring figure of the outcast archetype is explained through many feelings and many events that the author portrays to the reader. In the book To Kill a Mockingbird Lee develops the characterization that Boo is an outcast(10-16). Boo Radley stands out more than the others as an outcast, he fits the definition pretty good as it states.“The Outcast: A figure who is banished from a social group for some crime (real or imagined) against his fellow man, The outcast is usually destined to become a wanderer’” (Gonzo, AP Lang. “Character Archetypes.” Common Archetypes in Literature. Web. 1 April 2014.). When Boo was younger he was associated with a bad group in which he got in trouble a lot.

Alex McFaun said...

Northrop Frye states “ In mondern literary criticism ‘archetype’ means a recurring or repeating unit or pattern which indicates that a literary text is following a certain convention or working in a certain convention or working in a certain genre.”(qtd by H.G. Wells 7). Boo is first mentioned as someone who doesn’t come out very often, thus making him isolated from the rest of Maycomb.(Lee 1) Lee later states that people know little to nothing about the Radley’s showing just how isolated they are. (7) The Radley’s are also seen as mysterious threats to the kids of Maycomb.(Lee 11, 17) Z.D Gurevitch states“ Jem realizes that Boo does not want to be associated with the people and their misunderstandings, their social norms and rules and their prejudices (qtd by Best, Rebecca, 240). Though Boo qualifies for other archetypes, he meets these archetypal qualifications proving he is an outcast.

Justin Johnson said...

Justin Johnson
First Paragraph: Bilbo Swaggins

Throughout literature the recurring hero archetype appears, shaping a character to fit a mold (Mackenzie-Bowi). Often the hero undergoes a rigorous journey that slowly starts to transform the character, these heroes are in many cultures for their bravery, unselfishness, and heroic acts (Mackenzie-Bowi). When the hero accepts the quest they regrettably have to leave their place of solitude and peace, home (Mackenzie-bowie). However, the hero does not always travel alone, they may travel with a group of loyal companions who tag along to help the hero successfully fulfill his/her duty (Kefor’s class handout?). The majority of heroes have unusual childhoods starting off and acquire some sort of talent that helps them become triumphant (Kefor’s class handout?). Never-ending challenges “impede the hero’s quest but do not cause complete failure” of the assigned task (Mackenzie-Bowie). As seen in the Hobbit Bilbo can be classified as an archetypal hero as he battles his way across Middle Earth trying to reach Smaug (Tolkien). Unlike most heroes Bilbo did not obtain any supernatural powers or have a mysterious background (Tolkien). Bilbo lived a common life in the Shire, a quiet village in a peaceful meadow, “Bilbo by no means looks for heroic opportunity”(Mackenzie-Bowie) (Tolkien). As luck would have it Bilbo’s entire life would change in a flash when he stumbles upon Gandalf and 13 dwarves and a mission to kill a monstrous dragon (Tolkien). Bilbo Baggins transforms from a seclusive Hobbit into an accomplished adventurer, defying the expectations of those around him (Tolkien). Bilbo is exposed to carnivorous goblins, giant spiders, and mythical elves in order to reclaim the Dwarves’ sacred home in Mt. Erebor, along the way Bilbo builds his reputation after countlessly outsmarting fearsome enemies and being the savior among his Dwarven companions (Tolkien). In the beginning, Bilbo’s “heroic acts are unlooked for”, it is not only until he starts to drastically gain self-confidence and courage that he increasingly fits the hero archetype (Mackenzie-Bowi). Mackenzie- Bowie enlightens upon the substantial representation of Bilbo being a hero in Bilbo a Very Private Hero, Bilbo puts the tasks handed to him above all else even risking his life for the greater good.

Joey Annand said...

The character of Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird remarkably represents the outcast archetype. Krause labels Boo Radley as an outsider in Outsiders in “To Kill a Mockingbird” (unnumbered page). She discusses his history as youth criminal and that he became a shut-in, which ultimately resulted in his exclusion from the Maycomb community. Within the text of the novel, Lee describes this event when stating the doors and windows at the Radley house were always closed throughout the week, “[Boo Radley] was not seen again for fifteen years. (13) Additionally, Boo Radley is branded with the title of “recluse” (Field 38). She also mentions that when Boo Radley reveals himself to the protagonist of the story, he withdraws from society again. The narrator, Scout, claims: “[She] never saw him again” (Lee in Field).

Kambrynn Bowman said...

Some of the world’s oldest literary masterpieces focus around a hero and the journey they embark on. Novels focusing around a hero are filled with danger, excitement, and suspension. Every book’s hero and plot is unique in their own way, however they all share the same common idea. A hero can be defined as, “A person who has risked life and limb for another.” (Ator) The hero comes from humble beginnings and own an exceptional natural skill for fighting. (Hourihan, 3) In order to perform their quest, the hero must, “leave civilized order.” (Hourihan 4) The destination or goal of the quest varies throughout literature, but the components are not warm and fuzzy. Enemies constantly stand in the way of the hero, and they need to find a way to around the them. (Hourihan 3) Luckily, “The hero overcomes these opponents because [they] are strong, brave, resourceful, rational, and determined to succeed.” (Hourihan, 19) After the quest is completed, the hero collects a prize, ranging from wealth to a sense of accomplishment, and is welcomed home with open arms. Collins created the archetypal hero of Katniss Everdeen. Katniss lives in a time where North America is divided among twelve districts, Katniss from a penniless family in the most poverty stricken of the districts, District Twelve. (Collins) Katniss’s late father has trained her in the art of archery. (Collins) Although Katniss has been using the weapon for some time, Collins makes it evident that Katniss has a real gift for hunting. These skills come in handy when Katniss volunteers for her sister to compete in a gruesome killing match against twenty-four other adolescents. (Collins) Katniss’s bravery to take her sister’s place in the games ultimately saved her sister’s life. (Collins) Collins created a forest-esque arena where the tributes will be hunting down one another until there is one left standing. Katniss’s goal is evident: to survive. (Collins) Katniss saves the lives of some tributes while taking other’s away. (Collins) Death looked Katniss straight in the eye multiple times, however due to her cunning and ingenious tactics, she was able to be crowned victor of the Hunger Games and collect a vast amount of money. (Collins) Katniss Everdeen fits the mold of the modern hero.

Patrick Robles said...

There is nothing small about Lennie Small(Steinbeck). “Despite his immense size and strength, Lennie is a gentle innocent who wishes only to live in peace with his friend George and care for animals(Cavendish 1462). Lennie Small is portrayed as a mentally handicapped giant as one of the central characters (Steinbeck and Cavendish1460). When curly picks on Lennie, Lennie refuses to fight, but his listens to gorge and crushes his and in self defense(Steinbeck). Lennie cries after because he is scared of what he has done(Steinbeck).

Courtney Toomey said...



One of the most universal archetypes found in modern day and ancient literature is the journey of a young hero, also known as the initiate (Aponte). In Veronica Roth’s best selling trilogy, Divergent, Tris Prior is facing the challenge of her life‒ the journey from a “Stiff” (Roth, 59) to a dauntless member. An initiate is a young hero-to-be, who has not yet completed the rights of passage in order to begin their quest. Aponte states that “[Initiation] is the fall through knowledge to maturity, the transition from innocence to experience, from innocence to corruption.” When Tris chose Dauntless at the choosing ceremony, she had no idea what was in store for her. For the next few weeks, Tris and her friends are pushed to their limits, both physically and mentally, until they are finally welcomed as Dauntless members. Shortly after, Tris and fellow divergent, Four, save hundreds of Abnegation lives by stopping the attack simulation. This archetype is common in literature because most stories have heros, and every hero has to start as an initiate. Aponte argues that one constant of this archetypal pattern is a confrontation between a child psychologically or physically isolated (the initiate), and the agent of corruption (the bad guy). In Divergent, this aspect is displayed when Tris chooses to leave her family, separating herself from everything she has ever known, stepping out of the safety of Abnegation, and ultimately ends up fighting against Jeanine Matthews. Veronica Roth’s character Tris Prior is a perfect example of the initiate archetype. Among other challenges, initiates test their physical limits, face a whole new world of mystery, and undergo drastic change.


Life Struggles in Rap said...

Ryan Landry
Plagiarism is an act or instance of using closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author’s work as one’s own, as by not crediting the original author.
Many artists have been sued and or sued others for using samples of their songs without the authorization of them. In 1978, Joe Walsh released his song “Life’s Been Good” and the song went on to be #12 on the US Billboard Hot 100. This song was his most successful solo. In 2013, Eminem released his latest album “MMLP2”. This album contained many hit songs, such as: “Monsters” and “Rap God”. However, a particular song stuck out in this album. One of the last songs in this album called “So Far” was extremely similar in many aspects to the song “Life’s Been Good” by Joe Walsh. Using the same exact instrumental, Eminem also used a specific rhyme scheme to match the same rhythm as Joe Walsh.
At the end of the album Eminem even added in the inside joke “uh-oh, here comes a flock of wah wahs”. That inside joke was said in the studio ten seconds after Joe Walsh finished his song. Eminem “coincidentally” said the same exact inside joke ten seconds after he finished recording “So Far” in the studio. Eminem uses some of the lyrics form “Life’s Been Good” in “So Far” such as: “Life’s Been Good” and “My Maserati goes 185(mph)/ I lost my driver’s license, now I don’t drive”.
It is very clear Eminem intentionally copied Joe Walsh’s song in multiple ways. However, Eminem has not been sued by Joe Walsh and or the Eagle’s. It has not gained too much popularity or controversy and not many fans of Eminem or the Eagle’s have been too concerned or bothered by this.