Wednesday, April 16, 2014

The Poetry of Song: Review of Devices & Elements

Below is a list of the devices that we have covered thus far in the course. For each device, develop a review bank based on the following template. Absentees must be sure to obtain active listening notes and instruction from peers or Mr. Kefor. You will have an objective test, for which you will be accountable for all of these terms, on Thursday, May 1.

Device: definition. Artist’s “Song Title from Active Listening”; Artist’s “Song Title from Elsewhere”; (example).


imagery, hyperbole, allegory, alliteration, assonance, consonance, local color, double entendre, oxymoron, irony, paradox, tone, point of view

7 comments:

Gwen Saccocia said...

1. Imagery is used in literature to refer to descriptive language that evokes the senses.
The Beatles’ “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”: “Cellophane flowers of yellow and green”
Ed Sheeran’s “The City”: “I hear people walk by when it’s late / Sirens bleed through my windowsill”
2. Hyperboles are a figure of speech in which the statements are exaggerated, possibly to evoke strong feelings, but should not be taken literally.
Ray Charles’ “Drown In My Own Tears”: “I’ll drown in my own tears”
Of Monsters and Men’s “Little Talks”: “It’s killing me to see you this way”
3. Allegories are a way to convey a meaning other than the literal.
Rush’s “The Trees”: “They wonder why the maples / Can’t be happy in their shade”
Bob Dylan’s “Mr.Tambourine Man”: “Take me on a trip upon your magic swirlin’ ship”
4. Alliteration is the repetition of the same consonant sound at the beginning of successive words.
CSNY’s “Helplessly Hoping”: “Helplessly hoping / Her harlequin hovers nearby”
Ed Sheeran’s “You Need Me, I Don’t Need You”: “Suffolk sadly seems to sort of suffocate me”
5. Assonance is the repetition of internal vowel sounds in succession.
Jack Johnson’s “Sleep Through The Static”: “The feelings that rained down on the plains all dried and cracked”
Twenty One Pilots’ “Car Radio”: “I could pull the steering wheel”
6. Consonance is the repetition of the same internal consonant sound in short succession.
Jack Johnson’s “Sleep Through The Static”: “Mind your manners wave your banners”
My Chemical Romance’s “Na Na Na”: “Drop like a bullet shell”
7. Local Color is a type of imagery that reflects aspects specific to a particular region.
The Byrds’ “Lover of the Bayou”: “I cooked a bat in a gumbo pan”
The Standells’ “Dirty Water”: “Down by the river, down by the banks of the river Charles”
8. Double entendres are phrases that could be understood in two ways.
Tom Petty’s “Mary Jane’s Last Dance”: “Last dance with Mary Jane, one more time to kill the pain”
The 1975’s “Chocolate”: “Oh, my car smells like chocolate”
9. An oxymoron is a phrase that combines two contradicting terms.
Ozzy Osbourne’s “I Just Want You”: “There are no indisputable truths”
Alana Grace’s “Pretty Ugly”: “Cause I’m pretty ugly”
10. Irony is a situation in which there is a discordance or unintended connection that goes beyond the obvious meaning.
Dave Matthew’s Band “Funny the Way It Is”: “Somebody’s heart is broken and it becomes your favorite song”
All Time Low’s “The Irony of Choking on a Lifesaver”: (title)
11. A paradox is a statement that leads to a contradiction or situation that defies intuition (but it makes sense).
Ozzy Osbourne’s “I Just Want You”: “There are no identical twins”
Katy Perry’s “Hot N Cold”: “You’re wrong when it’s right”
12. A song’s tone is composed of the attitude towards a subject and the intended audience.
Pink Floyd’s “Have a Cigar”: cynical disdain
James Blunt’s “Miss America”: solemn reminiscence
13. There are many different variations of point of views in songs. A point of view may be determined by how the speaker is telling the story as well as to whom they are talking to.
Joe Walsh’s “Life’s Been Good”: “They say I’m lazy but it takes all my time” (1st)
James Blunt’s “Blue on Blue”: “What can I do if I can’t be there with you?” (multiple person narrative)

Caeley Whalen said...

1. Imagery: visually descriptive or figurative language
Examples: Little Green; Joni Mitchell; “Like the color when the spring is born”
Somewhere Only We Know; Keane
2. Hyperbole: exaggerated statements or claims
Examples: Drown in My Own Tears; Ray Charles; “I guess I’m drowning in my own tears” Just the Way You Are; Bruno Mars
3. Alliteration: the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of consecutive words
Examples: Helplessly Hoping; CSNY; “Love isn’t lying, it loose in a lady who lingers”
Grenade; Bruno Mars
4. Assonance: the repetition of the sound of a vowel
Examples: Sleeping Through the Static; Jack Johnson; “Because it’s a battle when you dabble in war
Our Song; Taylor Swift
5. Consonance: repetition of internal consonant sounds
Examples: Sleeping Through the Static; Jack Johnson; “Mind your manners, wave your banners
3005; Childish Gambino
6. Allegories: a phrase that can be interpreted in a way other than the literal
Examples: Mr.Tambourine Man; Bob Dylan; “Take me on a trip upon your magic swirlin’ ship”
H.E.R; Common
7. Local Color; focuses on specific features of a character
Examples: Castles Made of Sand; Jimi Hendrix; “You can hear her scream, “You’re a disgrace”
Arabella; Arctic Monkeys
8. Double Entendre; a word or phrase open to two interpretations
Examples: Mary Jane’s Last Dance; Tom Petty; “Last dance with Mary Jane, one more time to kill the pain”
Cocoa Butter Kisses; Chance the Rapper
9. Oxymoron; literary device where two contradictory terms appear in a conjunction
Examples: I Just Want You; Ozzy Osbourne; “There are no unlockable doors”
This Means War; Rizzle Kicks
10. Irony; a disordinance beyond a phrases obvious meaning
Examples: Funny The Way It Is; Dave Matthews Band; “One kid walks 10 miles to school, anothers dropping out”
Fluorescent Adolescent; Arctic Monkeys
11. Paradox; a statement that has a senseless conclusion despite reasoning
Examples: I Just Want You; Ozzy Osbourne: “There are no identical twins”
Something I Need; OneRepublic
12. Tone; speakers attitude toward the subject
Examples: Rock and Roll Band; Boston; nostalgically appreciative
The Love Club; Lorde; optimistically anticipating
13. Point of View; determined by speaker of song and whom they are speaking to
Examples: Life’s Been Good; Joe Walsh; “I can’t complain but sometimes I still do” (1st)
Fight For You; Pia Mia (multiple)

Caeley Whalen said...

1. Imagery: visually descriptive or figurative language
Examples: Little Green; Joni Mitchell; “Like the color when the spring is born”
Somewhere Only We Know; Keane
2. Hyperbole: exaggerated statements or claims
Examples: Drown in My Own Tears; Ray Charles; “I guess I’m drowning in my own tears” Just the Way You Are; Bruno Mars
3. Alliteration: the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of consecutive words
Examples: Helplessly Hoping; CSNY; “Love isn’t lying, it loose in a lady who lingers”
Grenade; Bruno Mars
4. Assonance: the repetition of the sound of a vowel
Examples: Sleeping Through the Static; Jack Johnson; “Because it’s a battle when you dabble in war
Our Song; Taylor Swift
5. Consonance: repetition of internal consonant sounds
Examples: Sleeping Through the Static; Jack Johnson; “Mind your manners, wave your banners
3005; Childish Gambino
6. Allegories: a phrase that can be interpreted in a way other than the literal
Examples: Mr.Tambourine Man; Bob Dylan; “Take me on a trip upon your magic swirlin’ ship”
H.E.R; Common
7. Local Color; focuses on specific features of a character
Examples: Castles Made of Sand; Jimi Hendrix; “You can hear her scream, “You’re a disgrace”
Arabella; Arctic Monkeys
8. Double Entendre; a word or phrase open to two interpretations
Examples: Mary Jane’s Last Dance; Tom Petty; “Last dance with Mary Jane, one more time to kill the pain”
Cocoa Butter Kisses; Chance the Rapper
9. Oxymoron; literary device where two contradictory terms appear in a conjunction
Examples: I Just Want You; Ozzy Osbourne; “There are no unlockable doors”
This Means War; Rizzle Kicks
10. Irony; a disordinance beyond a phrases obvious meaning
Examples: Funny The Way It Is; Dave Matthews Band; “One kid walks 10 miles to school, anothers dropping out”
Fluorescent Adolescent; Arctic Monkeys
11. Paradox; a statement that has a senseless conclusion despite reasoning
Examples: I Just Want You; Ozzy Osbourne: “There are no identical twins”
Something I Need; OneRepublic
12. Tone; speakers attitude toward the subject
Examples: Rock and Roll Band; Boston; nostalgically appreciative
The Love Club; Lorde; optimistically anticipating
13. Point of View; determined by speaker of song and whom they are speaking to
Examples: Life’s Been Good; Joe Walsh; “I can’t complain but sometimes I still do” (1st)
Fight For You; Pia Mia (multiple)

Caeley Whalen said...

1. Imagery: visually descriptive or figurative language
Examples: Little Green; Joni Mitchell; “Like the color when the spring is born”
Somewhere Only We Know; Keane
2. Hyperbole: exaggerated statements or claims
Examples: Drown in My Own Tears; Ray Charles; “I guess I’m drowning in my own tears” Just the Way You Are; Bruno Mars
3. Alliteration: the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of consecutive words
Examples: Helplessly Hoping; CSNY; “Love isn’t lying, it loose in a lady who lingers”
Grenade; Bruno Mars
4. Assonance: the repetition of the sound of a vowel
Examples: Sleeping Through the Static; Jack Johnson; “Because it’s a battle when you dabble in war
Our Song; Taylor Swift
5. Consonance: repetition of internal consonant sounds
Examples: Sleeping Through the Static; Jack Johnson; “Mind your manners, wave your banners
3005; Childish Gambino
6. Allegories: a phrase that can be interpreted in a way other than the literal
Examples: Mr.Tambourine Man; Bob Dylan; “Take me on a trip upon your magic swirlin’ ship”
H.E.R; Common
7. Local Color; focuses on specific features of a character
Examples: Castles Made of Sand; Jimi Hendrix; “You can hear her scream, “You’re a disgrace”
Arabella; Arctic Monkeys
8. Double Entendre; a word or phrase open to two interpretations
Examples: Mary Jane’s Last Dance; Tom Petty; “Last dance with Mary Jane, one more time to kill the pain”
Cocoa Butter Kisses; Chance the Rapper
9. Oxymoron; literary device where two contradictory terms appear in a conjunction
Examples: I Just Want You; Ozzy Osbourne; “There are no unlockable doors”
This Means War; Rizzle Kicks
10. Irony; a disordinance beyond a phrases obvious meaning
Examples: Funny The Way It Is; Dave Matthews Band; “One kid walks 10 miles to school, anothers dropping out”
Fluorescent Adolescent; Arctic Monkeys
11. Paradox; a statement that has a senseless conclusion despite reasoning
Examples: I Just Want You; Ozzy Osbourne: “There are no identical twins”
Something I Need; OneRepublic
12. Tone; speakers attitude toward the subject
Examples: Rock and Roll Band; Boston; nostalgically appreciative
The Love Club; Lorde; optimistically anticipating
13. Point of View; determined by speaker of song and whom they are speaking to
Examples: Life’s Been Good; Joe Walsh; “I can’t complain but sometimes I still do” (1st)
Fight For You; Pia Mia (multiple)

Emily Eberle said...

1. Imagery is used in literature to refer to descriptive language that evokes sensory experience
• Jimi Hendrix’s “Castles Made Of Sand”; “As she slams the door in his drunken face”
• Taylor Swift’s “All Too Well”
2. Hyperbole is a figure in speech in which statements are exaggerated to evoke strong feelings
• Ray Charles’ “Drown In My Own Tears”; “I’m drowning in my own tears”
• BeyoncĂ©’s “End of Time”
3. Allegory is a figurative mode of representation conveying a meaning other than the literal
• Rush’s “The Trees”; “And they wonder why the maples/Can’t be happy in their shade”
• Ed Sheeran’s “Lego House”
4. Alliteration is the repeating of the same consonant sound at the beginning of several words
• CSNY’s “Helplessly Hoping”; “Heartlessly helping himself to her bad dreams”
• Taylor Swift’s “You Belong With Me”
5. Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds
• Wu-Tang Clan’s “Iron Flag”; “One boot off he Rudolph”
• Eminem’s “Lose Yourself”
6. Consonance is the repetition of the same consonant two or more times in short succession
• Jack Johnson’s “Sleep Through The Static”; “Because it’s a battle when you dabble in war”
• Ed Sheeran’s “You Need Me, I Don’t Need You”
7. Local Color is imagery that focuses on specific features
• The Byrds’ “Lover of the Bayou”; “I drank the blood from a rusty can”
• Chris Brown’s “Forever”
8. Double Entendre is a phrase that could be interpreted two ways
• Tom Petty’s “Mary Jane’s Last Dance”; “Last dance with Mary Jane/One more time to kill the pain”
• Kelly Clarkson’s “Because Of You”
9. Oxymoron is a figure of speech that combines two normally contradicted terms
• Govt. Mule’s “Beautifully Broken”; “She’s so beautifully broken”
• Taylor Swift’s “Sad Beautiful Tragic”
10. Irony is a situation in which there is an incongruity that goes beyond the most evident meaning
• Soundgarden’s “Burden in My Hand”; “kill everything you love”
• Ed Sheeran’s “Kiss Me”
11. Paradox is a statement that leads to a contradiction
• Ozzy Osbourne’s “I Just Want You”; “There are no identical twins”
• Katy Perry’s “Hot N Cold”
12. Tone is the underlying attitude of the songwriter
• Pink Floyd’s “Have a Cigar”; arrogant
• MKTO’s “Classic” nostalgic
13. Point of View is determined by who the speaker is talking to
• Billy Joel’s “Allentown”; First person narrative
• Chris Brown’s “Should’ve Kissed You” First Person Narrative

Cassie Phillips said...

• Imagery is descriptive language that appeals to the different senses
o Ex: “A girl with kaleidoscope eyes” – “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” by The Beatles
o Ex: “When I still see it all in my head/In burning red”- “Red” by Taylor Swift
• Hyperbole is a figure of speech in which exaggeration is used to evoke strong feelings or create emphasis
o Ex: “I guess I’m drowning in my own tears”- “Drown in My Own Tears” by Ray Charles
o Ex: “Oh, her eyes, her eyes make the stars look like they're not shining”- “Just the Way You Are” by Bruno Mars
• Allegory is a figurative representation that displays a deeper meaning rather than just the literal meaning
o Ex: “So the maples formed a union/And demanded equal rights”- “The Trees” by Rush
o Ex: “When the jester sang for the king and queen/In a coat borrow from James Dean”- “American Pie” by Don McLean
• Alliteration is the repeating of the same consonant sound at the beginning of several words in close succession
o Ex: “Helplessly hoping/Her harlequin hovers nearby”- “Helplessly Hoping” by CSNY
o Ex: “Leave all your love and your longing behind”- “Dog Days Are Over” by Florence and the Machine
• Assonance is the internal repetition of vowel sounds in successive words
o Ex: “Learn how to use them, then abuse them, and choose them”- “Sleeping Through the Static” by Jack Johnson
o Ex: “He won't have it, he knows his whole back's to these ropes”- “Lose Yourself” by Eminem
• Consonance is the internal repetition of consonants in successive words
o Ex: “Platonic chronic shows, tonic prose”- “Iron Flag” by Wu-Tang Clan
o Ex: Dear Maria, count me in/ There's a story at the bottom of this bottle”- “Dear Maria, Count Me In” by All Time Low
• Local Color focuses on specific features of a particular region
o Ex: “Picture yourself on a boat on a river/With tangerine trees and marmalade skies”- “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” by The Beatles
o Ex: “On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair/Warm smell of colitas, rising up through the air”- “Hotel California” by The Eagles
• Double Entendre is a phrase that can be interpreted in two ways
o Ex: “Last dance with Mary Jane, one more time to kill the pain”- “Last Dance with Mary Jane” by Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers
o Ex: “Into my own parade, cast your dancing spell my way/I promise to go under it¬”- “Mr. Tambourine Man” by Bob Dylan
• Oxymoron is a phrase that combines two contradictory phrases
o Ex: “She’s so beautifully broken”- “Beautifully Broken” by Govt. Mule
o Ex: “Baby, got to be cruel, you got to be cruel to be kind”- “Cruel To Be Kind” by Nick Lowe
• Irony is a situation where there is an unintended connection those goes beyond the obvious meaning
o Ex: “It was my own lovely lady, and she said, “Oh it’s you.”- “Escape” by Rupert Holmes
o Ex: “The Irony of Choking on a Lifesaver” (title) by All Time Low
• Paradox is statement that leads to contradiction but also expresses truth
o Ex: “There are no identical twins”- “I Just Want You” by Ozzy Osbourne
o Ex: "Slowly walking down the hall / Faster than a cannonball”- “Champagne Supernova” by Oasis
• Tone is part of the composition that includes the attitude toward the subject
o Ex: “Oh by the way, which one’s pink?”- “Have a Cigar” by Pink Floyd (Tone: cynical)
o Ex: “Cause I've seen more spine in jellyfish/I've seen more guts in eleven-year-old kids”- “Seventy Times 7” by Brand New (Tone: bitter disgust)
• Point of View has different variations depending on who the speaker is and who they are referring to in the song
o Ex: “Well we’re living here in Allentown/And they’re closing all the factories down”- “Allentown” by Billy Joel (POV: 1st)
o Ex: “Do you feel like a puzzle, you can't find your missing piece?/ Tell me how you feel”- “Talk” by Coldplay (POV: 2nd)

Victoria Vaphiades said...

1. Imagery is descriptive language that evokes the senses such as sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell.
Jimi Hendrix’s “Castles Made of Sand”: “She drew her wheelchair to the edge of the shore
Ed Sheeran’s “I See Fire”: “Watch the flames climb high into the night”
2. Hyperbole is a figure of speech in which statements are exaggerated, usually used to evoke strong feelings and create emphasis.
Ray Charles’ “Drown In My Own Tears”: “I guess I’ll drown in my own tears”
Bruno Mars’ “Just the Way You Are”: “Her eyes make the stars look like they’re not shining”
3. Allegory is a way to convey meanings that are not literal.
Rush’s “The Trees”: “For the maples want more sunlight/And the oaks ignore their pleas”
Dido’s “Don’t Leave Home”: “I arrived when you were weak/I’ll make you weaker, like a child”
4. Alliteration is the repetition of the same letter sound at the beginning of several words in close succession.
CSNY’s “Helplessly Hoping”: “Love isn’t lying/It’s loose in a lady who lingers”
Joni Mitchell’s “Big Yellow Taxi”: “They paved paradise and put up a parking lot”
5. Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the middle of words in close succession.
Jack Johnson’s “Sleep Through the Static”: “You’re too good looking and mistooken”
Orianthi’s “According to You”: “I’m a mess in a dress”
6. Consonance is repetition of internal consonant sounds in several words in close succession.
Wu-Tang Clan’s “Iron Flag”: “Platonic chronic shows, tonic prose”
Train’s “Hey Soul Sister”: “You gave my love direction, a game show love connection”
7. Local color refers to the characteristics of a certain region.
The Byrds’ “Lover of the Bayou”: “I was raised and swam with the crocodile”
Passenger’s “Feather On The Clyde”: “Well there’s a river that runs through Glasgow”
8. Double entendre are phrases intended to be understood in two different ways.
Tom Petty’s “Mary Jane’s Last Dance”: “Last dance with Mary Jane, one more time to kill the pain”
Van Morrison’s “Brown Eyed Girl”: “Slipping and a-sliding… with you, my brown eyed-girl”
9. Oxymoron is a figure of speech that combines two contradictory terms.
Govt. Mule’s “Beautifully Broken”: “She’s so beautifully broken”
Simon & Garfunkel’s “The Sound of Silence”: “No one dared disturb the sound of silence”
10. Irony is a situation in which there is an unintended connection that goes beyond the most evident meaning.
Dave Matthew’s Band “Funny the Way It Is”: “Someone’s going hungry and someone else is eating out”
Madonna’s “Love Tried to Welcome Me”: “These are my eyes but they cannot see”
11. Paradox is a statement that leads to a contradiction, but makes sense otherwise.
Ozzy Osbourne’s “I Just Want You”: “There are no identical twins”
Daughter’s “Landfill”: “I want you so much/But our hate your guts”
12. Tone encompasses the attitudes toward the subject and toward the audience.
Boston’s “Rock n’ Roll Band”: reflective enthusiasm
James Vincent McMorrow’s “Breaking Hearts”: insensitive disinterest
13. Point of view is who the speaker of the song is as well as the audience they are speaking to.
Joe Walsh’s “Life’s Been Good”: “I have a mansion, forget the price” (1st)
Sara Jackson Holman’s “Freight Train”: “What’s a little pain when you’ve got so much to love” (2nd)