Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The Poetry of Song: Plagiarism in Song and Music

Musical plagiarism is complex, subjective, and a bit confusing. For decades, blues musicians have covered or restructured older songs as homage to past musicians. An artist may borrow lines, make allusions, or sample. Occasionally, artists take issue with this "borrowing" and sue.

For blog-work this week, research and listen to some examples of musical plagiarism. Identify: 1) the definition of plagiarism 2) at least one example of a truly plagiarized song (paragraph explanation) and 3) at least one example of a coincidental relationship between 2 songs (paragraph explanation). Discuss your findings here.

 In the spirit of avoiding plagiarism and associated transgressions, you must cite (MLA format) at least 3 sources for each argument. Citations will also allow you to incorporate periodicals and other resources that may offer some direct evidence to support your claims. On the left side of this blog, you will find some of the many useful citation tools available to you.

Some notable instances include (listed as original/supposed plagiarism): Chiffon's "He's So Fine"/George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord"; Tom Petty's "Mary Jane's Last Dance"/The Red Hot Chili Peppers' "Dani California"; Queen's "Under Pressure"/Vanilla Ice's "Ice, Ice Baby" , Joe Satriani's "If I Could Fly"/Coldplay's "Viva La Vida" and, more recently, Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven"/The Black Keys' "Little Black Submarines," Bob Dylan's "Fourth Time Around" and Fleet Foxes' "Lorelai,"and Pink Floyd's "Breathe"/Dave Matthews Band's "Drunken Soldier." You are not limited to these examples, so feel free to find your own.

20 comments:

alison denekamp said...

www.soundsjustlike.com

^ this is a really useful website for coincidental songs that sound similar, it gives you a long list and listening opportunities! :)

Michael Ready said...

Michael Ready
Class E
4/9/14
1. Plagiarism- The practice of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as your own.
2. Clear plagiarism that I have found is from one of the examples that was provided in class. I am a pretty big Black keys fan and their song “Little Black Submarines” is very similar to “Stairway to Heaven” by Led Zeppelin. I never realized that these songs were as similar as they are until today honestly. It is not like most examples of plagiarism however, when a band will take a guitar rift from another and obviously place it their own song. The similarities of these particular songs is not as evident like most examples of plagiarism, but more subtle, and can be recognized in the overall structure of each song.
3. The major relationship that I found between these two songs is the format and structure of the song. Both “Stairway to Heaven”, and “Little Black Submarines” start similar and progress in a parallel fashion. The plagiarism is not as apparent as I thought it would be, but if you listen to each individual song you can pick up the structure of each that is obviously very similar. Both songs start with a slow more acoustic feel and as they progress they both speed up and evolve into a faster song that feels much more like rock. The main plagiarism that I really noticed was just the structure of each and how they both progressed in a very similar fashion.

alison denekamp said...

1. Plagarism-the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own.
2. In my eyes(Or should I say my ears) a truly plagiarized song is “Ice Ice Baby” by Vanilla Ice, plagiarizing “Under Pressure” by the collaboration of Queen and David Bowie. Undeniably, the opening “dum-dum-dum-dumdumdum-dum” bass riff is identical to the bass riff in “Under Pressure”. Although this may be the only recognizable similarity, given the contrasting difference of genres, it is such a blatant plagiarism, that It simply cannot be compromised.
3. A coincidental relationship is present between the songs, “Waterloo” by ABBA, and “Build Me Up Buttercup” by The Foundations. Both songs begin with a drum progression and jump into jovial singing styles throughout the song. Backup vocals are prmonent in both songs, and harmonies pose similarities.

Jaden Draggoo said...

1) Definition of Plagiarism: (n.) a piece of writing or other work reflecting such unauthorized use or imitation.

2) In Eminem’s song, “…So Far”, he uses samples from Joe Walsh’s, “Life’s Been Good”, throughout Eminem’s song he uses samples of Walsh’s song in multiple parts in the song but its split apart with samples of other songs in between. Some of those samples also being beats from Eminem’s old albums and songs. Eminem uses Walsh’s song in the beginning, middle and end but as I said, split up. Eminem’s version in the beginning was saying the opposite as Walsh describes in his song such as the first verse, “I own a mansion but live in a house, a king size bed but I sleep on the couch,” while Walsh’s song states, “I have a mansion but forget the price, I’ve never been there but they tell me it’s nice… I have accountants pay for it all”, Eminem’s version also says that he has all these nice things and also doesn’t use them but he uses more down to earth things such as living in a house other than a mansion while Walsh glamourizes his wealth by bragging about what he has.

3) A coincidental relationship between the two songs is that Eminem is purposely saying the opposite of what Walsh is saying in his song. Also, the beat is obviously copied from Walsh’s song into Eminem’s song to turn Walsh into “The Real Slim Shady”. While the beat is the same, the two songs are very different in many ways such as Eminem being Eminem and making everything vulgar while Walsh doesn’t make anything vulgar like Eminem.




"Rap Songs of the Week: Eminem Turns Joe Walsh into Slim Shady on 'So Far...'" SPIN. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

"Eminem So Far..." WhoSampled. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

"Joe Walsh Sampled on New Eminem Song." Ultimate Classic Rock. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

Mr. Jacobs said...

Plagiarism in music is the intentional theft of musical cords, lyrics, or both to use in a new song if not copying the song exactly to claim as your own. Many of the great bands have been accused of this in the past but Led Zeppelin in particular has a laundry list a mile long of them. This list of songs they have been accused of plagiarizing includes some of their most famous singles like "Stairway to Heaven" which has parts copied note for note from a song called "Taurus" by a band named Spirit. No credit was given but at the time it became known Zeppelin was so popular that most people didn't care or assumed the plagiarism was reversed and Spirit had copied Zeppelin.
However sometimes music is similar purely by coincidence or due to having similar inspiration like in the case of Huey Lewis and the News' "I Want a New Drug" and of all things the theme from ghost busters. As odd as it is the similarities are definitely there but it is highly unlikely that this was in any way true plagiarism due to the refusal of Huey Lewis to write the theme, inspiration may have been borrowed but they are significantly different not enough to be considered plagiarized, the songs simply have noticeable similarities. The studio does openly admit that they advised Ray Parker Jr, the composer for the theme, to use Huey Lewis as an inspiration after he rejected offers to compose but have never admitted to plagiarism of any form and most likely just wanted something with a similar feel to it for the movie resulting in a similar but different song.

Bibliography
Evers, Derek. http://www.thefader.com/. 5 September 2008. Culture Article. 9 April 2014.
News, Huey Lewis and the. "I Want a New Drug." 1984. CD.
Ramakishnan, Rohan. Cracked.com. 6 May 2010. Factual Humor Article. 9 April 2014.
Ray Parker, Jr. "Ghostbusters." 1984. CD.
Spirit. "Taurus." 1968. CD.
Zepplin, Led. "Stairway to Heaven." 1971. CD.

Michael Ready said...

Michael Ready
Class E
4/9/14
1. Plagiarism- The practice of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as your own.
2. Clear plagiarism that I have found is from one of the examples that was provided in class. I am a pretty big Black keys fan and their song “Little Black Submarines” is very similar to “Stairway to Heaven” by Led Zeppelin. I never realized that these songs were as similar as they are until today honestly. It is not like most examples of plagiarism however, when a band will take a guitar rift from another and obviously place it their own song. The similarities of these particular songs is not as evident like most examples of plagiarism, but more subtle, and can be recognized in the overall structure of each song.
3. The major relationship that I found between these two songs is the format and structure of the song. Both “Stairway to Heaven”, and “Little Black Submarines” start similar and progress in a parallel fashion. The plagiarism is not as apparent as I thought it would be, but if you listen to each individual song you can pick up the structure of each that is obviously very similar. Both songs start with a slow more acoustic feel and as they progress they both speed up and evolve into a faster song that feels much more like rock. The main plagiarism that I really noticed was just the structure of each and how they both progressed in a very similar fashion.

Anonymous said...

Meagan Graham
4/9/14



1.) Plagiarism is taking anything that was made by another person, then taking it and calling it your own.
2.) Funs song Some Nights seems to diverge from Simon and Garfunkel’s Cecilia. The beginning is almost exactly the same to each other. There is a part in both songs where the tempo drops and there’s only clapping and the voice of the signers. The songs oddly follow the same beat and it’s seemingly stolen by Fun the younger of the two groups.


3.) Michael Bolton’s Love is A Wonderful Thing is very close to the Isely Brothers Love is a Wonderful Thing. Though the lyrics have changed the title and the beginning intro into the two songs remain the same. The Instrumental Pickups also sound the same and happen at the same point in the song. The moment when the horns pick up in the Isely brother’s song the same happens in Bolton’s. The song seems to be an homage or in some ways coincidental.






Work Cited

"Login to Sounds Just Like." Fun.: Some Nights Sounds like Simon & Garfunkel: Cecilia. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

"Famous Copyright Infringement Plagiarism Cases in Music." Famous Copyright Infringement Plagiarism Cases in Music. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.

Gwen Saccocia said...

1. Plagiarism the action of using someone else’s exact work, lyrics or music, and not giving credit to the rightful owner.
2. A clear example of plagiarism in song can be found within One Direction’s “Live While We’re Young”, which has been ripped off of The Clash’s “Should I Stay Or Should I Go”. The chords at the beginning of “Live While We’re Young” identically resemble those in “Should I Stay Or Should I Go”, which was released in 1982. Harry Styles, a member of One Direction, later spoke out about the controversy after heated twitter comments were being thrown everywhere. Styles confirms the plagiarism of the riff saying that “it was kind of on purpose,”. He also nods his respect to The Clash when he added that “it's a great riff.” Even though the young British pop band blatantly took music from a legendary punk rock band, there were no lawsuits involved, just nasty tweets after the release of “Live While We’re Young”.
3. When Katy Perry’s “Roar” is listened next to Sara Bareilles’ “Brave”, it is clear that parts of the two’s music in the songs coincidentally sound extremely similar. When one of the songs starts playing on the radio, it is challenging to distinguish which song is on before Perry or Bareilles starts singing. As Bareilles begins to sing “Brave”, the music in the background resembles the starting music of “Roar”. Although many listeners criticize Perry for plagiarising music from Bareilles, who’s song came out first, Bareilles denies the accusations. The two friends joke about the incident and are possibly planning on collaborating with each other in the future.

Boardman, Madeline. "Katy Perry's Alleged Plagiarism Isn't The First: 12 Artists Accused Of Jacking Songs." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 12 Aug. 2013. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

"One Direction Speak Out About Those Pesky Plagiarism Rumours! - The Hot Hits." One Direction Speak Out About Those Pesky Plagiarism Rumours! - The Hot Hits. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

"Sara Bareilles Says Talk on 'Roar' Vs 'Brave' Is Good for Business." Billboard. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

Victoria Vaphiades said...

1. Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as one’s own.

2. An example of a song that, in my opinion, was truly plagiarized is One Direction’s “Best Song Ever”, which seems to be exactly like The Who’s “Baba O’Riley”. The same chords are used in both songs, and are too similar to just be a coincidence. The main similarity is in the very first part of the song; the introductions are almost exactly the same. However when The Who was asked about their opinion, they denied any harsh feelings towards the British boy band. They were actually pleased that One Direction was influenced by their music.

3. Bruno Mars’ “Locked Out of Heaven” sounds similar to The Police’s “Roxanne”, but it may just be coincidence. The two songs do have similar notes and rhythm, but it might have not been intentionally plagiarized. When Bruno Mars was confronted about the similar tracks, Bruno replied saying he had no intention of copying The Police, although he grew up listening to their songs are performing their songs. While he denied the intention of copying “Roxanne”, he didn’t deny that they sounded similar. However I believe that it may have just been coincidence and not purposely plagiarized.

Souces:
"The Who's 'Baba O' Riley' vs. One Direction's 'Best Song Ever'" Pollstar. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.
"Does Bruno Mars Think 'Heaven' Sounds Like A Police Song?" New Music Videos, Reality TV Shows, Celebrity News, Pop Culture. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

Caeley Whalen said...

Plagiarism: when a piece of work is stolen from someone who is not the originator and passes it off as their own
Truly Plagiarism: Vanilla Ice’s Ice Ice Baby and Queen’s Under Pressure is an example of truly plagiarized work. The original, Under Pressure, was copied by Vanilla Ice and brought to light in the 1990’s. However, Vanilla Ice has denied that he has copied Queen and David Bowie’s collaboration. It is clear that Vanilla Ice had sampled “most identifiable riffs” to incorporate into his only popular song. Vanila Ice has said that the notes are different in both songs, but has since put out a public apology saying, “[He] has no excuse” and that “[He] was manipulated” ("Vanilla Ice Says 'Sorry'" Youtube.com. "thunkspot", Feb.-Mar. 2009. Web) The case of infringement never went to court, and Vanilla Ice’s music career was left in the dust.

Coincidental Plagiarism: Rizzle Kicks’ song, Let’s Skip to the Good Bit, and EMF’s, Unbelievable is a lesser known case of ‘accidental’ plagiarism. The members of Rizzle Kicks, Jordan Stephens and Harley Alexander-Sule released their second album Roaring 20’s is September of 2013, while EMF’s single was launched in 1991. Both groups have similar sounds when it comes to their music, but for the case of plagiarism, Lets Skip to the Good Bit and Unbelievable noticeable have the same sound, rhythm, and cadence. Specifically, in the post-chorus breakdown. EMF has taken no action in bringing the boys of Rizzle Kicks to court, and has not commented on the allegations of plagiarism.
(Neither Rizzle Kicks or EMF have commented on the claims of plagiarism)

Cassie Phillips said...

1)The definition of plagiarism is the act of using the same or closely related language or thoughts of another author without the author’s consent or authorization.
2)Vanilla Ice, in his popular song “Ice Ice Baby”, plagiarized the opening baseline from “Under Pressure”, a song by the well-known band Queen and David Bowie. Vanilla Ice altered the rhythm of the opening slightly, believing that by changing it, he could get away with using the baseline without authorization. The 1990 case never went to trial due to the fact in was obvious that Vanilla Ice had used the opening bass rhythm illegally. "We sampled it from them but it's not the same bassline,” claims Vanilla Ice in an interview about the plagiarism scandal. “It goes 'ding ding ding di di ding ding… ding ding ding di di ding ding.' That's the way theirs goes. Ours goes 'ding ding ding di di ding ding… DING… ding ding ding di di ding ding.' That little bitty change -- it's not the same." No credit was given originally, until after the song became a hit and the use of the baseline had become evident to the public. The case never went to trial, however it is believed that Vanilla Ice paid a settlement to Queen and David Bowie.
Sources:
"Famous Copyright Infringement Plagiarism Cases in Music." Famous Copyright Infringement Plagiarism Cases in Music. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Apr. 2014. .
"1990: Vanilla Ice on "Ice Ice Baby" vs. Queen/Bowie's "Under Pressure"" Boing Boing 1990 Vanilla Ice on Ice Ice Baby vs QueenBowies UnderPressure Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014. .
3)The song “Dani California” by the Red Hot Chili Peppers was thought to sound very similar to Tom Petty’s record “Last Dane with Mary Jane”. The opening rifts of both songs can be considered parallel to each other, though not exactly the same. The way the lyrics are sung in the verses, the overall tempo, as well as the theme of the lyrics itself also have related qualities. However, it doesn’t seem there was a direct use of plagiarism despite the similarities. When asked about the Red Hot Chili Pepper’s song, Tom Petty replied, “The truth is, I seriously doubt that there is any negative intent there. And a lot of rock & roll songs sound alike.” No lawsuit was filed on the behalf of Petty. Any similarities of the two songs were considered to Petty as seemingly coincidental and harmless, it was flattering, if anything.
Sources:
"Red Hot Chili Peppers Accused Of Plagiarism." Blogcritics. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014. .
"Tom Petty Doubts Chili Peppers Similarity Had "Negative Intent"" Rolling Stone. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014. .

Kasara Maloney said...

1. Plagiarism: an instance of using or closely imitating someone else's work without authorization as one's own and without crediting the original author.

2. I've heard each song on the radio before yet never noticed the plagiarism involved between Third Eye Blind's "Semi charmed life", and Spin Doctors "Two Princes". "Two Princes", having been published in 1993 obviously came before "Semi charmed life" which was published in 1997. Both songs have virtually the same vocal and guitar tunes and sound nearly identical. There is no question as to whether this song was plagiarized as it is far from subtle. I mainly recognized the similarities of the structures in both songs as plagiarism.

Katy Johansen said...

Plagiarism: the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own.

Plagiarized Songs:
1. “The Way” by Ariana Grande ft. Mac Miller
“The Way” uses the exact music as Brenda Russell used in her song “A Little Bit of Love”. The piano chords and keyboard sounds are the same in both songs, bringing up the idea that Ariana’s song samples Brenda’s song. While neither song has the same lyrics as the other, the identical tempo of both songs could be considered as plagiarism.



2. “Nobody’s Business” by Rihanna ft. Chris Brown
In Michael Jackson’s #1 song “The Way You Make Me Feel”, he uses the lyrics “Ain’t nobody’s business/ Ain’t nobody’s business but mine and my baby” and “Come on be my girl/ I wanna make you mine”. In Rihanna’s “Nobody’s Business”, she and Chris Brown use the exact same lyrics. It could have been sampled because of appreciation for Michael Jackson’s music style, but there is no doubt that Rihanna took these lyrics from Michael Jackson.


Coincidental Relationship Between Songs:
1. “Roar” by Katy Perry & “Brave” by Sara Bareilles

After Katy Perry released the first single from her album “Prism” last summer, nobody was talking about how good or bad the song was. They were talking about how it sounds almost identical to the song “Brave” by Sara Bareilles, who happens to be a friend of Katy. Mash-ups were made of the two songs, and it couldn’t be denied that the two songs sounded the same. When asked about the similarity, Sara said in a public statement: "I mean, I can't say that I think that they don't sound similar. I've known Katy a really long time and we're friends. And at the end of the day, it was really only good for my song. So, thank you, Katy Perry for that".



BIBLIOGRAPHY:
N.p., n.d. Web. .

"Time.com." Entertainment Everybodys Business What People Are Saying About the New RihannaChris Brown Duet Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014. .

"Katy Perry Jacked Roar From Brave, Admits Sara Bareilles! Find Out Why She's Not Hatin' HERE!" PerezHilton RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014. .

Jake Munoz said...

Plagiarism can be defined as the intentional copying or recreation of another's copyrighted work. In music, plagiarism can be found through a guitarist's riff or a vocalist's tone or cadence. While some artists claim that the recreation was a simple homage to the original artist, some people, especially the original artist, may disagree and say it was a blatant theft of copyrighted work. The area is grey and the line is thin with musical plagiarism, but in some cases, it is as clear as day.

Johnny Cash, famous blues artist, was sued by Gordon Jenkins over the blatant copying of the song "Crescent City Blues". Cash released the song "Folsom City Blues" in 1955, the song has a strong resemblance to Jenkins' song, stealing lyrics, vocal tones, and several instrumental sounds. Jenkins, who released "Crescent City Blues" in 1953, was quick to sure Cash and won the lawsuit, receiving $75,000 over the disputed lyrics.

Not every song that sounds the same can be pinned on plagiarism, sometimes it's just a matter of similar ideas. Jimi Hendrix had a tendency to play a riff in live shows that strongly resembles the main riff in The Rolling Stones' song, "Satisfaction". The riff can most commonly be found in Hendrix's cover of the song "Hey Joe". The two songs, "Satisfaction" and "Hey Joe" clearly have no resemblance in that they have very different main riffs, the vocals are completely different, and the tone can be seen as different as well. The two sounds are completely coincidental and there's nothing more to it.

Life Struggles in Rap said...

Ryan Landry
Plagiarism is an act or instance of using closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author’s work as one’s own, as by not crediting the original author.
Many artists have been sued and or sued others for using samples of their songs without the authorization of them. In 1978, Joe Walsh released his song “Life’s Been Good” and the song went on to be #12 on the US Billboard Hot 100. This song was his most successful solo. In 2013, Eminem released his latest album “MMLP2”. This album contained many hit songs, such as: “Monsters” and “Rap God”. However, a particular song stuck out in this album. One of the last songs in this album called “So Far” was extremely similar in many aspects to the song “Life’s Been Good” by Joe Walsh. Using the same exact instrumental, Eminem also used a specific rhyme scheme to match the same rhythm as Joe Walsh.
At the end of the album Eminem even added in the inside joke “uh-oh, here comes a flock of wah wahs”. That inside joke was said in the studio ten seconds after Joe Walsh finished his song. Eminem “coincidentally” said the same exact inside joke ten seconds after he finished recording “So Far” in the studio. Eminem uses some of the lyrics form “Life’s Been Good” in “So Far” such as: “Life’s Been Good” and “My Maserati goes 185(mph)/ I lost my driver’s license, now I don’t drive”.
It is very clear Eminem intentionally copied Joe Walsh’s song in multiple ways. However, Eminem has not been sued by Joe Walsh and or the Eagle’s. It has not gained too much popularity or controversy and not many fans of Eminem or the Eagle’s have been too concerned or bothered by this.

Lizzie said...

1. Plagiarism is the acknowledgement of something coming from another source and not giving the rightful owner the credit.
2. Noel Gallegher accused Green Day of plagiarism on his song “Wonderwall” for their hit “Boulevard of Broken Dreams.” Some may not see it right away as for me is was sort of shocking when I listened to it because I would never think a song like “Wonderwall” could be transformed with the same arrangements into punk rock. If you listen closely you star to realize such a resemblance those two particular songs have. The words of “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” almost fit perfectly into the melody of Noel Gallegher’s song. Noel Gallegher caught Green Day with the same melody and accused them. Although Noel once “borrowed” melody for his songs from another music artist, Noel paid that artist to use it in his music while Green Day did not. The discrepancy on plagiarism between Noel and Green day came down to just an argument, I don’t believe they went well into it to bring it to court.
3. It’s funny how one song can be written by an artist without thinking it was already published. For these particular songs, their beats start off very similar. The instruments are played to a beat that is a little too similar, but it could just be a coincidence. Lissie’s “Loosen the Knot” displayed in 2010 and Coldplay’s “Low” exposed in 2005 seem very similar with the beats they use. Although, Coldplay uses the instruments in the song at a slow pace to make the beat of the drum sound more of a singer/songwriter song rather than a rock or pop song. Lissie, on the other hand, uses the beat of the drum at a faster tempo to make the song more upbeat and danceable. The two songs can be very distinct at times, but if you listen to the song after one another it’s almost as though they worked together to make similar songs. I wouldn’t say this is true plagiarism considering they never figured out they sound similar, but I wouldn’t argue that these two songs have the same beat. Also, there may be other songs with the same beat as it seems like the most common beat and I have heard it with other songs before. Coldplay has not presented Lissie with the news of plagiarism and stealing their song for there will be not law suits or court for these artists in the music industry.


"Gallagher Attacks Green Day For 'Ripping Off' Wonderwall." Contactmusic.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

Emily Eberle said...

1. The definition or plagiarism is the practice of taking someone else’s ideas or work and passing them off as one’s own.
2. An example of a plagiarized song is The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Dani California.” The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ plagiarized Tom Petty’s song “Mary Jane’s Last Dance.” Petty’s song was released in 1993 while The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ song was released in 2006. The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ song is very similar to Petty’s. Gaffney’s show producer Jarred Morris said, “’The chord progression, the melody, the tempo, the key, the lyrical theme… they’re identical.’”
3. Joe Satriani’s “If I Could Fly” and Coldplay’s “Vida La Vida” sound very similar. Coldplay’s song was released in 2008, and Joe Satriani’s was released in 2008. Joe Satriani sued Coldplay for stealing “’substantial original portions.’” The guitar is almost the same in both songs.
"Joe Satriani Sues Coldplay For "Viva La Vida" Plagiarism." Rolling Stone. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.
"Red Hot Chili Peppers Accused Of Plagiarism." Blogcritics. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

Jennifer Berard said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jennifer Berard said...

1) Plagiarism: Act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own, as by not crediting the original author.

2) Plagiarized song:
The songs "Semi Charmed Life" by Third Eye Blind and "Two Princes" by Spin Doctors are both very up beat and fun songs to listen to with just one little glitch. Third Eye Blind's song has plagiarized the Spin Doctors' song by using almost exactly the same music. As soon as the song starts to play you can tell that the songs are almost completely identical to one another. The only real difference between the two is the lyrics in the song, and also any small spins Third Eye Blind put onto the music to make it more their style.

3) Coincidentally similar:
One song that I think was accidentally plagiarized by the artists without them actually meaning to do it was...Coldplay's "Viva La Vida". They allegedly plagiarized the song "If I Could Fly" by Joe Satriani. In truth there is only one really similar guitar riff in Coldplay's song that really sounds similar to Satriani's song. However the case was taken to court but was later thrown out, the two artist later settle the dispute in a mutual agreement outside of the courts. I really don't believe that it was Coldplay's intention to plagiarize another song.

...Works Cited
Kreps, Daniel. "Joe Satriani Sues Coldplay For "Viva La Vida" Plagiarism Read More: Http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/joe-satriani-sues-coldplay-for-viva-la-vida-plagiarism-20081205#ixzz2yXSBxYIO Follow Us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook." Http://www.rollingstone.com. JANN S. WENNER, 5 Dec. 2008. Web. 10 Apr. 2014. .

Neptune, Jacob. "Third Eye Blind: Semi Charmed Life Sounds like Spin Doctors: Two Princes." Sounds Just Like. Adam Wagner, 26 Mar. 2013. Web. 9 Apr. 2014.

Jason said...

Two songs that sounds almost the exact same are AC/DECs "TNT" and Lou Gramms "Arrow through your heart". AC/DC came out with the song first which would lead people to think that Lou Gramm copied them and used the beginning of the song in his. So the next time you listen to these songs, pay attention to the beginnings and you'll notice they sound the same.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adukrwHY09s

Two songs that sound similar but may not be copy righted are Star Wars's "imperial march" and Mary Poppins "Spoon full of sugar". It transitions from instrument to voice with the high point of the imperial march going with the chorus of a spoon full of sugar when she says "A spoon full of sugar makes the medicine go down."

http://www.soundsjustlike.com/2720/john-williams-sounds-like-walt-disney/