Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Cognitive Biases: Journalism

Please post your exercise results as a comment to this post.

19 comments:

Louied33 said...


Through the bias of The Bandwagon effect, anyone could believe in a certain idea even that many people believe even he or she might believe the opposite. For example, a person might fight for the legalization of marijuana with his or her friends even though he or she really believes it should be illegal, and this could affect his or her overall views on many subjects relating to drugs.

Through the bias of the Just-World phenomenon, a person might believe someone is getting what they deserve but could ultimately harm themselves in the process. For example, a man might think that a man deserves to get murdered, so that man kills the other person, but he ultimately gets put in prison for killing that person.

Through the bias of Rosy retrospection, a person may believe he or she owed more for what he or she believed he or she did in the past, which could ultimately harm their future life. For example, a man could believe he deserves a raise for something he thinks he did in the past. This could lead to a large argument with his boss which might cause the man to lose the job he was already at.

Brett Stern said...

Through the bias of the bandwagon effect, a student who does not have many friends may do what other people do to try to gain friends. For example, if all the “cool” kids skip a class the “uncool” child may do the same.
Through the bias of false consensus effect a teacher may believe students agree with them but, in reality they do not. For example, if a teacher talks about a story they may think students are interested or agree when in reality they are just trying to waste time.
Through the bias of bizarre effect a teacher may do something weird to make kids remember a certain fact or topic. For example, If a teacher yells and runs around when students mention president Taft students are more likely to remember what Taft did because their teacher acted silly.

tyler troiano said...

Through the bias of in group bias, people might not give their own full opinion because they want to fit in with their groups. For example, if a favorite athletic team was brought up someone might go along with what the main team was so they could fit in and not be picked on.

Through the bias of bandwagon effect people believe as everyone else does. For example, many people become bandwagon fans of the Boston Bruins when the playoffs come one. They do not care at all during the regular season.

Through the bias of egocentric bias, people are very cocky and exaggerate how well or how poor they performed. For example, someone who had a big hit in a baseball game might brag how it decided the whole game and the whole season.

Charlie Benkart said...

Through the bias of Frequency illusion, I may see more of cars that are familiar to me.For example, my mom owns a Honda so I see more Honda's.
Through the bias of Confirmation bias someone who likes pit bulls may look for information to defend them. For example, they may look for news stories where pit bulls save lives

Through the bias of Hot-hand fallacy, someone may think they are going to do better at something based on previous successful attempts. For example, someone may think that they have a better chance at winning the lottery based on previous wins

Liam Lenhart said...

Through the bias of In group bias , people may alienate others because they are not in their group. For example, the group might ignore and not accept a new student.

Through the bias of the hard-easy effect, some people will give up on a task before even trying. For example, a person might give up on a puzzle the first time they meet a challenge.

Through the bias of the google effect, people could forget easy information. For example, our generation doesn’t need to know the capitals of our country.

Marisa Amato said...

Through the bias of Unit Bias, a person may feel the need to finish what is on their plate at another person's house. For example, if my friend comes over for dinner, they may eat everything on their plate, though they don't like it, just to make whoever cooked the meal feel good.

Through the bias of Stereotyping, people may judge a person even without knowing information about that person. For example, football players are often stereotyped for being jerks and jocks when in most cases that is not true.

Through the bias of Hard-Easy Effect, people may give up on a challenge or problem before even taking a chance to try it. For example, if a student comes across a lengthy worded math problem on homework, they may just skip it and say they didn't understand it (though they didn't even read it) to avoid getting it wrong or being challenged.

Morgan Nicholson said...

Morgan Nicholson
Through the bias of anchoring and focalism, one won’t get all the information necessary or get all the facts regarding their topic. For example, a student may be writing a paper, use Google for information, but only use the first page of resources.

Through the bias of the bandwagon effect, a person may not voice their actual opinions because it goes against the popular beliefs of others. For example, one in the South might be completely for homosexual marriages in their state, but because that idea opposes the more popular opinion, they may not speak up.

Through the bias of frequency illusion, one becomes aware of a particular subject and suddenly that thing is popping up everywhere, and everyone knows about it. For example, one might just hear a new song and enjoy it, but suddenly the song is on every ten minutes and being played on every radio station.

Meghan M. said...

Through the bias of anchoring or focalism, you're not learning all that you could be about your topic. For example, someone might do a report for school and look in only one book for information.

Through the bias of frequency illusion, something that you recently saw or heard may start appearing in many places. For example, you might buy a new shirt and then suddenly see lots of people wearing the same one,

Through the bias of confirmation bias, you might only remember information or facts that support what you already believe. For example, if you are looking for reasons to support your argument that gum should be allowed in school, you'll only remember the information that agrees with your idea.

Lucas Arruda said...

Through the bias of Bandwagon, someone believes something because many other people believe in it. For example, someone might start a rumor which goes all around school or where every. True or not people start to believe it because everyone else does.

Through the bias of Frequency Illusion, is when you learn something new or to start to pay attention to something more often. For example, if you get a new car, that you call yours, you would start to notice that a lot of other people have the same exact car as you but you never noticed it before until now.

Through the bias of Anchoring, is when you are concentrate heavily on one idea and not anything else. For example, when a student relays on being a professional athlete and concentrates he/her whole life to it until one day he/she gets hurt badly and not able to farfel the dream but also can’t find anything else to do because the only thing he/she was thinking about was being an athlete and not anything else.

Amy Pereira said...

Through the bias of Identifiable Victim Effect, a student in school might respond more strongly to one important and identified person rather than a group of unreliable people. For example, the student might listen to a teacher more than a group of students.

Through the bias of Bandwagon Effect, a person who doesn’t know anything about sports might root for the team that is currently winning within a certain sport. For example, “fair-weather fans” only root for certain teams when they are doing well and might not know much about the sport to begin with.

Through the bias of Out-Group Homogeneity Bias, a group of people might view their friend group as more varied than other people would. For example, while a group of friends from the soccer team may all have different personalities, people might see them as the “soccer friends”.

John Munger said...

Through the bias of __Out-group homogenity bias, a person may notice variance in his friendships. For example, he might see his group of friends to be much different than other groups of friends in his/her school.

Through the bias of In-group bias, people may be rude to a person who is no in their friend group. For example, they may alienate a new student to the school.

Through the bias of hard-easy effect, people will give up on something before they even start .For example, they might give up on building a desk when they meet the first challenging part of the construction.
John Munger

Jillian Blye said...

Through the bias of The Bandwagon effect, someone may join in or believe in a cause simply because their friends do, sort of like a trend. For example, a group of friends may do something illegal or drink and party so the other friend joins in because they think they have to.


Through the In Group bias may only give attention to the people in the friend group. For example, if there was a new student or someone who the friend group doesn't know, they may not pay attention to them.

Through the bias of the Hard-Easy Effect, someone may give up without even trying. For example, if there is lengthy homework hard problems, the student may not even try because of what it looks like.

Laudan Pouremad said...

Through the bias of the Bandwagon effect, someone might blindly believe something only because of the beliefs of people around them. For example, a child might believe something politically or socially because of their upbringing.

Through the bias of the frequency illusion, someone might attain an item and then see that item everywhere. For example, someone might buy a car and then see that same car all the time after.

Through the bias of the confirmation bias, one might always seek information that confirms their beliefs. For example, a student might only use supporting data in a persuasive essay.

Tara Kiley said...

Through the bias of anchoring or focalism, a person creates their opinions off of one source and is not taking into consideration other ideas. For example, when a student is writing a research report and only uses one website and does not look at any other information on the internet.

Through the bias of bandwagon effect, people copy or mimic another person to feel like they belong or fit in with a certain crowd. For example, when someone is looking at a magazine and sees an article of clothing that’s “trending”, they feel obligated to go out and purchase the same thing so they fit in with the rest of society.

Through the bias of frequency illusion, people obtain something new and suddenly start seeing it everywhere. For example, when a person learns a new vocabulary word like “admonish”, they take notice to it and recognize it in a book they are reading for English class.

Kristin Lynch said...

Through the bias of the Bandwagon Effect, someone could think what they want to do is the right thing even if it is, but won’t say anything because everyone else in the group that the person is with opposes what that person is thinking so nothing is said and the right thing won’t commence.
Through the bias of the Frequency Illusion, a person could obtain something that may seem new to them, but once that something they will see and notice that thing more and more because they know more about it now that that thing has come to their attention.
Through the bias of the Confirmation Bias, someone, such as a student working on a persuasive essay, will only seek information and facts to back up their side and make a stranger argument towards whatever they are writing about.

Cody Aranjo said...

The Bandwagon effect is characterized by, “the probability of individual adoption increasing with respect to the proportion who have already done so.” In much simpler words, the bandwagon effect can be described as, when someone does something to fit in with everyone else who is doing it. For example, if every girl in school wore Ugg boots and one girl didn't have a pair of them, because she didn't like the style of them, then she would buy a pair anyway so she could fit in with the other girls.
Through the bias of stereotyping, many people often judge others by their physical appearance, or the way they act. Often times stereotyping happens before one person has met the other. For example, if there was a new girl in school who wore all black clothing, then other students would characterize her as emo.
The frequency illusion bias also known as, the Baader- Meinhof Phenomenon, is when a person discovers an object they never saw before, and they start seeing that object more and more each day. For example, I own a pair of Adidas soccer pants with three stripes down each leg. I thought I was the only kid in school that owned a pair of them, but the next day at school I saw at least twenty other students wearing the same exact pants as me.
Cody Aranjo

Juliana Sullivan said...

Biases are another describing way to use an opinion which have different "effects" to write and describe them. One example is the base rate fallacy or base rate raglect. Which is the tendency to ignore base rate information (general information) and focus on specific information. This basically means that instead of giving useless information you can use helpful information to get straight and to the point. The cheerleader effect is the tendency for people to appear more attractive in a group than in insulation. I agree with this effect because I feel more unattractive or insecure because you feel like people are looking at you rather than the whole group itself. My final favorite is the IKEA effect which means the tendency for people to place a disproportionately high value on objects that they partially assembled themselves, such as furniture from ikea, regardless of the quality of the end result. This effect I feel is made for mostly everything because you will buy a product you think will end up being fun and useful and turns out to be poorly built.

elise cracco said...

Through the bias of social desirability, a loser has the tendency to over-report socially desirable characteristics or behaviors in one self and under-report socially undesirable characteristics or behaviors. For example, they will buy popular clothes and items to seem more popular.
Through the bias of in-group bias, a leader will have the tendency to give preferential treatment to others they perceive to be members of their own groups. For example, a boss will give some people bonuses but not others.
Through the bias of, out-group homogeneity bias individuals see members of their own group as being relatively more varied than members of other groups. For example, a leader of that group knows all of the individuals very well. But they don’t know the other group well.
Elise Cracco

Cw said...

Through the bias of social desirability, a loser has the tendency to over-report socially desirable characteristics or behaviors in one self and under-report socially undesirable characteristics or behaviors. For example, they will buy popular clothes and items to seem more popular.
Through the bias of in-group bias, a leader will have the tendency to give preferential treatment to others they perceive to be members of their own groups. For example, a boss will give some people bonuses but not others.
Through the bias of, out-group homogeneity bias individuals see members of their own group as being relatively more varied than members of other groups. For example, a leader of that group knows all of the individuals very well. But they don’t know the other group well.
elise cracco