Sunday, October 26, 2014

Interdisciplinary Arts: Blog Work for Halloween Week


This week, you will progress through the hodgepodge of micro-assignments below and post a comment to this blog containing all of your responses (due prior to Halloween weekend). It is wise to preserve your work in Word or Google Drive as you progress. Enjoy!

WARM-UP: Click here to see the most amazing pumpkin carvings in the history of pumpkins and carving and all things amazing!

PART A:

1. Click here to visit Stephen Wiltshire's website. Mr. Wiltshire is an artistic savant who is capable of reproducing incredibly detailed landscapes from memory. 1. On the left, click on "My Videos". Watch at least four of the videos and offer a commentary for each.


2. Visit his "Gallery" and browse through his work. Identify his most impressive drawing and his most impressive painting; offer explanation for each.


3. Produce a response (as a comment here) that includes a discussion of artwork by: Julian Beever; Kurt Wenner; Kris Kuksi 


4. View Scott Wadell's tutorial on edging. Offer a synopsis, focusing on his description of edge work in comparison and contrast to your cast drawing experience. 

5. Search the internet for self-portraits by the following artists: Rembrandt van Rijn, Vincent Van Gogh, Kathe Kollwitz, Chuck Close, Lucian Freud, Gregory Gillespie, Edward Hopper, Pablo Picasso, Paul Cezanne, Susanna Coffey, Brett Gamache (my college roommate and good friend). For each artist, record the title, year of completion, and country of origin. Identify three comparable (composition, color, mood, etc.) self-portraits from the list. Construct a paragraph which identifies the parallels between these 3 works.

6. Identify the strongest self-portrait (from #5). In a paragraph, explain its salient elements and defend your claim. 

7. Typically, self-portraits are not lucrative efforts for living artists. Why might an artist choose to focus on self-portraits? What may drive an artist, like Rembrandt, to devote so much time and effort towards depicting himself? Explain in paragraph form.



PART B:

Virtual Scavenger Hunt: Find the answers to the following questions. These questions will require viewing, reading, and strategic web browsing skills.

1. How many windows are in Andrew Wyeth's "Master Bedroom"? What medium does Wyeth use?
2. Identify the figure depicted in a boat in Michelangelo's "Last Judgement".
3. What pachyderm is distorted in the background of Salvador Dali's "One Second Before Awakening from a Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate"?
4. What time is it in Vincent van Gogh's "Night Cafe"?
5. Monet and Manet are both Impressionists and have similarities beyond their names. Compare and contrast these two artists.
6. Who is Camille Claudel? Examine her "L'Age Mur" and identify the 3 figures depicted.
7. Identify the works stolen during the infamous Gardner Museum heist. Identify and describe your favorite piece.
8. Summarize the "legend" behind the man with the top hat in Eugene Delacroix's most famous painting.
9. What is David Mach's "Gorilla" made of?
10. Describe your favorite Ron Mueck sculpture.
11. Paul Rahilly is one of Mr. Kefor's former professors. a) What breed of dog is depicted in his "Girl in a Paper Dress"? b) In which of his paintings does one find a chili pepper? c) a brioche?

PART C: 

Review the Metacognitive Reflection rubric (on our Edline page) and begin your reflection.

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

Warm up: These pumpkins are insane, i love the details they put into them so much!! its so cool how they got the 3D aspects to merge between them, also its cool how they got a few of then to look like they were eating. lastly i wanted to say that the textures looked so realistic and the faces looked realistic.
-Arianna Heath. D

Anonymous said...

A)It is amazing how he can look at a city and then reproduce everything on paper over the course of days. His Drawing of Florence, Italy was the most impressive because it is so detailed and has every building and street. Also, the most impressive painting I saw was of the NYFD trucks/cars where he has every bit of detail including the lines on the ground.
-Camden Cleathero

Anonymous said...

I think it is fascinating how he can put so much detail into his drawings and they're only from memory.Most of Stephens work are drawn cities that he has seen and remembered. Watching him work and his art progress through the videos is very interesting.
-Brian Cronin

Anonymous said...

In Scott Waddell's video he talks about how diffrent edges certain lights on diffrent shapes can effect the images property (hard or soft). He also describes how to get these diffrent kinds of edges. He finishes the video describing how to fade and edge while painting.
-Brian Cronin

Anonymous said...

its amazing how he can draw all of those drawing from memory. he can also add so much detail. the detail looks like your there seeing this in person.
-shane boria

Anonymous said...

All of these artists self-portraits are very impressive and it is interesting looking at all of their different styles. Between all of these artist self portraits Pablo Picasso, Vincent Van Gogh, and Paul Cezanne have the most similar work. These three artists all paint with not much detail and heavy strokes. You can see all of their strokes and the backgrounds are usually blotchy with different colors. The way these three artists compose their paintings are very similar
-Brian Cronin

Anonymous said...



the edge work in the video was well prepare and took long to make than mine. he also knows a lot more then i do and probably enjoys art and drawing. my drawing was an assignment and was not fully prepared.
-shane boria

Anonymous said...

Part A.1.) The first video “Person of the week” was an interview of Mr.W , it discussed how he process drawing and how long it takes him to draw a picture from memory, but when they asked him questions it was difficult for him to answer. The second video “we will not rest - UBS Campaign” , his sister and himself were talking about how his drawing is , also it was said that he didn’t speak till he was five so drawing has always been his language, he doesn’t know any other way, to him drawing is his air. The third video “who am i?” was a short video that showed his process of making a video from memory and how all his measurements are actuate and precise. The last video “Sydney-3 days 3 minutes” is a video of him drawing Sydney in time laps but really it took him 3 days strait.
2.)I found “From Southbank on an autumn evening” to be my favorite of his drawings because I likes how it was all black except for the leaves, it was a good contrast and pop. His painting “pont alexander 3” was stunning because it has an eerie aspect to it that was drawing, you could really tell what time of day it was when he say this.
3.) Julian Beever's 3D pavement drawings are amazing! They are so realistic and so creative, you have to take a real hard look at them to tell if it’s a drawing or not which is so awesome! He works with sidewalks and draws realistic and interactive pieces in buys places and they just seem to go along with the setting.
All of Kurt Wenner’s drawings and art seem to possess a fantasy like aspect to them, the proportions are distorted which adds to the charm, also the colors he uses are more towards the neutrals rather than bright color.
The art of Kris Kuksi is all 3d sculptures and they have a hard feel to them, there is so much detail and they have a syfi and cold demander to them.
-Arianna Heath

Anonymous said...


6.)I believe that lucian freud’s self portrait has the strongest feel to it out of all the other portraits. He seems to capture all of the hard and deep lines of his face that have formed over the years. He also seems to capture a sad look in his eye , a deeper feeling is lingering in his face, it isn’t polished and fake. you see that raw emotion and the expression is not one possessed for the painting, i believe this is one of his regular facial expressions. lastly the shading techniques he used on the curves and details of his face give it salient qualities , meaning it looks 3D like its leaving the page. the texture he used while painting also gives it the 3D appeal.

7.)An artist might choose to focus on self portraits to pick out the flaws and errors see in himself day after day, it could also be that they know the layout of there face forwards and back so its easier to focus on the familiar rather than the unknown. what may have driven an artist like rembrandt would be narcissism, after looking at his self portraits i noticed that he seemed a bit full of himself and made himself look very lavish.

Part B.)
1.
there is one window in Andrew Wyeth's "Master Bedroom". Wyeth uses paint as his medium. all of his art for the most part are paintings.

2.
the figure in the boat is the boat driver who brings the sinners souls to hell to be greeted by the devil.

3.
an elephant is distorted in the background.

4.
i believe the clock says 3:00.

5.
monet and manet are both great artists, but they are both very dissimilar, manet has a stiff and dark feel to his paintings where as monet has a lighter palette and a very feminine feel to it. they both have focus on females more than males so thats about the only connection i can make between the two.

6.
Camille Claudel was a French sculptor and graphic artist. the sculpture has a woman on her knees and it appears she is begging the man to come back but a feminine figure is wrapped around him, it could be another woman, an angel, or a demon taking him away from her.

7.
landscape with an obelisk flinck is my personal favorite of the artwork that was stolen from the collection. i found the landscape and the color pallet to be beautiful, i also love how about half of the painting to be nature and the other part to be smooth buildings.


9.)his gorilla is made of cloth hangers.

10.)my personal favorite of Ron Mueck would be the one of a young boy on what appears to be a bench with an old woman like manatee thing, it looks so peaceful and i just like it, its different than the other pieces, it seems at peace.

11.)a.) poodle.
AriannaHeath-D

Eric Sanford said...

Eric Sanford
Part A1:
1. a. “I am Innocent” Stephen creates a panorama drawing of New York City after a helicopter ride, then visits the fire department and police department, where he is jokingly put “in jail.”
b. “Person of the Week” Stephen is featured and interviewed about his art. He is asked to draw Piccadilly Circus after 10 minutes of observing it, completing the drawing in about an hour. He has also been made a member of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth.
c. “Jerusalem Panorama” Timelapse video of Stephen creating a panorama view of the city of Jerusalem in his usual method of painstaking detail, working from the far left of the canvas to the right.
d. “Sydney- 3Days in 3 minutes” time lapse of Stephen drawing a view of the city of Sydney from memory.
2. I think that Stephen Wiltshire’s most impressive drawing is his “Globe of New York”, which not only captures the details of every building in the city, but also creates an extremely different view, as though it is seen in a glass globe or fish eye lens. His most impressive painting in my opinion is his Arial view of London in oil paint, which captures the minute details of the city, showing individual small buildings rendered to the same extent as larger landmarks like the London Eye ferris wheel. The painting captures the essence of the bustling city, full of life and activity.
3. a. Julian Beever’s chalk drawing of a giant snail crawling onto a metal bench is incredibly impressive in creating the effect of being three-dimensional. The piece is extremely didtorted when looked at from any view other than the one intended, but from that one specific viewpoint, the image seems to pop off of the pavement and into real life. It is very well detailed and whimsical in tone, evoking amusement and awe.
b. Kurt Wenner’s piece “Dies Irae” is also a chalk drawing that creates a very impressive illusion of three-dimensionality. The subjects are several figures struggling to escape a yellow colored pit, which is crumbing away beneath them towards what could be Hell or the Underworld. The figures are drawin in the classical style, but seem to be strained and famished, desperate for escape from their torment. The piece is obviously more serious in tone when compared to Beever’s whimsical snail, evoking fear and pity for the figures.
c. Kris Kuksi’s piece “A Tribute to the Madness of Beethoven” showcases a bust of the composer as the focal point, with shaded, hollow eyes and a chain in his mouth. A pyramid-like backdrop to the bust, along with the rest of the sculpture, is teeming with complexity, many smaller figures scattered here and there, and two large skulls seemingly serve as bunkers to small soldier figures in the foreground. The piece is fascinating in both its complexity and its dark, ominous tone.

Eric Sanford said...

Part A2:
4. Edges can generally be categorized as soft or hard. As light hits an object, the point where the light can no longer hit an area of the object is the terminator edge, where light meets shadow. Gradation becomes softer with closer light sources. Edges with greater contrast are harder, while less contrasting edges are softer.
5. Rembrandt: “Self Portrait with Beret and Turned-Up Collar” -1659- Dutch Republic (Netherlands)
Van Gogh: “Self Portrait” -1889- France
Kollwitz: “Self-Portrait” -1934- Germany
Close: “Big Self Portrait” -1967-68- America
Freud: “Reflection (Self-Portrait)” -1985- Great Britain
Gillespie: “Self Portrait with Banana” -2000- America
Hopper: “Self Portrait” -1906- America
Picasso: “Self Portrait Facing Death” -1972- France
Cezanne: “Self Portrait” -1875- France
Coffey: “Flag” -2011- America
Gamache: “Self Portrait” -2013?- America
The profound show of emotion in the pieces from Kollwitz, Freud, and Van Gogh convey similar tones of regret, experience, and mortality, displaying sobering representations of themselves. The parallel of somber emotion is especially present between the pieces by Kollwitz and Freud, but is also present in the Picasso piece, though more through the technique of the painting than the actual subject in that case. The Picasso piece is far more abstract,
6. The strongest self-portrait of these is Kollwitz’s black and white lithograph self-portrait from 1934. The piece has a full range of values from white to black, with a very rough texture that adds emotional depth to the image. The piece evokes sympathy for the artist, who appears to have lived through many very hard years of life, and is fully exhausted but determined to carry on.
7. An artist may choose to focus on self-portraits in order to achieve their own personal goals rather than focusing on what would be more lucrative to sell. An artist may be driven to spend so much time depicting themselves in order to preserve their own view of themselves for posterity, so that future generations can remember them they way they choose.

Eric Sanford said...

Eric Sanford
Part B
1. There is 1 window in “Master Bedroom” by Andrew Wyeth, which is a watercolor piece.
2. The Boatman Charon from Greek mythology is in the boat in Michelangelo’s “Last Judgement”
3. An elephant is highly distorted to have incredibly long legs in the background of Salvador Dali's "One Second Before Awakening from a Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate".
4. It is 12:15 in Van Gogh’s “Night Café”.
5. Both artists were impressionistic painters, using loose brush strokes and color to convey emotion in pieces. Both were also born in Paris in approximately the same time period.
6. Camille Claudel was a French sculptor and artist. L’Age Mur is a bronze sculpture portraying the artist as the female figure pleading with the male figure, representative of her former lover, Auguste Rodin, who is abandoning her for his wife, the third, abstract figure of the sculpture.
7. Several of Rembrandt’s pieces:Storm on the Sea of Galilee, A Lady and Gentleman in Black, and a Self Portrait; Vermeer’s The Concert); Govaert Flinck’s Landscape with an Obelisk; A Chinese vase (Ku); five works on paper by the Edgar Degas; and Edouard Manet’s Chez Tortoni.
My favorite from these stolen pieces is Landscape with an Obelisk, which depicts a dark scene with a massive tree in foreground looming over two small figures, one on horseback, with a bridge and waterwheel to the left in the middleground, and behind those in the background, an obelisk lit by a break in the cloud cover.
8. The man in the top hat is Delacroix, the artist.
9. David Mach’s “Gorilla” is made out of coat hangers.
10. My favorite Ron Mueck sculpture is his “Angel”, which depicts a white winged male figure looking rather forlorn, sitting on an oversized and worn down stool.
11. A. A poodle is depicted in Girl in a Paper Dress.
B. Chili Peppers are featured in Bread and Peppers (2005).
C. A brioche is depicted in Sticky Bun (2003).

Jake Burgess said...

Part 1
Singapore Time-lapse: It him 6 days to draw an exact copy of the Singapore skyline. He gets into immense detail. Stephan drew every window of every building.
New York Time-lapse: Stephen took a helicopter ride over the New York Harbor and it was covered by the news. It shows how back in 1988 he drew a few building in Paris at a young age. Every building has its identity still.
Dubai Panorama: Stephen flew through Dubai on a helicopter and then drew it. While drawing someone interviews him. Asking question like, “do you remember your dreams” When he’s drawing Stephen is the happiest. It is awe inspiring how happy he can be.
Boston Tea Party: A group of people go to his gallery and it’s a documentary of his life. At 7 he would draw London buildings

Part 2
Stephen’s most impressive drawing I believe is, St. Paul’s Cathedral during the Blitz. Not only is it an impressive drawing, it has a deeper meaning. The drawing shows to me during the hell of the blitz that good can prevail.
My favorite painting of Stephen’s is the FDNY chief’s car. Not only is the quality superb but also, the content speaks to me. My grandfather was a chief and I have memories of driving through Norton in his passenger seat.

Part 3
Julian Beever draws street art which often produces the illusion of a 3d experience. There is one of a “Water Fountain” and there is a person drinking the spray.

Part 4
Scott Wadell is wearing an annoying hat. He says there are two kinds of edges hard and soft. He then proceeds to define what an edge is.

Part 5
Gregory Gillespie- Self Portrait with a Banana, 2000, America
Edward Hopper- Self Portrait, 1930, America
Pablo Picasso- Self-Portrait, 1901, Spain
All three of these self-portraits are different, yet they are all the same. The three of these work show the artist in a peculiar way; the way the artists see themselves. The mood is the same. They all seem to be slightly tormented. Even though Hopper’s portrays him with a sort of smile; it’s a smile of pain.

Part 6
The strongest portrait is hopper’s. The way he looks over his shoulder you can see in his face he is troubled. You can feel the torment in his expression. In it he uses a vale of mystery to cover his inner turmoil.

Part 7
Artists may do self-portraits to show how they feel. Artists that do self-portraits do not care about money and what people think of them. Putting much effort into improving your self-portrait could be therapeutic. Sort of like putting a lot of effort into yourself to change your inside you can fix your outsides.

Jacob Burgess said...

Part B
1. There is one window, he uses paint as his medium
2. In the boat there is a man who appears to either be the devil or the man who transports deported souls to hell
3. There appears to be an elephant in the background
4. 12:15
5. Both Monet and Manet have drawn people surrounded by nature but, Manet enjoys drawing people more and has more art focused on people.
6. Camille Claudel was a French sculptor and graphic artist. She was the older sister of the poet and politician Paul Claudel. One of the characters is either death or the sea and it stealing a man from his wife which are the other two characters in the sculpture.
7. Govaert Flinck’s Landscape with an Obelisk (1638) is my favorite work stolen from the Gardner Museum Heist.
8. The man in the top hat represents the bourgeoisie.
9. Coat Hangers
10. I do not have a favorite Ron Mueck sculpture. They are all very weird and disturb me
11. A. a poodle
B. The pages all called it “new Still lifes”

Anonymous said...

A) It is amazing how he can look at a city and then reproduce everything on paper over the course of days. His Drawing of Florence, Italy was the most impressive because it is so detailed and has every building and street. Also, the most impressive painting I saw was of the NYFD trucks/cars where he has every bit of detail including the lines on the ground. Next, is Julian Beever a sidewalk artist who draws in chalk and is able to make pictures and drawings look as if they are coming up off of the ground. Kurt Wenner is another sidewalk artist who does pictures of buildings and skylines, as if you were in a helicopter above the cities. Lastly, there is Kris Kuksi who makes very intricate, very weird sculptures of people with chains and piercings and other things that I cannot tell what they are. In Scott Waddel’s tutorial on edging he talks about how light acts on different shapes and how it effects the edges in the drawing. He goes into detail on the kind of edges, soft and hard, then describes how they work and how to make them. He finishes up the video with how to paint an edge and how you fade it to the light and dark areas of the figure.
Rembrandt has a self-portrait of himself looking at the viewer and with a stern look on his face. Van Gogh has a very similar type of self-portrait looking back at the viewer with little expression on his face, but he paints in a different way where you can see his brush strokes and the background you can see the brush strokes and how he composed the painting. Unlike the 2 artists above Chuck Close has a very different style of art where he takes same sized squares, where there are different shapes and colors inside and they form a figure of himself staring back at the viewer.
The strongest self portrait I saw was the Chuck Close's because it was complex and he used figures and shapes of all different colors to produce an image of himself. It is rally cool because he makes himself look realistic while using funky shapes and colors. It is also not realism and it is different because it isn't a picture of a person but more than that it is an agreement and it uses multiple different things to make a composition.

B) 1. There is 1 window in the painting, the medium he uses is the dog lying on the bed.
2. There are many figures in the painting, the central most person has one arm over his head and one across his chest and a woman next to him looking down and to her right.
3. In the background of the painting there is an elephant with giant long skinny legs
4. The time on the clock in the painting says about 12:15
5. In Monet's paintings he paints more nature as Manet paints more people, they both are impressionists an have very similar painting styles.
6. She is a french sculptor and graphic artist during he late 1800's and early 1900's. In her sculpture L'Age mur there is a woman a man and what looks like an angel.
7. My favorite piece is the one of the boat crashing over a wave and the sky opening up to them and the sun shining dan on the sailors.
8. The identity of the man in the top hat has been widely debated. The suggestion that it was a self-portrait by Delacroix has been discounted by modern art historians. In the late 19th century, it was suggested the model was the theatre director Etienne arago; others have suggested the future curator of the Louvre, Frderic Villot, but there is no firm consensus on this point.
9. His gorilla is made of metal coat hangers.
10. My favorite sculpture is the one of the giant baby. Its a giant baby with a creepy face, it looks extremely realistic and it is one of the coolest things I've ever seen.
11. I believe the breed of dog in the painting is a poodle. I couldn't find a painting with a chill pepper in it, There is a brioche in the painting Three Graces.
-Camden Cleathero

Anonymous said...

A) It is amazing how he can look at a city and then reproduce everything on paper over the course of days. His Drawing of Florence, Italy was the most impressive because it is so detailed and has every building and street. Also, the most impressive painting I saw was of the NYFD trucks/cars where he has every bit of detail including the lines on the ground. Next, is Julian Beever a sidewalk artist who draws in chalk and is able to make pictures and drawings look as if they are coming up off of the ground. Kurt Wenner is another sidewalk artist who does pictures of buildings and skylines, as if you were in a helicopter above the cities. Lastly, there is Kris Kuksi who makes very intricate, very weird sculptures of people with chains and piercings and other things that I cannot tell what they are. In Scott Waddel’s tutorial on edging he talks about how light acts on different shapes and how it effects the edges in the drawing. He goes into detail on the kind of edges, soft and hard, then describes how they work and how to make them. He finishes up the video with how to paint an edge and how you fade it to the light and dark areas of the figure.
Rembrandt has a self-portrait of himself looking at the viewer and with a stern look on his face. Van Gogh has a very similar type of self-portrait looking back at the viewer with little expression on his face, but he paints in a different way where you can see his brush strokes and the background you can see the brush strokes and how he composed the painting. Unlike the 2 artists above Chuck Close has a very different style of art where he takes same sized squares, where there are different shapes and colors inside and they form a figure of himself staring back at the viewer.
The strongest self portrait I saw was the Chuck Close's because it was complex and he used figures and shapes of all different colors to produce an image of himself. It is rally cool because he makes himself look realistic while using funky shapes and colors. It is also not realism and it is different because it isn't a picture of a person but more than that it is an agreement and it uses multiple different things to make a composition.
-Camden Cleathero

Anonymous said...

B) 1. There is 1 window in the painting, the medium he uses is the dog lying on the bed.
2. There are many figures in the painting, the central most person has one arm over his head and one across his chest and a woman next to him looking down and to her right.
3. In the background of the painting there is an elephant with giant long skinny legs
4. The time on the clock in the painting says about 12:15
5. In Monet's paintings he paints more nature as Manet paints more people, they both are impressionists an have very similar painting styles.
6. She is a french sculptor and graphic artist during he late 1800's and early 1900's. In her sculpture L'Age mur there is a woman a man and what looks like an angel.
7. My favorite piece is the one of the boat crashing over a wave and the sky opening up to them and the sun shining dan on the sailors.
8. The identity of the man in the top hat has been widely debated. The suggestion that it was a self-portrait by Delacroix has been discounted by modern art historians. In the late 19th century, it was suggested the model was the theatre director Etienne arago; others have suggested the future curator of the Louvre, Frderic Villot, but there is no firm consensus on this point.
9. His gorilla is made of metal coat hangers.
10. My favorite sculpture is the one of the giant baby. Its a giant baby with a creepy face, it looks extremely realistic and it is one of the coolest things I've ever seen.
11. I believe the breed of dog in the painting is a poodle. I couldn't find a painting with a chill pepper in it, There is a brioche in the painting Three Graces.
-Camden Cleathero

Anonymous said...

B) 1. There is 1 window in the painting, the medium he uses is the dog lying on the bed.
2. There are many figures in the painting, the central most person has one arm over his head and one across his chest and a woman next to him looking down and to her right.
3. In the background of the painting there is an elephant with giant long skinny legs
4. The time on the clock in the painting says about 12:15
5. In Monet's paintings he paints more nature as Manet paints more people, they both are impressionists an have very similar painting styles.
6. She is a french sculptor and graphic artist during he late 1800's and early 1900's. In her sculpture L'Age mur there is a woman a man and what looks like an angel.
7. My favorite piece is the one of the boat crashing over a wave and the sky opening up to them and the sun shining dan on the sailors.
8. The identity of the man in the top hat has been widely debated. The suggestion that it was a self-portrait by Delacroix has been discounted by modern art historians. In the late 19th century, it was suggested the model was the theatre director Etienne arago; others have suggested the future curator of the Louvre, Frderic Villot, but there is no firm consensus on this point.
9. His gorilla is made of metal coat hangers.
10. My favorite sculpture is the one of the giant baby. Its a giant baby with a creepy face, it looks extremely realistic and it is one of the coolest things I've ever seen.
11. I believe the breed of dog in the painting is a poodle. I couldn't find a painting with a chill pepper in it, There is a brioche in the painting Three Graces.
-Camden Cleathero

Anonymous said...

4.) He mentions how a soft edge can blend the edge and hides it, but a hard edge is very abrupt and you can see the big contrast between them. When we were working on the cast drawings I noticed how the edge vanished when I blended the dark background with dark side of the skull, also when I had the light part of my skull meet my dark background it was very striking and popped out more as he said I would in the video.
-Arianna Heath

Carli Arcaro said...

PART A
1.) Singapore Panorama Full Time Lapse Video: It was very intriguing the way he drew things in a specific order. Also really amazed me how he did it in pen.
We will not rest - UBS Campaign: The way he scales his drawings with his finger and remembers every little detail about each city is so cool.
Time lapse of Stephen drawing Brisbane Panorama: Steven draws these panoramas without hesitation and without even thinking about what he needs to include. It just all comes to him.
Sydney - 3 days in 3 minutes: Steven looks so incredibly happy and he loves the attention. It so nice to swe such a positive affect towards people from his talents.
2.) I think Stevens most impressive drawing is St. Paul’s Cathedral during the Blitz because it is a very impressive work of art. Also, the most impressive painting I saw was of the NYFD trucks/cars where he has every bit of detail from the front of the picture to the end of it where the car and truck stands.
3.) Julian Beever has a type of side walk chalk art that is very creative and draws all sorts or scenery. Kurt Wenner has a more structured setting and scenery layout as to what he draws. Kris Kuksi is an amazing sculptor and I love how he includes figures on top of figures.
4.) He says how edging can be either categorized as hard or soft and when the light can no longer hit an object, it is called the terminator. His edging took a lot longer and was more precise than mine was.
5.) Rembrandt van Rijn- Self-Portrait with Two Circles, 1660. Kenwood House, London
Vincent Van Gogh- Self-Portrait, Spring 1887, Oil on pasteboard, 42 × 33.7 cm., Art Institute of Chicago (F 345).
Kathe Kollwitz- Self Portrait with Hand on Brow, 1910 by Käthe Kollwitz
Chuch Close- Self-Portrait, 1997. oil on canvas
Lucian Freud- Lucian Freud's Reflection (Self-portrait), 1985
Gregory Gillespie- Gregory Gillespie, “Self Portrait with Yellow Background,” 1998-1999
Edward Hopper- Hopper, Edward Whitney Museum of American A (Self-Portrait) (1903)-(1906)
Pablo Picasso- “Self-Portrait. 1907 year. "
Paul Cezanne- Paul-Cezanne-Self-Portrait-1879-1880
Susanna Coffey- Susanna Coffey Self-portrait (2002)
Brett Gamache- self portrait
Chuck Close’s self portraits consist of slanted grids in which he draws. He includes many reflecting colors and patterns. Pablo Picasso uses more of straight lines to make it more quirky looking. He also doesn’t shade in a lot of what he colors completely to give it more of an antique look. Susanna Coffey loves to add in the blue lip stick to herself portraits. Her blue eyes tend to stick out with the amount and colors of make up she adds to herself.
6.) I think Kathe Kollwitz’s self portrait is the strongest in many ways. I love how she traps the significance of the lights vs. the darks and shades very well. Her rendering and value are magnificent. The way she edges is perfect too.
7.) I think an artist chooses to focus on a self portrait in order to capture the real values of themselves. They have the opportunity to focus on depicting themselves in a good and bad way.

Carli Arcaro said...

1.) Singapore Panorama Full Time Lapse Video: It was very intriguing the way he drew things in a specific order. Also really amazed me how he did it in pen.
We will not rest - UBS Campaign: The way he scales his drawings with his finger and remembers every little detail about each city is so cool.
Time lapse of Stephen drawing Brisbane Panorama: Steven draws these panoramas without hesitation and without even thinking about what he needs to include. It just all comes to him.
Sydney - 3 days in 3 minutes: Steven looks so incredibly happy and he loves the attention. It so nice to swe such a positive affect towards people from his talents.
2.) I think Stevens most impressive drawing is St. Paul’s Cathedral during the Blitz because it is a very impressive work of art. Also, the most impressive painting I saw was of the NYFD trucks/cars where he has every bit of detail from the front of the picture to the end of it where the car and truck stands.
3.) Julian Beever has a type of side walk chalk art that is very creative and draws all sorts or scenery. Kurt Wenner has a more structured setting and scenery layout as to what he draws. Kris Kuksi is an amazing sculptor and I love how he includes figures on top of figures.
4.) He says how edging can be either categorized as hard or soft and when the light can no longer hit an object, it is called the terminator. His edging took a lot longer and was more precise than mine was.
5.) Rembrandt van Rijn- Self-Portrait with Two Circles, 1660. Kenwood House, London
Vincent Van Gogh- Self-Portrait, Spring 1887, Oil on pasteboard, 42 × 33.7 cm., Art Institute of Chicago (F 345).
Kathe Kollwitz- Self Portrait with Hand on Brow, 1910 by Käthe Kollwitz
Chuch Close- Self-Portrait, 1997. oil on canvas
Lucian Freud- Lucian Freud's Reflection (Self-portrait), 1985
Gregory Gillespie- Gregory Gillespie, “Self Portrait with Yellow Background,” 1998-1999
Edward Hopper- Hopper, Edward Whitney Museum of American A (Self-Portrait) (1903)-(1906)
Pablo Picasso- “Self-Portrait. 1907 year. "
Paul Cezanne- Paul-Cezanne-Self-Portrait-1879-1880
Susanna Coffey- Susanna Coffey Self-portrait (2002)
Brett Gamache- self portrait
Chuck Close’s self portraits consist of slanted grids in which he draws. He includes many reflecting colors and patterns. Pablo Picasso uses more of straight lines to make it more quirky looking. He also doesn’t shade in a lot of what he colors completely to give it more of an antique look. Susanna Coffey loves to add in the blue lip stick to herself portraits. Her blue eyes tend to stick out with the amount and colors of make up she adds to herself.
6.) I think Kathe Kollwitz’s self portrait is the strongest in many ways. I love how she traps the significance of the lights vs. the darks and shades very well. Her rendering and value are magnificent. The way she edges is perfect too.
7.) I think an artist chooses to focus on a self portrait in order to capture the real values of themselves. They have the opportunity to focus on depicting themselves in a good and bad way.

Carli Arcaro said...

Part A
1.) Singapore Panorama Full Time Lapse Video: It was very intriguing the way he drew things in a specific order. Also really amazed me how he did it in pen.
We will not rest - UBS Campaign: The way he scales his drawings with his finger and remembers every little detail about each city is so cool.
Time lapse of Stephen drawing Brisbane Panorama: Steven draws these panoramas without hesitation and without even thinking about what he needs to include. It just all comes to him.
Sydney - 3 days in 3 minutes: Steven looks so incredibly happy and he loves the attention. It so nice to swe such a positive affect towards people from his talents.
2.) I think Stevens most impressive drawing is St. Paul’s Cathedral during the Blitz because it is a very impressive work of art. Also, the most impressive painting I saw was of the NYFD trucks/cars where he has every bit of detail from the front of the picture to the end of it where the car and truck stands.
3.) Julian Beever has a type of side walk chalk art that is very creative and draws all sorts or scenery. Kurt Wenner has a more structured setting and scenery layout as to what he draws. Kris Kuksi is an amazing sculptor and I love how he includes figures on top of figures.
4.) He says how edging can be either categorized as hard or soft and when the light can no longer hit an object, it is called the terminator. His edging took a lot longer and was more precise than mine was.
5.) Rembrandt van Rijn- Self-Portrait with Two Circles, 1660. Kenwood House, London
Vincent Van Gogh- Self-Portrait, Spring 1887, Oil on pasteboard, 42 × 33.7 cm., Art Institute of Chicago (F 345).
Kathe Kollwitz- Self Portrait with Hand on Brow, 1910 by Käthe Kollwitz
Chuch Close- Self-Portrait, 1997. oil on canvas
Lucian Freud- Lucian Freud's Reflection (Self-portrait), 1985
Gregory Gillespie- Gregory Gillespie, “Self Portrait with Yellow Background,” 1998-1999
Edward Hopper- Hopper, Edward Whitney Museum of American A (Self-Portrait) (1903)-(1906)
Pablo Picasso- “Self-Portrait. 1907 year. "
Paul Cezanne- Paul-Cezanne-Self-Portrait-1879-1880
Susanna Coffey- Susanna Coffey Self-portrait (2002)
Brett Gamache- self portrait
Chuck Close’s self portraits consist of slanted grids in which he draws. He includes many reflecting colors and patterns. Pablo Picasso uses more of straight lines to make it more quirky looking. He also doesn’t shade in a lot of what he colors completely to give it more of an antique look. Susanna Coffey loves to add in the blue lip stick to herself portraits. Her blue eyes tend to stick out with the amount and colors of make up she adds to herself.
6.) I think Kathe Kollwitz’s self portrait is the strongest in many ways. I love how she traps the significance of the lights vs. the darks and shades very well. Her rendering and value are magnificent. The way she edges is perfect too.
7.) I think an artist chooses to focus on a self portrait in order to capture the real values of themselves. They have the opportunity to focus on depicting themselves in a good and bad way.

Carli Arcaro said...

PART B
1.)There is one window in the painting and the medium is the dog laying in the bed.
2.)The figure depicted in the boat in Michelangelo’s painting seems to be a devil man or someone associated with negativity.
3.)There is a distorted elephant in the background.
4.)It appears to be 12:15 in Vincent Van Gogh’s “Night Café”.
5.)Monet and Manet were both French impressionist painters in the 19th century. Monet painted a ton of landscapes and scenes while Manet did a lot of work with people as the main subjects
6.)Camille Claudel was a French sculptor and graphic artist. Three figures depicted in it are Camille who is reaching out to her love as he leaves her for his former mistress.
7.)The works that were stolen were Rembrandt’s Storm on the Sea of Galilee (1633), A Lady and Gentleman in Black (1633) and a Self Portrait (1634), an etching on paper; Vermeer’s The Concert (1658–1660); and Govaert Flinck’s Landscape with an Obelisk (1638); and a Chinese vase. My favorite piece would be Rembrandt’s Storm on the Sea of Galilee.
8.)I think the man in the top hat is the artist, Eugène Delacroix.
9.)The gorilla is made up of coat hangers.
10.)Ron Mueck's "Mask" is my favorite because of the face the guy is making in it.
11.)It looks like the dog in the painting is a poodle. One finds a chili pepper in Bread and Peppers. A brioche is in Brioche Pears and Eggs.

amanda pierce said...

Part A:
The first video i watched on Stephen Wiltshire’s website was the Full Time Lapse from SIngapore. I think it is incredible how is is able to remember every single building, tree, and detail throughout the whole city. The next video i watched was Who Am I? and what shocked me was the way that his drawings really come alive on the paper, he starts with the general outline of the buildings but then starts building upon every thing adding details, and cars. When the drawing merged into the actual photo i was astounded. The next video i watched was Stephen on Top Gear, my dad loves this show and cars so this was particularly of interest to me, and i loved how happy the guys were to see him draw the car. The last video i watched was the Jerusalem Panorama, and i was in awe as i watched him create the whole city from the left side of the paper to the right.
When i gazed through Wiltshire’s gallery it was his drawing of Vatican City that seemed to me the most impressive. The aerial view was great, to be able to see all of the roads and buildings was quite beautiful. His most impressive painting to me was the Tower Bridge at night. Many of his paintings were during daylight and every area was receiving light, to see him create this loose, dark painting is wonderful.
Julian Beevers artwork is something else. His chalk drawing bring you into a whole different world, or something else comes out. Kurt Wenner's drawing are out of this world as well. I love how 3d his chalk drawings are, especially the one of the dunkin’ donuts smoothie with banana and strawberry butterflies.
In Scott Wadels tutorial on edging liked the way he described the difference between soft edges and hard edges and how the lighting and contrast of a photo can affect the edges. I agreed with what Wadel said because i experienced how making paying attention to the edge can really enhance the drawing when i was working on Laocoon's head.
Rembrandt van Rijn: Self portrait as a young man: 1628 Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Vincent Van Gogh: Self- Portrait with Grey Felt 1886/7 Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. kathe kollwitz self portrait hand on the forehead. Chuck Close: Self Portrait 1997. Lucian Freud: Reflection 1985 Ireland. Gregory Gillespie: Self Portrait with Banana 2000 America. Edward Hopper: Self Portrait 1925-30 New York. Pablo Picasso Self Portrait 1901 Paris. Paul Cezanne: Self Portrait in Straw Hat 1875/6 France. Susanna Coffey: Flag 2011. Brett Gamache: Self Portrait 2013 America.
I believe the strongest self portrait was from Chuck Close. Close had originally done amazing self portraits with an airbrush that were stunningly realistic. He then started to do portraits that were realistic from afar but up close their abstract.
An artist might chose to do a self portrait because their self is the subject that they know the best. They know everything that makes up the subject, the mood, the thoughts. They can communicate with the subject effortlessly. Rembrandt and other artist may be driven by this inner flame that pushes them to be able to communicate with how they are feeling on the inside or who they truly are on to the canvas.
Part B
There is one window in Andrew Wyeth’s Master bedroom and the medium is watercolor.
In the boat is a giant green creature with a paddle.
An elephant is being distorted in the background with very long thin legs.
It is 3:00
Monet and Manet were both painters from France form within the same 10 years but they had a slightly different painting style, while they both painted impressionism Manet also painted realism.
Camille Claude was a sculpture and L’age mur depicts a demon, a man, and a begging women.
The thieves made off with works from Rembrandt, Manet, Degas and artifacts dating back to the Shang Dynasty. My favorite piece is Rembrandt self portrait.
It is Delacroix himself
Coat Hangers
My favorite Ron Mueck sculpture is the elderly couple.
A) It appears to be a goldendoodle. B) Artodyssey C) Pears and Eggs?

amanda pierce said...

Part A:
The first video i watched on Stephen Wiltshire’s website was the Full Time Lapse from SIngapore. I think it is incredible how is is able to remember every single building, tree, and detail throughout the whole city. The next video i watched was Who Am I? and what shocked me was the way that his drawings really come alive on the paper, he starts with the general outline of the buildings but then starts building upon every thing adding details, and cars. When the drawing merged into the actual photo i was astounded. The next video i watched was Stephen on Top Gear, my dad loves this show and cars so this was particularly of interest to me, and i loved how happy the guys were to see him draw the car. The last video i watched was the Jerusalem Panorama, and i was in awe as i watched him create the whole city from the left side of the paper to the right.
When i gazed through Wiltshire’s gallery it was his drawing of Vatican City that seemed to me the most impressive. The aerial view was great, to be able to see all of the roads and buildings was quite beautiful. His most impressive painting to me was the Tower Bridge at night. Many of his paintings were during daylight and every area was receiving light, to see him create this loose, dark painting is wonderful.
Julian Beevers artwork is something else. His chalk drawing bring you into a whole different world, or something else comes out. Kurt Wenner's drawing are out of this world as well. I love how 3d his chalk drawings are, especially the one of the dunkin’ donuts smoothie with banana and strawberry butterflies.
In Scott Wadels tutorial on edging liked the way he described the difference between soft edges and hard edges and how the lighting and contrast of a photo can affect the edges. I agreed with what Wadel said because i experienced how making paying attention to the edge can really enhance the drawing when i was working on Laocoon's head.
Rembrandt van Rijn: Self portrait as a young man: 1628 Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Vincent Van Gogh: Self- Portrait with Grey Felt 1886/7 Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. kathe kollwitz self portrait hand on the forehead. Chuck Close: Self Portrait 1997. Lucian Freud: Reflection 1985 Ireland. Gregory Gillespie: Self Portrait with Banana 2000 America. Edward Hopper: Self Portrait 1925-30 New York. Pablo Picasso Self Portrait 1901 Paris. Paul Cezanne: Self Portrait in Straw Hat 1875/6 France. Susanna Coffey: Flag 2011. Brett Gamache: Self Portrait 2013 America.
I believe the strongest self portrait was from Chuck Close. Close had originally done amazing self portraits with an airbrush that were stunningly realistic. He then started to do portraits that were realistic from afar but up close their abstract.
An artist might chose to do a self portrait because their self is the subject that they know the best. They know everything that makes up the subject, the mood, the thoughts. They can communicate with the subject effortlessly. Rembrandt and other artist may be driven by this inner flame that pushes them to be able to communicate with how they are feeling on the inside or who they truly are on to the canvas.
Part B
There is one window in Andrew Wyeth’s Master bedroom and the medium is watercolor.
In the boat is a giant green creature with a paddle.
An elephant is being distorted in the background with very long thin legs.
It is 3:00
Monet and Manet were both painters from France form within the same 10 years but they had a slightly different painting style, while they both painted impressionism Manet also painted realism.
Camille Claude was a sculpture and L’age mur depicts a demon, a man, and a begging women.
The thieves made off with works from Rembrandt, Manet, Degas and artifacts dating back to the Shang Dynasty. My favorite piece is Rembrandt self portrait.
It is Delacroix himself
Coat Hangers
My favorite Ron Mueck sculpture is the elderly couple.
A) It appears to be a goldendoodle. B) Artodyssey C) Pears and Eggs?

amanda pierce said...

Part A:
The first video i watched on Stephen Wiltshire’s website was the Full Time Lapse from SIngapore. I think it is incredible how is is able to remember every single building, tree, and detail throughout the whole city. The next video i watched was Who Am I? and what shocked me was the way that his drawings really come alive on the paper, he starts with the general outline of the buildings but then starts building upon every thing adding details, and cars. When the drawing merged into the actual photo i was astounded. The next video i watched was Stephen on Top Gear, my dad loves this show and cars so this was particularly of interest to me, and i loved how happy the guys were to see him draw the car. The last video i watched was the Jerusalem Panorama, and i was in awe as i watched him create the whole city from the left side of the paper to the right.
When i gazed through Wiltshire’s gallery it was his drawing of Vatican City that seemed to me the most impressive. The aerial view was great, to be able to see all of the roads and buildings was quite beautiful. His most impressive painting to me was the Tower Bridge at night. Many of his paintings were during daylight and every area was receiving light, to see him create this loose, dark painting is wonderful.
Julian Beevers artwork is something else. His chalk drawing bring you into a whole different world, or something else comes out. Kurt Wenner's drawing are out of this world as well. I love how 3d his chalk drawings are, especially the one of the dunkin’ donuts smoothie with banana and strawberry butterflies.
In Scott Wadels tutorial on edging liked the way he described the difference between soft edges and hard edges and how the lighting and contrast of a photo can affect the edges. I agreed with what Wadel said because i experienced how making paying attention to the edge can really enhance the drawing when i was working on Laocoon's head.
Rembrandt van Rijn: Self portrait as a young man: 1628 Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Vincent Van Gogh: Self- Portrait with Grey Felt 1886/7 Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. kathe kollwitz self portrait hand on the forehead. Chuck Close: Self Portrait 1997. Lucian Freud: Reflection 1985 Ireland. Gregory Gillespie: Self Portrait with Banana 2000 America. Edward Hopper: Self Portrait 1925-30 New York. Pablo Picasso Self Portrait 1901 Paris. Paul Cezanne: Self Portrait in Straw Hat 1875/6 France. Susanna Coffey: Flag 2011. Brett Gamache: Self Portrait 2013 America.
I believe the strongest self portrait was from Chuck Close. Close had originally done amazing self portraits with an airbrush that were stunningly realistic. He then started to do portraits that were realistic from afar but up close their abstract.
An artist might chose to do a self portrait because their self is the subject that they know the best. They know everything that makes up the subject, the mood, the thoughts. They can communicate with the subject effortlessly. Rembrandt and other artist may be driven by this inner flame that pushes them to be able to communicate with how they are feeling on the inside or who they truly are on to the canvas.
Part B
There is one window in Andrew Wyeth’s Master bedroom and the medium is watercolor.
In the boat is a giant green creature with a paddle.
An elephant is being distorted in the background with very long thin legs.
It is 3:00
Monet and Manet were both painters from France form within the same 10 years but they had a slightly different painting style, while they both painted impressionism Manet also painted realism.
Camille Claude was a sculpture and L’age mur depicts a demon, a man, and a begging women.
The thieves made off with works from Rembrandt, Manet, Degas and artifacts dating back to the Shang Dynasty. My favorite piece is Rembrandt self portrait.
It is Delacroix himself
Coat Hangers
My favorite Ron Mueck sculpture is the elderly couple.
A) It appears to be a goldendoodle. B) Artodyssey C) Pears and Eggs?